Loading...
09 September 9, 2015 CommissionCOMM-COMM-00050 TIME/DATE: LOCATION: Riverside County TransRortinion Commission MEETING AGENDA 9:30 a.m. / Wednesday, September 9, 2015 BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside e'a. COMMISSIONERS eel Chair— Daryl Busch Vice Chair — Scott Matas Second Vice Chair —John F. Tavaglione Kevin Jeffries, County of Riverside John F. Tavaglione, County of Riverside Chuck Washington, County of Riverside John J. Benoit, County of Riverside Marion Ashley, County of Riverside Deborah Franklin / Art Welch, City of Banning Brenda Knight / Jeff Fox, City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck / Tim Wade, City of Blythe Ella Zanowic / Jim Hyatt, City of Calimesa Dawn Haggerty / Jordan Ehrenkranz, City of Canyon Lake Greg Pettis / Shelley Kaplan, City of Cathedral City Steven Hernandez / To Be Appointed, City of Coachella Karen Spiegel / Randy Fox, City of Corona Scott Matas / Russell Betts, City of Desert Hot Springs Adam Rush / Clint Lorimore, City of Eastvale Linda Krupa / Paul Raver, City of Hemet Dana Reed / Douglas Hanson, City of Indian Wells Troy Strange / Glenn Miller, City of Indio Frank Johnston / Brian Berkson, City of Jurupa Valley Robert Radi / To Be Appointed, City of La Quinta Bob Magee / Natasha Johnson, City of Lake Elsinore Scott Mann / To Be Appointed, City of Menifee Jesse Molina / Jeffrey J. Giba, City of Moreno Valley Rick Gibbs / Jonathan Ingram, City of Murrieta Berwin Hanna / Kathy Azevedo, City of Norco Jan Harnik / Susan Marie Weber, City of Palm Desert Ginny Foat / Paul Lewin, City of Palm Springs Daryl Busch / Rita Rogers, City of Perris Ted Weill / To Be Appointed, City of Rancho Mirage Rusty Bailey / Andy Melendrez, City of Riverside Andrew Kotyuk / Scott Miller, City of San Jacinto Michael S. Naggar / Michael McCracken, City of Temecula Ben Benoit / Timothy Walker, City of Wildomar John Bulinski, Director, Governor's Appointee Caltrans District 8 Comments are welcomed by the Commission. If you wish to provide comments to the Commission, please complete and submit a Speaker Card to the Clerk of the Board. live a County Transportation Commission TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Jennifer Harmon, Office and Board Services Manager DATE: September 2, 2015 SUBJECT: Possible Conflicts of Interest — Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda of September 9, 2015 The September 9, 2015 agenda of the Riverside County Transportation Commission includes items that may raise possible conflicts of interest. A Commissioner may not participate in any discussion or action concerning a contract or amendment if a campaign contribution of more than $250 is received in the past 12 months or 3 months following the conclusion from any entity or individual listed. Agenda Item No. 81— Congestion Management Program Monitoring Consultant(s): VRPA Technologies, Inc. Georgiena M. Vivian, President 4630 W. Jennifer, Suite 105 Fresno, CA 93722 Agenda Item No. 8L —Amendment to Agreements for On -Call Environmental Consulting Services Consultant(s): LSA Associates, Inc. VCS Environmental Rob McCann, President Julie Vandermost Beeman, President 20 Executive Park, Suite 200 30900 Rancho Viejo Road, Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92614 San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675 HDR Engineering, Inc. Thomas T. Kim, Senior Vice President 3230 El Camino Real, Suite 200 Irvine, CA 92602 1CF Jones & Stokes, Inc. Jodi Young, Contract Manager 1 Ada Parkway, Suite 100 Irvine, CA 92618 RCTC Potential Conflicts of Interest September 2, 2015 Page 2 Agenda Item No. 8M — Authorization to Execute the Funds Transfer Agreement and Approval of Amendment for Forecasting Services with HDR, Inc. and Bridge Funding for the Coachella Vallev — San Gorgonio Pass Rail Corridor Service Development Plan Consultant(s): HDR Engineering, Inc. Kip Field, Vice President 2280 Market Street, Suite 100 Riverside, CA 92501 Tara Byerly From: Tara Byerly Sent: Thursday, September 03, 2015 7:33 AM To: Tara Byerly Cc: Jennifer Harmon Subject: RCTC: September Commission Agenda - 09.09.2015 Importance: High Good morning Commissioners: The September Agenda for the meeting scheduled for Wednesday, September 9, 2015 @ 9:30 a.m. is available. Please copy the link: http://www.rctc.org/uploads/media items/september-9-2015.original.pdf In addition, for your review is the attached conflict of interest memo and the form. Please let me know if you have any questions. Thank you. Conflict of Conflict of Interest Form.pdf [nterest Memo.pdf Respectfully, Tara S. Byerfy Deputy Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 787-7141 1 Tara Byerly From: Tara Byerly Sent: Thursday, September 03, 2015 7:37 AM To: Tara Byerly Subject: RCTC: September Commission Agenda - 09.09.2015 Importance: High Good morning Commission Alternates: The September Commission Agenda for the meeting scheduled for Wednesday, September 9, 2015 @ 9:30 a.m. is now available. http://www.rctc.org/uploads/media items/september-9-2015.original.pdf Respectfully, Tara S. yerfy Deputy Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 (951)787-7141 J. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION www.rctc.org AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, September 9, 2015 BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, CA In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting at the Commission office, 4080 Lemon Street, Third Floor, Riverside, CA, and on the Commission's website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Government Code Section 54954.2, and the Federal Transit Administration Title VI, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141 if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, including accessibility and translation services. Assistance is provided free of charge. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to the meeting time will assist staff in assuring reasonable arrangements can be made to provide assistance at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 3. ROLL CALL 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS — Each individual speaker is limited to speak three (3) continuous minutes or less. The Commission may, either at the direction of the Chair or by majority vote of the Commission, waive this three minute time limitation. Depending on the number of items on the Agenda and the number of speakers, the Chair may, at his/her discretion, reduce the time of each speaker to two (2) continuous minutes. In addition, the maximum time for public comment for any individual item or topic is thirty (30) minutes. Also, the Commission may terminate public comments if such comments become repetitious. Speakers may not yield their time to others without the consent of the Chair. Any written documents to be distributed or presented to the Commission shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board. This policy applies to Public Comments and comments on Agenda Items. Under the Brown Act, the Commission should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda that are not listed on the agenda. Commission members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES — JULY 8, 2015 Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda September 9, 2015 Page 2 6. PUBLIC HEARING - ADOPTION OF A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY AND AMENDED RESOLUTIONS OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF PERMANENT DRAINAGE EASEMENT AND PERMANENT UTILITY EASEMENT INTERESTS IN PORTIONS OF CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS A VACANT PARCEL WITH NO ASSIGNED ASSESSOR'S PARCEL NO. AND ASSESSOR PARCEL NOS. 118-040-027; AND 101-170-010 LOCATED IN CORONA, RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, BETWEEN PIERCE STREET ON THE EAST TO THE COUNTY LINE ON THE WEST, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Page 1 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Conduct a hearing to consider the adoption of resolutions of necessity, including providing all parties interested in the affected property and their attorneys, or their representatives, an opportunity to be heard on the issues relevant to the resolutions of necessity; 2) Make the following findings as hereinafter described in this report: a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; b) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; c) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and d) The offer of just compensation has been made to the owner. 3) Adopt Resolution of Necessity No. 15-018 and Amended Resolutions of Necessity Nos. 13-071 and 13-068, "Resolutions of Necessity for the Acquisition of Property Interests in Certain Real Property, by Eminent Domain, More Particularly Described as a Parcel of Land for Which No Assessor Parcel Number is Assigned (Caltrans Parcel No. 23880-1); and APNs 118-040-027 (CPN 22172-7); and 101-170-010 (CPN 22106-5) Located in Corona, California Riverside County, California", for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), Between Pierce Street on the East to the Riverside/County Line on the West, in Riverside County, California. 7. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS — The Commission may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Commission subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Commission. If there are less than 2/3 of the Commission members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 8. CONSENT CALENDAR — All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda September 9, 2015 Page 3 8A. QUARTERLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Page 29 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the year ended June 30, 2015. 88. QUARTERLY SALES TAX ANALYSIS Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 1 2015 (1Q 2015). 8C. QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended June 30, 2015. 8D. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the fourth quarter ended June 30, 2015. 8E. FISCAL YEAR 2013/14 TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT AND MEASURE A AUDIT RESULTS Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Transportation Development Act (TDA) and Measure A audit results report for Fiscal Year 2013/14. 8F. FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION TRIENNIAL REVIEW RESULTS Overview Page 38 Page 47 Page 105 Page 107 Page 116 This item is for the Commission to receive and file a report on the 2015 Triennial Review of the Commission performed by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda September 9, 2015 Page 4 8G. CALPERS DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY TO REQUEST DISBURSEMENTS Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 141 1) Designate the Chief Financial Officer, Deputy Executive Director, and Deputy Director of Finance to request disbursements from the CaIPERS pre -funding plan; and 2) Authorize the Chair to execute the Delegation of Authority to Request Disbursements. 8H. REVISIONS TO PROCUREMENT POLICY MANUAL Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 143 1) Approve the revised Riverside County Transportation Commission Procurement Policy Manual (PPM) for the procurement and contracting activities undertaken by the Commission, pursuant to legal counsel review as to conformance to state and federal law; and 2) Adopt Resolution No. 15-017, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding the Revised Procurement Policy Manual". 81. CONGESTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MONITORING Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 211 1) Approve Agreement No. 10-65-114-04, Amendment No. 4 to Agreement No. 10-65-114-00, with VRPA Technologies for continued monitoring of the Congestion Management Program (CMP) system of highways and roads per federal requirements for an additional amount of $28,167, and a total amount not to exceed $286,960; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda September 9, 2015 Page 5 8J. FISCAL YEAR 2015/16 ANNUAL LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND PLANNING ALLOCATIONS TO WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS AND COACHELLA VALLEY ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS Page 217 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve an allocation of Local Transportation Fund (LTF) planning funds in the amount of $684,750 for Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) and $373,500 for the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) for efforts identified in each agency's FY 2015/16 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan (Work Plan) that support transportation planning programs and functions consistent with regional and subregional plans, programs and requirements. 8K. AGREEMENT FOR CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL CONSTRUCTION ZONE ENHANCEMENT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM SERVICES DURING THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE INTERSTATE 215 CENTRAL WIDENING PROJECT FROM SCOTT ROAD TO NUEVO ROAD IN THE CITIES OF MENIFEE AND PERRIS Page 226 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 13-31-035-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 13-31-035-00, with the California Highway Patrol (CHP) for Construction Zone Enhanced Enforcement Program (COZEEP) services during the construction of the Interstate 215 Central widening project for an additional amount of $1.1 million, resulting in a total amount not to exceed $2,180,000; 2) Approve an increase of $1.1 million in FY 2015/16 budget revenues and expenditures for construction support services related to the project; 3) Approve an increase of $5 million in FY 2015/16 budget revenues and expenditures for construction services related to the project; and 4) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 8L. AMENDMENT TO AGREEMENTS FOR ON -CALL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING SERVICES Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 232 1) Approve the following amendments to provide on -call environmental consulting services for an additional three-year term, for a total term not to exceed five years; Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda September 9, 2015 Page 6 a) Agreement No. 13-31-132-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 13-31-132-00, with ICF International; b) Agreement No. 13-31-149-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 13-31-149-00, with LSA Associates, Inc.; c) Agreement No. 13-31-150-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 13-31-150-00, with HDR Engineering, Inc.; and d) Agreement No. 13-31-151-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 13-31-151-00, with VCS Environmental; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to execute task orders awarded under the terms of the agreements. 8M. AUTHORIZATION TO EXECUTE THE FUNDS TRANSFER AGREEMENT AND APPROVAL OF AMENDMENT FOR FORECASTING SERVICES WITH HDR, INC. FOR THE COACHELLA VALLEY — SAN GORGONIO PASS RAIL CORRIDOR SERVICE DEVELOPMENT PLAN Page 242 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Authorize the Executive Director to execute the Caltrans Division of Rail (Caltrans) Fund Transfer Agreement No. 16-25-017-00; 2) Approve Agreement No. 14-25-072-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 14-25-072-00, with HDR, Inc. (HDR) for rail forecasting services, for an additional amount of $69,450, and a total amount not to exceed $1,917,095, with bridge funding from Coachella Valley Rail fund reserves in advance of Commission receipt of Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) grant funds; and 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 8N. ANNUAL FUNDING MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING WITH SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA REGIONAL RAIL AUTHORITY Overview This item is for the Commission to: Page 247 1) Approve the form of the Fiscal Year 2015/16 Annual Funding Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) No. 16-25-014-01 with Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) and authorize the Executive Director to approve and execute the final MOU, pursuant to legal counsel review; and Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda September 9, 2015 Page 7 2) Authorize the Executive Director to approve and execute amendments to the MOU, pursuant to legal counsel review, for additional amounts up to the total amounts not to exceed $14,555,000 for operations and $9,483,000 for capital projects. 80. REVIEW OF COACHELLA VALLEY ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS NEIGHBORHOOD ELECTRIC VEHICLE PLAN Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan. 9. INTERSTATE 15 EXPRESS LANES PROJECT — ECONOMIC BENEFIT ANALYSIS Overview Page 267 Page 386 This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Economic Benefit Analysis study on the Interstate 15 Express Lanes project. 10. 2016 STATE TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM UPDATE Overview This item is for the Commission to approve reprogramming State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) projects as reflected in Table A. 11. FEDERAL AND STATE LEGISLATION UPDATE Page 405 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on federal and state legislation. 12. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA 13. COMMISSIONERS / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT Overview Page 403 This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and the Executive Director to report on attended meetings/conferences and any other items related to Commission activities. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda September 9, 2015 Page 8 14. CLOSED SESSION 14A. CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8 Agency Negotiator: Executive Director or Designee Property Owner(s): See Below Item APN(s) CPN(s) Property Owner(s) 1 234-240-011 234-250-016 234-250-018 234-250-024 N/A Riverside County Transportation Commission 14B. CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL: ANTICIPATED LITIGATION Exposure to Litigation Pursuant to Subdivision (d)(2) of Government Code Section 54956.9 Potential Number of Case(s): 1 14C. CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL: EXISTING LITIGATION Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9 (d)(1) Case No(s). RIC 1307299 and RIC 1405648 15. ADJOURNMENT The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, October 14, 2015, Board Chambers, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ROLL CALL SEPTEMBER 9, 2015 Present Absent County of Riverside, District I /21❑ County of Riverside, District II � ❑ County of Riverside, District III A ❑ County of Riverside, District IV � ❑ County of Riverside, District V � ❑ City of Banning � ❑ City of Beaumont , ❑ City of Blythe ❑ City of Calimesa : ❑ City of Canyon Lake S ❑ City of Cathedral City A ❑ City of Coachella � ❑ City of Corona ) ❑ City of Desert Hot Springs )71/ ❑ City of Eastvale i2' ❑ City of Hemet )2r ❑ City of Indian Wells 0 ❑ City of Indio gr ❑ City of Jurupa Valley 2r ❑ City of La Quinta 0 ❑ City of Lake Elsinore . ❑ City of Menifee S. ❑ City of Moreno Valley 0 ❑ City of Murrieta 0 ❑ City of Norco % ❑ City of Palm Desert 0 ❑ City of Palm Springs 2' ❑ City of Perris .21❑ City of Rancho Mirage � ❑ City of Riverside ,3 ❑ City of San Jacinto ❑ City of Temecula ,2r ❑ City of Wildomar 2 ❑ Governor's Appointee, Caltrans District 8 X 0 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION COMMISSIONER SIGN -IN SHEET SEPTEMBER 9, 2015 AGENCY EMAIL ADDRESS ANAME 44,..', 4/2 Z067zL Qn.(iieleaktia4., �}/If)illo � .l cam. .X..,.., � .� �_ , r�du�cCi S�JI eeg �� 13eA VI` 1 1,) 1 ,fyAt, 'oaL Prove 6- (nms`-vim -.\icabv �� 6�✓o rf tOti A R l .X_ /2 efLl ."T�d C'4-4._..4 2_,4_„„. .,, , . �� u .----sue. itAI-K.L i\r16�A P PA T L) N -a_ K)q o f 4 �fu,r t- (�ekl RADA 6-A- CPUjAl t � Pe64 kj-,,e' )--e__ C roc o/19_s/ AK�-v. / l67 i 5- v., _l • -tlzr�i s CTC .U4e.P . 6 ' S b s.�:vr_,1- /47-- S�,,c,, S _._ oC L0ivE.-- f .-\Jco-Tr \(... 3`l4,44 ilevrt girfi,e.„,, 'rrc,r- parr. IQ\ 2A oo4 �S 1(-- -i n — 1C 4-$ osti ' /\�v77L,-(-7- VJ.f61P.' rVe'tl lis- '1ZA V, / _,,y,,, ..5 ems-- 4. , ,o �14er q.N�, -pc. IT-E,d 6 ye1 ev ..,� �.y.� ����� ��� 1-1 f N I � r \i 4-1 1 )1 , >1 C' T�L _ �d�la,�` �E'��5 ro. -�� F' C ITS, or- 1�D i(3 �pt e�tv\ RtiAlkimsti (7,6 if ()DckdAtike,, n. 67 Q,A1-2,4_eo A 1/4 Q.L. :),c4hvt, !r DATE: DETACH FIND SUBMT TO THE CLERK OF THE BOARD 1� CHECK IF SUBJECT OF PUBLIC COMMENTS: Er PUBLIC COMMENTS: g Cd7G ,7310Cea, ,:q'OA AGENDA ITEM NO.: SUBJECT OF (AS usTEo ON THE waENoa) 2.7e AGENDA ITEM: PHONE NL `G `-p35 1'a-6. ZIP CODE REPRESENTING: L�riJuN��c./ % PHONE NO.: �.04-044..Q___, NAME: U R,s9$!4-- (Qi/'j!Q 1M.-- - ADDRESS:4oV3 /7/7491e-Al.V.042 S1L STREET OIRiANIZA / P CITY BUSINESS ADDRESS: STREET CITY ZIP CODE DETACH AND SUBMIT it THE CLERK OF THE BOARD DATE: l $ CHECK IF SUBJECT OF PUBLIC COMMENTS: y PUBLIC COMMENTS: f/rc(/'y �'�5)o#J I AGENDA ITEM NO.: SUBJECT OF (AS LISTED ON THE AGENDA) -( AGENDA ITEM: NAME: Zl C.4.6 WW14..) ADDRESS: �j EET SG A7 Ar-- ' i /4- ctTY REPRESENTING: PHONE NO.: NAME OF AGENCY / ORGANIZATION / GROUP PHONE NO.: gS/ 'T SLR) g z?gd ZIP CODE BUSINESS ADDRESS: STREET CITY ZIP CODE DETACH AND SUBMIT TO THE CLERK OF THE BOARD DATE I 1 201 C5- CHECK IF SUBJECT OF �( C l PUBLIC COMMENTS: Xi PUBLIC COMMENTS: AGENDA ITEM NO.: (AS LISTED ON THE AGENDA) SUBJECT OF ,4GE A7: f �^ NAME: I PHONE NO.._9 01. y ADDRESS: STREET CITY ZIP CODE REPRESENTING: PHONE NO.: NAME OF AGENCY / ORGANIZATION / GROUP BUSINESS ADDRESS: STREET CRY ZIP CODE DETACH AND SUBMIT TO THE CLERK OF THE BOARD DATE: CHECK IF SUBJECT OF PUBLIC COMMENTS: PUBLIC COMMENTS: AGENDA ITEM NO.: y (AS LISTED ON THE Af3ENDA) NAME: SUBJECT OF AGENDA M: ADDRESS: STREET REPRESENTING: PHONE NO.: CITY ZIP CODE PHONE NO.: BUSINESS ADDRESS: STREET CITY ZIP CODE AGENDA ITEM 5 MINUTES RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MINUTES Wednesday, July 8, 2015 1. CALL TO ORDER The Riverside County Transportation Commission was called to order by Chair Daryl Busch at 9:34 a.m. in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE Commissioner Deborah Franklin led the Commission in a flag salute. 3. ROLL CALL Commissioners/Alternates Present Commissioners Absent Marion Ashley Linda Krupa Ben Benoit Clint Lorimore John J. Benoit Bob Magee Daryl Busch Scott Mann John Bulinski Jesse Molina Joseph DeConinck Michael Naggar Ginny Foat Greg Pettis Deborah Franklin Robert Radi Rick Gibbs Dana Reed Dawn Haggerty Karen Spiegel Berwin Hanna Troy Strange Jan Harnik John F. Tavaglione* Kevin Jeffries Ted Weill Frank Johnston Chuck Washington Brenda Knight Ella Zanowic Andrew Kotyuk *Arrived after the meeting was called to order 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS Steven Hernandez Scott Matas City of Riverside Ms. Sara Costin, representing the Local Chapter for the Women's Transportation Seminar — Inland Empire Chapter (WTS-IE), announced the WTS-IE is hosting its 4th annual battle of the all stars fundraising softball event on July 29, 2015 at the San Manuel Stadium. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 8, 2015 Page 2 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES—JUNE 10, 2015 M/S/C (Radi/Washington) to approve the June 10, 2015 minutes as submitted. Abstain: Foat and Kotyuk 6. PUBLIC HEARING — ADOPTION OF A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY AND AMENDED RESOLUTIONS OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF FEE, PERMANENT ACCESS EASEMENT, AND PERMANENT SLOPE EASEMENT INTERESTS IN PORTIONS OF CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS AN ALLEYWAY WITH NO ASSIGNED ASSESSOR'S PARCEL NO., AND ASSESSOR PARCEL NOS. 102-050-003 AND 102-050-006 LOCATED IN CORONA, RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, BETWEEN PIERCE STREET ON THE EAST TO THE COUNTY LINE ON THE WEST, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Chair Busch opened the public hearing and called upon legal counsel to explain the nature and scope of this hearing. Haviva Shane, legal counsel, explained the purpose of this hearing is for the Board to consider the adoption of Resolution of Necessity No. 15-015 and Amended Resolutions of Necessity Nos. 13-045 and 13-046 for the acquisition of real property for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP). She stated at the conclusion of this hearing, the Board will be asked to adopt the resolution of necessity and she listed the findings. She explained the purpose of this hearing is to consider the need for acquisition of the property and not to consider the value of the property. Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board, verified the proof of mailing that certifies the notices were sent to the property owners of said parcel numbers are on file with the Commission. Ms. Harmon stated there were no written objections, protests, or requests to be heard from the owners or their representatives. Mark Lancaster, Right of Way Manager, presented the resolution of necessity and two amended resolutions of necessity for the SR-91 CIP and discussed the following areas: • Four findings required by the Board; • Project Map — Parcel map — Parcel location in the project area; • Offers of just compensation; • Aerial views of the parcels; and • Staff recommendation. Chair Busch called on any person who wished to be heard that has an interest in a property. There were no requests to speak. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 8, 2015 Page 3 Chair Busch then called on any other person who wished to be heard. There were no requests to speak. At this time, Chair Busch closed the public hearing. M/S/C (Reed/Harnik) to: 1) Conduct a hearing to consider the adoption of resolutions of necessity, including providing all parties interested in the affected property and their attorneys, or their representatives, an opportunity to be heard on the issues relevant to the resolutions of necessity; 2) Make the following findings as hereinafter described in this report: a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; b) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; c) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and d) The offer of just compensation has been made to the owner. 3) Adopt Resolution of Necessity No. 15-015 and Amended Resolutions of Necessity Nos. 13-045 and 13-046, "Resolutions of Necessity for the Acquisition of Property Interests in Certain Real Property, by Eminent Domain, More Particularly Described as Ca!trans Parcel No. 23769 and Assessor Parcel Nos. 102-050-003 and 102-050-006 located in Corona, Riverside County, California", for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), between Pierce Street on the east to the Riverside/Orange County line on the West, in Riverside County, California. 7. PUBLIC HEARING — RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSIT SERVICES FUNDING ALLOCATION FOR FISCAL YEAR 2015/16 Chair Busch opened the public hearing. Fina Clemente, Transit Manager, presented the FY 2015/16 funding allocation for Riverside County transit services, highlight the following: • Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP) FY 2015/16 — FY 2017/18; • FY 2015/16 transit financial plan by revenue source; • FY 2015/16 transit revenue outlook: Local Transportation Fund, Measure A, and State Transit Assistance funds; and • Staff recommendation. Chair Busch called on any person who wished to be heard. There were no requests to speak. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 8, 2015 Page 4 At this time, Chair Busch closed the public hearing. M/S/C (Kotyuk/Molina) to: 1) Conduct a public hearing at its July Commission meeting on the proposed Section 5307 Program of Projects (POP); 2) Approve the Fiscal Year 2015/16 Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) Section 5307 and 5311 POP for Riverside County; 3) Approve the FY 2015/16 Local Transportation Fund (LTF) and State Transit Assistance (STA) fund allocations for transit; 4) Direct staff to add projects into the Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP); 5) Adopt Resolution No. 15-014, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission to Allocate State Transit Assistance Funds"; and 6) Approve the disbursement of $4,798,000 in LTF funds to Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) as a bridge loan due to the United States Department of Labor (DOL) suspension of federal funds due to Public Employees' Pension Reform Act of 2013 (PEPRA) issues. 8. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS There were no additions or revisions to the agenda. 9. CONSENT CALENDAR M/S/C (Pettis/Reed) to approve the following Consent Calendar items. 9A. FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION PROPOSED TRIENNIAL OVERALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISE PROGRAM GOAL FOR FEDERAL FISCAL YEARS 2016-18 1) Adopt 10.8 percent as the Commission's Federal Transit Administration (FTA) proposed triennial Overall Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) race -neutral goal for Federal Fiscal Years 2016-18 for the period October 1, 2015 to September 30, 2018; 2) Adopt Resolution No. 15-016, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Adopting Its Triennial Overall Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Program Goal (49 CFR Part 26) as it Applies to Funding Received Directly from the Federal Transit Administration"; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director to approve final adjustments to the DBE race -neutral goal for FFY 2016-18 as a result of comments received during the public notice and comment period. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 8, 2015 Page 5 9B. FISCAL YEARS 2016-20 MEASURE A FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANS FOR LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS Approve the Fiscal Years 2016-20 Measure A Five -Year Capital Improvement Plans (CIPs) for Local Streets and Roads (LSR) as submitted. 9C. 2009 MEASURE A LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT BASE YEAR REQUIREMENTS FOR EASTVALE AND JURUPA VALLEY 1) Approve the 2009 Measure A Local Streets and Roads (LSR) Maintenance of Effort (MOE) base year requirement of $38,949 for the city of Eastvale (Eastvale); and 2) Approve the 2009 Measure A LSR MOE base year requirement of $0 for the city of Jurupa Valley (Jurupa Valley). 9D. 2015 STATE ROUTE 91 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Receive and file the 2015 State Route 91 Implementation Plan. 9E. CITY OF LAKE ELSINORE REQUEST FOR TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM MITIGATION FEE REGIONAL ARTERIAL PROGRAM FUNDS FOR INTERSTATE 15/RAILROAD CANYON ROAD AND FRANKLIN STREET INTERCHANGE PROJECT 1) Approve programming $4.6 million in Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Regional Arterial funds for design and right of way phases for the Interstate 15/Railroad Canyon Road and Franklin Street interchange project; 2) Approve an additional $4 million in TUMF Regional Arterial funds for the construction phase contingent upon approval of U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) funding; 3) Approve Agreement No. 10-72-016-04, Amendment No. 4 to Agreement No. 10-71-016-00, with the city of Lake Elsinore for $2 million in design and $2.6 million in right of way funds related to the project; 4) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 5) Approve a budget adjustment to increase Fiscal Year 2015/16 TUMF Regional Arterial expenditures in the amount of $4.6 million. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 8, 2015 Page 6 9F. UTILITY AGREEMENTS FOR THE STATE ROUTE 74 WIDENING PROJECT BETWEEN DEXTER AVENUE IN THE CITY OF LAKE ELSINORE AND 7TH STREET IN THE CITY OF PERRIS 1) Approve Agreement No. 15-31-113-00 between the Commission and Southern California Edison Company (SCE) to reimburse SCE's review cost of joint use agreements (JUAs), legal descriptions, and plat maps to establish SCE utility easements with prior rights relocated by the State Route 74 widening project between Dexter Avenue in the city of Lake Elsinore and 7t" Street in the city of Perris, for a total amount not to exceed $65,000; 2) Approve Agreement No. 15-31-115-00 between the Commission and Elsinore Valley Municipal Water District (EVMWD) to reimburse EVMWD's review cost of JUAs, legal descriptions, and plat maps to establish EVMWD's utility easements with prior rights relocated by the SR-74 widening project between Dexter Avenue in the city of Lake Elsinore and 7h Street in the city of Perris, for a total amount not to exceed $45,000; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements, on behalf of the Commission. 9G. COACHELLA VALLEY-SAN GORGONIO PASS RAIL CORRIDOR STUDY PURPOSE AND NEED STATEMENT REVISION AND DRAFT CONCEPT ALTERNATIVES TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM 1) Receive and file the revised Purpose and Need Statement for the Coachella Valley -San Gorgonio Pass Rail Corridor Study; and 2) Receive and file the draft Concept Alternatives Technical Memorandum. 9H. RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2013/14 Receive and file the Riverside County Public Transportation Annual Countywide Performance Report (Countywide Report) for Fiscal Year 2013/14. 91. FISCAL YEAR 2015/16 SAN BERNARDINO ASSOCIATED GOVERNMENTS AGREEMENT FOR INLAND EMPIRE RIDESHARE AND 511 SERVICES 1) Approve Agreement No. 15-41-114-00 with the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) as part of the Commission's continuing bi-county partnership with SANBAG to deliver commuter/employer rideshare services and operation of the Inland Empire 511 (IE511) system for Fiscal Year 2015/16 in an amount not to exceed $1,650,000; and Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 8, 2015 Page 7 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. 10. 2016 STATE TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM PLAN UPDATE Shirley Medina, Planning and Programming Director, presented the 2016 State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), highlighting the following areas: • STIP, STIP fund estimate, past STIP cycles, and reprogramming; • 2014 STIP projects; • Special session; • STIP intracounty formula; • 2016 STIP, project selection, and submittal timeline; and • Staff recommendation. At this time, Commissioner John Tavaglione joined the meeting. Anne Mayer noted the SR-60/Truck Climbing and Descending Lane project is in the FY 2016/17 STIP. She explained it is probable this project will stay in that fiscal year since the rest of this project is funded by State Highway Operation and Protection Program funds (SHOPP), which is for the safety components of the project. The other projects listed with the exception of the I-10/Jefferson Street interchange project, which is under construction, will likely see multiyear delays in funding. M/S/C (Molina/Tavaglione) to approve the formula percentage distribution among the three geographic areas in Riverside County (Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley) based on taxable sales per the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Intracounty Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for purposes of preparing the 2016 STIP submittal. 11. 91 PROJECT — CONSTRUCTION UPDATE David Thomas, Toll Project Manager, presented a construction update on the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (91 Project), highlighting the following areas: • Project area map; • Photo — South side of SR-91/Lincoln Avenue interchange cut and reface work of the businesses, utility relocation, jack and bores, and directional drilling; • Photo — Old eastbound SR-91 to northbound/southbound 1-15 connector existing bridge demolition over BNSF Railway (BNSF) tracks, and soffit and stem installation; Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 8, 2015 Page 8 • Photo — Southbound 1-15 to westbound SR-91 connector deck pour, existing bridge demolition over BNSF tracks, demolition of existing connector bridge toward western abutment limits, and drilling operation by BNSF tracks; • Photo — East Grand Boulevard flyover connector facing east and west, eastbound SR-91 at Serfas Club Drive off ramp facing west retaining wall footing rebar and formwork installation; • Photo — SR-91 new Frontage Road alignment between Serfas Club Drive and Maple Street facing north a stem pour, Wardlow Circle facing west mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) panel installation for right of way; • Photo — Cast and place retaining walls, MSE walls, paving operation on 1-15, and 1-15 median at old Temescal Road facing north paving and block out for median sign structure foundation, 91 Corona squeeze where the lanes were narrowed to pave the outer edge of concrete; • Photo — Eastbound SR-91 at Smith to Maple Streets facing southwest a sound wall demolition, Smith to Sherman Avenues facing east sound wall demolition and temporary fence installation, Serfas Club Drive off ramp at Northmoor properties facing east and westbound 91/71 interchange looking northeast the earthwork being done; • Photo — Westbound SR-91 at Green River Road off -ramp at west Prado Road bridge deck the stem -soffit concrete pour between Abutment 1 and Bent 4, facing north the deck concrete placement between Abutment 1 and Bent 4, the removal of false work between Abutment 1 and Bent 3; and • Major construction activities summary; • Upcoming activities — August 2015 the completion of new Frontage Road and eastbound Maple Street onramp, 2-month closure at Serfas Club Drive westbound off ramp, 15-month closure at Serfas Club Drive eastbound on ramp; September 2015 — Northwest connector traffic switch, Green River Road westbound off ramp traffic switch; electronic toll and traffic management system turnover on April 14, 2016; New lanes open in 2017; and • How to stay connected. In response to Commissioner Ben Benoit's question regarding the number of laborers, David Thomas replied there are approximately 500 laborers onsite and an approximate total of 1,000 laborers currently employed on the overall project. In response to Commissioner Karen Spiegel's question regarding potential delays related to the BNSF tracks, David Thomas replied there are some challenges being dealt with, however, he is confident staff will achieve a solution in order to complete the project on schedule. Anne Mayer discussed the active projects impacting BNSF tracks, which have created several closures for BNSF. Staff is managing the situation and working closely with BNSF. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 8, 2015 Page 9 At Commissioner Kevin Jeffries' request, David Thomas described the ramp configurations at the 15/91 interchange upon project completion. Commissioner Jeffries expressed concern there will be five lanes at Ontario Avenue, which will reduce to three lanes within a half -mile, creating a new major bottleneck as a result of this project. In response to Commissioner Dawn Haggerty's question regarding project completion, Dave Thomas replied in 2017, all lanes will be open to traffic, including the toll lanes. In response to Commissioner Clint Lorimore's question regarding which month the lanes will open, David Thomas replied the current project schedule indicates January 9, 2017, for substantial completion. Anne Mayer expressed her appreciation to the entire 91 Project team. M/S/C to receive and file an update on the 91 Project. 12. FEDERAL AND STATE LEGISLATION UPDATE Aaron Hake, Government Relations Manager, presented an update on the federal and state legislative activities, highlighting the following areas: • H.R. 2497 — National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Reciprocity Act; • The Developing a Reliable and Innovative Vision for the Economy (DRIVE) Act; • Special session on transportation; and • Transit: The California Public Employees' Pension Reform Act (PEPRA) (California) vs. U.S. Department of Labor Section 13(c). At this time, Commissioner Jeffries stepped out of the meeting. Commissioner John Benoit expressed his support for H.R. 2497 and his gratitude to Congressman Jeff Denham for his efforts. Commissioner Scott Mann expressed his support for H.R. 2497 and briefed the Commission on his discussions with U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. He then asked for the next steps toward the passage of H.R. 2497. Aaron Hake replied his sense is that H.R. 2497 stands a much better chance in the House than it does in the Senate as it was not included in the Senate's DRIVE Act. He suggested the Commission needs to champion this bill in the House to ensure it makes it to the conference committee. Then the Commission needs to be engaged in the Senate conferences. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 8, 2015 Page 10 Commissioner Mann stated the U.S. Conference of Mayors last summer unanimously approved a resolution in support of a reciprocity bill and suggested the Commission leverage these successes. M/S/C (Mann/Harnik) to: 1) Receive and file an update on federal and state legislation; and 2) Adopt the following bill position — H.R. 2497 — Support. At this time, Commissioner Jeffries rejoined the meeting. 13. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR FOR DISCUSSION There were no items pulled from the Consent Calendar. 14. COMMISSIONERS/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 14A. Commissioner Harnik announced the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) scheduled a California Gold Workshop: Bring Cap and Trade Dollars to Southern California for August 6, at SCAG's main office. 14B. Commissioner Bob Magee referred to Agenda Item 9E, "City of Lake Elsinore Request for Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Regional Arterial Program Funds for Interstate 15/Railroad Canyon Road and Franklin Street Interchange Project", and expressed appreciation it passed unanimously. He expressed his appreciation to Commission staff, the Technical Advisory Committee, and his fellow Commissioners for support. He then stated his city's commitment to continue to be a good regional partner and to project completion. 14C. Anne Mayer announced the November Commission meeting will be held on Thursday, November 12, 2015, at 9:30 a.m. in the Eastern Municipal Water District's Board Room in Perris due to the Veterans' Day holiday. At this time, Commissioners Benoit, Jeffries, Magee, Mann, and Jesse Molina as well as Caltrans District 8 Representative John Bulinski left the meeting. 15. CLOSED SESSION 15A. CONFERENCE WITH LEGAL COUNSEL: EXISTING LITIGATION Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.9 (d)(1) Case No(s). RIC 1314276 and RIC 1311601 There were no announcements from Closed Session items. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 8, 2015 Page 11 16. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, Chair Busch adjourned the meeting at 11:06 a.m. The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, September 9, 2015, Board Chambers, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. Respectfully submitted, 0)-)""9-(L- H Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board AGENDA ITEM 6 PUBLIC HEARING RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Mark Lancaster, Right of Way Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Adoption of a Resolution of Necessity and Amended Resolutions of Necessity for the Acquisition of Permanent Drainage Easement and Permanent Utility Easement Interests in Portions of Certain Real Property by Eminent Domain, More Particularly Described as a Vacant Parcel with No Assigned Assessor's Parcel No. and Assessor Parcel Nos. 118-040-027; and 101-170-010 Located in Corona, Riverside County, California, for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project, Between Pierce Street on the East to the County Line on the West, in Riverside County, California STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Conduct a hearing to consider the adoption of resolutions of necessity, including providing all parties interested in the affected property and their attorneys, or their representatives, an opportunity to be heard on the issues relevant to the resolutions of necessity; 2) Make the following findings as hereinafter described in this report: a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; b) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; c) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and d) The offer of just compensation has been made to the owner. 3) Adopt Resolution of Necessity No. 15-018 and Amended Resolutions of Necessity Nos. 13-068 and 13-071, "Resolutions of Necessity for the Acquisition of Property Interests in Certain Real Property, by Eminent Domain, More Particularly Described as a Parcel of Land for Which No Assessor Parcel Number is Assigned (Caltrans Parcel No. 23880-1); and APNs 118-040-027 (CPN 22172-7); and 101-170-010 (CPN 22106-5) Located in Corona, California Riverside County, California", for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), Between Pierce Street on the East to the Riverside/County Line on the West, in Riverside County, California. Agenda Item 6 1 BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission is being asked to consider the adoption of this resolution to acquire additional property interests in the parcel listed below. This interest is required for construction of the SR-91 CIP. The power of eminent domain is used by the Commission only as a last resort to obtain interests necessary for public highway projects after 1) negotiations have stalled; or 2) the owner has requested the Commission proceed directly to eminent domain for tax or other advantages; or 3) the eminent domain process is necessary to clear the title to the property. In this case, offers of just compensation have been made to the owners for the full Fair Market Value as determined by an appraisal. Commission staff attempted to negotiate amicable settlements in good faith, and will continue to do so throughout the process. Fair Market Value is defined by the state of California and is one of the most inclusive definitions in the United States. It requires the highest and best use of the property be considered. All of the Commission's appraisals must meet the California definition of Fair Market Value. One of the requirements for acquiring property for improvement projects is that an offer of just compensation be made to the owners of the property. The Commission makes these offers in person whenever possible. The amount of compensation is determined by appraisals prepared by independent appraisal firms licensed by the Bureau of Real Estate Appraisers. The content of these appraisals, what elements are considered in them, and the methodologies used in the preparation are all proscribed by various laws and the Uniform Standards of Appraisal Practice (USPAP), published by the Appraisal Foundation. The Federal Government recognizes the USPAP as generally accepted appraisal standards and requires USPAP compliance for appraisers in federally related transactions. Every appraisal calculates the market value of the acquisition as defined by the California Code of Civil Procedure, based on the highest and best use, as defined in USPAP, and includes consideration of severance damages and project benefits, which is also defined in the California Code of Civil Procedure. In every case, the owner is invited to accompany the appraiser during the site visit so that as much information as possible is considered in the appraisal. A review appraisal prepared by a different certified appraiser is then conducted to ensure all proper procedures have been followed. Additionally, in accordance with state law, every owner is offered up to $5,000 to reimburse them for the cost to have their own appraisal prepared. Staff will bring to the Commission those interests that meet one of the criteria above. The timing of these resolutions will balance the need to give the owners as much time as possible to reach an agreement, while at the same time allowing enough time for the Commission to go through the process to obtain possession in time to avoid delays to the design -build contractor. The legal process from adoption of the resolutions of necessity to receiving legal possession of the properties takes approximately 150 days. California eminent domain law provides that a public entity may not commence with eminent domain proceedings until its governing body has Agenda Item 6 2 adopted a resolution of necessity, which resolution may only be adopted after the governing body has given each party with an interest in the affected property, or their representatives, a reasonable opportunity to appear and be heard on the following matters: 1) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; 2) The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; 3) The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and 4) The offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner. Since an agreement has not been reached with some property owners, it may be necessary to acquire necessary interests by eminent domain. The initiation of the eminent domain process is accomplished by the Commission's adoption of resolutions of necessity for the affected properties. Record property owners must be afforded an opportunity to appear at the hearing and lodge objections. A notice of this hearing was sent by first class mail to the property owners, and stated the Commission's intent to consider the adoption of resolutions, the right of the property owners to appear and be heard on these issues, and that failure to file a written request to appear would result in a waiver of the right to appear and be heard. The Commission scheduled this hearing at which all persons who filed a written request in compliance with applicable law may appear and be heard. Aerial views of the parcels subject to this staff report in relation to the SR-91 CIP are attached. Finding 1: Public Interest and Necessity Require the Project SR-91 in Riverside County ranks among the nation's worst commutes. Stop -and -go traffic is the norm, especially during morning and late afternoon rush hours. Traffic congestion on eastbound SR-91 between the cities of Anaheim and Corona is routinely among the worst 15 areas in the nation. SR-91 is continuing to experience increased congestion as a result of population growth in Riverside and San Bernardino Counties and the increase in jobs in Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Demographic projections for the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) region show population and employment in Riverside and Orange Counties are forecast to increase substantially by 2035. As a result, traffic volumes on SR-91 are expected to increase by approximately 50 percent by 2035, which would result in even greater congestion and delays on SR-91. The existing travel demand on SR-91 has led to a heavy directional commute pattern between Los Angeles, Orange and Riverside Counties that is projected to continue into the future. Agenda Item 6 3 SR-91 is the only major highway that links Orange and Riverside Counties. Extending from the Orange County/Riverside County line in the city of Corona to Pierce Street in Riverside, the SR-91 CIP will add mixed flow lanes, tolled express lanes, improve interchanges, bridges, ramps, and local streets. New freeway to freeway ramp connections between the SR-91 and Interstate 15 also will be made. The SR-91 CIP is designed to reduce delays, improve air quality, offer a choice between regular (mixed flow) lanes and express lanes, allow faster emergency response, relieve local street congestion, and provide better access to public transit and commuter rail. Finding 2: The Project is Planned or Located in a Manner Most Compatible with Greatest Public Good and Least Private Injury A thorough analysis was conducted to find the single best location for the SR-91 CIP. Environmental analyses and findings indicate the chosen alignment uniquely satisfies engineering, public health, and environmental issues, and is the most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury. To minimize private injury, a thorough analysis regarding the need for each property and each interest was conducted in the planning stages of the SR-91 CIP. Efforts during the planning stages included conducting public outreach meetings and seeking feedback about the SR-91 CIP alignment and potential impacts. Staff also met regularly with various local agencies and businesses to determine if modifications to the alignment were necessary to minimize impacts. These efforts continued over the course of years to ensure the alignment design achieved the greatest public good with the least private injury. As part of the acquisition process, unless settlement was reached within the first 30 days after an offer was made, every property owner was provided an opportunity to participate in meetings with project staff. The goal of these meetings was to minimize private injury not only on the basis of information staff obtained through the planning process, but also on the information provided by the property owners. As a result, staff has in some cases included mitigation measures to reduce and minimize impacts to the property. Compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act has been satisfied by Caltrans' certification of an environmental impact report (EIR) in its role as lead agency on August 8, 2012, and the Commission's subsequent consideration of that certified EIR in its role as a responsible agency on November 14, 2012. Finding 3: The Real Property to be Acquired is Necessary for the Project The property interests sought below have been analyzed to determine if a feasible design alternative that exists would alleviate the need for the interest. As indicated above, the property owners of the interests were invited to meet with project staff and provide input to address any concerns the property owners may have with the design of the SR-91 CIP in the manner proposed and the necessity of the acquisition. To the extent the property owners Agenda Item 6 4 raised such concerns, staff took those concerns into consideration and attempted to make design modifications as feasible as possible. In the end, staff recommends the following interests in real property are necessary for the project. RON No. 15-018 — Owner: ASC 1.46 Acres, LLC (John M. Brewster and Karen A. Brewster); No Assigned Assessor Parcel No.; CPN 23880-1 The real property to consider in this resolution is owned in fee by ASC 1.46 Acres, LLC (John M. Brewster, Sr. and Karen A. Brewster). The property is bounded by SR-91 to the north, Palisades Drive to the south, and commercial properties to the east and west. The property has an irregular land configuration and is currently vacant. Due to design refinements, the Commission is now seeking to acquire a non-exclusive drainage easement across a portion of the property. Since the land is a vacant lot, no improvements will be impacted. An offer of just compensation for the property interest was made to the property owner on July 2, 2015. Legal definition(s), legal description(s), and/or plot map(s) of the property and the part to be acquired is attached as an exhibit to Resolution of Necessity No. 15-018. An aerial view of the parcel and the parcel's relationship to the SR-91 CIP is also attached. A Notice of Hearing to property owners was mailed on July 24, 2015. Amended RON No. 13-068 — Owner: Public Storage, Ltd.; APN 118-040-027; CPN 22172-7 The real property subject to the amended resolution is owned by Public Storage Properties, Ltd., a California limited liability partnership. The property is irregular in shape and consists of approximately 126,071 square feet, or 2.90 acres of land area, and is bounded by Pomona Road to the north and west, SR-91 to the south, and Smith Avenue to the east. The property is currently improved with a self -storage facility comprised of six storage buildings containing 463 rental units, office and on -site manager's apartment, associated parking lot, and other improvements. The Commission previously acquired fee, permanent wall footing easement, permanent utility easement and temporary construction easement interests in portions of the property. Resolution No. 13-068 was adopted on November 13, 2013; the property was subsequently acquired through negotiated purchase. Because of design changes, the Commission must now acquire a permanent and perpetual utility easement of 622 square feet, of which 47 square feet lies within the retaining wall footing easement acquired on September 2, 2014. An offer of just compensation for the additional interest was made to the property owner on July 23, 2015. Agenda Item 6 5 Legal definition(s), legal description(s), and/or plat map(s) of the portions to be acquired are exhibits to Amended Resolution of Necessity No. 13-068. An aerial view of the parcel with an overlay of the property interests to be acquired and the parcel's relationship to the SR-91 CIP is also attached. The Notice of Hearing to property owners was mailed on July 24, 2015. Amended RON No. 13-071 — Owners: John M. Brewster, Sr. and Karen A. Brewster; APN 101-170-010; CPN 22106-5 The real property subject to the amended resolution is owned in fee by John M. Brewster, Sr. and Karen A. Brewster and is a parcel comprised of approximately 49,590 square feet, or 1.14 acres of land area, and is bounded by SR-91 to the north, Palisades Drive to the south, and commercial properties to the east and west. The property has an irregular land configuration and is currently vacant. The Commission previously acquired a fee interest in a portion of the property. Due to design refinements, the Commission is now seeking to acquire a non-exclusive drainage easement across a portion of the property. Since the land is a vacant lot, no improvements will be impacted. An offer of just compensation for the additional interest was made to the property owners on May 26, 2015. Legal definition(s), legal description(s), and or/ plot map(s) of the larger parcel and the part to be acquired is attached as an exhibit to Amended Resolution of Necessity No. 13-071. An aerial view of the parcel and the parcel's relationship to the SR-91 CIP is also attached. A Notice of Hearing to the property owners was mailed on July 24, 2015. Finding 4: Offers of Just Compensation Have Been Made to the Property Owners Litigation guarantees were obtained from Commonwealth Land Title Insurance Company and First American Title Insurance Company to confirm and identify the parties with an interest in the parcels affected by the SR-91 CIP. The Commission then served the affected property owners and other interested parties as appropriate, with a notice of the Commission's decision to appraise the property. The Commission had the real property interests appraised by Scott A. Lidgard, MAI, CCIM, and Thomas M. Pike, Jr., MAI, to establish the Fair Market Value of the property the Commission is seeking to acquire from the parties identified herein. Offers of just compensation were made to the property owners to purchase the property interests, based on the approved appraisals, as required by Section 7267.2 of the California Government Code. In this instance, the Commission will acquire the interests necessary and set forth above from the property owners to ensure the property will be available to meet the time frames associated with the construction of the SR-91 CIP. Agenda Item 6 6 Fiscal Impact There is no fiscal impact due to adoption of the resolution of necessity. All property acquisition expenses are included in the SR-91 CIP budget. Attachments: 1) Resolution No. 15-018 2) Amended Resolution No. 13-068 3) Amended Resolution No. 13-071 Agenda Item 6 7 ATTACHMENT 1 RESOLUTION NO. 15-018 RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF A DRAINAGE EASEMENT INTEREST IN A PORTION OF CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, WHICH HAS NO ASSESSOR PARCEL NUMBER ASSIGNED BY THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY ASSESSOR'S OFFICE, LOCATED IN CORONA, RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, WHICH COVERS THE AREA BETWEEN PIERCE STREET ON THE EAST TO THE COUNTY LINE ON THE WEST, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (Commission) proposes to acquire a drainage easement interest in a portion of certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, a parcel of land for which no assessor parcel number is assigned (identified only as CPN 23880-1), for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code, and section 1240.120 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, September 9, 2015, at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and the affected property owner and other interested parties were afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. Section 2. Public Use. The public use for the drainage easement interest to be acquired is for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes the Commission to acquire, by eminent domain, property necessary for such purposes. 8 Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "A" are the legal description and depiction of the property to be acquired by the Commission, and which describes the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property defined, described and/or depicted in Exhibit "A" is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights of way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights of way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights of way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interest subject to such existing public use(s) pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights of way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public uses pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. 9 Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of the Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non -material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interest or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9th day of September, 2015. Daryl R. Busch, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 10 11 PS OMAS EXHIBIT `Al' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Caltrans Parcel No. 23880-1 Drainage Easement APN N.A. A strip of land 20.00 feet wide in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, being a portion of the lands described in the Relinquishment of Highway Right of Way in the County of Riverside, Road 08-RIV-91-0.0-3.6 Request No. 185 R recorded September 28, 1971 as Document No. 109814 of Official Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the lands described in the deed recorded March 24, 2004 as Document No. 2004-0205087 of Official Records of said County; thence North 18°24'07" East 111.20 feet along the general easterly line of last said lands to a point thereon, said point being distant South 18°24'07" West 5.77 feet from an angle point of said general easterly line, said point also being the most westerly corner of the lands described in the Affidavit — Death of Trustee recorded April 19, 2007 as Document No. 2007-0264803 of Official Records of said County; thence North 41 °37'34" East 5.69 feet to a point on the general southerly line of the lands described in said Document No. 2007-0264803, said point being distant South 57°50'28" East 2.31 feet from said most westerly corner; thence South 57°50'28" East 20.28 feet along said general southerly line to a point thereon; thence South 41 °37'34" West 4.91 feet; thence South 18°24'07" West 107.51 feet; thence North 70°22'27" West 20.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 2,293 square feet. See Exhibit `A2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. MA2PTG010501\SURVEY\LEGALS\22106_APN_101-170-010\Legais\23880-1_DE.doc 5/28/2015 Page 1 of 2 EXHIBIT A, PAGE 2 OF 5 12 PS OMAS The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. Prepared under the direction of Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 6.-z8-/s Date MA2PTG010501\SURVEY\LEGALS\22106_APN_101-170-010\Lega1s123880-1_DE.doc 5/28/2015 Page 2 of 2 EXHIBIT A, PAGE 3 OF 5 13 EXHIBIT A2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 23880-1 DE 2,293 SQ.FT. N/A 03' Q - � u , ��Q /1 \ ��tiGOVI<P '6 e\-W 1/ / D Q >Q't' K Q ,� P08 �009, D0C RED. \0.- 80. \ 29,2 \ ` ' Is, 4 26 j , `L 0 �0 *`�-1__ 1 90.75' 31.86' 116.97' 0.R 0 p9 . / C , ' , p �. A �O '�,, F� '300 0 � 7,7 \0 `9 c�00�0� Sir070 -57 6'_ , \ P. J` \ �LP , 0 CURVE TABLE \ \\ , 0 \\ 0 �� \ \ 0 \\\ � 0 & 12.... \ \ 7s\ �� \\\ S 9>fo,pr f0s\ \ \ r G� \ �sro �'F` \ \ \ F \F \*\ +fs p 9' �? 9 ,o'P v, 0o O`�F 60 101_170y038 \ L=201 .61 ' 0=09° 1 7'08" L=541 .34' A=25° 50'51 " } \ \ I \ . L 4 " ����>. �yF Fj 9 ,, c3 LINE TABLE L1 N61 °05'1 9"W L2 - N70°22127"W L3 - N18°24'07"E LEGEND POB Indicates Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing ( )Title to State Cl - R=1 244.00' C2 - R=1 199.97' ))) i Access Prohibited NOTES FEET 2 3 S 8 0- 1 DRAINAGE EASEMENT ' �� Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to obtain ground distances. All distances are in feet unless otherwise noted. 360 0 60 120 240 PREPARED BY: PSOMAS 3 Hutton Centre Drive Ste. 200 Santa Ana, California 92707 (714)481-80534714)545-8803 (Fax) DATE: 04-06-15 REV.: 05-28-15 EA: 0F540 FA#: DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS pp TT 8 PYI-ii44-VA Porp9A. nr 5 2.9 1 2 14 EXHIBIT A2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 23880-1 DE 2,293 SO.FT. N/A 4/ � PARCEL } PARCEL N0,30911 P,M, 207/ )36 .\N P O B'o 8 MAP 1 2- 17 0) \• �� , " � f1r• FAO 23, DOC. 2004-0205087 REC. 03-24-2004 �'\ %o DETAIL N0. O.R. ��'� ••v' �- � � �-� �� . 5 .--- -- oc` do ° ) cam \ ; q'36 k 0� c30U, /�? `T 0 P •��" \ A=09°17'08" �,� �) c �y., ° J • , � P.ss 'S �A G0 • "A" °) L=201.61' SCALE 1" =20' CURVE TABLE 0l ��o o i c'� cP6. Vim, 4 o LEGEND C1 - R=1244.00' POB Indicates Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing ( ) Title to State i i i i Access Prohibited NOTES FEET 2 3 8 8 0- 1 DRAINAGE EASEMENT I Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to obtain ground distances. All distances are in feet unless otherwise noted. 60 . 0 10 20 40 PREPARED BY: PSOMAS 3 Hutton Centre Drive, Ste. 200Santo (714)481Ana, 2707 8053/(714)54598883 (Fox) DATE: 04-06-15 REV.: 05-28-15 EA: OF540 FA#: DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO.TOTAL SHEETS 8 EXHIAV A, AG2 0,15 2. 9 2 2 15 Legal Definitions of Property to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Drainage Easement" (CPN 23880--1) refers to non-exclusive, permanent and perpetual easement and right of way in favor of ROTC, and to its successors and assigns, to construct, reconstruct, repair, extend and maintain excavation, together with all rights necessary for incidentals thereto, on, over, under and across the Property, including the right to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush or other vegetation or flora, from time to time, as determined in its sole discretion, as described in the exhibit attached hereto and by reference made apart hereof, and with the following, and as set forth below: RCTC, its agents, employees, successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress to and egress from the easement and right of way for the purpose of exercising the rights conveyed herein. 17336.02100\13173025.1 EXHIBIT A, PAGE 1 OF 5 16 ATTACHMENT 2 AMENDED RESOLUTION NO. 13-068 RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF A PERMANENT UTILITY EASEMENT INTEREST IN A PORTION OF CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, IDENTIFIED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NO. 118-040-027, LOCATED IN CORONA, RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, WHICH COVERS THE AREA BETWEEN PIERCE STREET ON THE EAST TO THE COUNTY LINE ON THE WEST, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the "Commission") proposes to acquire a utility easement interest in a portion of certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel No. 118-040-027 (Caltrans Parcel No. 22172-7), for the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code, and section 1240.120 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, September 9, 2015 at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and the affected property owners were afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. Section 2. Public Use. The public use for a utility easement in a portion of the property to be acquired is for the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes the Commission to acquire, by eminent domain, property necessary for such purposes. 17 Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "A" are the legal definitions, descriptions and maps of the interests to be acquired by the Commission that describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property defined, described and/or depicted in Exhibit "A" is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section S. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of - way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights - of -way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights -of -way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interest subject to such existing public uses pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights -of -way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public uses pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. 18 Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of the Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non -material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9th day of September, 2015. Daryl R. Busch, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 19 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS EXHIBIT `El' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Ca'trans Parcel No. 22106-5 Drainage Easement APN 101-170-010 / A strip of land in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, being a portion of the lands described in the Affidavit — Death of Trustee recorded April 19, 2007 as Document No. 2007-0264803 of Official Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the most westerly corner of said lands; thence South 57°50'28" East 2.31 feet along the general southerly line of said lands to a point thereon, said point being the True Point of Beginning; thence South 57°50'28" East 20.28 feet continuing along last said line to a point thereon; thence North 41°37'34" East 13.10 feet to a point on general northerly line of said lands, said point being the beginning of a non -tangent curve concave southerly having a radius of 12099.70 feet, to which point a radial line bears North 04°38'46" East; thence westerly along said last said line and said curve 25.06 feet through a central angle of 00°07'07" to a point thereon, said most westerly corner and point of beginning being westerly along said line and said curve 2.86 feet from said point; thence South 41 °37'34" West 1.34 feet to the True Point of Beginning. Containing 145 square feet. See Exhibit `E2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. MA2PTG010501\SURVEYMLEGALS\22106_APN_101-170-0101ega1s122106-5 DE.doc 4/6/2015 Page 1 of EXHIBIT A, PAGE 2 OF 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS Prepared under the direction of Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 Date • 1..AND Sem I N. �000 52C60A1 A MA2PTG0105011SURVEY\LEGALS\22106_APN_101-170-0101Lega1s122106-5_DE.doc Page 2 of 2 4/6/2015 EXHIBIT A, PAGE 3 OF 5 EXHIBIT E2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 221 06-5 DE 1,45 SO.FT. 1 01,-70-01 0 '4 \ ' \ T'\ \-A + \ / ��)� ' NOV' P 0 B REC`0 ''� c C e' b, 4 OSO 32g82 4.0 ` O � -,D3� \ • 73 D 0- � - -- i,, . \97, "E O• O.R. 9 6 ; �o , Og . ' � � 0 • 4/6'_ ��C' 0.0 -% �.r \P_57..0 , 0- �9 ss 2 C'� G�� R2 �� r 0 0 0 cop F p� so 9 p / co6 cep 9 60 O� �r` 0 •'A �4 ,6 v 9 �O C�` do �� '� \ . \ , // / (\ `\ \ ' \ \ 0 n,s,1 \ \ ib ' \ � \ �✓L� \ \ \ q�/ /1> �� \ 12 LF ,<. \ ti6,'As � j0� �F `� X\ .V� 6' 6 �q� 9 / •6' /o � pA) / 0.7`� 60 p 4�o \���°po c' 0,,,D0 r28• _038 <N98 N08°45'56"EiK_' } \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ �\\. \4 S `''6 "P ° ��' ,, 0 ,s, vp�o \�y��J 1111‘ . \ / i'll ' 4 �43` I' 1.• �p0 RADIAL TABLEc9_ R1 _ N04°30'51 R2 N05°37'04"E LEGEND TPOB Indicates True Point POB Indicates Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing Of Beginning S20°57'27 24.55' ( ) Title to State 1 1 11 Access Prohibited NOTES FEET 2 2 1 Q 6- 5 DRAINAGE EASEMENT Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to obtain ground distances. All distances ore in feet unless otherwise noted. i 0 60 120 240 360 PREPARED BY: PSOMAS ontotAna, Calion forniae� 707 200 (714)481-0053/(714)545-00H (Fax) DATE: 04-06-15 REV.: EA: OF540 FA#: DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO.TOTAL SHEETS 8 R I V 91 2. 9 1 2 EXHIBIT E2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 22106-5 DE 145 SOFT. 101-170-010 DOC. NO. 2004-0205087 O.R. t/ REC. 03-24-2004 ,-- 101-430-008 �' y Pr1R3EL / NO J 309 1 1 3 � �R� � �''` PARCEL NJJAP/ 1 u 1 J J I1�1 J u �/ J >/ 1 J" /� /^ 5 / NO Q� �' / �' OMB -- �' o ---....„<- -- 5 .. ��ee f} �7 f'� 5 [P NO4' 3l.%+5 7 "E � I'I � A 5 ` 4\ "i" 51 7�,O 4\\ OO O n OO o�-yO 99 S+' Cl v�O99 �i �O 5.5\ / / / .� 45 uFrti' rV ,iJi <\ 4* r / l _ 0I ` \\2? 6)6 % 0 / / O '�' S 6 ' / / .06 79 / / �3 I •09, 10 '' � 20 (P./ 3 �o Nq1 f �/ ul '\ 57 43 \ / O \x / (1 `0 / DETATIL "A" <\ so // SCALE 1" =10' o°� o ,`9 �p // / CDDO�0 O LEGEND ,, POB Indicates True Point Of Beginning POB Indicates Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing \ ( )Title to State LLJ_L_ Access Prohibited NOTES Coordinates and bearings are on 2 2 1 0 6- 5 CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide DRAINAGE EASEMENT by 0.99997476 to obtain ground I distances. All distances are in feet unless otherwise noted. FEET 0 5 10 20 30 PREPARED BY: DATE: 04-06-15 REV.: EA: OF540 FA#: PSOMAS DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO.TOTAL SHEETS Hutton SantaAna, CaliforniaDrive, 200 nia92707 (714)481-8053/(710545-8883 (Fax) 8 RIV 91 2.9 2 2 Legal Definitions of Property to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Drainage Easement" (CPN 22106 5) refers to non-exclusive, permanent and perpetual easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, and to its successors and assigns, to construct, reconstruct, repair, extend and maintain excavation, together with all rights necessary for incidentals thereto, on, over, under and across the Property, including the right to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush or other vegetation or flora, from time to time, as determined in its sole discretion, as described in the exhibit attached hereto and by reference made apart hereof, and with the following, and as set forth below: RCTC, its agents, employees, successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress to and egress from the easement and right of way for the purpose of exercising the rights conveyed herein. EXHIBIT A, PAGE 1 OF 5 ATTACHMENT 3 AMENDED RESOLUTION NO. 13-071 RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY FOR THE ACQUISITION OF A PERMANENT DRAINAGE EASEMENT INTEREST IN A PORTION OF CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY, BY EMINENT DOMAIN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS ASSESSOR PARCEL NO. 101-170-010, LOCATED IN CORONA, RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, FOR THE STATE ROUTE 91 CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, WHICH COVERS THE AREA BETWEEN PIERCE STREET ON THE EAST TO THE COUNTY LINE ON THE WEST, IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (Commission) proposes to acquire a drainage easement interest in a portion of certain real property, located in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel No. 101-170-010 (Caltrans Parcel No. 22106-5), for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project in Riverside County, California, pursuant to the authority granted to it by section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code, and section 1240.120 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, pursuant to section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, the Commission scheduled a public hearing for Wednesday, September 9, 2015, at 9:30 a.m., at the County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, and gave to each person whose property is to be acquired and whose name and address appeared on the last equalized county assessment roll, notice and a reasonable opportunity to appear at said hearing and be heard on the matters referred to in section 1240.030 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; and WHEREAS, said hearing has been held by the Commission, and the affected property owners were afforded an opportunity to be heard on said matters; and WHEREAS, the Commission may now adopt a Resolution of Necessity pursuant to section 1240.040 of the California Code of Civil Procedure; NOW, THEREFORE, THE COMMISSION DOES HEREBY RESOLVE AND DECLARE AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Compliance with California Code of Civil Procedure. There has been compliance by the Commission with the requirements of section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure regarding notice and hearing. Section 2. Public Use. The public use for a drainage easement in a portion of the property to be acquired is for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project in Riverside County, California. Section 130220.5 of the California Public Utilities Code authorizes the Commission to acquire, by eminent domain, property necessary for such purposes. 20 Section 3. Description of Property. Attached and marked as Exhibit "A" are the legal definitions, descriptions, and/or maps of the interests to be acquired by the Commission that describe the general location and extent of the property with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. Section 4. Findings. The Commission hereby finds and determines each of the following: (a) The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; (b) The proposed project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury; (c) The property defined, described, and/or depicted in Exhibit "A" is necessary for the proposed project; and (d) The offer required by section 7267.2 of the California Government Code was made. Section 5. Use Not Unreasonably Interfering with Existing Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights of way appropriated to existing public uses. The legal descriptions of these easements and rights of way are on file with the Commission and describe the general location and extent of the easements and rights of way with sufficient detail for reasonable identification. In the event the herein described use or uses will not unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described interest subject to such existing public uses pursuant to section 1240.510 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Section 6. More Necessary Public Use. Some or all of the real property affected by the interest to be acquired is subject to easements and rights of way appropriated to existing public uses. To the extent that the herein described use or uses will unreasonably interfere with or impair the continuance of the public use as it now exists or may reasonably be expected to exist in the future, the Commission finds and determines that the herein described use or uses are more necessary than said existing public use. Counsel for the Commission is authorized to acquire the herein described real property appropriated to such existing public uses pursuant to section 1240.610 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. Staff is further authorized to make such improvements to the affected real property that it determines are reasonably necessary to mitigate any adverse impact upon the existing public use. 21 Section 7. Further Activities. Counsel for the Commission is hereby authorized to acquire the hereinabove described real property in the name of and on behalf of the Commission by eminent domain, and counsel is authorized to institute and prosecute such legal proceedings as may be required in connection therewith. Legal counsel is further authorized to take such steps as may be authorized and required by law, and to make such security deposits as may be required by order of court, to permit the Commission to take possession of and use said real property at the earliest possible time. Counsel is further authorized to correct any errors or to make or agree to non -material changes in the legal description of the real property that are deemed necessary for the conduct of the condemnation action, or other proceedings or transactions required to acquire the subject real property. Counsel is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired. Section 8. Effective Date. This Resolution shall take effect upon adoption. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9th day of September, 2015. Daryl R. Busch, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 22 23 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS EXHIBIT `El' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Ca'trans Parcel No. 22106-5 Drainage Easement APN 101-170-010 / A strip of land in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, being a portion of the lands described in the Affidavit — Death of Trustee recorded April 19, 2007 as Document No. 2007-0264803 of Official Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the most westerly corner of said lands; thence South 57°50'28" East 2.31 feet along the general southerly line of said lands to a point thereon, said point being the True Point of Beginning; thence South 57°50'28" East 20.28 feet continuing along last said line to a point thereon; thence North 41°37'34" East 13.10 feet to a point on general northerly line of said lands, said point being the beginning of a non -tangent curve concave southerly having a radius of 12099.70 feet, to which point a radial line bears North 04°38'46" East; thence westerly along said last said line and said curve 25.06 feet through a central angle of 00°07'07" to a point thereon, said most westerly corner and point of beginning being westerly along said line and said curve 2.86 feet from said point; thence South 41 °37'34" West 1.34 feet to the True Point of Beginning. Containing 145 square feet. See Exhibit `E2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. MA2PTG010501\SURVEYMLEGALS\22106_APN_101-170-0101ega1s122106-5 DE.doc 4/6/2015 Page 1 of EXHIBIT A, PAGE 2 OF 5 24 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS Prepared under the direction of Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 Date MA2PTG0105011SURVEY\LEGALS\22106_APN_101-170-0101Lega1s122106-5_DE.doc Page 2 of 2 4/6/2015 EXHIBIT A, PAGE 3 OF 5 25 EXHIBIT E2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 221 06-5 DE 1,45 SO.FT. 1 01,-70-01 0 '4 \ ' \ T'\ \-A + \ / ��)� ' NOV' P 0 B REC`0 ''� c C e' b, 4 OSO 32g82 4.0 ` O � -,D3� \ • 73 D 0- � - -- i,, . \97, "E O• O.R. 9 6 ; �o , Og . ' � � 0 • 4/�_ ��C' -% �.r \P_57..0 , 0- �9 ss 2 C'� G�� R2 �� r p 0 0 cop F O p� s,0 9 p i9 co6 cep 90 0 O� �r` O •'A �4 ,6 v 9 �O C�` do �� '� \ . \ , // / (\ `\ \ ' \ \ 0 n,s,1 \ \ (b ' \ � \ �✓L� \ \ \ q�/ /1> �� \ 12 LF ,<. \ ti6,'As � j0� �F `� X\ .V� 6' 0 �q� 9 / •6' ,p � pA) / O`PF 60 p 4�o \���°po c' 0,,,D0 r28• _038 <N98 N08°45'56"EiK_' } \ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ �\\. \4 S `''� "P ° ��' ,, 0 ,s, vp�o \�y��J 1111‘ . \ / i'll ' 4 �43` I' 1.• �p0 RADIAL TABLEc9_ R1 _ N04°30'51 R2 N05°37'04"E LEGEND TPOB Indicates True Point POB Indicates Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing Of Beginning S20°57'27 24.55' ( ) Title to State 1 1 11 Access Prohibited NOTES FEET 2 2 1 Q 6- 5 DRAINAGE EASEMENT Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to obtain ground distances. All distances ore in feet unless otherwise noted. i 0 60 120 240 360 PREPARED BY: PSOMAS ontotAna, Calion forniae� 707 200 (714)481-0053/(714)545-00H (Fax) DATE: 04-06-15 REV.: EA: OF540 FA#: DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO.TOTAL SHEETS 8 R I V 91 2. 9 1 2 26 EXHIBIT E2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 22106-5 DE 145 SOFT. 101-170-010 DOC. NO. 2004-0205087 t/ REC. 03-24-2004 y PAR3 ,I PARCEL NJJAP/ 1 u J J i\JO.309 J I1�1 J u �/ J >/ POB 1 1 Y •mac'- � (P.Nq1 �/ O.R. 3 �R� 1 J" 4. "i" 4\\ 00 ° O0 o O u FrL' rV �' / � �' �` 5 o 5 % / r / Z `� 073 •09, '\ 43 \ \x � O <\ so oo? o ,`9 �6n CDDO�0 O ,, ,-- � „, 101-430-008 -- �' Z2O 99 ,iJi <\ �� /^ 4* .06 79 / / / 20 �o ul O Off, (, \ ��ee (} �7 f'� 5 [ f / / / // / / / .45 � LP I / DETATIL 1 06 - 1o '' 3 57 �_ "A" SCALE 1" =10' LEGEND POB Indicates True Point POB Indicates Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing Of Beginning ( )Title to State LLJ_L_ Access Prohibited NOTES FEET I 2 2 1 0 6- 5 DRAINAGE EASEMENT Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to obtain ground distances. All distances are in feet unless otherwise noted. 30 0 5 10 20 PREPARED BY: PSOMAS Hutton SantaAna, CaliforniaDrive, 200 nia92707 (714)481-8053/(710545-8883 (Fax) DATE: 04-06-15 REV.: EA: OF540 FA#: DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO.TOTAL SHEETS 8 RIV 91 2.9 2 2 27 Legal Definitions of Property to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Drainage Easement" (CPN 22106 5) refers to non-exclusive, permanent and perpetual easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, and to its successors and assigns, to construct, reconstruct, repair, extend and maintain excavation, together with all rights necessary for incidentals thereto, on, over, under and across the Property, including the right to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush or other vegetation or flora, from time to time, as determined in its sole discretion, as described in the exhibit attached hereto and by reference made apart hereof, and with the following, and as set forth below: RCTC, its agents, employees, successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress to and egress from the easement and right of way for the purpose of exercising the rights conveyed herein. EXHIBIT A, PAGE 1 OF 5 28 ANGELO J. PALMIERI (1926-1996) ROBERT F. WALDRON (1927-1998) MICHAEL J. GREENE. DENNIS W. GHAN- DAVID D. PARR' CHARLES H. KANTER` PATRICK A. HENNESSEY DON FISHER GREGORY N. WEILER WARREN A. WILLIAMS JOHN R. LISTER MICHAEL H. LEIFER RICHARD A. SALUS NORMAN J. RODICH RONALD M. COLE MICHAEL L. D'ANGELO STEPHEN A. SCHECK DONNA L. SNOW W PALMIERI, TYLER, WIENER WILHELM & WALDRON RYAN M. EASTER ELISE M. KERN MELISA R. PEREZ MICHAEL I. KEHOE CHADWICK C. BUNCH ANISH J. BANKER RYAN M. PRAGER ERIN BALSARA NADERI ERICA M. SOROSKY JERAD BELTZ CANDICE L. LEE JOSHUA J. MARX ERIN K. OYAMA STEVEN R. GUESS KATHERINE M. HARRISON BRIAN GLICKLIN ALAN H. WIENER', OF COUNSEL ROBERT C. IHRKE, OF COUNSEL MICHAEL C. CHO, OF COUNSEL JAMES E. WILHELM, RETIRED DENNIS G. TYLER', RETIRED •A PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION VIA E-MAIL & U.S. MAIL 2603 MAIN STREET EAST TOWER — SUITE 1300 IRVINE, CALIFORNIA 92614-4281 (949)851-9400 www.ptwww.com July 29, 2015 Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 San Bernardino, CA 92401-1400 Re: SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project Resolution of Necessity No. 13-071 APN No. 101-170-010 CPN's 22106-5, 22106-6, 23880-1 Dear Ms. Harmon: P.O. BOX 19712 IRVINE, CA 92623-9712 WRITER'S DIRECT DIAL NUMBER (949) 851-7279 WRITER'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBER (949)825-5453 FIRM'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBERS (949)851-1554 (949)757-1225 mke ho ee ptwww. co m REFER TO FILE NO. 37385-000 We represent John M. Brewster, Sr., Karen A. Brewster, and Allsize Storage Corona, Inc. in the above -referenced matter. Pursuant to your July 24, 2015 notification that the Riverside County Transportation Commission meeting on a proposed adoption of resolution of necessity will be held on September 9, 2015 at the Riverside County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, please be advised that we intend to appear and be heard at the meeting. Thank you. 1591429.1 PALMIERI, TYLER, WIENER, WILHELM &WALDRON Jennifer Harmon July 29, 2015 Page 2 If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. Very truly yours; ichaei . Kehoe MK:sh cc: Client 1591429.1 PALM I E R I TYLE R ANGELO J. PALMIERI (1926-1996) ROBERT F. WALDRON (1927-1996) ALAN H. WIENER* MICHAEL J. GREENE• DENNIS W. GHAN• DAVID D. PARR* CHARLES H. KANTER• PATRICK A. HENNESSEY DON FISHER GREGORY N. WEILER WARREN A. WILLIAIAS JOHN R. LISTER MICHAEL H. LEIFER SCOTT R. CARPENTER RICHARD A. SALUS NORFAAN J. RODICH RONALD M. COLE MICHAEL L. D'ANGELO STEPHEN A. &CHECK DONNA L. SNOW RYAN M. EASTER ELISE M. KERN MELI&A R. PEREY MICHAEL I. KEHOE CHADWICK C. BUNCH ANISH J. BANKER RYAN M. PRAGER ROBERT H. GARRETSON BLAINE M. SEARLE JERAD BELTY ERIN BAL&ARA NADERI ERICA M. SORO&KY PETER MOBLEH JOSHUA J. MARX ERIN K. OYAMA STEVEN R. GUESS MICHAEL C. CHO, OF COUNSEL ROBERT C. IHRKE OF COUNSEL JAMES E. WILHELM, OF COUNSEL DENNIS G. TYLER•, RETIRED •A PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION VIA E-MAIL ATTORNEYS AT LAW 2603 MAIN STREET EAST TOWER — SUITE 1300 IRVINE, CALIFORNIA 92614-4281 (949) 851-9400 www. ptwww. corn September 8, 2015 Jennifer Harmon Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502-2208 Re: Objection to Resolution of Necessity for acquisition of Caltrans Proposed Parcel Nos. 22106-6 and 23880-1 Dear Ms. Harmon: P.O. BOX 19712 IRVINE, CA 92623-9712 WRITER'S DIRECT DIAL NUMBER (949) 851-7279 WRITER'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBER (949) 825-5453 FIRM'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBERS (949)851-1554 (949)757-1225 mkehoeOptwww.com REFER TO FILE NO. 37385-000 We represent John M. Brewster, Sr., Karen A. Brewster, and Allsize Storage Corona, Inc. in the above -referenced matter. On behalf of our clients, we object to the proposed resolutions (to amend existing Resolution of Necessity No. 13-071 and add parcel 22106-6 and to adopt a new resolution to condemn parcel no. 23880-1) that seek to authorize condemnation of more of my clients' property. This letter is in lieu of our personal appearance. Please include this as part of the administrative record. We incorporate by reference the prior appraisals presented by RCTC to my client, the prior offers, and the reports available to the board on this matter including but not limited to the proposed construction plans affecting my clients' property. On behalf of our clients we assert the following objections to the adoption of a Resolution of Necessity based upon the notice received. 1098897.1 1900 Main Street, Suite 700, Irvine, CA 92614-7328 I T 949.851.9400 I F 949.851.1554 I ptwww.com PALMIERI TYLER ATTORNEYS AT LAW Jennifer Harmon September 8, 2015 Page 2 The project design plans have continually changed on this project. We have raised this issue before. The result has been multiple revisions affecting my clients' property. We are informed by RCTC staff that the revisions are the result of design changes during the project. Such design changes have already caused a partial abandonment of rights in the action against my clients. The latest design seeks to provide a drainage easement across my client's land and a perpetual right of access across my client's remaining property. Please be advised that this design, if approved, impacts my client's intended development as have all the prior iterations of the proposed easement. A valid offer required by Section 7267.2 of the Government Code has not been made. The proposed rights to be acquired include blanket rights of ingress and egress over the remainder property in addition to the actual area of the taking identified in the right-of-way map. (See definitions of proposed permanent easements). No offer of compensation was made for these blanket rights. These rights were not included in the appraisal. Indeed, the appraisal reports prepared do not identify this blanket easement much less value it. A valid offer must offer compensation for all the rights sought to be acquired. The property in question is adjoined to a secure storage facility the same type of use planned for the subject parcels. Taking blanket rights of access across such premises impacts value. Yet no value was offered for the rights taken. RCTC's retained appraiser, however, simply did not appraise all of the rights proposed to be taken. If those rights are not needed, then they cannot be included in the Resolution as RCTC can only take what is necessary. If they are needed, then they should have been appraised with the appropriate offer made. Without a valid offer, the resolution is invalid. Additionally, as raised repeatedly on prior occasions (to no avail with this body), to the extent the proposed resolutions give RCTC's attorneys the ability to change the taking at counsel's sole discretion, it is an invalid delegation of the Commission's legislative authority. At each of the resolution hearings on this project, staff has repeated how the Commission must make certain findings to authorize the specific takings proposed. The Commission is in fact required by the Eminent Domain Law to make such findings as the legislative body for RCTC. (Code Civ. Proc., § 1245.210, subd.(a).) However, the proposed resolution provides that counsel, not the Commission, "is further authorized to reduce or modify the extent of the interests or property to be acquired so as to reduce the 1623987.1 1900 Main Street, Suite 700, Irvine, CA 92614-7328 1 T 949.851.9400 ( F 949.851.1554 1 ptwww.com PALMIERI TYLER Jennifer Harmon September 8, 2015 Page 3 compensation payable in the action where such change would not substantially impair the construction and operation for the project for which the real property is being acquired." (Proposed Resolution, Section 7, last sentence [emphasis added].) The Commission should know, in fact must know, the taking it is approving. Likewise, when RCTC is authorizing its attorneys to take property from its lawful owner, the property owner is entitled to know what property and property rights are being taken from him. The proposed resolution fails to give this body and the property owner the basic and fundamental information of what is being taken. To the extent the resolutions purport to grant the aforementioned delegation of this body's legislative authority to RCTC's attorneys, that violates my clients' rights to substantive and procedural due process. If adopted with such delegation, the resolutions are void. My clients respectfully request that the hearing on this resolution be postponed until all of the rights being taken have been appraised and valid offers have been made; and that the invalid delegation of legislative authority to counsel be excised from any proposed resolution. In short, the Commission should not adopt the resolution as proposed at this hearing. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. Vey truly yours, Michael I. Ke MK:sh cc: Clients 1098897.1 Jennifer Harmon From: Sue M. Haugen [shaugen@ptwww.com] Sent: Tuesday, September 08, 2015 3:00 PM To: Jennifer Harmon Cc: Michael Kehoe Subject: Objection to Resolution of Necessity Attachments: Letter to Harmon at RCTC re objection to RON 2015 09 08.PDF Good Afternoon Ms. Harmon, Mike Kehoe asked that I forward the attached correspondence to you. Thank you. PALMIERI TYLER ATTORNEYS AT LAW Sue Haugen 1 Assistant to Ronald M. Cole and Michael I. Kehoe Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 1900 Main Street, Suite 700 I Irvine, CA 92614 Direct Dial (949) 851-7237 1 Fax (949) 851-1554 shaugen@ptwww.com ptwww.com This message and any attached documents contain information from the law firm of Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP that may be privileged and confidential and protected from disclosure. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, or an employee or agent responsible for delivering this message to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by replying to the message and deleting it from your computer. Thank you. 1 ANGELO J. PALMIERI (1928-1998) ROBERT F. WALDRON (1927-1998) MICHAEL J. GREENE* DENNIS W. GHAN` DAVID D. PARR' CHARLES H. KANTER• PATRICK A. HENNESSEY DON FISHER GREGORY N. WEILER WARREN A. WILLIAMS JOHN R. LISTER MICHAEL H. LEIFER RICHARD A. SALUS NORMAN J. RODICH RONALD M. COLE MICHAEL L. D'ANGELO STEPHEN A. SCHECK DONNA L. SNOW W W PALMIERI, TYLER, WIENER, WILHELM &WALDRON RYAN M. EASTER ELISE M. KERN MELISA R. PEREZ MICHAEL I. KEHOE CHADWICK C. BUNCH ANISH J. BANKER RYAN M. PRAGER ERIN BALSARA NADERI ERICA M. SOROSKY JERAD BELTZ CANDICE L. LEE JOSHUA J. MARX ERIN K. OYAMA STEVEN R. GUESS KATHERINE M. HARRISON BRIAN GLICKLIN ALAN H. WIENER., OF COUNSEL ROBERT C. IHRKE, OF COUNSEL MICHAEL C. CHO, OF COUNSEL JAMES E. WILHELM, RETIRED DENNIS G. TYLER', RETIRED •A PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION 2603 MAIN STREET EAST TOWER — SUITE 1300 IRVINE, CALIFORNIA 92614-4281 (949) 851-9400 www.ptwww.com VIA E-MAIL & U.S. MAIL July 29, 2015 Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 San Bernardino, CA 92401-1400 Re: SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project Resolution of Necessity No. 13-071 APN No. 101-170-010 CPN's 22106-5, 22106-6, 23880-1 P.O. BOX 19712 IRVINE, CA 92623-9712 WRITER'S DIRECT DIAL NUMBER (949)851-7279 WRITER'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBER (949) 825-5453 FIRM'S DIRECT FACSIMILE NUMBERS (949)851-1554 (949) 757-1225 mkehoe®ptwww.com REFER TO FILE NO. 37385-000 Dear Ms. Harmon: We represent John M. Brewster, Sr., Karen A. Brewster, and Allsize Storage Corona, Inc. in the above -referenced matter. Pursuant to your July 24, 2015 notification that the Riverside County Transportation Commission meeting on a proposed adoption of resolution of necessity will be held on September 9, 2015 at the Riverside County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, please be advised that we intend to appear and be heard at the meeting. Thank you. 1591429.1 PALMIERI, TYLER, WIENER WILHELM &WALDRON Jennifer Harmon July 29, 2015 Page 2 If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me. Very truly yours, ichael ehoe MK:sh cc: Client 1591429.1 Indian Wells (760) 568-2611 Irvine (949) 263-2600 Los Angeles (213) 617-8100 Ontario (909) 989-8584 ids BEST BEST & KRIEGER ATTORNEYS AT LAW 3390 University Avenue, 5th Floor, P.O. Box 1028, Riverside, CA 92502 Phone: (951) 686-1450 I Fax: (951) 686-3083 I www.bbklaw.com Margaret L. Barnes (951)826-8357 margaret.barnes@bbklaw.com File No. 17336.02100 July 24, 2015 Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, California 92501 Sacramento (916) 325-4000 San Diego (619) 525-1300 Walnut Creek (925) 977-3300 Washington, DC (202) 785-0600 VIA HAND DELIVERY Re: Notice of Hearing to Consider Adoption of a Resolution of Necessity, as to Brewster (APN 101-170-010, CPN 22106-5); Brewster (no APN; CPN 23880-1); and Public Storage (APN 118-040-027; CPN 22172-7) RCTC/SR91 CIP Project Dear Jennifer: Attached are the original notices of Hearing to Property Owners, with proofs of mailing, of the hearing on September 9, 2015 for the adoption of resolutions of necessity for additional right of way, as well as a new acquisition, necessary for the project. These notices are being provided for your use in noting the date of mailing at the hearing. Please do not hesitate to contact me, should have any questions. z E5V y RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Attachments Very truly yours, Margaret 16/Barnes Senior Litigation Paralegal for BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP 17336.02100\9758781.1 RON No. 15-0i? NOTICE OF HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTION OF A RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY Pursuant to Section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, you are hereby notified that at a regular meeting to be held on Wednesday, September 9, 2015, at 9:30 a.m., at the Riverside County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, located at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, the Commission of the Riverside County Transportation Commission intends to consider adopting a Resolution of Necessity, authorizing the commencement of eminent domain proceedings for the acquisition of real property that, according to the last equalized county assessment roll, is owned by you. The public use for which this resolution of necessity will be considered is for the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project in Riverside County, California. The legal descriptions of the property rights to be acquired and corresponding depiction are attached to this notice. A hearing will be held at the time and place mentioned above. You have the right to appear and be heard on the following matters: 1. Whether the public interest and necessity require the project for which the property is sought to be acquired. 2. Whether the project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury. 3. Whether the property sought to be acquired by eminent domain and described in the Resolution of Necessity is necessary for the proposed project. 4. Whether the offer required by Section 7267.2 of the California Government Code has been made. 17336.02100\13146854.1 Pursuant to California Code of Civil Procedure section 1245.235(b)(3), your failure to file a written request with RCTC to appear and be heard within 15 days from the date that this Notice is mailed may result in the waiver of your right to appear and be heard on the above -stated matters and issues that are the subject of the hearing. ALL COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3`d Floor Riverside, California 92501 DATE OF HEARING: PLACE OF HEARING: DATED: July 23, 2015. Wednesday, September 9, 2015 9:30 a.m. Riverside County Administration Building Board of Supervisors Chambers 4080 Lemon Street Riverside, California 92501 BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP By: Mark A. Easter Gregory G Snarr Attorneys for Riverside County Transportation Commission 17336.02100\13146854.1 Legal Definitions of Property to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Drainage Easement" (CPN 23880-1) refers to non-exclusive, permanent and perpetual easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, and to its successors and assigns, to construct, reconstruct, repair, extend and maintain excavation, together with all rights necessary for incidentals thereto, on, over, under and across the Property, including the right to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush or other vegetation or flora, from time to time, as determined in its sole discretion, as described in the exhibit attached hereto and by reference made apart hereof, and with the following, and as set forth below: RCTC, its agents, employees, successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress to and egress from the easement and right of way for the purpose of exercising the rights conveyed herein. 17336.02100\13173025.1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS EXHIBIT `Al' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Caltrans Parcel No. 23880-1 Drainage Easement APN N.A. A strip of land 20.00 feet wide in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, being a portion of the lands described in the Relinquishment of Highway Right of Way in the County of Riverside, Road 08-RIV-91-0.0-3.6 Request No. 185 R recorded September 28, 1971 as Document No. 109814 of Official Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the southeasterly corner of the lands described in the deed recorded March 24, 2004 as Document No. 2004-0205087 of Official Records of said County; thence North 18°24'07" East 111.20 feet along the general easterly line of last said lands to a point thereon, said point being distant South 18°24'07" West 5.77 feet from an angle point of said general easterly line, said point also being the most westerly corner of the lands described in the Affidavit — Death of Trustee recorded April 19, 2007 as Document No. 2007-0264803 of Official Records of said County; thence North 41 °37'34" East 5.69 feet to a point on the general southerly line of the lands described in said Document No. 2007-0264803, said point being distant South 57°50'28" East 2.31 feet from said most westerly corner; thence South 57°50'28" East 20.28 feet along said general southerly line to a point thereon; thence South 41 °37'34" West 4.91 feet; thence South 18°24'07" West 107.51 feet; thence North 70°22'27" West 20.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Containing 2,293 square feet. See Exhibit `A2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. MA2PTG010501\SURVEYILEGALS122106_APN 101-170-0101Legals123880-1 DE.doc 5/282015 — — Page 1 of 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 PS OMAS The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. Prepared under the direction of Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 5--28-/S Date M:12PTG0105011SURVEY\LEGALS122106_APN_101-170-0101LegaIs123880- t_DE.doc 5/28/2015 Page 2 of 2 EXHIBIT A2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 23880-1 DE 2,293 SO.FT. N/A �j3� 0 A \ 1 4A �G��� j ��' a \ 4Q 9)1 G0/ �( ' Q ,, 4�� A00/ " N0\' / //� 2004 DO '��29 - ' \ s \ s-1° s O_ �`So `��: / 'L6 • j o °s- 6' °� 1 90.75 31.86' 116.97' 2 0, R 0o9 • ` ;' Dc s, • 'o� -o v �",� �\� O \ CURVE / SS 6 20 ``� �'00 p./ p c� (��(P° •01 � �- ; <S p� TABLE 0G- \ \ �0 \ \ OO .9� \ \ \ 09 \ \ 0 ....6, �fL \\ \ `s>, 9 -PS \\\ 92,E f0 \ \ r0 �r F` \ 2r L� .(\ \ \ /N 4c"Psr �F \ \ rs� �F 9� ,P 9� 9 ,o'p ��0� OS�, 60 / O O ''P �� 101_170_038 \ ° „ L=201 .61=09 1 7'08 L=541.34' A=25°50'51" \ \ \ \ \POB , L2 �. r3 � JP �\ 00 0 ., Fj,9 ,, LINE TABLE L 1 N61 05 1 9 W L2 - N70°22127"W L3 - N18°24107"E LEGEND POB Indicates Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing ( ) Title to State Cl - R=1 244.00 C2 - R=1199.97' 1Lu_ Access Prohibited NOTES FEET 2 3 8 8 O- 1 DRAINAGE EASEMENT Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to obtain ground distances. All distances are in feet unless otherwise noted. i 0 60 120 240 360 PREPARED BY: PSOMAS 3 Hutton Centre Drive Ste 200 Santa (714)481Ana, 8053/(7114)54548883 (Fax) DATE: 04-06-15 REV.: 05-28-15 EA: OF540 FA#: DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO. TOTAL SHEETS 8 R I V 91 2. 9 1 2 EXHIBIT A2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 23880-1 DE 2,293 SO.FT. N/A PARCEL PARCEL P , M � 207/ '�a,066 , A N° ° �A P O B `,o • 8/ MAP 1 2- 17 A �N�. . � '� o 'Lo �\ act) rL o rA Nq5 S DOC. NO. 2004-0205087 REG. 03-24-2004 �� c, • A� 4D � rt,, ��' �A •qb ` , o� DETAIL "A" O.R. �, � � ' � /// � � �- ,-0 '0 c ss ti0 �° /pF `"oo 0, � 0 \O d', ` 6 � ,9N (90�' 00 O ,,0,� P O D r, .k9 - \ 0=09°17'08" AF, `-,• , ti, • 4) A A�' A L=201.61' SCALE 1" =20' CURVE TABLE oo 2.1 o T3.0 6- `•.1,, 4- 0 LEGEND C1 - R=1244.00' POB Indicates Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing ( )Title to State 1J._LL Access Prohibited NOTES FEET 2 3 8 8 0- 1 DRAINAGE EASEMENT Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to obtain ground distances. All distances are in feet unless otherwise noted. r 0 10 20 40 60 PREPARED BY: PSOMAS 3 Hutton Centre Drive, Ste. 200 Santa (714)481Ana, 8053/(714)545-8883 (Fax) DATE: 04-06-15 REV.: 05-28-15 EA: OF540 FA#: DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO.TOTAL SHEETS 8 R I V 91 2. 9 2 2 PROOF OF MAILING NOTICE I, Margaret L. Barnes, acting on behalf of the Riverside County Transportation Commission, hereby certify that on July 24, 2015, I mailed a copy of the attached notice by first- class mail to the following owners and other interested parties of real property situated in Riverside County, California, which has no assigned assessor parcel number, identified as CPN 23880-1: Karen A. Brewster Record Owner 212 Ironwood Drive, Suite D P.M.B. 325 Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814 John M. Brewster, Sr. Record Owner 212 Ironwood Drive, Suite D P.M.B. 325 Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814 Karen A. Brewster Courtesy Copy 17357 Los Angeles Street Yorba Linda, CA 92886 John M. Brewster, Sr. 17357 Los Angeles Street Yorba Linda, CA 92886 Linda Day, Trustee, Successor Trustee c/o Stephen A. Scheck Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 2603 Main Street, Suite 1300 Irvine, CA 92614 Linda M. Day 1103 East Wilson Avenue Orange, CA 92867 James Kroll, Trustee, Successor Trustee c/o Stephen A. Scheck Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 2603 Main Street, Suite 1300 Irvine, CA 92614 Courtesy Copy Possible Interested Party Possible Interested Party Possible Interested Party 17336.02100\ 13146854.1 James W. Kroll 1103 East Wilson Avenue Orange, CA 92867 Lawrence P. Kraemer P.O. Box 269 Huntington Beach, CA 92648-0269 Ray H. Overacker P.O. Box 269 Huntington Beach, CA 92648-0269 ASC 1.46 Acres LLC 17357 Los Angeles Street Yorba Linda, CA 92886 Richard W. Millar, Jr. Registered Agent for Service of Process 1301 Dove Street, Suite 900 Newport Beach, CA 92660 Michael I. Kehoe, Esq. Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 2603 Main Street, Suite 1300 Irvine, CA 92614 Dated: July 24, 2015. Possible Interested Party Possible Interested Party Possible Interested Party Record Owner Courtesy Copy Courtesy Copy 47 argaret L. Barnes 17336.02100\13146854.1 NOTICE OF HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTION OF AN AMENDMENT TO RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY NO. 13-068 Pursuant to Section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, you are hereby notified that at a regular meeting to be held on Wednesday, September 9, 2015, at 9:30 a.m., at the Riverside County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, located at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, the Commission of the Riverside County Transportation Commission intends to consider adopting to consider adopting an amendment to Resolution of Necessity No. 13-068, authorizing the commencement of eminent domain proceedings for the acquisition of additional real property interests in property that, according to the last equalized county assessment roll, is owned by you. The public use for which this resolution of necessity will be considered is for the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project in Riverside County, California. The definitions of the property rights to be acquired, together with the legal descriptions and corresponding depictions are attached to this notice. A hearing will be held at the time and place mentioned above. You have the right to appear and be heard on the following matters: 1. Whether the public interest and necessity require the project for which the property is sought to be acquired. 2. Whether the project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury. 3. Whether the property sought to be acquired by eminent domain and described in the Resolution of Necessity is necessary for the proposed project. 17336.02100\13170409.1 4. Whether the offer required by Section 7267.2 of the California Government Code has been made. Pursuant to California Code of Civil Procedure section 1245.235(b)(3), your failure to file a written request with RCTC to appear and be heard within 15 days from the date that this Notice is mailed may result in the waiver of your right to appear and be heard on the above - stated matters and issues that are the subject of the hearing. ALL COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 31'd Floor Riverside, California 92501 DATE OF HEARING: PLACE OF HEARING: DATED: July 23, 2015. Wednesday, September 9, 2015 9:30 a.m. Riverside County Administration Building Board of Supervisors Chambers 4080 Lemon Street Riverside, California 92501 BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP By: Mark A. Easter Gregory G Snarr Attorneys for Riverside County Transportation Commission 17336.02100\9758773.1 Legal Definitions of Property to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Permanent Utility Easement" (CPN 22172-7) grants to RCTC, including its successors and assigns, a permanent and perpetual easement, to relocate, construct, operate, use, maintain, alter, add to, reconstruct, enlarge, repair, renew, replace, inspect and/or remove, at any time and from time to time, underground utilities, including but not limited to sewers, water, electrical systems and communication systems, consisting wires, underground conduits, cables, vaults, manholes, handholds, and including above -ground enclosures, markers and concrete pads and other appurtenant fixtures and equipment necessary or useful for conveying electric energy to be used for light, heat, power, and for transmitting intelligence by electrical means and/or other purposes, in, under, on, over, along and across the land, as determined necessary by RCTC, its successors and assigns, together with all necessary rights of ingress and egress to the easement area in connection with the exercise of any of the easement rights. Property owners shall not erect or construct, or permit to be erected or constructed, any building, structure or improvement on, over or under any portion of the easement, or plant any tree or trees or plant any other vegetation or flora on any portion of the easement except at the written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. RCTC will not unreasonably withhold from Grantor, its successors and assigns, the right to utilize the easement area for parking, driveway access, landscaping (exclusive of vertical penetration), open space and density or floor area calculation. RCTC shall be entitled to trim, cut, or clear away any trees, brush, or other vegetation or flora from time to time determined in its sole discretion without payment of any additional compensation. No other easement or easements shall be granted on, under or over the easement without obtaining the prior written consent of RCTC, its successors and assigns. Property Owner shall not cause, directly, indirectly or negligently, any interference with or harm to the rights conveyed hereunder. 17336.02100\13172098.1 1 2 3 4 5 6 PS OMAS Caltrans Parcel No. 22172-7 Permanent Utility Easement APN 118-040-027 EXHIBIT `G1' LEGAL DESCRIPTION 7 8 In the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, being a portion of Lot 3 9 of the Re -subdivision of Block 69 of the Lands of the South Riverside Land and Water 10 Company, as shown on the map on file in Book 2, Page 3 of Maps, Records of San 11 Bernardino County, California, described as follows: 12 13 Beginning at the westerly terminus of that certain course as described in the exception to 14 the land granted to the State of California by the grant deed recorded in Book 2386, Page 15 581 of Official Records of said Riverside County, said certain course being known as 16 Course "B" in said deed and recited as having a bearing and length of North 79°39'00" 17 East 292.33 feet; thence North 10°21'10" West 5.83 feet along the westerly line of said 18 exception to a point thereon; thence North 79°08'56" East 263.16 feet to the True Point 19 of Beginning; thence North 10°48'25" West 16.03 feet; thence North 01 °29'49" East 20 j 34.85 feet; thence South 79°18'59" East 17.06 feet; thence South 10°49'47" West 43.99 21 feet; thence South 79° 10' 13" East 7.94 feet; thence South 79°08'56" West 14.46 feet to 22 the True Point of Beginning. 23 24 Containing 622 square feet 25 26 The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate 27 System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing 28 grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean 29 combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. 30 31 See Exhibit `G2' attached hereto and made apart hereof. MA2PTG010501\SURVEY\LEGALS\22172_APN_118-040-027\Legals\22172-7.docx Page 1 of 5/27/2015 PS OMAS 1 2 Prepared under the direction of 3 4 5 6 Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Date MA2PTG0105011SURVEY\LEGALS\22172_APN_118-040-027\Legals\22172-7.docx Page 2 of 5/27/2015 EXHIBIT G2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 22172-7 PUE 622 SF 118-040-027 LINE TABLE / L1 - N10°48'25"W L2 - N01 °29'49"E L3 - S79°18'59"E L4 - 510°49'47"W L5 - S79°10'13"E L6 - S79°08'56"W a) o� 0 (~ 16.03' 34.85' 17.06'7 43.99' 7.94' 14.46' o Q 'N O' 0 CD CC to POR, ss J r OHO � ,—t�, O O OA Da �� ok., p2:;�0�' , �`�<0 co \''�' / _o(o^p_ 0 ° �4) VINE S TREE T 0 w (VACATED) o --c u' �T 13 1 LV z w Q = o o 'sr 0 co iLi Q 0 0 z a: `` O , O 4- 30' �o Doc, NO. — 0 134J33y 0, R., z RED. JUNr 9— 1979 PJR., I J7 VARIES 30' FiLU9 cffC1< VARIES L� J--11S LANDS r U 1r H in ' R1 VrRS1Dr LAND in ,tia^ AND WATER co . ti oA, NI ., E) ., 2/3 o �Prn �S��� CDC) v) �'i �i i, L 3 ` v �� L2� -J J S42°32'38"E 1 � ►�, 11/ .- —�, ; r (R) i -0P0/ _ �w 0 22172 7) ' „w PROPOSED R -•56 263.102 292' N1o°250,OA N�9•p3a'AQ„W �/ ''5.1903 5 Z 9 G f ZN 5 2 �10�ING R P S� 5 • a3 ' • C EXI51 P� G . , LEGEND �1E 91E R0 w FREE POB Indicates Point Of Beginning TPOB Indicates True Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing 1 1 1 1 1 Title to State (1BOUER5 D AI \N R V BE - F NOTES 2 2 1 ►7 2 - 7 PERMANENT UTLITY EASEMENT Coordinates and bearings are on CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide by 0.99997476 to obtain ground distances. All distances are in feet unless otherwise noted. I FEET 0 50 100 200 300 PREPARED BY: PSOMAS 3 Hutton Centre Drive, Ste. 200 Santa Ano, California 92707 (714)751-7373/(714)545-8883 (Fax) DATE: 05-27-2015 REV.: EA: OF540 FM*: DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO.TOTAL SHEETS 8 R I V 91 4.8 1 1 PROOF OF MAILING NOTICE I, Margaret L. Barnes, acting on behalf of the Riverside County Transportation Commission, hereby certify that on July 24, 2015, I mailed a copy of the attached notice by first- class mail to the following owners and other interested parties of real property situated in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel No. 118-040-027 (CPN 22172-7): Public Storage Properties, Ltd., a California limited Record Owner partnership P. O. Box 25025 Glendale, CA 92201 Public Storage Properties, Ltd., a California limited Record Owner partnership 1510 Pomona Corona, CA 92880 Carolynn Ruth Courtesy Copy Public Storage Properties, Ltd., a California limited partnership 1510 Pomona Corona, CA 92880 Dated: July 24, 2015. argaret L. Barnes 17336.02100\13170409.1 NOTICE OF HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTION OF AN AMENDMENT TO RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY NO. 13-071 Pursuant to Section 1245.235 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, you are hereby notified that at a regular meeting to be held on Wednesday, September 9, 2015, at 9:30 a.m., at the Riverside County Administration Building, Board of Supervisors Chambers, located at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California, the Commission of the Riverside County Transportation Commission intends to consider adopting to consider adopting an amendment to Resolution of Necessity No. 13-071, authorizing the commencement of eminent domain proceedings for the acquisition of additional real property interests in property that, according to the last equalized county assessment roll, is owned by you. The public use for which this resolution of necessity will be considered is for the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project in Riverside County, California. The definitions of the property rights to be acquired, together with the legal descriptions and corresponding depictions are attached to this notice. A hearing will be held at the time and place mentioned above. You have the right to appear and be heard on the following matters: 1. Whether the public interest and necessity require the project for which the property is sought to be acquired. 2. Whether the project is planned or located in the manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and least private injury. 3. Whether the property sought to be acquired by eminent domain and described in the Resolution of Necessity is necessary for the proposed project. 17336.02100\13164559.1 4. Whether the offer required by Section 7267.2 of the California Government Code has been made. Pursuant to California Code of Civil Procedure section 1245.235(b)(3), your failure to file a written request with RCTC to appear and be heard within 15 days from the date that this Notice is mailed may result in the waiver of your right to appear and be heard on the above - stated matters and issues that are the subject of the hearing. ALL COMMUNICATIONS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO: Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, California 92501 DATE OF HEARING: PLACE OF HEARING: DATED: July 23, 2015. Wednesday, September 9, 2015 9:30 a.m. Riverside County Administration Building Board of Supervisors Chambers 4080 Lemon Street Riverside, California 92501 BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP By: Mark A. Easter Gregory G Snarr Attorneys for Riverside County Transportation Commission 17336.02100\13164559.1 PROOF OF MAILING NOTICE I, Margaret L. Barnes, acting on behalf of the Riverside County Transportation Commission, hereby certify that on July 24, 2015, I mailed a copy of the attached notice by first- class mail to the following owners and other interested parties of real property situated in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel No. 101-170-010 (CPNs 22106-6): Karen A. Brewster Record Owner 212 Ironwood Drive, Suite D P.M.B. 325 Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814 John M. Brewster, Sr. Record Owner 212 Ironwood Drive, Suite D P.M.B. 325 Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814 Karen A. Brewster Courtesy Copy 17357 Los Angeles Street Yorba Linda, CA 92886 John M. Brewster, Sr. 17357 Los Angeles Street Yorba Linda, CA 92886 Linda Day, Trustee, Successor Trustee c/o Stephen A. Scheck Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 2603 Main Street, Suite 1300 Irvine, CA 92614 Linda M. Day 1103 East Wilson Avenue Orange, CA 92867 James Kroll, Trustee, Successor Trustee c/o Stephen A. Scheck Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 2603 Main Street, Suite 1300 Irvine, CA 92614 Courtesy Copy Possible Interested Party Possible Interested Party Possible Interested Party 17336.02100\13164559.1 Legal Definitions of Property to be Acquired The following is a list of definitions of legal rights to be acquired by Riverside County Transportation Commission: "Drainage Easement" (CPN 22106-6) refers to non-exclusive, permanent and perpetual easement and right of way in favor of RCTC, and to its successors and assigns, to construct, reconstruct, repair, extend and maintain excavation, together with all rights necessary for incidentals thereto, on, over, under and across the Property, including the right to trim, cut or clear away any trees, brush or other vegetation or flora, from time to time, as determined in its sole discretion, as described in the exhibit attached hereto and by reference made apart hereof, and with the following, and as set forth below: RCTC, its agents, employees, successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress to and egress from the easement and right of way for the purpose of exercising the rights conveyed herein. 17336.02100\13172755.1 PS OMAS EXHIBIT `E1' LEGAL DESCRIPTION Caltrans Parcel No. 22106-5 Drainage Easement APN 101-170-010 A strip of land in the City of Corona, County of Riverside, State of California, being a portion of the lands described in the Affidavit — Death of Trustee recorded April 19, 2007 as Document No. 2007-0264803 of Official Records of said County, described as follows: Beginning at the most westerly corner of said lands; thence South 57°50'28" East 2.31 feet along the general southerly line of said lands to a point thereon, said point being the True Point of Beginning; thence South 57°50'28" East 20.28 feet continuing along last said line to a point thereon; thence North 41 °37'34" East 13.10 feet to a point on general northerly line of said lands, said point being the beginning of a non -tangent curve concave southerly having a radius of 12099.70 feet, to which point a radial line bears North 04°38'46" East; thence westerly along said last said line and said curve 25.06 feet through a central angle of 00°07'07" to a point thereon, said most westerly corner and point of beginning being westerly along said line and said curve 2.86 feet from said point; thence South 41 °37'34" West 1.34 feet to the True Point of Beginning. Containing 145 square feet. See Exhibit `E2' attached hereto and made a part hereof. The distances described herein are grid distances and are based on California Coordinate System of 1983, Zone 6, 2007.00 epoch. Ground distances may be obtained by dividing grid distances by the mean combination factor of the courses being described. The mean combination factor for this conversion is 0.99997476. MA2PTG0105011SUR VEYILEGALSl22106_APN_101-170-0101LegaIs122106-5_DE. doc 4/6/2015 Page I of 2 PS 4MAS Prepared under the direction of e"5-jgr'lefre-h 4 e - g -/5- Brian E. Bullock, PLS 5260 Date M:12PTG0105011SURVEY\LEGALSN22106_APN_101-170-010\Lega1s\22106-5_DE.doc Page 2 of 2 4/6/2015 EXHIBIT E2 , PARCEL# TITLE AREA APN 22106-5 DE 145 SO.FT. 101-170-010 ,0° \ \ 1 / 2 � eo � o0 00 Q / REC, `0 `\\ 01' G�ti FAQ \ S0 0 o�', 1 Q .. G4�,ogk2- \ 3 298 0• 0 \ \ G. o0 R. 0/ P O B '� r ���33 s �p - s \ \ \ \ • 09 q oGj fG \ \ F \\ ` F��9 �0 \ / is" 6 j06' \ 9�rp.QrL �� \ \ 4P•/s c R 2 4F � \ \ \ 0 o_ s . 20 0" �� \ \ r \ tn,AcP; � O� F-4 \ r \ �� \ % �• fs'J . \ a— \\\\ ����� — '�/0°° 6'° roc ��� — — vP \ • 2 ��_ .p q� \\\ -p • ° oc� , FC AA P �p F •OOP 9O 9 •- 9 �- \/ r •CT ADO c�O�0 OJ, ,60 ° FO •'P 'A 4- 2'9> 6'0 1'A�� \3_,,, P_ 99• 1p �\\ �c�' cP o RADIAL TABLE �' 4�. ���9�°0 `�.>'_ o22, R1 - N04°30'51"E \-Pic:')�FJ (9;y00o ,5�, R2 - N05° 37'04"E S 28, o_ �� J 4� <.\989 01.170-038 • 1 •68 , LEGEND N08°45'56"E R TPOB Indicates True Point Of Beginning ° „ W, POB Indicates Point Of Beginning S20 57 27 (R) Indicates Radial Bearing 24.55 ( )Title to State 11_LL. Access Prohibited NOTES Coordinates and bearings are on 2 2 1 U 6- 5 CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing are grid distances. Divide DRAINAGE EASEMENT by 0.99997476 to obtain ground I distances. All distances ore in feet unless otherwise noted. FEET 0 60 120 240 360 PREPARED BY: DATE: 04-06-15 REV.: EA: OF540 FA#: PSOMAS DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO.TOTAL SHEETS 3 Hutton Centre Drive Ste. 200 Santo (714)481-805347141545-8883 (Fax) 8 RIV 91 2.9 1 2 EXHIBIT E2 PARCEL# TITLE AREA AP 22106-5 DE 145 SQ.FT. 101-170-010 DOC. NO. 2004-0205087 O.R. REC. 03-24-2004 �- 101-430-008 PARCEL i�� PARCEL MAP NO , 3091 1 / � / P,M., 207/ 1 2- 17 ---- � °3��3g''F-l9.l /� NOq .--.----- POB --'' o -- NO4°30'51"E (R) ---___<- 4. 00 ° 2 S 00 �9.9 .A 7 q7 ° '9 q9 , i0 - i i \ V'.- 951 Jg,,IP 4 \,2S 86 7 °06' v3O .� ss�° / - 06 , 79 •- -- , — `.. �- (221 06- 5) s o- ' ' 9 .�0 �' �o'1'3A �o 3 P° Nq 1 / �cP_ \ / / tea'. / 7 F�-1:5J / / •`9�_ O�Ci / '4/ / O ,p , / / / DETATIL "A" ��; �''o --1 SCALE 1"=10' / •>9p�6, 57 c3O�0 i/ 01 LEGEND '1P POB Indicates True Point Of Beginning POB Indicates Point Of Beginning (R) Indicates Radial Bearing \ ( ) Title to State J_LI.L Access Prohibited NOTES Coordinates and bearings are on 2 2 1 0 6- 5 CCS 1983(2007.00) Zone 6. Distances and stationing ore grid distances. Divide DRAINAGE EASEMENT by 0.99997476 to obtain ground distances. All distances are in feet I unless otherwise noted. FEET 0 5 10 20 30 PREPARED BY: DATE: 04-06-15 REV.: EA: OF540 FAQ: PSOMAS DISTRICT COUNTY ROUTE SHEET PM SHEET NO.TOTAL SHEETS 3 Hutton Centre Drive Ste. 200 Santa481" ao5347114)545-8883 (fox) 8 R I V 91 2.9 2 2 PROOF OF MAILING NOTICE I, Margaret L. Barnes, acting on behalf of the Riverside County Transportation Commission, hereby certify that on July 24, 2015, I mailed a copy of the attached notice by first- class mail to the following owners and other interested parties of real property situated in Riverside County, California, more particularly described as Assessor Parcel No. 101-170-010 (CPNs 22106-5): Karen A. Brewster 212 Ironwood Drive, Suite D P.M.B. 325 Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814 John M. Brewster, Sr. 212 Ironwood Drive, Suite D P.M.B. 325 Coeur d'Alene, ID 83814 Karen A. Brewster 17357 Los Angeles Street Yorba Linda, CA 92886 John M. Brewster, Sr. 17357 Los Angeles Street Yorba Linda, CA 92886 Linda Day, Trustee, Successor Trustee c/o Stephen A. Scheck Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 2603 Main Street, Suite 1300 Irvine, CA 92614 Linda M. Day 1103 East Wilson Avenue Orange, CA 92867 James Kroll, Trustee, Successor Trustee c/o Stephen A. Scheck Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 2603 Main Street, Suite 1300 Irvine, CA 92614 Record Owner Record Owner Courtesy Copy Courtesy Copy Possible Interested Party Possible Interested Party Possible Interested Party 17336.02100\ 13164559.1 James W. Kroll 1103 East Wilson Avenue Orange, CA 92867 Lawrence P. Kraemer P.O. Box 269 Huntington Beach, CA 92648-0269 Ray H. Overacker P.O. Box 269 Huntington Beach, CA 92648-0269 ASC 1.46 Acres LLC 17357 Los Angeles Street Yorba Linda, CA 92886 Richard W. Millar, Jr. Registered Agent for Service of Process 1301 Dove Street, Suite 900 Newport Beach, CA 92660 Michael I. Kehoe, Esq. Palmieri, Tyler, Wiener, Wilhelm & Waldron LLP 2603 Main Street, Suite 1300 Irvine, CA 92614 Dated: July 24, 2015. Possible Interested Party Possible Interested Party Possible Interested Party Record Owner Courtesy Copy Courtesy Copy Aflif/iGe ;ed,t4t,4-- Margaret L. Barnes 17336.02100\13164559.1 Commission Request =CTC Riverside Counq ironsportolion Commission THE COMMI SSI ON I S REQUESTED TO MAKE THE FOLLOW! NG FI NDI NGS 1. The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; 2. The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; 3. The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and 4. The offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner. 301Sb3A18/3DNVI:10 3N11 A1Nnco .. irovk 91 RQJECT P FAST FORWARD PROJECT MAP Parcel Locations in the Project RCTC CORONA A NORTH 1 EXPRESS LANES 1 WESTBOUND REGULAR LANES EASTBOUND REGULAR LANES MAGNOLIA AVE ONTARIO AVE. Mom Riverside County ironsporloiion Commission PIERCE ST r 'A� OFFERS OF JUST COMPENSATION RCTC 91 pROJECT FAST FORWARD No. 1 2 Ownership John M. Brewster Sr. & Karen A. Brewster Public Storage Properties, Ltd. 3 ASC 1.46 Acres LLC Offer Date May 26, 2015 July 23, 2015 July 2, 2015 PARCEL 1 John M Brewster Sr. & Karen A Brewster 101-170-010 PROJECT FAST FORWARD Permanent Drainage Easement 145 SF PARCEL 2 Public Storage Properties, Ltd. 118-040-027 ROTC R�ivedde ComityTrmfspnrMHan EaeromissioR 91 PROJECT FAST FORWARD Permanent Dra PARCEL 3 Permanent Drainage Easement 2,293 SF Staff Recommends RIY6r5id® County Uonsporloiion Commission THE COMM! SSI ON ADOPT A RESOLUTI ON OF N ECESSI TY BASED ON THE FOLLOW! N G FI N DI N GS: 1. The public interest and necessity require the proposed project; 2. The project is planned or located in a manner that will be most compatible with the greatest public good and the least private injury; 3. The real property to be acquired is necessary for the project; and 4. The offer of just compensation has been made to the property owner. AGENDA ITEM 8A RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Financial Statements BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the year ended June 30, 2015. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: During the past fiscal year, staff monitored the revenues and expenditures for the Commission. The attached financial statements present the revenues and expenditures for the 12 months of FY 2014/15. Many accrual adjustments for revenues and expenditures have been made for June 30, 2015, and are reflected in these financial statements; however, staff will continue to make year-end accrual adjustments depending upon materiality through the completion of the audit in October. The operating statement shows sales tax revenues through the fourth quarter at 86 percent of the budget. This is a result of the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 33. GASB 33 requires sales tax revenue to be accrued for the period in which it is collected at point of sale. The State Board of Equalization collects the Measure A funds and remits these funds to the Commission after the reporting period for the business. This creates a two -month lag in the receipt of revenues by the Commission. Accordingly, these financial statements reflect the revenues related to collections through May 2015. On a cash basis through June 30, 2015, the Measure A and Local Transportation Fund (LTF) sales tax receipts are 4.46 percent and 5.96 percent higher, respectively, than the same period last fiscal year. At the January 14 meeting, staff presented the FY 2014/15 mid -year revenue projections and recommended that the Commission maintain the current year revenue projections for Measure A and LTF revenues at $167 million and $81.5 million, respectively. State Transit Assistance Fund receipts of $3.5 million for the third quarter were received in May 2015. Staff will continue to monitor the trends in sales tax receipts and report to the Commission any necessary adjustments, if material. Agenda Item 8A 29 Federal, state, and local revenues are on a reimbursement basis. The Commission will receive these revenues as eligible project costs are incurred and invoiced to the respective agencies. Significant federal and state reimbursements are related to the Perris Valley Line, Interstate 215 corridor improvement, and State Route 91 high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane projects. The following is an analysis of federal and state reimbursement revenues reflected in this quarterly financial report: Federal Reimbursement State Reimbursement Revenues Budget Actual Budget Actual Highways SR-91 HOV Lanes $ 5,543,000 $ 129,677 $ - $ 1-215 - 40,676,000 21,595,692 Other 1,340,000 708,801 68,677 Total 6,883,000 838,478 40,676,000 21,664,369 Rail Perris Valley Line 69,652,500 44,732,561 45,668,000 8,328,391 Other 2,500,000 1,300,000 3,589,325 Total 72,152,500 44,732,561 46,968,000 11,917,716 Other Total 4,315,900 2,903,857 4,859,000 3,491,760 $ 83,351,400 $ 48,474,896 $ 92,503,000 $ 37,073,845 Staff will continue to prepare year-end reimbursement accrual adjustments in connection with the year-end closing and audit process; however, actual federal and state reimbursement revenues, as presented above, are below budgeted amounts primarily due to delays on the 1-215 and Perris Valley Line projects. Local reimbursements are below budgeted amounts primarily due to delays in traffic signal improvements, lower than anticipated reimbursable expenditures for the Perris Valley Line improvements in the city of Perris, and delayed closing of sale of excess Commission -owned rail property. During the FY 2014/15 budget process, the Commission took a conservative approach in estimating Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) revenues of $8 million passed through Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG). At the January 14 meeting, the Commission approved the revised FY 2014/15 revenue projections and increased the TUMF revenues to $12 million. Actual TUMF revenues through May are approximately $15.7 million. The budgeted balance of $154,500 relates to TUMF zone reimbursements from WRCOG for the 74/215 interchange project. Staff will continue to prepare year-end TUMF revenue and reimbursement revenue accrual adjustments in connection with the year-end closing and audit process. Other revenues include property management revenues generated from properties acquired in connection with the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project (91 Project) and various rail properties. Agenda Item 8A 30 The Commission took a conservative approach in estimating investment income for FY 2014/15 as a result of flat interest yields on investment balances. Investment income is above budgeted amounts primarily as a result of the investment of sales tax and toll revenue bond proceeds. Staff will continue to prepare year-end investment income accrual adjustments in connection with the year-end closing and audit process. The expenditure and other financing source/use categories are in line overall with the expectations of the budget with the following exceptions. Staff will continue to prepare year- end expenditure accrual adjustments in connection with the year-end closing and audit process. • Salaries and benefits expenditures are under budget due to unused full-time equivalents and budget authority; • Professional services expenditures are under budget due to unused budget authority for rail and station development planning, debt and investment management, and various projects' legal services; • Support costs are under budget due to unused budget authority for the marketing of new rail service and rail safety advertisements, rail operations and station maintenance, and motorist assistance call box upgrades; • Program operations are under budget due to unused budget authority for 91 Project permit activities, motorist and commuter assistance program operations, and rail program management and operations related to the Perris Valley Line project; • Engineering, construction, design -build, and right of way/land expenditures relate to various capital projects. The status of significant capital projects with budgets exceeding $5 million is discussed in the attached; • Operating and capital disbursements are made as claims are submitted to the Commission by transit operators; • Special studies are under budget due to unused budget authority for toll operations and rail feasibility studies; • Local streets and roads expenditures are related to the timing of Measure A sales tax revenue accrual adjustments for June and the cleanup, which will be determined in late August and September. That will have a direct effect on the local streets and roads turn -back expenditures to local jurisdictions; • Regional arterial expenditures primarily represent expenditures for the highways and regional arterial program administered by the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG). CVAG requests reimbursements from the Commission based on available funds and sufficient budget authority; • Debt service interest expenditures on the 2010 and 2013 Sales Tax Bonds and the 2013 Toll Bonds are made annually in December and June, while interest expenditures on the 2009 Sales Tax Bonds are made monthly due to the variable rate nature of the bonds. Principal payments on the 2009 and 2010 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds are made annually in June. Principal payments for the 2013 Sales Tax Bonds and the 2013 Toll Bonds are not expected to begin until June 2018 and June 2022, respectively; Agenda Item 8A 31 • The Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan with the U.S. Department of Transportation is subordinate to the 2013 Toll Bonds. During the fourth quarter, the Commission drew down $48.9 million in TIFIA loan proceeds. During construction of the 91 Project and for a period of up to five years following substantial completion, interest is compounded and added to the initial TIFIA loan. TIFIA debt service payments are expected to commence on December 1, 2021, which is approximately five years after substantial completion of the 91 Project, through June 1, 2051; and • Capital outlay expenditures are under budget due to unused budget authority for station security improvements and Commission network, hardware, and software improvements. Attachments: 1) Quarterly Financial Statements —June 2015 2) Quarterly Project Status —June 2015 Agenda Item 8A 32 ATTACHMENT 1 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY BUDGET TO ACTUAL 4TH QUARTER FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 6/30/2015 FY 2014/15 4TH QUARTER REMAINING PERCENT BUDGET ACTUAL BALANCE UTILIZATION Revenues Sales tax $ 261,444,700 $ 225,368,638 $ (36,076,062) 86% Federal reimbursements 83,351,400 48,474,896 (34,876,504) 58% State reimbursements 92,503,000 37,073,845 (55,429,155) 40% Local reimbursements 6,461,000 1,124,169 (5,336,831) 17% Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee 12,154,600 15,717,061 3,562,461 129% Other revenues 575,000 1,622,531 1,047,531 282% Investment income 2,450,900 5,349,892 2,898,992 218% Total revenues 458,940,600 334,731,032 (124,209,568) 73% Expenditures Salaries and benefits 8,330,300 7,365,268 965,032 88% Professional and support Professional services 17,000,100 11,243,337 5,756,763 66% Support costs 5,928,400 4,030,519 1,897,881 68% Total Professional and support costs 22,928,500 15,273,856 7,654,644 67% Projects and operations Program operations - general 21,597,200 13,914,687 7,682,513 64% Engineering 18,079,600 7,762,730 10,316,870 43% Construction 241,660,180 128,043,062 113,617,118 53% Design Build 255,303,500 187,496,856 67,806,644 73% Right of way/land 186,800,400 66,557,384 120,243,016 36% Operating and capital disbursements 139,169,289 87,460,977 51,708,312 63% Special studies 1,220,000 268,642 951,358 22% Local streets and roads 49,882,000 42,850,143 7,031,857 86% Regional arterials 30,600,000 17,273,467 13,326,533 56% Total projects and operations 944,312,169 551,627,948 392,684,221 58% Debt service Principal 7,400,000 7,400,000 - 100% Interest 47,296,200 45,900,072 1,396,128 97% Total debt service 54,696,200 53,300,072 1,396,128 97% Capital outlay 3,782,000 475,334 3,306,666 13% Total Expenditures 1,034,049,169 628,042,478 406,006,691 61% Excess revenues over (under) expenditures (575,108,569) (293,311,446) 416,323,561 51% Other financing sources/(uses) Operating transfer in 526,661,100 218,840,890 (307,820,210) 42% Operating transfer out (526,661,100) (218,840,890) 307,820,210 42% TIFIA loan proceeds 191,600,000 48,904,095 (142,695,905) 26% Total financing sources/(uses) 191,600,000 48,904,095 142,695,905 26% Net change in fund balances (383,508,569) (244,407,351) 559,019,466 64% Fund balance July 1, 2014 986,842,300 1,031,476,421 44,634,121 105% Fund balance June 30, 2015 $ 603,333,731 $ 787,069,070 $ 603,653,587 130% 33 Revenues Sales tax Federal reimbursements State reimbursements Local reimbursements Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Other revenues Investment income Total revenues Expenditures Salaries and benefits Professional and support Professional services Support costs Total Professional and support costs Proiects and operations Program operations - general Engineering Construction Design Build Right of way/land Operating and capital disbursements Special studies Local streets and roads Regional arterials Total proiects and operations Debt service Principal Interest Total debt service Capital outlay Total Expenditures Excess revenues over (under) expenditures Other financing sources/(uses) Operating transfer in Operating transfer out TIFIA loan proceeds Total financing sources/(uses) Net change in fund balances Fund balance July 1, 2014 Fund balance June 30, 2015 GENERAL FUND RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY BUDGET TO ACTUAL BY FUND 4TH QUARTER FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 6/30/2015 SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS FSP/ SAFE MEASURE A SALES TAX WESTERN COUNTY COACHELLA VALLEY PALO VERDE VALLEY TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND STATE TRANSIT ASSISTANCE TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM COACHELLA MITIGATION FEE VALLEY RAIL (TUMF) AGENCY FUND COMMERCIAL PAPER SALES TAX TOLL REVENUE BONDS BONDS DEBT SERVICE COMBINED TOTAL $ 2,900,000 $ 13,470 412,152 3,209,467 238,943 115,913 1,052,476 848 29,994 20,560 4,647,035 3,346,788 4,221,664 85,311 1,672,944 668,460 2,954,722 385,010 4,627,666 1,053,470 1,889,794 3.069,419 10,117,232 98,374 12,105,400 3.069,419 $ 106,812,909 $ 33,199,125 45,697,008 33,452,226 266,222 (29,884) 569,207 751,045 97,923 187,518,733 33.297,048 2,732,054 7,834,378 680,948 8,515,326 8.469,812 3,464,073 120,063,223 187,496,856 64.006,639 5,594,572 170,268 30,191,490 419,456,933 3,909 7,849 7,849 24,035 5,846,000 11,675,809 16.673,467 34,219,311 $ 982,844 $ 71,739,896 $ 9,733,864 $ 982,844 982,844 982,844 3,091 241,371 71,984,358 57,692,043 192,839 9,926.703 320 320 8,211,130 57,692,043 8,211,130 15,746,945 195,881 15,942.826 272,664 233,209 4,098 237,307 459,544 4,298,657 7,979,839 2,550,745 600.000 15,888,785 12,205 12,205 43,430 826,177 5,741 831,918 500,000 500,000 6,236 2,083 2,083 1,746,669 1,746,669 708,324 708.324 177,831 177.831 2,764,418 1,175,250 3,939.668 7,400,000 $ 225,368,638 48,474,896 37,073,845 1,124,169 15,717,061 1,622,531 5,349,892 334,731,032 7,365,268 11,243,337 4,030,519 15,273,856 13,914,687 7,762,730 128,043,062 187,496,856 66,557,384 87,460,977 268,642 42,850,143 17,273,467 551,627,948 7,400,000 45,900,072 45,900,072 367,560 107,774 53,300,072 53,300,072 475,334 21, 322,290 4,208,200 430,812,087 34,231,069 982,844 57.692,043 8,211,450 16,398,756 875,348 8,319 53,300,072 628,042,478 (16,675,255) 15,349,533 (2.723) (861,412) (243,293,354) 548,700 (548,700) 147,177,900 (52,115,037) 48,904,095 (934,021) 6,923 14.292, 315 1,715,253 (16,013,064) (466.000) (455.930) (863.143) 779,531 491,681 1,746,669 (3.520,140) 708.324 32,793,399 (138,894,293) 177,831 (4,516.447) (49,360,404) (293,311,446) 22,184,904 218,840,890 (2,764,486) (218,840,890) 48,904,095 15,346,810 (1,328.445) 10, 590,109 $ 9.261.664 $ 143,966,958 6,923 (861,412) (99326,396) (927,098) 7,890,918 336,826,290 33,433,491 7.029.506 $ 237.499.894 $ 32.506.393 $ (16,013,064) (1.720,749) 556 115,877,309 556 $ 114.156.560 $ (466.000) 1,249.253 55,502,966 56.752.219 $ (455.930) 57,318,771 56.862.841 $ 779,531 (83.612) 4,134,185 4.050.573 $ (3.520,140) (106,100.894) 491,681 (1.773,471) (105,392.570) 28,409,089 199,471,010 491.681 $ 26.635.618 $ 94.078.440 $ (4,516.447) 19,420,418 48,904,095 (4,338.616) (29,939.986) (244,407,351) 45, 709,443 136, 312,284 1,031,476,421 41.370.827 $ 106.372.298 $ 787,069,070 34 ATTACHMENT 2 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY PROJECT STATUS 4TH QUARTER FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 6/30/2015 FY 2014/15 BUDGET Project Description 4TH QUARTER EXPENDITURES Project Status 91 Project (Design -Build) The project will connect with Orange County Transportation Authority's tolled express lanes at the Orange County/Riverside County line and continue approximately eight miles to the Interstate (I)-15/State Route (SR)-91 interchange. The project involves widening pavement on the outside of the existing highway to reposition general purpose lanes and repurposing the existing High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes to accommodate two -tolled express lanes in the median in each direction. The SR-91 CIP also involves constructing one new general purpose lane in each direction from SR-71 to 1-15, ultimately providing two -tolled express lanes and five general purpose lanes in each direction. SR-91 CIP development activities began in September 2007, construction work related to roadway and structures began in July 2014, and the toll lanes are expected to open in January 2017. The total acquisition and construction cost of the SR-91 CIP is estimated at $1.4 billion, including capitalized interest, debt service reserves, and cost of issuance. 1-15 Express Lanes Project The project is currently in the preliminary engineering and environmental phase of work to add up to two -tolled express lanes in each direction from SR-60 to Cajalco Road in Corona. The project will use the design -build method of project delivery. Project development activities began in April 2008, and lanes are expected to open to traffic in 2020. The estimated project cost is $415 million. $ 426,455,700 7,113,700 $ 223,296,520 3,545,529 The Design -Build contract is on schedule with actual reported progress of 46 percent as of June 30, 2015. The Commission has acquired and delivered all 197 Caltrans Parcel Numbers to the Design -Builder. Construction has begun on 23 bridges (of 32) and 33 walls (of 93), while 63 utility relocations (of 90) are complete. The substantial completion date of January 2017 is unchanged. The under -run of the FY 2014/15 budget at fourth quarter can be attributed to three main components: slower ramp -up of major construction than anticipated which resulted in less expenditures for construction ($75 million); project and construction management, Caltrans support services, and utility relocation costs that have occurred but have yet to be invoiced ($37 million); and lower than planned right of way (ROW) acquisition and associated goodwill costs ($60 million). Other large cost under -runs occurred for the SR-91 express bus transit enhancement ($5 million), railroad relocation ($4 million), and ROW mitigation ($3 million). Staff continues to advance the project report and environmental document, which is expected to be completed in FY 2015/16. Various methods of project delivery were analyzed in 2013, and ultimately staff received Commission approval in January 2014 to use the design -build method of project delivery and begin planning for the design -build phase of work. The project construction management contract and the traffic and revenue study contract were both approved by the Commission in April 2015. The project under -run of the FY 2014/15 budget at fourth quarter is primarily related to preliminary engineering ($1.2 million). Other large cost under -runs occurred for general legal support ($334,000), special legal support ($435,000), and financial advisory services ($268,000). 35 FY 2014/15 BUDGET Project Description 4TH QUARTER EXPENDITURES Project Status 91/71 Interchange Improvements Project The project is in the final design phase for interchange improvements to the 91/71 interchange. Final design began in March 2012. The estimated project cost is $123 million. SR-91 HOV Lanes/Adams Street to 60/91/215 Interchange Construction is on -going along with utility relocation. Construction of the project should be completed in fall of 2015. The estimated project cost is $273 million. 1-215 Corridor Improvements/Scott Road to Nuevo Road The project will add one mixed flow lane in each direction. Preliminary engineering began in 2007 and was completed in 2011. Final design began in 2011 and was completed in December 2012; construction began in 2013 and is expected to be completed in 2016. The estimated project cost is $120 million. 5,835,800 8,912,400 42,549,500 844,228 A contract for the final design consultant was awarded at the February 2012 Commission meeting. A notice to proceed with the final design phase was issued in March 2012. Final design was delayed due to the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) requirement for a new environmental assessment on potholing on federal property. The ACOE also required preparation of an additional environmental assessment to cover project construction impacts on federal property resulting from the eastbound SR-91 to northbound SR-71 flyover connector. The ROW acquisition activities began in the third quarter of FY 2014/15. Final design was completed during the third quarter of FY 2014/15. The project under -run of the FY 2014/15 budget at fourth quarter is due to no incurred costs for ROW acquisition and support ($4M). Final design costs have been invoiced through March 2015, and staff will accrue the balance of work performed through June 2015 through the year-end closing process. All other budgeted costs occurred as planned. 851,793 26,086,522 Construction began in April 2012 and is managed by Caltrans. Caltrans completed design work, and expenditures remain within the budget authority. The majority of utility relocation work is complete, and construction work at the 14th Street interchange is functionally complete wifh the full width of the new overcrossing constructed and all movements open to traffic. Work continues on the soil -nail walls alongside the freeway at Ivy Street overcrossing. A delay in project completion due to Union Pacific railroad issues at Pachappa Drive is probable; however, all freeway lanes and ramps are forecasted to be completed by the second quarter of FY 2015/16. The notice to proceed for construction was issued in December 2012 and construction started in January 2013; construction work continues to be on schedule. A major change dealing with aesthetic treatment will likely prolong the work, but all traffic related work will be completed by the second quarter of FY 2015/16. The under -run of the FY 2014/15 budget through the fourth quarter is related to the lag of construction invoice submittals by the contractor. 36 FY 2014/15 BUDGET Project Description 4TH QUARTER EXPENDITURES Project Status Mid County Parkway A recirculated project report and environmental document is under development for a new corridor from 1-215 to SR-79. The environmental phase is anticipated to be completed in FY 2014/15. Construction of this new facility will be completed over many years as funding becomes available; the project cost is estimated at $1.3 to $1.6 billion. Perris Valley Line and other rail projects The project is in the construction phase with the extension of commuter rail services to the city of Perris. The project commenced in December 2007 when the Commission received approval from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to move into project development. Expected completion date is December 2015 for an estimated project cost of $248.3 million. Other rail projects include adding a fourth main track between the Riverside Downtown station to the connector to the San Jacinto Branch Line at Highgrove. 13,893,100 140,981,300 3,909,546 Staff completed the work on the Environmental Impact Report (EIR)/Environmental Impact Study (EIS). Major milestones have been met and the project is moving forward to the Record Of Decision scheduled for the first quarter of FY 2015/16. A budget amendment was approved by the Commission in April 2014 to allocate additional funding for the completion of Phase II Final EIR/Supplemental EIS. In April 2015 the Commission approved the EIR. 75,473,487 Final design is complete and the FTA awarded the Small Starts Grant Agreement funds. ROW acquisition activities for the station and layover facility at south Perris have been completed. Following the settlement of a lawsuit challenging elements of the California Environmental Quality Act document in July 2013, the construction contract was given full notice to proceed in October 2013 following FTA approval of the Small Starts Grant Agreement. Active construction commenced in January 2014; some construction delays have occurred due to various factors. These delays are not expected to impact the scheduled completion date of December 2015. This list discusses the significant capital projects (i.e., total budgeted costs in excess of $5 million) and related status. Capital project expenditures are generally affected by lags in invoices submitted by contractors and consultants, as well as issues encountered during certain phases of the projects. The capital projects budgets tend to be based on aggressive project schedules. 37 AGENDA ITEM 8B RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Sales Tax Analysis BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 1 2015 (1Q 2015). BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its December 2007 meeting, the Commission awarded an agreement with MuniServices, LLC (MuniServices) for quarterly sales tax reporting services plus additional fees contingent on additional sales tax revenue generated from the transactions and use tax (sales tax) audit services. As part of the recurring contracts process, the Commission approved a five-year extension through June 30, 2018. The services performed under this agreement pertain to only the Measure A sales tax revenues. Since the commencement of these services, MuniServices submitted an audit update, which reported findings generated and submitted to the State Board Equalization (SBOE) for review and determination of errors in sales tax reporting related to 363 businesses. Through 4Q 2014, the SBOE approved corrections for 262 of these accounts for a total sales tax revenue recovery of $5,266,551. Updated amounts for 1Q 2015 will be provided once received from MuniServices. If the SBOE concurs with the error(s) for the remaining claims, the Commission will receive additional revenues; however, the magnitude of the value of the remaining findings was not available. It is important to note that while the recoveries of additional revenues will be tangible, it will not be sufficient to alter the overall trend of sales tax revenues. Additionally, MuniServices provided the Commission with the quarterly sales tax summary report for 1Q 2015. Most of the 1Q 2015 Measure A sales tax revenues were received in the second quarter of calendar year 2015, during April through June 2015, due to a lag in the sales tax calendar. The summary section of the 1Q 2015 report is attached and includes an overview of California's economic outlook, local results, historical cash collections analysis by quarter, summary of the top 25 sales/use tax contributions, historical sales tax amounts, annual sales tax by business category, five-year economic trend for significant business category (construction), and final results. Agenda Item 8B 38 Taxable transactions for the top 25 tax contributors in Riverside County generated 24.7 percent of taxable sales for the benchmark year ended 1Q 2015, slightly lower than the 25.8 percent for the benchmark year ended 10 2014. The top 100 tax contributors generated 40 percent of taxable sales for the benchmark year ended 1Q 2015, compared to the 40.7 percent for the benchmark year ended 1Q 2014. In the Economic Category Analysis below, all categories experienced new highs in the 1Q 2015 benchmark year compared to the prior eight benchmark year quarters with the exception of transportation, which was slightly below the 4Q 2014 benchmark year high point. Construction and miscellaneous had the largest increases of 9.4 and 7.7 percent, respectively, while general retail and food products increased 5.8 percent. The other economic categories had increases ranging from 5.5 to 2.5 percent. %of Total /%Change ROTC California Riverside County ECONOMIC San Bernardino County CATEGORY ANALYSIS Inland Empire S.F. Bay Area Sacramento Valley Central Valley South Coast North Coast Central Coast General Retail 29.0/5.8 28.4/3.2 28.3/4.6 25.2/4.2 26.7/4.5 27.2/2.8 28.0/2.2 30.6/4.4 29.0/3.0 28.0/1.7 31.7/2.0 Food Products 16.8 / 5.8 19.8/6.0 19.0/5.5 14.9/6.1 16.9/5.8 21.2/6.9 16.7/5.4 16.0/4.0 20.8/5.9 18.3/3.8 30.5/5.1 Transportation 26.7 / 2.5 24.5/1.9 27.7/3.6 29.0/4.4 28.4/4.0 21.6/2.1 28.5/2.8 26.7/2.4 24.1/1.1 30.7/0.4 21.5/2.4 Construction 10.7 / 9.4 9.1/6.1 13.3/3.4 8.5/3.3 10.8/3.4 9.2/5.7 11.0/7.0 11.4/5.6 8.0/7.3 12.7/4.4 9.3/3.9 Business to Business 14.9 / 5.5 17.0/4.5 10.8/4.3 21.1/7.5 16.1/6.4 19.6/5.7 14.1/4.2 14.1/3.3 17.0/3.6 9.2/6.2 5.8/14.3 Miscellaneous 2.0 / 7.7 1.1/2.3 0.9/11.0 1.2/15.8 1.1/13.8 1.2/3.1 1.7/2.8 1.2/3.4 1.0/-1.3 1.0/21.5 1.1/-0.9 Total 100.0 / 5.3 100.0/3.9 100.0/4.3 100.0/5.3 100.0/4.8 100.0/4.3 100.0/3.7 100.0/3.8 100.0/3.5 100.0/2.6 100.0/3.8 General Retail: Apparel Stores, Department Stores, Furniture/Appliances, Drug Stores, Recreation Produc s, Florist/Nursery, and Misc. Retail Food Products: Restaurants, Food Markets, Liquor Stores, and Food Processing Equipment Construction: Building Materials Retail and Building Materials Wholesale Transportation: Auto Parts/Repair, Auto Sales- New, Auto Sales- Used, Service Stations, and Misc. Vehicle Sales Business to Business: Office Equip., Electronic Equip., Business Services, Energy Sales, Chemical Products, Heavy Industry, Light Industry, and Leasing Miscellaneous: Health & Government, Miscellaneous Other, and Closed Account Adjustments An analysis of sales tax performance by quarter through 1Q 2015 is attached and illustrates fairly consistent cycles for sales tax performance for most of the economic categories since the recent economic recession. For seven of the top ten segments (auto sales -new, restaurants, department stores, miscellaneous retail, building materials -wholesale, apparel stores, and building materials -retail) during the past eight benchmark year quarters, sales tax receipts reached a new high point. These seven segments represent 55.8 percent of the total sales tax receipts. Service stations, one of the top ten segments representing 9.8 percent to the total sales tax receipts, decreased to a new low point in the past two-year period during 10 2015 due to lower fuel prices. Light industry remained relatively unchanged, and food markets had a slight decrease from the previous 3Q 2014 high point. These top ten segments represent 75 percent of the total sales tax receipts. For the other segments representing 25 percent of the total sales tax receipts, the eleven segments representing 15.7 percent of the total sales tax receipts reached new high points in the past two years during 10 2015. In the Economic Segment Analysis below, auto sales -new, restaurants, and department stores represent the three largest segments for Riverside County, or 32.4 percent of total sales taxes. This is the tenth consecutive quarter since 3Q 2008 that department stores and auto sales -new have been in the top three economic segments. Growth seen in previous quarters for the Agenda Item 8B 39 service stations segment has been declining continuously from the high in the last four years due to lower fuel prices, and this segment reached a new low point in 1Q 2015. Restaurants replaced service stations in the top three economic segments beginning in 4Q 2014 and resulted from continued steady growth in restaurant prices with no decline in restaurant use. ECONOMICSEGMENT ANALYSIS RCTC California Riverside County San Bernardino Count V Inland Empire S.F. Bay Area Sacramento Valley Central Valley South Coast North Coast Central Coast Largest Segment Auto Sales- New Restaurants Restaurants Service Stations Service Stations Restaurants Auto Sales- New Department Stores Restaurants Service Stations Restaurants % of Total /% Change 11.2/8.8 13.9/7.4 12.0/8.4 11.5/-3.2 11.0/-3.8 14.9/7.8 12.2/7.5 13.7/2.7 15.1/7.1 13.0/-5.5 22.0/6.7 2nd Largest Segment Restaurants Auto Sales- New Auto Sales- New Department Stores Restaurants Auto Sales- New Department Stores Auto Sales- New Auto Sales- New Department Stores Misc. Retail % of Total /% Change 10.7/8.3 10.8/8.2 11.8/9.4 10.6/5.3 10.9/8.4 10.4/8.7 11.3/1.6 10.5/12.0 10.9/7.5 11.2/1.0 9.8/3.0 3rd Largest Segment Department Stores Department Stores Department Stores Restaurants Department Stores Department Stores Restaurants Service Stations Department Stores Auto Sales- New Service Stations % of Total /% Change 10.5/2.4 9.9/1.7 11.2/0.1 9.9/8.4 10.9/2.6 8.3/1.8 10.8/6.4 10.2/-6.5 9.6/1.3 10.4/7.8 9.3/0.3 During the review of the 1Q 2015 detailed report with MuniServices, information regarding sales tax comparison by city and change by economic segments (two highest gains and two highest losses) from 1Q 2015 to 1Q 2014 was provided. Staff continues to monitor monthly sales tax receipts and other available economic data to determine the need for any adjustment to the revenue projections. Staff will utilize the forecast scenarios included with the complete report and receipt trends in assessing such projections. Attachments: 1) Sales Tax Digest Summary 1Q 2015 2) Sales Tax Performance Analysis by Quarter 3) Quarterly Sales Tax Change Comparison by City for 1Q 2015 to 1Q 2014 Agenda Item 8B 40 ATTACHMENT 1 Riverside County Transportation Commission Sales Tax Digest Summary Collections through June 2015 Sales through March 2015 (2015Q1) CALIFORNIA'S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK California sales tax receipts increased by 3.1% over the same quarter from the previous year, with Northern California reporting a 3.4% increase compared to 2.9% for Southern California. Receipts for RCTC changed by 2.1% over the same periods. The effect of recent nationwide retail trends is being felt in California. Americans are buying less "stuff' from traditional retail outlets and instead are spending more money on experiences. Air travel is up 2.8% for January and February, and the growth is coming from consumers, not business travelers. (U.S. Dept. of Transportation) Hotel occupancy rates were up 3.1% year over year in the first quarter of 2015. The overall occupancy rate of 61.1% was the highest ever recorded for the first quarter. (Smith Travel Research) Sales at restaurants were up 9% for the first four months of 2015. (U.S. Census Bureau) Jewelry sales rose for 25-straight months before dipping slightly in April. (MasterCard Advisors) All of this took place despite a stronger dollar reducing foreign tourism, which suggests that much of the growth is coming from Americans spending money at home. Current Sales and Use Tax laws may be based on outdated business models and spending habits. LOCAL RESULTS Net Cash Receipts Analysis Local Collections Less: Cost of Administration Net 1Q2015 Receipts Net 1Q2014 Receipts Actual Percentage Change $39,620,861 (509,200) 39,111,661 38,312,787 2.1% Business Activity Performance Analysis Local Collections Less: Payments for Prior Periods Preliminary 1Q2015 Collections Projected 1Q2015 Late Payments Projected 1Q2015 Final Results Actual 1Q2014 Results Projected Percentage Change $39,620,861 (1,577,342) 38,043,519 1,530,239 39,573,758 38,919,856 1.7 www.MuniServices.com (861d) 800-8181 Page 1 Riverside County Transportation Commission HISTORICAL CASH COLLECTIONS ANALYSIS BY QUARTER $44, 000 $42, 000 In $40,000 a ar V a z $36,000 $ 34, 000 (in thousands of $) $600 . _v., $500 $400 H ar ar LL $300 .0 E a $200 $100 $32,000 —H $0 4Q2012 1Q2013 2Q2013 3Q2013 4Q2013 1Q2014 2Q2014 3Q2014 4Q2014 1Q2015 Net Receipts +SBOE Admin Fees Due TOP 25 SALES/USE TAX CONTRIBUTORS The following list identifies RCTC's Top 25 Sales/Use Tax contributors. The list is in alphabetical order and represents sales from April 2014 to March 2015. The 24.7% of RCTC's total sales and use tax revenue. AMAZON.COM ARCO AM/PM BEST BUY STORES CARMAX THE AUTO SUPERSTORE CHEVRON SERVICE STATIONS CIRCLE K FOOD STORES COSTCO WHOLESALE DEPT OF MOTOR VEHICLES DESERT SUNLIGHT HOME DEPOT JACK IN THE BOX RESTAURANTS KOHL'S DEPARTMENT STORES LOWE'S HOME CENTERS Top 25 Sales/Use Tax contributors generate MACY'S DEPARTMENT STORE MCDONALD'S RESTAURANTS RALPH'S GROCERY ROSS STORES SAM'S CLUB SHELL SERVICE STATIONS STATER BROS MARKETS TARGET STORES USA SERVICE STATIONS VERIZON WIRELESS WAL MART STORES WALGREEN'S DRUG STORES www.MuniServices.com (8i0) 800-8181 Page 2 Riverside County Transportation Commission HISTORICAL SALES TAX AMOUNTS The following chart shows the sales tax level from sales through March 2015, the highs, and the lows for each segment over the last two years. $20,000 $18,000 $16,000 $14,000 $12,000 $10,000 $8,000 $6,000 $4,000 $2,000 $0 fin thousands of $j DJ 102015 High ■ Low eye% a Qc +° ems ��5 °{ �• e & y• � a`e' eS�c e�L�w e k� °a5 N. #��tiaa � �J Q { [a`c ale 4a Qa k°ob 40 �•� P` � ce 4�� �* PQ %\b 4 e ANNUAL SALES TAX BY BUSINESS CATEGORY 102015 4Q2014 302014 202014 102014 402013 302013 202013 102013 402012 fin thousands of $j --2fi;9ta5 42,689 17,134 23,799 45,903 45,225 44,557 43,879 43,636 43,102 42,677 42,162 41,353 26,597 26.352 25,887 25,443 24,956 24,421 24,188 23,834 23,531 42,825 16,929 23,639 42,743 16,498 23,215 42,240 16,144 22,782 41,666 15,661 22,553 41,213 15,171 22,254 40,615 14,972 22,398 39,909 14,341 22,443 39,229 13,990 22,390 38,817 13,780 21,781 3,21❑ 3,159 3,079 3,083 2,980 2,951 2,859 2,800 2,83❑ 2,807 50 $20,000 S40,000 $60,000 $80,000 $100,000 $120,000 $140,000 $160,000 $180,000 ■ General Retail •_ Food Products ■ Transportation ■ Construction ■ Business To Business ■ Miscellaneous www.MuniServices.com (8 4) 800-8181 Page 3 Riverside County Transportation Commission FIVE-YEAR ECONOMIC TREND: CONSTRUCTION $ 5,000 $4,500 $4,000 $ 3, 500 $ 3,000 $ 2, 500 $ 2,000 $1, 500 $1,000 $500 $0 (in thousands of $) 0 0 0 0 ,-1 sH sH sH N N N N m m m m '71- 71- 71- 71- un 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N FINAL RESULTS: October -December 2014 Sales Local Net Cash Collections Less: Prior Quarter Payments Add: Late Payments Local Net Economic Collections after Adjustments Percent Change from October -December 2013 Sales MUNISERVICES' ON -GOING AUDIT RESULTS This Quarter $345,261 Total to Date $ 5,266,551 $42,964,292 ($1,947,530) $1,350,459 $42,367,221 UP BY 4.8 www.MuniServices.com (8 �) 800-8181 Page 4 RCTC 1/2%: Sales Tax Performance Analysis by Quarter ATTACHMENT 2 TOTAL TOTAL $50, 000, 000 - $45, 000, 000 - $40, 000, 000 - $35, 000, 000 $30, 000, 000 - $25, 000, 000 - $20, 000, 000 - $15, 000, 000 - $10,000,000 - $5, 000, 000 - $0 CATEGORY N M gi--I NM fr Efi ( afr NM•cr- NMg NM V Et' r V c-INM V i--IN Mg U1 U1 U1 lD lD lD lD r•-• n 00000000010101010000,--1 N N N N M M M M�� d- V U1 0000000000000000000���,-1,-1����������� �.-I.-I 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000 N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N CV ry N N N N N Q2 43 Economic TOTAL $16,000,000 201501 QoQ %A QoQ $A YoY %A YoY $A $39,573,758 1.7% $653,903 5.3% $7,992,270 $14,000,000 $12,000,000 $10,000,000 $8, 000, 000 'GENERAL RETAIL 201501 QoQ %A QoQ $A YoY %A YoY $A $11,359,678 4.9% $533,837 5.8% $2,557,620 % of 2015Q1 Total: 28.7% FOOD PRODUCTS 201501 QoQ %A QoQ $A YoY %A YoY $A $7,204,362 4.5% $308,288 5.8% $1,463,045 % of Total: 18.2% 'TRANSPORTATION $10,283,054 -1 2015Q1 QoQ %A QoQ $A YoY %A YoY $A $6,000,000 .3%-$136,331 2.5% $1,022,483 % of Total: 26.0% $4, 000, 000 $2, 000, 000 $0 CONSTRUCTION 2015Q1 QoQ %A QoQ $A YoY %A YoY $A $4,131,523 5.2% $205,285 9.4% $1,473,436 % of Total: 10.4% BUSINESS TO BUSINESS 2015Q1 QoQ %A QoQ $A YoY %A YoY $A $5,811,772 2.8% $159,250 5.5% $1,245,714 % of Total: 14.7% QoQ = 15Q1 / 14Q1 YoY = YE 15Q1 / YE 14Q1 45 INLAND EMPIRE: Quarterly Comparison of 2014Q1 and 2015Q1 ( January thru March Sales ) ATTACHMENT 3 General Retail 0 a 2 u C m A � m Jan - Mar 2015 (2015Q1) Jan - Mar 2014 (2014Q1) % Chg Gain Gain Decline Decline RCTC RCTC 4.9% 4.5% -1.3% 5.2% 2.8%I 7.3% 39,573,758 38,919,856-1.7%IAuto Sales - New Restaurants Service Stations Food Markets RIVERSIDE COUNTY BANNING -29.0% 8.6% -4.3% -28.2% 41.6% -80.8% BEAUMONT 7.8% 10.7% -8.2% -3.3% 17.1% -59.0% BLYTHE -5.7% 2.5% -1.4% -3.0% 40.6% -36.1% CORONA 0.7% 2.4% 1.1% 8.3% 9.9% 10.0% LAKE ELSINORE 2.6% 4.6% 10.1% 5.1% 3.0% 64.0% HEMET 1.2% 4.2% -10.0% 2.6% 4.5% -2.3% INDIO 13.7% 4.6% 1.4% 8.0% -1.3% -6.2% PERRIS -0.7% 4.2% -9.3% -5.0% 2.4% 20.5% SAN JACINTO 5.9% 3.1% -11.1% -17.5% 22.9% -20.9% RIVERSIDE 5.7% 10.2% 3.4% 16.8% 8.8% -7.2% COACHELLA 10.8% 12.8% -8.0% 0.0% -47.5% -11.8% PALM SPRINGS -0.9% 5.8% -14.5% -6.1% -3.5% -18.4% DESERT HOT SPRINGS 0.6% 5.1% -19.5% -31.6% -14.3% 6.1% NORCO 11.9% 1.1% 0.3% 162.7% 9.6% -0.6% INDIAN WELLS 5.0% 12.4%-100.0% -47.9% -35.8% 113.9% RANCHO MIRAGE -2.3% 10.6% -20.5% -6.0% 8.8% 14.3% PALM DESERT -0.2% 5.5% -6.5% 3.6% 6.9% 34.9% CATHEDRAL CITY 2.4% 2.2% 13.5% 11.7% 11.6% 0.7% LA QUINTA -3.4% -4.3% 9.2% -2.2% -8.9% 44.5% MORENO VALLEY 5.3% 3.0% -2.5% -15.0% -15.5% 11.6% TEMECULA 6.7% 4.3% 10.1% 14.5% -0.2% 10.9% CANYON LAKE 29.4% 9.0% 1.4% -16.9% -13.1% 0.0% CALIMESA 12.0% 10.0% -22.8% -20.1% -9.9% -52.1% MURRIETA 3.0% 0.7% 1.9% 5.0% -18.1% 16.5% WILDOMAR 9.6% -2.0% -10.2% 35.3% -8.2% -24.7% MENIFEE 10.0% 2.2% -3.9% 66.1% 8.1% -11.4% EASTVALE 0.2% 9.2% -32.0% 12.0% 9.4% 13.7% JURUPA VALLEY -19.3% 3.1% -8.6% 1.5% 6.4% -5.3% RIVERSIDE COUNTY 17.6% -0.8% -28.7% -50.5% 76.3% -22.0% 428,542 894,222 411,519 7,813,483 1,782,393 2,451,468 2,369,568 1,820,789 509,049 12,641,450 838,126 2,970,134 317,902 1,248,336 391,996 1,221,014 4,626,308 2,055,281 2,112,119 3,527,708 6,818,808 37,918 149,620 2,921,430 309,180 1,314,413 1,416,865 1,901,412 5,889,226 460,632 866,392 399,989 7,472,912 1,688,659 2,542,074 2,252,736 1,843,472 509,974 11,815,335 865,066 3,042,924 348,821 1,163,508 357,312 1,226,974 4,555,089 1,868,756 2,160,722 3,563,364 6,360,718 35,408 160,062 2,930,577 323,331 1,205,496 1,370,829 1,976,279 6,468,845 -7.0% 3.2% 2.9% 4.6% 5.6% -3.6% 5.2% -1.2% -0.2% 7.0% -3.1% -2.4% -8.9% 7.3% 9.7% -0.5% 1.6% 10.0% -2.2% -1.0% 7.2% 7.1% -6.5% -0.3% -4.4% 9.0% 3.4% -3.8% -9.0% Auto Sales - New Light Industry Auto Sales - New BIdg.Matls-Whsle Auto Sales - New Auto Parts/Repair Department Stores Miscellaneous Other Restaurants Auto Sales - New Food Markets Restaurants Restaurants BIdg.Matls-Whsle Restaurants Restaurants Restaurants Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Restaurants Restaurants Restaurants Restaurants BIdg.Matls-Retail Electronic Equipment Leasing Apparel Stores Restaurants Department Stores Energy Sales Auto Sales - New Restaurants Miscellaneous Retail Auto Sales - New Restaurants Light Industry BIdg.Matls-Whsle Restaurants Leasing Food Markets Auto Sales - New Recreation Products Furniture/Appliance Furniture/Appliance Restaurants Auto Parts/Repair Restaurants Restaurants Furniture/Appliance Food Processing Eqp Auto Sales - New Miscellaneous Retail Restaurants Food Processing Eqp Miscellaneous Retail Leasing Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Auto Sales - New Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Light Industry Auto Sales - New Department Stores Misc. Vehicle Sales Department Stores Service Stations Service Stations BIdg.Matls-Retail Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Service Stations Department Stores BIdg.Matls-Whsle Department Stores BIdg.Matls-Retail Furniture/Appliance Food Markets Light Industry Service Stations Heavy Industry Heavy Industry Food Markets Energy Sales Light Industry Energy Sales BIdg.Matls-Retail Food Markets Furniture/Appliance Misc. Vehicle Sales Service Stations Food Markets Food Markets BIdg.Matls-Whsle Food Markets Auto Sales - Used Miscellaneous Other Leasing Food Markets Food Markets Miscellaneous Retail Service Stations Service Stations 46 Non -Confidential MuniServices AGENDA ITEM 8C RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Megan Kavand, Accountant Michele Cisneros, Deputy Finance Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Investment Report BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended June 30, 2015. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: For the past few years and as a result of a low interest rate environment, the Commission's investments were primarily concentrated in the Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund (RCPIF). Other investments included the state Local Agency Investment Fund and mutual funds. In connection with the issuance of sales tax revenue bonds and toll revenue bonds and the execution of Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR-91 CIP), the Commission anticipated the need to engage an investment manager for the bond proceeds and other required funds. Additionally, the Commission desired to engage an investment manager to provide investment advisory and management services related to the Commission's operating funds. Accordingly, at its May 2013 meeting, the Commission awarded two investment management services agreements to Logan Circle Partners, L.P. (Logan) for SR-91 CIP funds and to Payden & Rygel Investment Management (Payden & Rygel) for Commission operating funds. Logan invested the SR-91 CIP debt proceeds during the first quarter of FY 2013/14 in the Short - Term Actively Managed Program (STAMP). Payden & Rygel was authorized to make specific investments for the Commission's operating funds beginning with the third quarter of FY 2014/15. In June 2015 the Commission funded its FY 2014/15 SR-91 CIP equity contribution of approximately $35 million; the funds were invested by Logan in a separate STAMP account. The quarterly investment report for the Fourth Quarter of FY 2014/15 as required by state law and Commission policy reflects the increased investment activities resulting from the SR-91 CIP and available operating cash. The quarterly investment report includes the following information: Agenda Item 8C 47 • Investment Portfolio Report; • STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category; • STAMP Portfolio by Account; • STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account; • STAMP Portfolio Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Equity Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by investment category; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report; • Logan Circle Partners, L.P. Short Duration Fourth Quarter 2015 Review; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Fourth Quarter 2015 Review; and • County of Riverside Investment Report for the Quarter Ended June 30, 2015. The Commission's investments were in full compliance with the Commission's investment policy adopted on September 10, 2014, and investments securities permitted under the Indenture for the Commission's Sales Tax Revenue Bonds and the Master Indenture for the Commission's Toll Revenue Bonds. Additionally, the Commission has adequate cash flows for the next six months. Attachments: 1) Investment Portfolio Report 2) STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category 3) STAMP Portfolio by Account 4) STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account 5) STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments 6) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund Summary of Investments 7) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of Investments 8) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of Investments 9) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments 10) STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments 11) STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Equity Fund Summary of Investments Agenda Item 8C 48 12) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category 13) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report 14) Logan Circle Partners, L.P. Short Duration Quarterly Review 15) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Fourth Quarter 2015 Review 16) County of Riverside Investment Report Agenda Item 8C 49 ATTACHMENT 1 Riverside County Transportation Commission Investment Portfolio Report Period Ended: June 30, 2015 RATING COUPON PAR PURCHASE MATURITY YIELD TO PURCHASE MARKET UNREALIZED FAIR VALUE MOODYS/FITCH/S&P RATE VALUE DATE DATE MATURITY COST VALUE GAIN (LOSS) OPERATING FUNDS City National Bank Deposits 7,078,023 A3/BBB+ N/A N/A County Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund 353,110,142 Aaa-bf/AAAN1 N/A 0.42 % Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF) 3,636,124 Not Rated N/A N/A Subtotal Operating Funds 363,824,289 FUNDS HELD IN TRUST County Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund: Local Transportation Fund 105,550,670 Aaa-bf/AAAN1 N/A 0.42% Subtotal Funds Held in Trust 105,550,670 COMMISSION MANAGED PORTFOLIO US Bank Payden & Rygel Operating First American Government Obligation Fund Subtotal Commission Managed Portfolio 50,074,133 See attached report for details 3,647,614 Aaa-mf/-/AAAm N/A 53,721,746 STAMP PORTFOLIO for 91 CIP Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund 41,370,761 Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund 67,034,323 Series A & Series B Reserve Fund 18,470,920 Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund 18,579,657 Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund 59,841,573 Sales Tax Revenue Equity Fund 32,724,034 Subtotal STAMP Portfolio TOTAL All Cash and Investment: E 761,117,972 238,021,267 400,000,000 350,000,000 300,000,000 250,000,000 200,000,000 150,000,000 100,000,000 50,000,000 See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details Nature of Investments ■ STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Reserve ■ STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Project Fund ■ STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Capitalized Interest ■ STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Equity ■ Commission Managed Portfolio ■ Trust Funds ■ Operating Funds N/A Portfolio Investment Type 35.27% Fixed Income 1.27% Mutual 0.21%Money Funds Market Funds 0.47% LAIF 62.78% County Pool/Cash 50 ATTACHMENT 2 MEM Mine _ R i•versid a Cou n i y Tr nnspor Drier Commission STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account Account Identifier Security Typ Category Issuer 'rna Maturity 06/20/2017 Trade Date 06/15/2015 Current Face Value 900,000.00 Original Cost 900,554.67 ' e a i Date --- Base Market Value 900,711.00 Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss 167.65 Coupon 0.217 Summarized Yield Credit Rating 0.180 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3133EECD0 Agency Federal Farm Credit Banks Consolidated Systemwide E 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 313383QM6 Agency Federal Home Loan Banks Office of Finance 07/24/2018 06/15/2015 100,000.00 100,160.00 07/24/2015 100,111.00 14.16 1.950 0.282 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3134G56F7 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 06/19/2017 06/16/2015 450,000.00 450,247.50 09/19/2015 450,594.00 384.15 1.000 0.398 AA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADR7 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 05/O1/2020 05/15/2015 475,000.00 471,527.75 --- 468,250.25 (3,358.55) 1.375 1.682 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp O1/13/2022 07/05/2013 550,000.00 529,303.50 --- 556,858.50 23,177.59 2.375 2.169 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EACA5 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 03/27/2019 07/05/2013 800,000.00 875,900.00 --- 869,144.00 18,554.32 3.750 1.372 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135GOD75 Agency Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/22/2020 05/06/2015 600,000.00 593,490.00 --- 592,884.00 (785.16) 1.500 1.750 AAA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 3133XCQE6 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Banks Office of Finance 07/28/2015 08/13/2013 108,852.66 114,567.42 --- 109,281.54 117.12 5.250 0.185 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B03W2 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 08/25/2017 07/31/2013 45,000.00 44,964.84 --- 45,347.40 387.01 1.426 0.921 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 3137ANLP8 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/25/2016 06/18/2015 100,000.00 100,839.84 --- 100,880.00 _ 58.70 1.655 0.758 AA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31395E7135 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 08/15/2019 07/09/2013 112,085.97 118,583.45 --- 117,175.79 379.64 4.500 1.197 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AQT24 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp O1/25/2019 10/21/2013 170,000.00 171,195.31 --- 173,211.30 2,472.42 2.130 1.539 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3137AHXC7 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/15/2021 06/18/2015 178,456.52 179,237.27 --- 178,981.18 (428.83) 3.000 1.266 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31393V2T7 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 06/15/2018 07/08/2013 200,713.26 212,285.63 --- 209,034.83 720.24 4.500 0.710 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3137AEV69 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp O1/25/2018 06/22/2015 229,817.22 230,966.31 --- 230,908.85 (141.56) 1.873 0.533 AA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 06/25/2022 07/03/2013 235,000.00 220,358.40 --- 234,565.25 11,367.96 2.396 2.412 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A7E22 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 04/15/2028 07/08/2013 236,134.17 244,472.65 --- 245,154.50 3,642.71 3.500 0.895 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AEV77 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 05/25/2018 07/03/2013 251,000.00 258,314.30 --- 260,141.42 4,965.69 2.699 _ 1.310 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ASNH3 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 09/25/2021 07/03/2013 401,814.91 392,664.21 --- 399,174.99 4,267.73 1.459 1.637 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137ASNH3 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 09/25/2021 08/15/2013 401,814.91 391,267.27 --- 399,174.99 5,447.47 1.459 1.637 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137B03 W2 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 08/25/2017 06/17/2015 550,000.00 553,695.31 --- 554,246.00 610.11 1.426 0.921 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31393V2T7 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 06/15/2018 07/08/2013 660,837.66 698,939.08 --- 688,235.99 2,371.34 4.500 0.710 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-t Interest 3137ANLP8 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/25/2016 07/09/2013 930,000.00 939,227.34 --- 938,184.00 5,483.93 1.655 0.758 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3137ANLP8 Agency CM() Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/25/2016 07/08/2013 3,070,000.00 3,100,460.16 --- 3,097,016.00 18,102.87 1.655 0.758 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31392JJ83 Agency CM() Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 03/25/2018 07/08/2013 29,994.16 31,643.84 --- 31,130.34 143.06 5.000 1.113 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31393EXC8 Agency CM() Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/25/2018 07/24/2013 38,778.30 40,995.93 --- 40,393.80 154.17 4.500 0.798 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392HWL3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2018 07/12/2013 40,766.43 43,034.06 --- 42,291.91 150.28 5.000 1.090 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392BVM5 Agency CM() Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2017 07/11/2013 65,716.10 69,371.56 --- 67,179.60 (132.52) 5.500 0.967 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A7MJ8 Agency CM() Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 12/25/2019 08/20/2013 144,225.55 142,084.70 --- 145,190.42 2,363.91 1.520 1.169 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392FPP6 Agency CM() Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 11/25/2017 07/15/2013 170,085.68 180,131.36 --- 175,831.17 (232.90) 5.000 1.091 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3136A4M89 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae O1/25/2019 07/05/2013 180,944.57 182,096.68 --- 183,627.98 2,019.44 1.934 1.314 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31394DVM9 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2034 06/19/2014 190,536.70 201,462.79 --- 200,787.57 1,842.57 5.000 1.133 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3I392F6C6 Agency CM() Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 12/25/2017 07/09/2013 268,640.85 284,969.18 --- 278,040.60 (344.80) 5.000 1.091 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31393EXC8 Agency CM() Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/25/2018 07/24/2013 349,004.66 368,963.36 --- 363,544.19 1,387.57 4.500 0.798 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A72D3 Agency CM() Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 04/25/2022 07/03/2013 395,000.00 375,250.00 --- 396,228.45 17,097.58 2.482 2.417 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3136A4M89 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae O1/25/2019 07/05/2013 589,032.32 592,782.80 --- 597,767.67 6,573.94 1.934 1.314 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 3136A8G38 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/25/2017 07/08/2013 755,173.07 744,022.47 --- 758,964.04 10,531.20 1.246 0.940 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3136ACGF2 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2016 07/15/2013 1,147,943.75 1,150,813.61 --- 1,149,975.61 1,828.19 1.083 0.652 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3I36A8G38 Agency CM() Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/25/2017 07/08/2013 2,492,883.13 2,456,074.16 --- 2,505,397.40 34,764.28 1.246 0.940 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378BX20 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 06/16/2051 03/17/2015 71,902.71 70,303.40 --- 70,250.39 (54.57) 1.240 2.175 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7E3 Agency CM() Government National Mortgage Association 05/16/2046 05/22/2015 233,935.63 224,852.34 --- 227,972.61 3,076.15 1.744 2.520 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 Agency CM() Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2042 --- 450,000.00 427,324.22 --- 421,074.00 (6,419.17) 2.273 3.529 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 38376G5B2 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 08/16/2033 01/22/2015 30,571.83 30,777.24 --- 30,644.90 (36.80) 2.400 1.144 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377DPX8 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 11/20/2036 12/31/2013 40,123.24 42,062.11 --- 40,498.39 (651.61) 2.500 1.230 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38379C2M7 Agency CM() The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 09/20/2041 07/11/2014 52,039.55 54,416.93 --- 53,911.42 (574.77) 1.660 1.163 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RSZ9 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 06/16/2039 01/21/2015 79,290.63 84,032.92 --- 83,718.22 (368.62) 4.500 2.187 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CRT6 Agency CM() The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 10/20/2040 05/22/2014 127,582.04 123,196.41 --- 125,770.37 2,341.12 2.000 2.340 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 04/20/2039 07/03/2013 124,049.14 126,995.31 --- 128,532.28 2,243.82 3.000 1.709 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377JZ89 Agency CM() The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 10/20/2039 07/05/2013 169,837.62 175,032.27 --- 177,020.06 2,867.45 3.500 1.906 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376T5Z1 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guar[ O1/16/2039 01/26/2015 170,992.43 178,644.34 --- 177,965.50 (420.70) 3.000 1.768 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376WA62 Agency CM() The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 10/20/2039 01/21/2015 175,569.71 184,328.70 --- 186,284.73 1,985.10 4.000 1.522 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 38377UN20 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guar O1/20/2040 06/24/2015 188,609.65 191,998.72 --- 192,048.00 (108.84) 3.000 0.991 AA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378TAF7 Agency CM() The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 07/20/2041 07/05/2013 246,861.07 246,898.29 --- 252,491.97 5,719.05 2.500 1.885 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 38377LN38 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 11/16/2038 06/16/2015 269,207.59 278,293.34 --- 277,962.22 (443.37) 3.500 1.793 AA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 38376GB33 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 10/16/2044 01/23/2015 350,000.00 359,262.85 --- 359,863.00 1,971.47 3.500 1.339 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B6ZL8 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 12/25/2019 01/07/2014 50,227.37 51,231.34 --- 50,989.32 48.96 2.075 1.373 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3I28PHVS7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/O1/2019 07/16/2013 87,776.90 92,494.91 --- 91,646.98 838.72 5.000 0.337 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128H4NR6 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 05/O1/2018 07/16/2013 90,658.65 96,041.51 --- 94,655.79 613.13 5.000 0.729 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3I28GNR59 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 10/O1/2016 07/05/2013 115,884.24 122,764.87 --- 118,138.19 (1,002.64) 6.000 2.271 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128MBTH0 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 03/01 /2019 07/26/2013 115,773.50 122,719.91 --- 120,898.79 453.55 5.000 1.134 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3I294LPZo Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 12/O1/2016 07/05/2013 138,530.95 146,453.19 --- 141,753.18 (315.62) 6.000 1.335 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3128MMAK9 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 09/O1/2019 07/08/2013 158,475.13 168,478.88 --- 168,262.56 2,526.06 5.000 0.844 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3I32FEAK7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 12/O1/2017 07/03/2013 161,949.58 171,615.94 --- 169,089.93 1,066.86 5.000 0.187 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128PGLY7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 05/O1/2017 07/17/2013 202,160.18 213,026.30 --- 211,073.42 3,538.31 5.000 -0.783 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A7JU5 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/25/2017 07/03/2013 325,000.00 351,203.13 --- 343,190.25 4,369.71 3.882 1.256 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31385XBG1 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 03/O1/2018 09/13/2013 19,544.36 20,814.75 --- 20,176.04 (80.01) 6.000 1.596 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 31416YXJ2 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/O1/2026 07/03/2013 65,816.16 68,911.57 --- 69,592.03 1,090.07 3.500 1.821 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31402RBG3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/01 /2019 --- 80,980.04 86,863.06 --- 84,297.79 (446.81) 6.000 1.617 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 31404WTT3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 05/O1/2019 12/31/2013 86,083.98 95,961.47 --- 89,667.66 (3,359.31) 4.500 1.502 AAA 51 Page 2 of 30 MEM Mine .--._ Ri•versida toun yTr nnspor orien(ammissinn STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account 256350023 Account Identifier LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EJ6V5 Security Type Category Agency MBS Issuer Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 'ma Maturity 09/0]/2026 Trade Date 11/18/2013 Current Face Value 132,960.85 Original Cost 141,167.03 'ex a Date --- Base Market Value 142,119.19 Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon 4.000 Summarized Yield Credit Rating 1.842 AAA 1,681.18 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31410GSQ7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 12/O1/2017 07/05/2013 137,343.67 147,472.76 --- 142,752.26 (170.07) 6.000 1.047 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AEYG6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/25/2018 11/20/2013 152,279.69 153,481.28 --- 154,049.18 1,029.21 1.825 1.363 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 3I385JLF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/01/2017 09/18/2013 162,126.25 173,069.77 --- 167,601.25 (804.03) 6.000 1.424 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31417Y1CF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 01/O1/2030 07/10/2013 158,636.02 167,361.00 --- 171,618.79 4,444.84 4.500 2.149 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 314I3XVG5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/01/2019 08/04/2014 200,000.00 218,500.00 --- 215,846.00 697.40 4.506 2.419 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31418AFW3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/O1/2022 07/10/2013 241,203.89 249,118.39 --- 250,972.64 3,506.96 3.000 1.238 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 31381PEB0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 11/01/2020 09/26/2014 265,000.00 279,036.72 --- 280,279.90 2,981.82 3.370 2.208 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402QT68 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 10/01 /2019 07/11/2013 269,075.10 290,685.20 --- 281,901.91 (2,222.28) 6.000 1.749 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402RBG3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/O1/2019 --- 276,940.03 297,030.48 --- 288,286.26 (1,515.87) 6.000 1.617 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3138L1TX7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 11/O1/2017 06/18/2015 313,311.59 314,731.29 --- 316,147.06 1,428.72 1.660 1.223 AA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund -I 3136A4M48 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae O1/25/2022 07/05/2013 377,698.69 378,760.97 --- 383,349.06 5,046.64 2.098 1.622 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31401MWC1 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/O1/2018 07/12/2013 812,917.92 866,773.73 --- 846,792.21 3,356.76 4.500 0.890 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36200AFG9 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 11/15/2017 07/09/2013 48,044.94 51,197.89 --- 49,610.72 (398.82) 5.500 1.884 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B6A2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2052 01/22/2015 142,140.94 137,660.16 --- 138,050.12 96.43 1.826 2.684 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36290WH47 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/15/2018 07/18/2013 935,729.52 994,212.63 --- 982,450.50 5,081.14 4.500 0.429 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 11/16/2041 05/22/2015 71,378.35 69,588.31 --- 69,944.36 335.95 1.400 2.275 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KXW4 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 02/16/2037 12/11/2014 199,509.02 198,542.65 --- 197,968.81 (729.23) 1.705 2.109 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KSL4 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 12/16/2046 --- 425,000.00 415,829.11 --- 402,657.75 (13,285.13) 2.785 3.492 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KRS0 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 07/16/2043 05/08/2015 450,000.00 434,460.94 --- 430,290.00 (4,464.97) 2.389 3.182 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378XP62 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guar 05/16/2055 05/14/2015 475,274.31 481,140.98 --- 477,484.34 (3,677.08) 2.500 2.400 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 02582JGY0 Asset Backed American Express Credit Account Master Trust 05/15/2020 06/25/2015 175,000.00 174,917.97 --- 175,134.75 493.88 0.476 0.451 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 02582JGJ3 Asset Backed American Express Credit Account Master Trust 05/15/2019 06/11/2015 487,000.00 487,209.26 --- 487,374.99 172.24 0.980 0.922 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 16157IFH2 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 05/15/2019 06/17/2015 175,000.00 174,890.63 --- 174,833.75 (58.29) 0.456 0.507 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 17305EFE0 Asset Backed Citibank Credit Card Issuance Trust 09/07/2018 06/23/2015 330,000.00 331,727.34 --- 331,663.20 (44.80) 1.320 0.892 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 36162WACI Asset Backed GE Equipment Transportation LLC, Series 2013-1 11/25/2016 07/09/2013 408,019.21 406,680.40 --- 408,247.70 407.34 0.690 0.465 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 47787RAD2 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2012-B 01/15/2019 06/12/2015 350,000.00 350,054.69 --- 350,210.00 158.17 0.690 0.605 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 47787UAC7 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2015 02/15/2018 06/12/2015 425,000.00 425,066.41 --- 424,974.50 (89.13) 0.456 0.462 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 58768WAD1 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Receivables Trust 2013-1 11/15/2019 06/16/2015 350,000.00 351,066.41 --- 351,291.50 252.85 1.130 0.883 AAA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 55314QAC1 Asset Backed MMAF Equipment Finance LLC 2012-A O8/10/2016 01/16/2014 92,258.57 92,474.80 -- 92,291.78 5.86 0.940 0.481 AAA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 55314QAC1 Asset Backed MMAF Equipment Finance LLC 2012-A O8/10/2016 --- 510,989.44 512,294.63 --- 511,173.40 70.19 _ 0.940 0.481 AAA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 89231NAC7 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2012-B Owner Trust 07/15/2016 02/14/2014 148,800.34 148,899.15 --- 148,809.27 (10.82) 0.460 0.418 AAA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 89231NAC7 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2012-B Owner Trust 07/15/2016 --- 167,314.67 167,412.81 --- 167,324.71 (9.43) 0.460 0.418 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 90290KAD7 Asset Backed USAA Auto Owner Trust 2014-1 05/15/2019 06/12/2015 445,000.00 443,991.80 -- 444,790.85 773.73 0.940 0.974 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 002799AM6 Corporate _ Abbey National Treasury Services PLC 03/13/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 300,810.00 --- 300,624.00 (167.46) 1.375 1.251 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 00138CAA6 Corporate AIG GLOBAL FDG SR SECD MEDIUMTERM NTS 12/15/2017 06/22/2015 300,000.00 300,696.00 --- 300,432.00 (259.47) 1.650 1.590 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 02580ECC5 Corporate American Express Bank, FSB. 09/13/2017 07/08/2013 250,000.00 287,890.00 --- 273,307.50 2,892.75 6.000 1.670 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 0258MODR7 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 09/22/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 300,678.00 --- 300,978.00 311.75 1.550 1.401 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 02665 WAT8 Corporate American Honda Finance Corporation 03/13/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 299,877.00 --- 300,030.00 150.88 1.500 1.496 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 037833AM2 Corporate Apple Inc. 05/05/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 300,957.00 --- 300,897.00 (38.15) 1.050 0.886 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 037833AJ9 Corporate Apple Inc. 05/03/2018 06/17/2015 3,000,000.00 2,960,430.00 --- 2,969,670.00 8,907.83 1.000 1.364 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 06050TLY6 Corporate Bank of America, National Association 03/26/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 298,968.00 --- 299,553.00 568.80 1.650 1.706 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 063679ZT4 Corporate Bank of Montreal 01/30/2017 06/12/2015 300,000.00 304,620.00 --- 304,758.00 247.73 1.950 0.938 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 06406HCJ6 Corporate Bank of New York Company, Inc. , The 03/06/2018 06/22/2015 250,000.00 249,360.00 02/06/2018 248,530.00 (833.89) 1.350 1.574 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 05531FAL7 Corporate BB&T Corporation 08/15/2017 06/22/2015 250,000.00 251,235.00 07/14/2017 250,847.50 _ (377.95) _ 1.600 1.431 A 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 084664BE0 Corporate Berkshire Hathaway Finance Corporation 05/15/2018 06/17/2015 800,000.00 890,632.00 --- 887,296.00 (2,583.92) 5.400 1.507 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 084670BD9 Corporate Berkshire Hathaway Inc. 01/31/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 305,106.00 --- 304,680.00 (298.91) 1.900 0.905 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-t Interest 05565QCCO Corporate BP Capital Markets P.L.C. 11/06/2017 07/03/2013 300,000.00 292,194.00 --- 299,796.00 4,114.74 1.375 1.404 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 05565QCY2 Corporate BP Capital Markets P.L.C. 02/13/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 300,573.00 --- 301,050.00 485.66 1.674 1.537 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 07330NAGO Corporate Branch Banking and Tmst Company 12/O1/2016 06/12/2015 300,000.00 300,138.00 11/O1/2016 300,393.00 258.79 1.050 0.951 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 166764AV2 Corporate Chevron Corporation 03/02/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 299,187.00 --- 299,874.00 673.92 1.365 1.381 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 166764AE0 Corporate Chevron Corporation 06/24/2018 06/17/2015 300,000.00 301,848.00 05/24/2018 301,788.00 (44.80) 1.718 1.507 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 166764AE0 Corporate Chevron Corporation 06/24/2018 06/17/2015 2,200,000.00 2,213,552.00 05/24/2018 2,213,112.00 (328.54) 1.718 1.507 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 166754AK7 Corporate CHEVRON PHILLIPS CHEM CO LLC / CHEVRON 05/O1/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 299,631.00 --- 299,703.00 66.78 1.700 1.736 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 20030NAP6 Corporate Comcast Corporation 01/15/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 325,509.00 _ --- 324,504.00 (296.49) 6.500 1.140 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 209111ET6 Corporate Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. 04/O1/2018 06/22/2015 220,000.00 245,828.00 --- 245,014.00 (664.75) 5.850 1.610 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 22546QAV9 Corporate Credit Suisse AG 04/27/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 297,495.00 --- 297,909.00 376.45 1.700 1.954 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 233851BF0 Corporate Daimler Finance North America LLC 08/O1/2017 06/12/2015 300,000.00 299,250.00 --- 299,574.00 310.34 1.375 1.444 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 233851AT1 Corporate Daimler Finance North America LLC 01/11/2016 07/08/2013 500,000.00 497,995.00 --- 501,470.00 1,898.98 1.250 0.694 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 25600WAD2 Corporate DNB Boligkreditt AS 03/21/2018 06/16/2015 400,000.00 399,608.00 --- 400,196.00 583.13 1.450 1.431 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 26442CAD6 Corporate Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC 04/15/2018 06/11/2015 116,000.00 127,422.52 --- 127,352.92 92.35 5.100 1.506 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 532457BK3 Corporate Eli Lilly and Company 03/O1/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 298,908.00 --- 299,175.00 249.58 1.250 1.355 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 30231GAL6 Corporate Exxon Mobil Corporation 03/06/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 299,583.00 --- 299,757.00 167.60 1.305 1.336 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 30231GAL6 Corporate Exxon Mobil Corporation 03/06/2018 06/10/2015 420,000.00 419,525.40 --- 419,659.80 126.57 1.305 1.336 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 30231GAL6 Corporate Exxon Mobil Corporation 03/06/2018 06/10/2015 580,000.00 579,344.60 --- 579,530.20 174.79 1.305 1.336 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 31677QAV1 Corporate Fifth Third Bank 02/28/2018 06/23/2015 250,000.00 248,055.00 01/28/2018 248,160.00 95.13 1.450 1.734 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest _ 36962G3H5 Corporate General Electric Capital Corporation 09/15/2017 07/03/2013 300,000.00 340,212.00 --- 326,679.00 5,001.21 5.625 1.514 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 36962G3H5 Corporate General Electric Capital Corporation 09/15/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 328,362.00 --- 326,679.00 (1,143.35) 5.625 1.514 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 41283LAB1 Corporate Harley-Davidson Financial Services, Inc. 03/15/2017 06/22/2015 250,000.00 256,430.00 --- 255,602.50 (767.49) 2.700 1.368 A 52 Page 3 of 30 MEM Mine R i•: ersid a Cou n i y Tr onspor orien Commission STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account 205091001 Account LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest Identifier 44328MAL8 Security Type Category Corporate Issuer HSBC Bank PLC 'ma Base Market Value 3,698,623.75 Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss 18,340.07 Coupon 3.100 Summarized Yield Credit Rating 0.830 AA Maturity 05/24/2016 Trade Date --- Current Face Value 3,625,000.00 Original Cost 3,799,301.25 i Date --- -- 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 40434CAA3 Corporate HSBC USA Inc. 06/23/2017 06/12/2015 300,000.00 300,090.00 299,856.00 (232.50) 1.300 1.325 A 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 459200GX3 Corporate International Business Machines Corporation 07/22/2016 07/10/2013 465,000.00 477,936.30 --- 471,682.05 2,104.64 1.950 0.589 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 46623EKD0 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co. 03/01/2018 06/10/2015 _ 300,000.00 299,310.00 02/01/2018 298,947.00 (374.29) 1.700 1.835 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 46625HJL5 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co. 05/15/2018 06/03/2015 500,000.00 497,550.00 --- 496,105.00 (1,496.40) 1.625 1.904 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 48121CYK6 Corporate JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association 10/01/2017 07/03/2013 300,000.00 341,424.00 --- 327,105.00 4,497.83 6.000 1.883 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 59217GAY5 Corporate Metropolitan Life Global Funding I 01/10/2018 06/12/2015 _ 300,000.00 299,646.00 --- 299,442.00 (209.84) 1.500 1.575 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 59217GBH1 Corporate Metropolitan Life Global Funding I 04/10/2017 06/10/2015 _ 300,000.00 300,504.00 --- 300,678.00 185.84 1.300 1.171 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 59217GAC3 Corporate Metropolitan Life Global Funding I 09/29/2015 07/03/2013 740,000.00 766,284.80 --- 743,441.00 525.72 2.500 0.612 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 6174467U7 Corporate Morgan Stanley 04/25/2018 06/10/2015 _ 300,000.00 301,584.00 --- 302,028.00 467.33 2.125 1.877 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 6174467U7 Corporate Morgan Stanley 04/25/2018 06/03/2015 500,000.00 504,020.00 --- 503,380.00 (554.75) 2.125 1.877 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 553794AA6 Corporate MUFG Americas Holdings Corporation 02/09/2018 06/11/2015 _ 300,000.00 298,716.00 01/09/2018 298,857.00 121.02 1.625 1.775 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 63307EAB3 Corporate National Bank of Canada 10/19/2016 05/21/2015 900,000.00 918,414.00 --- 918,396.00 1,234.24 2.200 0.622 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 69371RM52 Corporate PACCAR Financial Corp. 05/18/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 299,034.00 --- 299,529.00 481.66 1.400 1.456 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 718172AA7 Corporate Philip Mortis International Inc. 05/16/2018 06/23/2015 250,000.00 277,717.50 --- 277,637.50 47.56 5.650 1.697 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 _ 69349LAP3 Corporate PNC Realty Investors, Inc. 11/01/2016 06/12/2015 300,000.00 300,210.00 10/02/2016 300,387.00 183.07 1.150 1.046 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 74153WCE7 Corporate Pricoa Global Funding I 08/18/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 299,511.00 --- 299,052.00 (469.07) 1.350 1.501 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 747525AG8 Corporate QUALCOMM Incorporated 05/18/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 299,025.00 --- 299,067.00 28.54 1.400 1.510 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 21686CAD2 Corporate Rabobank Nederland 01/19/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 310,389.00 --- 309,879.00 (223.96) 3.375 1.227 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 767201AM8 Corporate Rio Tinto Finance (USA) Limited 05/20/2016 07/03/2013 600,000.00 617,400.00 --- 610,470.00 5,010.29 2.500 0.529 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 78011DAF1 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 10/01/2018 06/16/2015 300,000.00 302,877.00 --- 304,242.00 1,392.60 2.000 1.552 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 78011DAC8 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 09/19/2017 05/21/2015 1,000,000.00 1,001,090.00 --- 998,440.00 (2,606.92) 1.200 1.271 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 78008K5V1 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 04/19/2016 07/08/2013 2,000,000.00 2,099,900.00 --- 2,034,980.00 5,841.17 2.875 0.686 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 822582AZ5 Corporate Shell International Finance B.V. 11/15/2016 06/12/2015 300,000.00 300,429.00 --- 300,627.00 209.52 0.900 _ 0.747 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 822582AC6 Corporate Shell International Finance B.V. 03/22/2017 07/08/2013 400,000.00 449,936.00 --- 428,224.00 4,530.88 5.200 1.067 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 842434CN0 Corporate Southem California Gas Company 06/15/2018 06/15/2015 250,000.00 249,992.50 --- 250,602.50 609.92 1.550 1.466 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 064159CQ7 Corporate The Bank of Nova Scotia 07/15/2016 06/12/2015 300,000.00 302,034.00 --- 301,902.00 (59.11) 1.375 0.763 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 38141GRC0 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. 01/22/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 303,852.00 --- 304,563.00 774.13 2.375 1.765 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 38144LAB6 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. 09/01/2017 07/03/2013 300,000.00 322,515.00 --- 328,428.00 16,153.92 6.250 1.777 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 38143USC6 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. 02/07/2016 07/03/2013 600,000.00 627,936.00 --- 609,720.00 3,082.14 3.625 0.923 A 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 742718DV8 Corporate The Procter & Gamble Company 08/15/2016 07/10/2013 1,240,000.00 1,256,033.20 --- 1,249,448.80 3,544.00 1.450 0.768 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 89114QAZ1 Corporate The Toronto -Dominion Bank 03/13/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 300,762.00 --- 301,605.00 854.46 1.625 1.422 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 891 I4QAE8 Corporate The Toronto -Dominion Bank 10/19/2016 07/08/2013 750,000.00 776,452.50 --- 764, I60.00 3,515.22 2.375 0.913 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 891145TN4 Corporate The Toronto -Dominion Bank 03/13/2017 05/21/2015 1,000,000.00 1,010,240.00 --- 1,009,200.00 (505.31) 1.500 0.954 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 89837LAA3 Corporate The Trustees of Princeton University 03/01/2019 --- 445,000.00 496,093.57 --- 494,840.00 (590.50) 4.950 1.783 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 25468PCV6 Corporate The Walt Disney Company 12/01/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 299,427.00 --- 299,823.00 385.93 1.100 1.125 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 89153UAE1 Corporate Total Capital Canada Ltd 01/15/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 300,000.00 --- 300,306.00 306.00 1.450 1.409 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89153VAC3 Corporate Total Capital International 06/28/2017 07/08/2013 160,000.00 157,765.60 --- 161,484.80 2,628.46 1.550 1.078 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 89233P6S0 Corporate Toyota Motor Credit Corporation 10/05/2017 06/11/2015 200,000.00 200,184.00 --- 200,510.00 329.12 1.250 1.135 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 89236TAY1 Corporate Toyota Motor Credit Corporation 10/24/2018 06/17/2015 500,000.00 505,870.00 -- 504,615.00 (1,213.10) 2.000 1.712 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89236TAYl Corporate Toyota Motor Credit Corporation 10/24/2018 06/17/2015 2,000,000.00 2,023,480.00 --- 2,018,460.00 (4,852.39) 2.000 1.712 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 91159HHD5 Corporate U.S. Bancorp 05/15/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 303,276.00 04/15/2017 303,615.00 411.47 1.650 0.970 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 90261XHH8 Corporate UBS AG 03/26/2018 06/22/2015 250,000.00 249,357.50 --- 249,627.50 266.13 1.800 1.856 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 91324PCF7 Corporate UnitedHealth Group Incorporated 12/15/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 300,543.00 --- 299,463.00 (1,071.21) 1.400 1.474 A 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 90327QCW7 Corporate USAA Capital Corporation 12/13/2016 07/11/2013 4,000,000.00 4,145,440.00 --- 4,077,040.00 14,388.66 2.250 0.912 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 928668AF9 Corporate Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. 11/20/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 300,525.00 --- 300,279.00 (237.38) 1.600 1.560 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 92976WBH8 Corporate Wells Fargo & Company 02/01/2018 06/22/2015 200,000.00 221,176.00 --- 220,884.00 (163.07) 5.750 1.611 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 94974BEZ9 Corporate Wells Fargo & Company 12/15/2016 06/12/2015 300,000.00 307,113.00 --- 306,852.00 (79.90) 2.625 1.043 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 94974BGF1 Corporate Wells Fargo & Company 01/30/2020 06/03/2015 1,000,000.00 991,540.00 --- 990,450.00 (1,205.73) 2.150 2.371 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 05634CUN4 CP Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. 07/22/2015 06/10/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,933.34 --- 1,999,820.00 380.00 0.000 0.154 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 05634CUN4 CP Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. 07/22/2015 06/10/2015 3,200,000.00 3,198,293.34 --- 3,199,712.00 608.00 0.000 0.154 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 075881V1UT1 CP Becton, Dickinson and Company 07/27/2015 06/15/2015 3,300,000.00 3,298,267.50 --- 3,299,637.00 709.50 0.000 0.152 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 1518T3UD2 CP CenterPoint Energy, Inc. 07/13/2015 06/10/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,175.00 --- 1,999,900.00 200.00 0.000 0.150 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 1518T3UD2 CP CenterPoint Energy, Inc. 07/13/2015 06/10/2015 3,200,000.00 3,198,760.00 --- 3,199,840.00 320.00 0.000 0.150 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 63946EUD4 CP Comcast Corporation 07/13/2015 06/10/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,211.66 --- 1,999,900.00 186.67 0.000 0.150 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 12665KU95 CP CVS Health Corp. 07/09/2015 06/16/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,486.66 --- 1,999,940.00 135.56 0.000 0.135 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 12665KU95 CP CVS Health Corp. 07/09/2015 06/16/2015 3,300,000.00 3,299,152.99 --- 3,299,901.00 223.67 0.000 0.135 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27743KUL2 CP Eastman Chemical Company 07/20/2015 06/18/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,300.00 --- 1,999,840.00 315.00 0.000 0.152 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27805BU94 CP Eaton Corporation 07/09/2015 06/09/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,250.00 --- 1,999,940.00 140.00 0.000 0.135 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 27805BU94 CP Eaton Corporation 07/09/2015 06/09/2015 3,300,000.00 3,298,762.50 --- 3,299,901.00 231.00 0.000 0.135 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 2925A3UA4 CP Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P. 07/10/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,265.00 --- 1,399,944.00 164.50 0.000 0.160 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 2925A3UA4 CP Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P. 07/10/2015 06/09/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,915.00 --- 1,999,920.00 235.00 0.000 0.160 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 2925A3UA4 CP Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P. 07/10/2015 06/09/2015 3,300,000.00 3,298,209.75 --- 3,299,868.00 387.75 0.000 0.160 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 29250BU74 CP Encana Corporation 07/07/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,391.00 --- 1,399,972.00 107.33 0.000 0.120 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 29250BU25 CP Encana Corporation 07/02/2015 05/29/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,065.56 --- 2,000,000.00 32.22 0.000 0.000 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 29250BU25 CP Encana Corporation 07/02/2015 05/29/2015 3,300,000.00 3,298,458.17 --- 3,300,000.00 53.17 0.000 0.000 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 3024X3U69 CP FMC Technologies, Inc. 07/06/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,555.11 --- 1,399,972.00 57.56 0.000 0.144 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 44890NU65 CP Hyundai Capital America 07/06/2015 05/07/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,333.20 --- 1,999,960.00 98.90 0.000 0.144 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 44890NU24 CP Hyundai Capital America 07/02/2015 05/14/2015 3,300,000.00 3,298,068.58 --- 3,300,000.00 44.92 0.000 0.000 AA 53 Page 4 of 30 MEM Mine .--._ R i•versid a Can n i y Tr tnspor i orien Lemmissi on STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account 256350001 Account LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien Identifier 57163UUV6 Security Type Category Marriott International, Inc. 'ma Maturity 07/29/2015 Trade Date 06/19/2015 'ex Base Market Value 1,999,760.00 Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon 0.000 Summarized Yield Credit Rating 0.154 AA Current Fa .ue 2,000,000.00 Original Cost 1,999,033.88 a Date --- CP 491.12 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 57163UUV6 CP Marriott International, Inc. 07/29/2015 06/19/2015 3,200,000.00 3,198,454.21 --- 3,199,616.00 785.79 0.000 0.154 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 60920WU65 CP Mondelez International, Inc. 07/06/2015 05/21/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,875.56 --- 1,999,960.00 82.22 0.000 0.144 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 60920WU65 CP Mondelez International, Inc. 07/06/2015 05/21/2015 2,350,000.00 2,348,678.78 --- 2,349,953.00 96.61 0.000 0.144 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6116M3VH7 CP Monsanto Company 08/17/2015 05/28/2015 2,000,000.00 1,997,732.78 --- 1,999,500.00 883.89 0.000 0.192 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 6116M3VH7 CP Monsanto Company 08/17/2015 05/28/2015 3,100,000.00 3,096,485.80 --- 3,099,225.00 1,370.03 0.000 0.192 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 61979KU69 CP Motiva Enterprises LLC 07/06/2015 06/11/2015 900,000.00 899,731.25 --- 899,982.00 35.75 0.000 0.144 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 61979KU69 CP Motiva Enterprises LLC 07/06/2015 06/11/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,581.94 --- 1,399,972.00 55.61 0.000 0.144 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 61979KU69 CP Motiva Enterprises LLC 07/06/2015 06/11/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,402.78 --- 1,999,960.00 79.44 0.000 0.144 AAA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6362P3UQ5 CP National Grid USA 07/24/2015 06/24/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,387.78 --- 1,999,800.00 285.55 0.000 0.157 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 6362P3UQ5 CP National Grid USA 07/24/2015 06/24/2015 3,200,000.00 3,199,020.45 --- 3,199,680.00 456.88 0.000 0.157 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 66807NUV5 CP NorthWestem Corporation 07/29/2015 06/29/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,194.44 --- 1,999,760.00 537.78 0.000 0.154 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 68268UU21 CP ONEOK Partners, L.P. 07/02/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,426.78 --- 1,400,000.00 26.05 0.000 0.000 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 68268UU21 CP ONEOK Partners, L.P. 07/02/2015 06/10/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,367.22 --- 2,000,000.00 37.22 0.000 0.000 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 68268UU21 CP ONEOK Partners, L.P. 07/02/2015 06/10/2015 3,200,000.00 3,198,987.55 --- 3,200,000.00 59.56 0.000 0.000 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 69430MU61 CP Pacific Gas and Electric Company 07/06/2015 05/26/2015 1,525,000.00 1,524,322.64 --- 1,524,969.50 56.34 0.000 0.144 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 77434MVE2 CP Rockwell Collins, Inc. 08/14/2015 06/18/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,506.66 --- 1,999,540.00 713.34 0.000 0.188 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 77434MVE2 CP Rockwell Collins, Inc. 08/14/2015 06/18/2015 3,200,000.00 3,197,610.66 --- 3,199,264.00 1,141.34 0.000 0.188 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 88513BUP3 CP Thomson Reuters Corporation 07/23/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,130.45 --- 1,399,874.00 318.88 0.000 0.147 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 88513BUQ1 CP Thomson Reuters Corporation 07/24/2015 06/09/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,728.88 --- 1,999,800.00 464.45 0.000 0.157 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 88513BUQ1 CP Thomson Reuters Corporation 07/24/2015 06/09/2015 3,300,000.00 3,297,902.65 --- 3,299,670.00 766.34 0.000 0.157 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 96950MUA5 CP Williams Partners L.P. 07/10/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,416.66 --- 1,399,944.00 119.00 0.000 0.160 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 96950MUE7 CP Williams Partners L.P. 07/14/2015 06/15/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,222.22 --- 1,999,900.00 261.11 0.000 0.139 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 96950MUE7 CP Williams Partners L.P. 07/14/2015 06/15/2015 3,200,000.00 3,198,755.55 --- 3,199,840.00 417.78 0.000 0.139 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 06/25/2015 0.00 10,729.00 --- 10,729.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 NA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 --- - 91,980.19 -- 91,980.19 - 0.000 0.000 NA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 --- - 134,184.17 --- 134,184.17 - 0.000 0.000 NA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 --- - 189,003.04 -- 189,003.04 - 0.000 0.000 NA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 --- - 318,613.35 --- 318,613.35 - 0.000 0.000 NA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 --- - 376,394.86 -- 376,394.86 - 0.000 0.000 NA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 184126YS3 Muni Clayton County Water Authority 05/01/2017 07/11/2013 _ 770,000.00 755,939.80 --- 775,082.00 12,002.52 _ 1.300 _0.936 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 235219752 Muni Dallas, City of 02/15/2017 07/10/2013 650,000.00 650,000.00 --- 658,950.50 8,950.50 1.589 0.735 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 235219JS2 Muni Dallas, City of 02/15/2017 07/10/2013 2,135,000.00 2,135,000.00 --- 2,164,398.95 29,398.95 1.589 0.735 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 407288YD5 Muni Hamilton, County of 12/01/2015 07/18/2013 630,000.00 630,000.00 --- 630,718.20 718.20 0.803 0.530 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 407288YD5 Muni Hamilton, County of 12/01/2015 07/18/2013 2,080,000.00 2,080,000.00 --- 2,082,371.20 2,371.20 0.803 _ 0.530 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 407288YD5 Muni Hamilton, County of 12/01/2015 07/18/2013 6,645,000.00 6,645,000.00 --- 6,652,575.30 7,575.30 0.803 0.530 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 49130TRY4 Muni Kentucky Housing Corporation 01/01/2017 06/17/2015 275,000.00 274,634.25 --- 274,579.25 (61.10) 0.937 1.040 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 64966H4E7 Muni New York, City of 10/01/2017 07/12/2013 1,170,000.00 1,238,222.70 --- 1,208,223.90 1,097.95 3.140 1.656 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 912828UA6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/30/2017 06/17/2015 120,000.00 119,095.31 --- 119,484.00 375.69 0.625 0.805 AA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912833KR0 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/15/2018 07/05/2013 380,000.00 353,517.80 --- 369,489.20 5,396.80 0.000 0.977 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828TJ9 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 08/15/2022 07/05/2013 495,000.00 461,355.47 --- 479,843.10 11,787.80 1.625 2.090 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828UF5 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 12/31/2019 --- 500,000.00 493,388.87 -- 491,210.00 (2,459.87) 1.125 1.531 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 01/31/2021 05/15/2015 500,000.00 512,578.13 --- 508,280.00 (4,045.18) 2.125 1.812 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828KQ2 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/15/2019 07/05/2013 500,000.00 539,902.34 --- 533,555.00 6,718.44 3.125 1.342 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 912828J84 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2020 06/17/2015 600,000.00 591,140.63 --- 594,096.00 2,891.56 1.375 1.591 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 912828KQ2 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/15/2019 06/17/2015 600,000.00 638,062.50 --- 640,266.00 2,538.57 3.125 1.342 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828J84 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2020 --- 950,000.00 936,470.70 --- 940,652.00 4,054.63 1.375 1.591 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828RX0 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 12/31/2016 09/13/2013 950,000.00 945,212.89 --- 955,567.00 7,765.79 0.875 0.482 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828UA6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/30/2017 07/05/2013 1,250,000.00 1,214,648.44 --- 1,244,625.00 14,291.40 0.625 0.805 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VK3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 06/30/2018 07/05/2013 1,575,000.00 1,567,678.71 --- 1,592,104.50 21,575.31 1.375 1.007 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 912828UZ1 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/30/2018 06/11/2015 1,650,000.00 1,628,343.75 --- 1,635,183.00 6,456.39 0.625 0.947 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UA6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/30/2017 07/05/2013 1,750,000.00 1,700,507.81 --- 1,742,475.00 20,007.95 0.625 0.805 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UB4 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/30/2019 06/17/2015 2,500,000.00 2,433,398.44 --- 2,445,325.00 11,411.75 1.000 1.514 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UZ1 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/30/2018 06/03/2015 3,400,000.00 3,360,421.88 --- 3,369,468.00 8,058.65 0.625 0.947 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VB3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/15/2023 07/05/2013 3,500,000.00 3,253,085.94 --- 3,385,445.00 87,521.13 1.750 2.205 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828RU6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/30/2016 07/05/2013 3,500,000.00 3,496,855.47 --- 3,520,510.00 21,829.59 0.875 0.460 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828SY7 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/31/2017 07/05/2013 3,900,000.00 3,828,550.78 --- 3,899,376.00 34,877.00 0.625 0.633 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828784 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2020 06/03/2015 4,300,000.00 4,243,023.44 --- 4,257,688.00 13,856.64 1.375 1.591 AAA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 64468EAZ3 VRDN Labor, New Hampshire Department of 11/01/2020 07/03/2013 3,200,000.00 3,200,000.00 07/01/2015 3,200,000.00 - 0.140 0.140 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 64468EAY6 VRDN Labor, New Hampshire Department of 11/01/2020 11/04/2013 4,190,000.00 4,190,000.00 07/01/2015 4,190,000.00 - 0.140 0.140 AA 235,806,639.43 237,887,995.31 238,021,267.73 648,525.75 54 Page 5 of 30 �`� Riverside Coumy Ttnnsporlmion Commission STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2015 ATTACHMENT 3 Source Security Type Final Current Face Next Call Base Net Total Summarized Account Account Identifier Category Issuer Maturity Trade Date Value Original Cost Date Base Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Credit Rating 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392HWL3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2018 07/12/2013 40,766.43 43,034.06 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392F6C6 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 12/25/2017 07/09/2013 268,640.85 42,291.91 150.28 5.000 1.090 284,969.18 --- 278,040.60 (344.80) 5.000 1.091 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31393EXC8 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/25/2018 07/24/2013 349,004.66 368,963.36 363,544.19 AAA AAA 1,387.57 4.500 0.798 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392BVM5 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2017 07/11/2013 65,716.10 69,371.56 67,179.60 (132.52) 5.500 0.967 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3136A4M89 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 01/25/2019 07/05/2013 589,032.32 592,782.80 -- 597,767.67 6,573.94 1.934 1.314 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3136ACGF2 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2016 07/15/2013 1,147,943.75 1,150,813.61 1,149,975.61 1,828.19 1.083 0.652 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392FPP6 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 11/25/2017 07/15/2013 170,085.68 180,131.36 -- 175,831.17 (232.90) 5.000 1.091 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3136A8G38 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/25/2017 07/08/2013 2,492,883.13 2,456,074.16 2,505,397.40 34,764.28 1.246 0.940 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31393V2T7 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 06/15/2018 07/08/2013 660,837.66 698,939.08 -- 688,235.99 2,371.34 4.500 0.710 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3137ANLP8 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/25/2016 07/08/2013 3,070,000.00 3,100,460.16 3,097,016.00 18,102.87 1.655 0.758 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402RBG3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/01/2019 276,940.03 297,030.48 -- 288,286.26 (1,515.87) 6.000 1.617 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31410GSQ7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 12/01/2017 07/05/2013 137,343.67 147,472.76 142,752.26 (170.07) 6.000 1.047 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31294LPZ0 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 12/01/2016 07/05/2013 138,530.95 146,453.19 -- 141,753.18 (315.62) 6.000 1.335 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36200AFG9 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 11/15/2017 07/09/2013 48,044.94 51,197.89 49,610.72 (398.82) 5.500 1.884 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128MBTH0 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 03/01/2019 07/26/2013 115,773.50 122,719.91 -- 120,898.79 453.55 5.000 1.134 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36290WH47 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/15/2018 07/18/2013 935,729.52 994,212.63 982,450.50 5,081.14 4.500 0.429 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128H4NR6 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 05/01/2018 07/16/2013 90,658.65 96,041.51 -- 94,655.79 613.13 5.000 0.729 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402QT68 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 10/01/2019 07/11/2013 269,075.10 290,685.20 281,901.91 (2,222.28) 6.000 1.749 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128PGLY7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 05/01/2017 07/17/2013 202,160.18 213,026.30 -- 211,073.42 3,538.31 5.000 -0.783 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128GNR59 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 10/01/2016 07/05/2013 115,884.24 122,764.87 118,138.19 (1,002.64) 6.000 2.271 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31401MWC1 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/01/2018 07/12/2013 812,917.92 866,773.73 -- 846,792.21 3,356.76 4.500 0.890 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128PHVS7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/01/2019 07/16/2013 87,776.90 92,494.91 91,646.98 838.72 5.000 0.337 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3132FEAK7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 12/01/2017 07/03/2013 161,949.58 171,615.94 -- 169,089.93 1,066.86 5.000 0.187 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 037833AJ9 Corporate Apple Inc. 05/03/2018 06/17/2015 3,000,000.00 2,960,430.00 2,969,670.00 8,907.83 1.000 1.364 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 166764AE0 Corporate Chevron Corporation 06/24/2018 06/17/2015 2,200,000.00 2,213,552.00 05/24/2018 2,213,112.00 (328.54) 1.718 1.507 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 084664BE0 Corporate Berkshire Hathaway Finance Corporation 05/15/2018 06/17/2015 800,000.00 890,632.00 887,296.00 (2,583.92) 5.400 1.507 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89236TAY1 Corporate Toyota Motor Credit Corporation 10/24/2018 06/17/2015 2,000,000.00 2,023,480.00 -- 2,018,460.00 (4,852.39) 2.000 1.712 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89114QAE8 Corporate The Toronto -Dominion Bank 10/19/2016 07/08/2013 750,000.00 776,452.50 764,160.00 3,515.22 2.375 0.913 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 459200GX3 Corporate International Business Machines Corporation 07/22/2016 07/10/2013 465,000.00 477,936.30 -- 471,682.05 2,104.64 1.950 0.589 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 78008K5V1 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 04/19/2016 07/08/2013 2,000,000.00 2,099,900.00 2,034,980.00 5,841.17 2.875 0.686 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 44328MAL8 Condom. HSBC Bank PLC 05/24/2016 --- 3,625,000.00 3,799,301.25 -- 3,698,623.75 18,340.07 3.100 0.830 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 30231 GALE Corporate Exxon Mobil Corporation 03/06/2018 06/10/2015 580,000.00 579,344.60 579,530.20 174.79 1.305 1.336 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89153VAC3 Corporate Total Capital International 06/28/2017 07/08/2013 160,000.00 157,765.60 -- 161,484.80 2,628.46 1.550 1.078 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 90327QCW7 Corporate USAA Capital Corporation 12/13/2016 07/11/2013 4,000,000.00 4,145,440.00 4,077,040.00 14,388.66 2.250 0.912 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 742718DV8 Corporate The Procter & Gamble Company 08/15/2016 07/10/2013 1,240,000.00 1,256,033.20 -- 1,249,448.80 3,544.00 1.450 0.768 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 822582AC6 Corporate Shell International Finance B.V. 03/22/2017 07/08/2013 400,000.00 449,936.00 428,224.00 4,530.88 5.200 1.067 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 9AMMFO5B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 - 318,613.35 -- 318,613.35 - 0.000 0.000 NA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 184126YS3 Muni Clayton County Water Authority 64966H4E7 Muni New York, City of 05/01/2017 07/11/2013 770,000.00 755,939.80 775,082.00 12,002.52 1.300 0.936 AA 10/01/2017 07/12/2013 1,170,000.00 1,238,222.70 -- 1,208,223.90 1,097.95 3.140 1.656 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 407288YD5 Muni Hamilton, County of 12/01/2015 07/18/2013 2,080,000.00 2,080,000.00 2,082,371.20 2,371.20 0.803 0.530 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 235219JS2 Muni Dallas, City of 02/15/2017 07/10/2013 2,135,000.00 2,135,000.00 -- 2,164,398.95 29,398.95 1.589 0.735 AA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828SY7 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UB4 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/31/2017 07/05/2013 3,900,000.00 3,828,550.78 3,899,376.00 34,877.00 0.625 0.633 AAA 11/30/2019 06/17/2015 2,500,000.00 2,433,398.44 -- 2,445,325.00 11,411.75 1.000 1.514 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828J84 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2020 06/03/2015 4,300,000.00 4,243,023.44 4,257,688.00 13,856.64 1.375 1.591 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UA6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/30/2017 07/05/2013 1,750,000.00 1,700,507.81 - 1,742,475.00 20,007.95 0.625 0.805 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828RU6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/30/2016 07/05/2013 3,500,000.00 3,496,855.47 3,520,510.00 21,829.59 0.875 0.460 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UZ1 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/30/2018 06/03/2015 3,400,000.00 3,360,421.88 -- 3,369,468.00 8,058.65 0.625 0.947 AAA 59,841,573.28 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 89231NAC7 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2012-B Owner Trost 07/15/2016 --- 167,314.67 167,412.81 -- 167,324.71 (9.43) 0.460 0.418 AAA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 55314QAC1 Asset Backed MMAF Equipment Finance LLC 2012-A 2925A3UA4 CP Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P. 08/10/2016 01/16/2014 92,258.57 92,474.80 92,291.78 5.86 0.940 0.481 AAA 07/10/2015 06/09/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,915.00 -- 1,999,920.00 235.00 0.000 0.160 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 88513BUQ1 CP Thomson Reuters Corporation 07/24/2015 06/09/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,728.88 1,999,800.00 464.45 0.000 0.157 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 1518T3UD2 CP CenterPoint Energy, Inc. 07/13/2015 06/10/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,175.00 -- 1,999,900.00 200.00 0.000 0.150 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 3024X3U69 CP FMC Technologies, Inc. 07/06/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,555.11 1,399,972.00 57.56 0.000 0.144 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 77434MVE2 CP Rockwell Collins, Inc. 08/14/2015 06/18/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,506.66 -- 1,999,540.00 713.34 0.000 0.188 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 44890NU65 CP Hyundai Capital America 07/06/2015 05/07/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,333.20 1,999,960.00 98.90 0.000 0.144 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 63946EUD4 CP Comcast Corporation 07/13/2015 06/10/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,211.66 1,999,900.00 186.67 0.000 0.150 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 29250BU25 CP Encana Corporation 07/02/2015 05/29/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,065.56 2,000,000.00 32.22 0.000 0.000 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27805BU94 CP Eaton Corporation 07/09/2015 06/09/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,250.00 1,999,940.00 140.00 0.000 0.135 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 69430MU61 CP Pacific Gas and Electric Company 07/06/2015 05/26/2015 1,525,000.00 1,524,322.64 1,524,969.50 56.34 0.000 0.144 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 12665KU95 CP CVS Health Corp. 07/09/2015 06/16/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,486.66 -- 1,999,940.00 135.56 0.000 0.135 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 57163UUV6 CP Marriott International, Inc. 07/29/2015 06/19/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,033.88 1,999,760.00 491.12 0.000 0.154 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 60920WU65 CP Mondelm International, Inc. 07/06/2015 05/21/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,875.56 -- 1,999,960.00 82.22 0.000 0.144 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27743KUL2 CP Eastman Chemical Company 07/20/2015 06/18/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,300.00 1,999,840.00 315.00 0.000 0.152 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 05634CUN4 CP Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. 07/22/2015 06/10/2015 2,000,000.00 1,998,933.34 -- 1,999,820.00 380.00 0.000 0.154 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 682681JU21 CP ONEOK Partners, L.P. 07/02/2015 06/10/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,367.22 2,000,000.00 37.22 0.000 0.000 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 61979KU69 CP Motiva Enterprises LLC 07/06/2015 06/11/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,402.78 -- 1,999,960.00 79.44 0.000 0.144 AAA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 66807NUV5 CP NorthWmtem Corporation 07/29/2015 06/29/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,194.44 1,999,760.00 537.78 0.000 0.154 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6176M3VH7 CP Monsanto Company 08/17/2015 05/28/2015 2,000,000.00 1,997,732.78 -- 1,999,500.00 883.89 0.000 0.192 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6362P3UQ5 CP National Grid USA 07/24/2015 06/24/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,387.78 1,999,800.00 285.55 0.000 0.157 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 96950MUE7 CP Williams Partners L.P. 07/14/2015 06/15/2015 2,000,000.00 1,999,222.22 -- 1,999,900.00 261.11 0.000 0.139 AA 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 --- - 189,003.04 --- 189,003.04 - 0.000 0.000 NA 41,370,761.03 55 Page 6 of 30 �`� Riverside (owsly Tmnspor oiion Commission STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account 256350004 Account LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond identifier 3133XCQE6 Security Type Category Agency CMO Issuer Federal Home Loan Banks Office of Finance Final Maturity 07/28/2015 Trade Date 08/132013 Current Face Value 108,852.66 Original Cost 114,567.42 Next Call Date -- Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss 117.12 Coupon 5.250 Yield 0.185 Summarized Credit Rating AAA 109,281.54 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 89231NAC7 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2012-B Owner Trust 07/152016 02/14/2014 148,800.34 148,899.15 --- 148,809.27 (10.82) 0.460 0.418 AAA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 55314QAC1 Asset Backed MMAF Equipment Finance LLC 2012-A O8/10/2016 --- 510,989.44 512,294.63 --- 511,173.40 70.19 0.940 0.481 AAA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 2925A3UA4 CP Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P. 07/102015 06/09/2015 3,300,000.00 3,298,209.75 -- 3,299,868.00 387.75 0.000 0.160 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 88513BUQ1 CP Thomson Reuters Corporation 07/24/2015 06/09/2015 3,300,000.00 3,297,902.65 --- 3,299,670.00 766.34 0.000 0.157 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 1518T3UD2 CP CenterPoint Energy, Inc. 07/132015 06/10/2015 3,200,000.00 3,198,760.00 -- 3,199,840.00 320.00 0.000 0.150 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 07588MUT1 CP Becton, Dickinson and Company 07/27/2015 06/15/2015 3,300,000.00 3,298,267.50 --- 3,299,637.00 709.50 0.000 0.152 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 77434MVE2 CP Rockwell Collins, Inc. 08/142015 06/18/2015 3,200,000.00 3,197,610.66 -- 3,199,264.00 1,141.34 0.000 0.188 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 29250BU25 CP Encana Corporation 07/02/2015 05/29/2015 3,300,000.00 3,298,458.17 --- 3,300,000.00 53.17 0.000 0.000 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 27805BU94 CP Eaton Corporation 07/092015 06/09/2015 3,300,000.00 3,298,762.50 -- 3,299,901.00 231.00 0.000 0.135 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 12665KU95 CP CVS Health Corp. 07/09/2015 06/16/2015 3,300,000.00 3,299,152.99 --- 3,299,901.00 223.67 0.000 0.135 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 57163UUV6 CP Marriott International, Inc. 07/292015 06/19/2015 3,200,000.00 3,198,454.21 -- 3,199,616.00 785.79 0.000 0.154 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 44890NU24 CP Hyundai Capital America 07/02/2015 05/14/2015 3,300,000.00 3,298,068.58 --- 3,300,000.00 44.92 0.000 0.000 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 05634CUN4 CP Bacardi U.S.A., hie. 07/222015 06/10/2015 3,200,000.00 3,198,293.34 -- 3,199,712.00 608.00 0.000 0.154 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 68268UU21 CP ONEOK Partners, L.P. 07/02/2015 06/10/2015 3,200,000.00 3,198,987.55 --- 3,200,000.00 59.56 0.000 0.000 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 61979KU69 CP Motiva Enterprises LLC 07/062015 06/11/2015 900,000.00 899,731.25 -- 899,982.00 35.75 0.000 0.144 AAA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 60920WU65 CP Mondelez International, Inc. 07/06/2015 05/21/2015 2,350,000.00 2,348,678.78 --- 2,349,953.00 96.61 0.000 0.144 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 6116M3VH7 CP Monsanto Company 08/172015 05/28/2015 3,100,000.00 3,096,485.80 -- 3,099,225.00 1,370.03 0.000 0.192 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 6362P3UQ5 CP National Grid USA 07/24/2015 06/24/2015 3,200,000.00 3,199,020.45 --- 3,199,680.00 456.88 0.000 0.157 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 96950MUE7 CP Williams Partners L.P. 07/142015 06/15/2015 3,200,000.00 3,198,755.55 -- 3,199,840.00 417.78 0.000 0.139 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 --- - 376,394.86 --- 376,394.86 - 0.000 0.000 NA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 407288YD5 Muni Hamilton, County of 12/012015 07/18/2013 6,645,000.00 6,645,000.00 -- 6,652,575.30 7,575.30 0.803 0.530 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 64468EAY6 VRDN Labor, New Hampshire Department of 11/012020 11/042013 4,190,000.00 4,190,000.00 07/012015 4,190,000.00 - 0.140 0.140 AA 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 64468EAZ3 VRDN Labor, New Hampshire Department of 11/012020 07/03/2013 3,200,000.00 3,200,000.00 07/O1/2015 3,200,000.00 - 0.140 0.140 AA 67,034,323.37 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31393EXC8 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/252018 07/242013 38,778.30 40,995.93 -- 40,393.80 154.17 4.500 0.798 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137603W2 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 08/252017 06/172015 550,000.00 553,695.31 --- 554,246.00 610.11 1.426 0.921 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3136A4M89 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 01/252019 07/05/2013 180,944.57 182,096.68 -- 183,627.98 2,019.44 1.934 1.314 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137ASNH3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 09/252021 08/152013 401,814.91 391,267.27 --- 399,174.99 5,447.47 1.459 1.637 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3136A8G38 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/252017 07/08/2013 755,173.07 744,022.47 -- 758,964.04 10,531.20 1.246 0.940 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31393V2T7 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 06/152018 07/082013 200,713.26 212,285.63 --- 209,034.83 720.24 4.500 0.710 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137ANLP8 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/252016 07/09/2013 930,000.00 939,227.34 -- 938,184.00 5,483.93 1.655 0.758 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31402RBG3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/O1/2019 --- 80,980.04 86,863.06 --- 84,297.79 (446.81) 6.000 1.617 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I hnterest 31385JLF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/012017 09/18/2013 162,126.25 173,069.77 -- 167,601.25 (804.03) 6.000 1.424 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 36162WAC1 Asset Backed GE Equipment Transportation LLC, Series 2013-1 11/25/2016 07/09/2013 408,019.21 406,680.40 --- 408,247.70 407.34 0.690 0.465 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 38144LAB6 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. 09/O1/2017 07/03/2013 300,000.00 322,515.00 -- 328,428.00 16,153.92 6.250 1.777 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest _ 767201AM8 Corporate Rio Tinto Finance (USA) Limited 05/20/2016 07/03/2013 _ 600,000.00 617,400.00 -- 610,470.00 5,010.29 2.500 0.529 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 38143USC6 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. 02/07/2016 07/03/2013 600,000.00 627,936.00 -- 609,720.00 3,082.14 3.625 0.923 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 05565QCC0 Corporate BP Capital Markets P.L.C. 11/06/2017 07/03/2013 _ 300,000.00 292,194.00 --- 299,796.00 4,114.74 1.375 1.404 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 166764AEA Corporate Chevron Corporation 06/24/2018 06/17/2015 300,000.00 301,848.00 05/24/2018 301,788.00 (44.80) 1.718 1.507 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 36962G3H5 Corporate General Electric Capital Corporation 09/15/2017 07/03/2013 _ 300,000.00 340,212.00 --- 326,679.00 5,001.21 5.625 1.514 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 891145TN4 Corporate The Toronto -Dominion Bank 03/13/2017 05/21/2015 1,000,000.00 1,010,240.00 -- 1,009,200.00 (505.31) 1.500 0.954 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest _ 48121CYK6 Corporate JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association 10/O1/2017 07/03/2013 300,000.00 341,424.00 --- 327,105.00 4,497.83 6.000 _ 1.883 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 89236TAY1 Corporate Toyota Motor Credit Corporation 10/24/2018 06/17/2015 500,000.00 505,870.00 -- 504,615.00 (1,213.10) 2.000 1.712 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 02580ECC5 Corporate American Express Bank, FSB. 09/13/2017 07/08/2013 250,000.00 287,890.00 --- 273,307.50 2,892.75 6.000 _ 1.670 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 233851AT1 Corporate Daimler Finance North America LLC 01/11/2016 07/08/2013 500,000.00 497,995.00 -- 501,470.00 1,898.98 1.250 0.694 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 30231GAL6 Corporate Exxon Mobil Corporation 03/06/2018 _ 06/10/2015 _ 420,000.00 419,525.40 --- 419,659.80 126.57 1.305 _ 1.336 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 94974BGF1 Corporate Wells Fargo & Company 01/30/2020 06/03/2015 1,000,000.00 991,540.00 -- 990,450.00 (1,205.73) 2.150 2.371 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 6174467U7 Corporate Morgan Stanley 04/25/2018 06/03/2015 _ 500,000.00 504,020.00 --- 503,380.00 (554.75) 2.125 1.877 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 59217GAC3 Corporate Metropolitan Life Global Funding I 09/29/2015 07/03/2013 740,000.00 766,284.80 -- 743,441.00 525.72 2.500 0.612 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 46625HJL5 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co. 05/15/2018 06/03/2015 _ 500,000.00 497,550.00 --- 496,105.00 (1,496.40) 1.625 1.904 A 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 63307F.AB3 Corporate National Bank of Canada 10/19/2016 05/21/2015 900,000.00 918,414.00 -- 918,396.00 1,234.24 2.200 0.622 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 78011DAC8 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 09/19/2017 05/2E2015 1,000,000.00 1,001,090.00 --- 998,440.00 (2,606.92) 1.200 1.271 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 -- - 134,184.17 -- 134,184.17 - 0.000 0.000 NA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 407288YD5 Muni Hamilton, County of 12/O1/2015 _ 07/18/2013 _ 630,000.00 630,000.00 --- 630,718.20 718.20 0.803 _ 0.530 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund -I Interest 235219JS2 Muni Dallas, City of 02/15/2017 07/10/2013 650,000.00 650,000.00 -- 658,950.50 8,950.50 1.589 0.735 AA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828RX0 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 12/31/2016 09/13/2013 _ 950,000.00 945,212.89 --- 955,567.00 7,765.79 0.875 0.482 _ AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828J84 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2020 -- 950,000.00 936,470.70 -- 940,652.00 4,054.63 1.375 1.591 AAA 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828UA6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/30/2017 07/05/2013 1,250,000.00 1,214,648.44 -- 1,244,625.00 14,291.40 0.625 0.805 AAA 18,470,919.54 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135GOD75 Agency Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/22/2020 05/06/2015 600,000.00 593,490.00 --- 592,884.00 (785.16) 1.500 1.750 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADR7 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 05/O1/2020 05/15/2015 475,000.00 471,527.75 -- 468,250.25 (3,358.55) 1.375 1.682 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EACA5 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 03/27/2019 07/05/2013 800,000.00 875,900.00 --- 869,144.00 18,554.32 3.750 1.372 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 01/13/2022 07/05/2013 550,000.00 529,303.50 -- 556,858.50 23,177.59 2.375 2.169 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AEV77 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 05/25/2018 07/03/2013 251,000.00 258,314.30 --- 260,141.42 4,965.69 2.699 1.310 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377E89 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 10/202039 07/052013 169,837.62 175,032.27 -- 177,020.06 2,867.45 3.500 1.906 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31392083 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 03/252018 07/082013 29,994.16 31,643.84 --- 31,130.34 143.06 5.000 1.113 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376GB33 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 10/16/2044 01/23/2015 350,000.00 359,262.85 -- 359,863.00 1,971.47 3.500 1.339 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376G5B2 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 08/162033 01/222015 30,571.83 30,777.24 --- 30,644.90 (36.80) 2.400 1.144 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 06/252022 07/032013 235,000.00 220,358.40 -- 234,565.25 11,367.96 2.396 2.412 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CRT6 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 10/20/2040 05/22/2014 127,582.04 123,196.41 --- 125,770.37 2,341.12 2.000 2.340 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A7E22 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11645/2028 07/08/2013 236,134.17 244,472.65 -- 245,154.50 3,642.71 3.500 0.895 AAA Page 7 of 30 �`� Riverside (many TromponNinon Commission STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account 256350023 Account LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 identifier 3137603W2 Security Type Category Agency CMO Issuer Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp Final Maturity 08/25/2017 Trade Date 07/312013 Current Face Value 45,000.00 Original Cost 44,964.84 Next Call Date -- Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss 387.01 Coupon 1.426 Summarized Yield Credit Rating 0.921 AAA 45,347.40 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376T5Z1 Agency CMO The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 01/16/2039 01/26/2015 170,992.43 178,644.34 --- 177,965.50 (420.70) 3.000 1.768 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RSZ9 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 06/162039 01/212015 79,290.63 84,032.92 --- 83,718.22 (368.62) 4.500 2.187 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378BX20 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 06/162051 03/172015 71,902.71 70,303.40 -- 70,250.39 (54.57) 1.240 2.175 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3837867E3 Agency CMO Govemment National Mortgage Association 05/16/2046 05/22/2015 233,935.63 224,852.34 --- 227,972.61 3,076.15 1.744 2.520 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 Agency CMO The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 04/20/2039 07/03/2013 124,049.14 126,995.31 -- 128,532.28 2,243.82 3.000 1.709 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A7M18 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 12/25/2019 08/20/2013 144,225.55 142,084.70 --- 145,190.42 2,363.91 1.520 1.169 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ASNH3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 09/25/2021 07/03/2013 401,814.91 392,664.21 --- 399,174.99 4,267.73 1.459 1.637 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A72D3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 04/25/2022 07/03/2013 395,000.00 375,250.00 --- 396,228.45 17,097.58 2.482 2.417 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38379C2M7 Agency CMO The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 09/20/2041 07/11/2014 52,039.55 54,416.93 --- 53,911.42 (574.77) 1.660 1.163 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 Agency CMO Govemment National Mortgage Association 12/162042 --- 450,000.00 427,324.22 --- 421,074.00 (6,419.17) 2.273 3.529 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AQT24 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 01/252019 10/21/2013 170,000.00 171,195.31 --- 173,211.30 2,472.42 2.130 1.539 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 _ 38376WA62 Agency CMO The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 10/20/2039 01/21/2015 175,569.71 184,328.70 --- 186,284.73 1,985.10 4.000 1.522 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378TAF7 Agency CMO The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 07/20/2041 07/05/2013 246,861.07 246,898.29 --- 252,491.97 5,719.05 2.500 1.885 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377DPX8 Agency CMO The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 11/20/2036 12/31/2013 40,123.24 42,062.11 --- 40,498.39 (651.61) 2.500 1.230 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31395E71'5 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 08/15/2019 07/09/2013 112,085.97 118,583.45 -- 117,175.79 379.64 4.500 1.197 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31394DVM9 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2034 06/19/2014 190,536.70 201,462.79 --- 200,787.57 1,842.57 5.000 1.133 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KXW4 Agency MBS The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 02/162037 12/11/2014 199,509.02 198,542.65 -- 197,968.81 (729.23) 1.705 2.109 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31413XVG5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/01/2019 08/04/2014 200,000.00 218,500.00 --- 215,846.00 697.40 4.506 2.419 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A4M48 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 01/25/2022 07/05/2013 377,698.69 378,760.97 --- 383,349.06 5,046.64 2.098 1.622 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381PEB0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 11/01/2020 09/26/2014 265,000.00 279,036.72 --- 280,279.90 2,981.82 3.370 2.208 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A7JIJ5 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/25/2017 07/03/2013 325,000.00 351,203.13 -- 343,190.25 4,369.71 3.882 1.256 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KRS0 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 07/16/2043 05/08/2015 450,000.00 434,460.94 -- 430,290.00 (4,464.97) 2.389 3.182 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 Agency MBS The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 11/16/2041 05/22/2015 71,378.35 69,588.31 -- 69,944.36 335.95 1.400 2.275 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EJ6V5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/01/2026 11/18/2013 132,960.85 141,167.03 -- 142,119.19 1,681.18 4.000 1.842 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378XP62 Agency MBS The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 05/162055 05/142015 475,274.31 481,140.98 -- 477,484.34 (3,677.08) 2.500 2.400 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31404WTT3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 05/012019 12/312013 86,083.98 95,961.47 --- 89,667.66 (3,359.31) 4.500 1.502 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31417YKF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 01/012030 07/102013 158,636.02 167,361.00 -- 171,618.79 4,444.84 4.500 2.149 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31385XBG1 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 03/012018 09/132013 19,544.36 20,814.75 --- 20,176.04 (80.01) 6.000 1.596 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31416YXJ2 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/012026 07/032013 65,816.16 68,911.57 -- 69,592.03 1,090.07 3.500 1.821 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 _ 38378KSI4 Agency MBS The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass- Through Securities 12/16/2046 --- 425,000.00 415,829.11 --- 402,657.75 (13,285.13) 2.785 3.492 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B671.8 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 12/25/2019 01/07/2014 50,227.37 51,231.34 -- 50,989.32 48.96 2.075 1.373 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31418AFW3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/01/2022 07/10/2013 241,203.89 249,118.39 -- 250,972.64 3,506.96 3.000 1.238 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B6A2 Agency MBS Govemment National Mortgage Association 11/16/2052 01/22/2015 142,140.94 137,660.16 -- 138,050.12 96.43 1.826 2.684 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3128MMAK9 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 09/01/2019 07/08/2013 158,475.13 168,478.88 -- 168,262.56 2,526.06 5.000 0.844 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AEYG6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/25/2018 11/20/2013 152,279.69 153,481.28 -- 154,049.18 1,029.21 1.825 1.363 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 --- - 91,980.19 --- 91,980.19 _ - 0.000 0.000 NA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 01/31/2021 05/15/2015 500,000.00 512,578.13 -- 508,280.00 (4,045.18) 2.125 1.812 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828UF5 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 12/31/2019 --- 500,000.00 493,388.87 --- 491,210.00 (2,459.87) 1.125 1.531 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VB3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/15/2023 07/05/2013 3,500,000.00 3,253,085.94 -- 3,385,445.00 87,521.13 1.750 2.205 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828KQ2 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/15/2019 07/05/2013 _ 500,000.00 539,902.34 --- 533,555.00 6,718.44 3.125 1.342 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912833KR0 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/15/2018 07/05/2013 380,000.00 353,517.80 -- 369,489.20 5,396.80 0.000 0.977 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VK3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 06/30/2018 07/05/2013 1,575,000.00 1,567,678.71 -- 1,592,104.50 21,575.31 1.375 1.007 AAA 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828T19 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 08/15/2022 07/05/2013 495,000.00 461,355.47 -- 479,843.10 11,787.80 1.625 2.090 AAA 18,579,656.99 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 313383QM6 Agency Federal Home Loan Banks Office of Finance 07/24/2018 06/152015 100,000.00 100,160.00 07/242015 100,111.00 14.16 1.950 0.282 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 _ 3133EECD0 Agency Federal Farm Credit Banks Consolidated Systemwide Bonds 06/20/2017 06/15/2015 900,070.00 900,554.67 -- 900,711.00 167.65 0.217 0.180 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3134G56F7 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 06/192017 06/16/2015 450,000.00 450,247.50 09/19/2015 450,594.00 384.15 1.000 0.398 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3137AEV69 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 01/25/2018 06/22/2015 229,817.22 230,966.31 --- 230,908.85 (141.56) 1.873 0.533 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 3137AHXC7 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/15/2021 06/182015 178,456.52 179,237.27 -- 178,981.18 (428.83) 3.000 1.266 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3137ANLP8 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp 11/25/2016 06/18/2015 100,000.00 100,839.84 --- 100,880.00 58.70 1.655 0.758 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 38377LN38 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-7 11/16/2038 06/16/2015 269,207.59 278,293.34 -- 277,962.22 (443.37) 3.500 1.793 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 38377UN20 Agency CMO The Govemment National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-7 01/20/2040 06/24/2015 188,609.65 191,998.72 --- 192,048.00 (108.84) 3.000 0.991 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3138LITX7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 11/01/2017 06/182015 313,311.59 314,731.29 -- 316,147.06 1,428.72 1.660 1.223 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 _ 02582J6J3 Asset Backed American Express Credit Account Master Trost 05/15/2019 _06/11/2015 _ 487,000.00 487,209.26 --- 487,374.99 172.24 _ 0.980 _0.922 AAA_ 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 02582JGY0 Asset Backed American Express Credit Account Master Trost 05/15/2020 06/252015 175,000.00 174,917.97 -- 175,134.75 493.88 0.476 0.451 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 161571FH2 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 05/15/2019 06/17/2015 175,000.00 174,890.63 --- 174,833.75 (58.29) 0.456 0.507 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 17305EFE0 Asset Backed Citibank Credit Card Issuance Trost 09/07/2018 06/232015 330,000.00 331,727.34 -- 331,663.20 (44.80) 1.320 0.892 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 47787RAD2 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trost 2012-B 01/15/2019 06/12/2015 350,000.00 350,054.69 --- 350,210.00 158.17 0.690 0.605 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 47787UAC7 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2015 02/15/2018 06/12/2015 425,000.00 425,066.41 --- 424,974.50 (89.13) 0.456 0.462 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 58768WAD1 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Receivables Trust 2013-1 11/15/2019 06/16/2015 350,000.00 351,066.41 --- 351,291.50 252.85 1.130 0.883 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 90290KAD7 Asset Backed USAA Auto Owner Trust 2014-1 05/152019 06/12/2015 445,000.00 443,991.80 --- 444,790.85 773.73 0.940 0.974 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 00138CAA6 Corporate AIG GLOBAL FDG SR SECD MEDIUMTERM NTS BOOK ENTRY 1441 12/15/2017 06/22/2015 300,000.00 300,696.00 --- 300,432.00 (259.47) 1.650 1.590 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 002799AM6 Corporate Abbey National Treasury Services PLC e3H12017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 300,810.00 -- 300,624.00 (167.46) 1.375 1.251A Page 8 of 30 �`� Riverside (owsly Tmnspor onion Commission STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Security Type Final Current Face Next Call Base Net Total Summarized Account Account identifier Category Issuer Maturity Trade Date Value Original Cost Date Base Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Credit Rating 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 0258MODR7 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 02665WAT8 Corporate American Honda Finance Corporation 09/22/2017 06/11/2015 300.000.00 03/13/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 300,678.00 299,877.00 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 037833AM2 Corporate Apple Inc. 05/05/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 300,957.00 300,978.00 300,030.00 300,897.00 311.75 1.550 1.401 A 150.88 1.500 1.496 A (38.15) 1.050 0.886 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 05531FAL7 Corporate BB&T Corporation 08/15/2017 06/22/2015 250,000.00 251,235.00 07/14/2017 250,847.50 (377.95) 1.600 1.431 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 05565QCY2 Corporate BP Capital Markets P.L.C. 02/13/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 300,573.00 301,050.00 485.66 1.674 1.537 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 06050TLY6 Corporate Bank of America, National Association 03/26/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 298,968.00 -- 299,553.00 568.80 1.650 1.706 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 063679ZT4 Corporate Bank of Montreal O1/30/2017 06/12/2015 300,000.00 304,620.00 304,758.00 247.73 1.950 0.938 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 06406HC16 Corporate Bank of New York Company, Inc. , The 03/06/2018 06/22/2015 250,000.00 249,360.00 02/06/2018 248,530.00 (833.89) 1.350 1.574 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 064159CQ7 Corporate The Bank of Nova Scotia 07/15/2016 06/12/2015 300,000.00 302,034.00 301,902.00 (59.11) 1.375 0.763 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 07330NAG0 Corporate Branch Banking and Trust Company 12/O1/2016 06/12/2015 300,000.00 300,138.00 11/O1/2016 300,393.00 258.79 1.050 0.951 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 084670BD9 Corporate Berkshire Hathaway Inc. O1/31/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 305,106.00 304,680.00 (298.91) 1.900 0.905 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 166754AK7 Corporate CHEVRON PHI LIPS CHEM CO LLC / CHEVRON PHDLLIPS CHEM C( 05/O1/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 299,631.00 -- 299,703.00 66.78 1.700 1.736 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 166764AV2 Corporate Chevron Corporation 03/02/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 299,187.00 299,874.00 673.92 1.365 1.381 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 20030NAP6 Corporate Comcast Corporation O1/15/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 325,509.00 -- 324,504.00 (296.49) 6.500 1.140 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 209111ET6 Corporate Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. 04/01/2018 06/22/2015 220,000.00 245,828.00 245,014.00 (664.75) 5.850 1.610 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 21686CAD2 Corporate Rabobank Nederland 01/19/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 310,389.00 -- 309,879.00 (223.96) 3.375 1.227 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 22546QAV9 Corporate Credit Suisse AG 04/27/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 297,495.00 297,909.00 376.45 1.700 1.954 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 233851BF0 Corporate Daimler Finance North America LLC 08/O1/2017 06/12/2015 300,000.00 299,250.00 -- 299,574.00 310.34 1.375 1.444 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 25468PCV6 Corporate The Walt Disney Company 12/O1/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 299,427.00 299,823.00 385.93 1.100 1.125 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 25600WAD2 Corporate DNB Boligkreditt AS 03/21/2018 06/16/2015 400,000.00 399,608.00 -- 400,196.00 583.13 1.450 1.431 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 26442CAD6 Corporate Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC 04/15/2018 06/11/2015 116,000.00 127,422.52 127,352.92 92.35 5.100 1.506 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 30231GAL6 Corporate Exxon Mobil Corporation 03/06/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 299,583.00 -- 299,757.00 167.60 1.305 1.336 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 31677QAV1 Corporate Fifth Third Bank 02/28/2018 06/23/2015 250,000.00 248,055.00 01/28/2018 248,160.00 95.13 1.450 1.734 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 36962G3H5 Corporate General Electric Capital Corporation 09/15/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 328,362.00 -- 326,679.00 (1,143.35) 5.625 1.514 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 38141 GRCO Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. O1/22/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 303,852.00 304,563R0 774.13 2.375 1.765 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 40434CAA3 Corporate HSBC USA Inc. 06/23/2017 06/12/2015 300,000.00 300,090.00 299,856.00 (232.50) 1.300 1.325 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 41283LAB1 Corporate Harley-Davidson Financial Services, Inc. 03/15/2017 06/22/2015 250,000.00 256,430.00 -- 255,602.50 (767.49) 2.700 1.368 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 46623EKD0 Corporate IPMorgan Chase & Co. 03/01/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 299,310.00 02/01/2018 298,947.00 (374.29) 1.700 1.835 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 532457BK3 Corporate Eli Lilly and Company 03/O1/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 298,908.00 299,175.00 249.58 1.250 1.355 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 553794AA6 Corporate MUFG Americas Holdings Corporation 02/09/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 298,716.00 01/09/2018 298,857.00 I2I.02 1.625 1.775 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 59217GAY5 Corporate Metropolitan Life Global Funding I O1/10/2018 06/12/2015 300,000.00 299,646.00 299,442.00 (209.84) 1.500 1.575 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 59217GBH1 Corporate Metropolitan Life Global Funding I 04/10/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 300,504.00 -- 300,678.00 185.84 1.300 1.171 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 6174467U7 Corporate Morgan Stanley 04/25/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 301,584.00 302,028.00 467.33 2.125 1.877 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 69349LAP3 Corporate PNC Realty Investors, Inc. 11/O1/2016 06/12/2015 300,000.00 300,210.00 10/02/2016 300,387.00 183.07 1.150 1.046 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 69371RM52 Corporate PACCAR Financial Corp. 05/18/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 299,034.00 299,529.00 481.66 1.400 1.456 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 718172AA7 Corporate Philip Morris International Inc. 05/16/2018 06/23/2015 250,001).00 277,717.50 -- 277,637.50 47.56 5.650 1.697 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 74153WCE7 Corporate Pricoa Global Funding I 08/18/2017 06/10/2015 300,000.00 299,511.00 --- 299,052.00 (469.07) 1.350 1.501 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 747525AG8 Corporate QUALCOMM Incorporated 05/18/2018 06/11/2015 300,000.00 299,025.00 -- 299,067.00 28.54 1.400 1.510 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 78011DAF1 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 10/01/2018 06/16/2015 300,000.00 302,877.00 304,242.00 1,392.60 2.000 1.552 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 822582AZ5 Corporate Shell International Finance B.V. 11/15/2016 06/12/2015 300,000.00 300,429.00 -- 300,627.00 209.52 0.900 0.747 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 842434CN0 Corporate Southem California Gas Company 06/15/2018 06/15/2015 250,000.00 249,992.50 250,602.50 609.92 1.550 1.466 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 89114QAZ1 Corporate The Toronto -Dominion Bank 03/13/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 300,762.00 -- 301,605.00 854.46 1.625 1.422 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 89153UAE1 Corporate Total Capital Canada Ltd. 89233P6S0 Corporate Toyota Motor Credit Corporation 01/15/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 300,000.00 --- 300,306.00 306.00 1.450 1.409 AA 10/05/2017 06/11/2015 200,000.00 200,184.00 -- 200,510.00 329.12 1.250 1.135 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 89837LAA3 Corporate The Trustees of Princeton University 03/01/2019 445,000.00 496,093.57 494,840.00 (590.50) 4.950 1.783 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 90261XHIM Corporate UBS AG 03/26/2018 06/22/2015 250,000.00 249,357.50 -- 249,627.50 266.13 1.800 1.856 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 91159HHD5 Corporate U.S. Bancorp 05/15/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 303,276.00 04/15/2017 303,615.00 411.47 1.650 0.970 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 91324PCF7 Corporate UnitedHealth Group Incorporated 12/15/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 300,543.00 -- 299,463.00 (1,071.21) 1.400 1.474 A 256350005 LC-Prjea Fund-Toll2 928668AF9 Corporate Volkswagen Group of America, Inc. 11/20/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 300,525.00 -- 300,279.00 (237.38) 1.600 1.560 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 92976WBH8 Corporate Wells Fargo & Company 02/01/2018 06/22/2015 200,000.00 221,176.00 -- 220,884.00 (163.07) 5.750 1.611 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 94974BEZ9 Corporate Wells Fargo & Company 12/15/2016 06/12/2015 300,000.00 307,113.00 306,852.00 (79.90) 2.625 1.043 A 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 29250BU74 CP Encana Corporation 07/07/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,391.00 1,399,972.00 107.33 0.000 0.120 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 2925A3UA4 CP Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P. 07/10/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,265.00 1,399,944.00 164.50 0.000 0.160 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 61979KU69 CP Motive Enterprises LLC 07/06/2015 06/11/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,581.94 1,399,972.00 55.61 0.000 0.144 AA 256350005 LC-Prjea Fund-Toll2 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 68268UU21 CP ONFOK Partners, L.P. 88513BUP3 CP Thomson Reuters Corporation 07/02/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,426.78 1,400,000.00 26.05 0.000 0.000 AA 07/23/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,130.45 -- 1,399,874.00 318.88 0.000 0.147 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 96950MUA5 CP Williams Partners L.P. 07/10/2015 06/10/2015 1,400,000.00 1,399,416.66 1,399,944.00 119.00 0.000 0.160 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 9AMMFO5B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 06/30/2015 06/25/2015 0.00 10,729.00 -- 10,729.00 0.00 0.000 0.000 NA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 49130TRY4 Muni Kentucky Housing Corporation 01/01/2017 06/17/2015 275,000.00 274,634.25 274,579.25 (61.10) 0.937 1.040 AAA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 912828784 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2020 06/17/2015 600,000.00 591,140.63 -- 594,096.00 2,891.56 1.375 1.591 AA 256350005 LC-Prjea Fund-Toll2 912828KQ2 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/15/2019 06/17/2015 600,000.00 638,062.50 640,266.00 2,538.57 3.125 1.342 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 912828UA6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/30/2017 06/17/2015 120,000.00 119,095.31 -- 119,484.00 375.69 0.625 0.805 AA 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 912828UZ1 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/30/2018 06/11/2015 1,650,000.00 1,628,343.75 1,635,183.00 6,456.39 0.625 0.947 AA 32,724,033.53 58 Page 9 of 30 Ir leo. Riverside County ►ranseoriorion Commission STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2015 ATTACHMENT 4 Source Account Account Identifier Description Beginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base Sales Base Maturities and Redemptions Base Paydowns Net Total Realized Gain/Loss Base Amortization/A ccretion Base Change In Net Unrealized Gain/Loss Ending Base Market Value Ending Accrued Income Balance 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 9AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Accoun 350,824.92 17,238,684.28 (17,270,895.85) - - - - - 318,613.35 - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392HWL3 FNR 2003-3 BC 49,667.61 - - - (6,901.06) (246.49) (131.46) (96.70) 42,291.91 169.86 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392F6C6 FNR 2002-77 CB 323,441.02 - - - (42,497.74) (1,641.74) (1,003.90) (257.05) 278,040.60 1,119.34 205091001 _ LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31393EXC8 FNR 2003-88 TH 426,982.69 - - - _(58,433.25) (2,289.26) (898.48) (1,817.51) 363,544.19 1,308.77 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UB4 US TREASURY NB - 2,433,398.44 - - - - 514.81 11,411.75 2,445,325.00 2,117.49 205091001 _ LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 166764AE0 CHEVRON CORP - 2,213,552.00 - - - - (111.46) (328.54) 2,213,112.00 734.92 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89236TAY1 TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CC - 2,023,480.00 - - - - (167.61) (4,852.39) 2,018,460.00 7,444.44 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89114QAE8 TORONTO-DOMINION BANK 769,050.00 - - - - - (2,019.85) (2,870.15) 764,160.00 3,562.50 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 037833AF7 APPLE INC 3,001,290.00 - (3,001,560.00) - - 1,295.09 (68.74) (956.35) - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UA6 US TREASURY NB 1,742,615.00 - - - - - 2,794.99 (2,934.99) 1,742,475.00 926.40 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402RBG3 FN 735439 303,813.90 - - - (44,524.99) (2,162.12) (883.49) 301.95 256,545.25 1,232.24 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402RBG3 FN 735439 14,163.57 - - - (2,075.72) (97.74) (40.14) 9.98 11,959.94 57.45 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402RBG3 FN 735439 23,425.74 - - - (3,433.12) (151.42) (62.99) 2.87 19,781.07 95.01 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 44328MAL8 HSBC BANK PLC 1,026,550.00 - - - - - (4,454.56) (1,785.44) 1,020,310.00 3,186.11 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 44328MAL8 HSBC BANK PLC 2,694,693.75 - - - - - (10,816.87) (5,563.13) 2,678,313.75 8,363.54 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 30231GAL6 EXXON MOBIL CORPORATIC - 579,344.60 - - - - 10.81 174.79 579,530.20 2,417.88 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3136ACGF2 FNA 2013-M3 ASQ2 1,442,020.37 - - - (289,906.85) (108.23) (458.38) (1,571.29) 1,149,975.61 1,036.32 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392FPP6 FNR 2002-74 PE 208,630.44 - - - (30,843.16) (1,151.92) (619.87) (184.32) 175,831.17 708.69 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3136A8G38 FNA 2012-M13 ASQ2 2,622,714.55 - - - (116,445.56) 1,085.08 1,557.00 (3,513.67) 2,505,397.40 2,588.44 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31410GSQ7 FN 888927 171,460.35 - - - (26,783.48) (1,172.21) (673.41) (78.99) 142,752.26 686.72 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128MBTH0 FG G13052 137,831.00 - - - (15,410.41) (656.66) (388.33) (476.81) 120,898.79 482.39 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36290WH47 GN 619551 1,070,584.80 - - - (87,333.98) (4,068.96) (3,090.33) 6,358.97 982,450.50 3,508.99 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128H4NR6 FG E96700 108,160.10 - - - (12,283.32) (488.66) (331.03) (401.29) 94,655.79 377.74 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128PGLY7 FG J04843 249,032.69 - - - (34,898.66) (1,010.53) (790.74) (1,259.34) 211,073.42 842.33 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UZ1 US TREASURY NB - 3,360,421.88 - - - - 987.47 8,058.65 3,369,468.00 3,580.16 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 822582AC6 SHELL INTERNATIONAL FIN 433,256.00 - - - - - (3,345.64) (1,686.36) 428,224.00 5,720.00 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 184126YS3 CLAYTON CO WTR-B-REF 776,398.70 - - - - - 921.64 (2,238.34) 775,082.00 1,668.33 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 64966H4E7 NYC-TAXABLE-C 1,232,840.70 - - - - - (4,023.60) (20,593.20) 1,208,223.90 9,184.50 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 037833M9 APPLE INC - 2,960,430.00 - - - - 332.17 8,907.83 2,969,670.00 4,833.33 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828SY7 US TREASURY NB 3,900,312.00 - - - - - 4,568.68 (5,504.68) 3,899,376.00 2,064.55 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828WK2 US TREASURY FRN 11,488,851.00 - (11,489,577.41) - - 980.40 347.55 (601.54) - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 38376GWZ9 GNR 2010-141 A 1,264,709.25 - - - (1,262,726.77) 705.58 (3.85) (2,684.21) - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 313384FM6 FED HOME LN DISCOUNT N7 674,966.25 - - (675,000.00) - - 65.35 (31.60) - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 407288YD5 HAMILTON SWR-B-REF 2,084,867.20 - - - - - - (2,496.00) 2,082,371.20 1,391.87 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 084664BE0 BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY FIls - 890,632.00 - - - - (752.08) (2,583.92) 887,296.00 5,520.00 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392BVM5 FNR 2002-3 PG 87,964.42 - - - (19,938.22) (542.18) (322.02) 17.60 67,179.60 301.20 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828784 US TREASURY NB - 2,960,390.63 - - - - 587.81 9,501.56 2,970,480.00 10,368.85 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828184 US TREASURY NB - 1,282,632.81 - - - - 220.11 4,355.08 1,287,208.00 4,493.17 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 459200GX3 IBM CORP 473,449.05 - - - - - (1,079.82) (687.18) 471,682.05 4,004.81 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828SU5 US TREASURY NB 800,128.00 - - (800,000.00) - - (201.83) 73.83 - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828VG2 US TREASURY NB 5,008,200.00 - (5,007,457.03) - - 16,605.25 1,739.55 (19,087.78) - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 78008K5 V 1 ROYAL BANK OF CANADA 2,043,460.00 - - - - - (9,021.10) 541.10 2,034,980.00 11,500.00 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3136A4M89 FNA 2012-M3 2A1 615,436.98 - - - (15,926.76) (62.18) (202.92) (1,477.45) 597,767.67 949.32 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 313384FV6 FED HOME LN DISCOUNT N7 999,940.00 - - (1,000,000.00) - - 204.26 (144.26) - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 313384FV6 FED HOME LN DISCOUNT N7 - 399,973.56 - (400,000.00) - - 26.44 - - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 313384FV6 FED HOME LN DISCOUNT N7 - 1,199,926.33 - (1,200,000.00) - - 73.67 - - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 313384FV6 FED HOME LN DISCOUNT N7 424,974.50 - - (425,000.00) - - 86.81 (61.31) - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89153VAC3 TOTAL CAPITAL INTL SA 161,795.20 - - - - - 140.16 (450.56) 161,484.80 20.67 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 90327QCW7 USAA CAPITAL CORP 4,094,520.00 - - - - - (10,639.88) (6,840.12) 4,077,040.00 22,750.00 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31294LPZ0 FG E02240 180,143.25 - - - (36,632.41) (1,071.95) (768.61) 82.90 141,753.18 692.65 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 59217GAV 1 MET LIFE GLOB FUNDING I 546,689.50 - (545,256.15) - - 77.67 (956.15) (554.87) - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828RU6 US TREASURY NB 3,523,800.00 - - - - - 230.87 (3,520.87) 3,520,510.00 2,593.92 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36200AFG9 GN 595167 58,761.11 - - - (8,664.97) (384.09) (230.61) 129.27 49,610.72 220.21 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 235219152 DALLAS-B-REF-TXBL 2,169,629.70 - - - - - - (5,230.75) 2,164,398.95 12,816.17 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31393V2T7 FUR 2627 GY 796,803.56 - - - (100,932.11) (3,978.97) (1,781.82) (1,874.67) 688,235.99 2,478.14 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89233P6J0 TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CO 5,008,100.00 - (5,002,050.00) - - 1,546.86 (1,650.31) (5,946.55) - - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402QT68 FN 735073 331,459.33 - - - (46,198.10) (2,653.64) (841.24) 135.56 281,901.91 1,345.38 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128GNR59 FG E85908 212,115.38 - - - (91,348.74) (2,642.22) (438.98) 452.75 118,138.19 579.42 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31401MWC1 FN 712643 923,230.43 - - - (67,548.27) (2,706.60) (2,887.98) (3,295.38) 846,792.21 3,048.44 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 742718DV8 PROCTER & GAMBLE CO/TH 1,254,793.20 - - - - - (1,311.27) (4,033.13) 1,249,448.80 6,792.44 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128PHVS7 FG J06025 108,990.37 - - - (15,961.21) (588.95) (305.14) (488.08) 91,646.98 365.74 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3132FEAK7 FG Z50010 208,929.38 - - - (36,934.50) (1,468.86) (591.47) (844.62) 169,089.93 674.79 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3137ANLP8 FHMS K501 A2 3,103,770.00 - - - - - (2,821.57) (3,932.43) 3,097,016.00 4,234.04 Subtotal - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 71,730,236.98 37,542,866.53 (42,316,796.44) (4,500,000.00) (2,474,583.36) (9,049.67) (55,779.38) (75,321.37) 59,841,573.28 167,159.68 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 9AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Accour - 31,765,301.59 (31,576,298.55) - - - - - 189,003.04 - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 61747C715 MORGAN STANLEY LIQ PUN 66,343.22 8,277,299.06 (8,343,642.28) - - - - - - - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 77434MTA3 Rockwell Collins, Inc. - 1,999,300.00 - (2,000,000.00) - - 700.00 - - - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27805BSM8 Eaton Corporation - 2,099,183.33 - (2,100,000.00) - - 816.67 - - - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 20279WR86 Commonwealth Edison Company 1,999,897.80 - [o - (2,000,000.00) - - 175.00 (72.80) - - Page 10 of 30 Riverside County ►ronsporlohon Commission STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account Account Beginning Base Identifier Description Market Value Base Purchases Base Base Change In Base Maturities Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued Base Sales and Redemptions Base Paydowns Gain/Loss ccretion Gain/Loss Market Value Income Balance 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 2925A3UA4 Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P. 1,998,915.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 88513BUQ1 Thomson Reuters Corporation 1,998,728.88 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 1518T3UD2 CenterPoint Energy, Inc. 1,999,175.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 3024X3U69 FMC Technologies, Inc. 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 50104MTN1 The Kroger Co. 0220XISB2 Altria Group, Inc. 1,399,555.11 770.00 235.00 1,999,920.00 606.67 464.45 1,999,800.00 525.00 200.00 1,999,900.00 359.33 57.56 1,399,972.00 2,099,197.34 (2,100,000.00) 802.66 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 86723BT83 Suncor Energy Inc. 1,998,969.44 1,999,105.56 (2,000,000.00) (2,000,000.00) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27743KTC4 Eastman Chemical Company 1,999,259.44 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 81685MTJ2 Sempm Energy Global Enterprise 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 88513BRE2 Thomson Reuters Corporation 1,999,844.40 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6821A3T54 Omnicom Capital Inc. 1,998,675.00 (2,000,000.00) (2,000,000.00) 1,030.56 894.44 740.56 1,325.00 (2,000,000.00) 375.55 (219.95) 1,999,426.66 - (2,000,000.00) 573.34 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 43357MR93 Hitachi Capital America Corp. 1,999,885.00 (2,000,000.00) 231.11 (116.11) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 96950MS42 Williams Partners L.P. 1,999,388.88 488.90 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien CCYUSD Receivable 69.70 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien CCYUSD Cash 0.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 83701MS59 South Carolina Fuel Company, In - 1,999,194.44 666.67 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 77434MVE2 Rockwell Collins, Inc. 1,998,506.66 320.00 713.34 1,999,540.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 11289RS18 Brookfield US Holdings Inc. 1,999,277.78 - (2,000,000.00) - - 722.22 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 63946ET12 Comcast Corporation 1,999,300.00 - (2,000,000.00) - - 700.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 37790BS10 Glencore Funding LLC 2,099,509.86 (2,100,000.00) 1,049.99 (559.85) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 29250BU25 Encana Corporation 1,999,065.56 902.22 32.22 2,000,000.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 44890NRP7 Hyundai Capital America 1,899,706.26 (1,900,000.00) 557.33 (263.59) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 60920WS43 Mondelez International, Inc. 1,499,638.80 640.42 (367.56) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 74432KR26 Prudential Financial, Inc. 1,999,980.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 2574P1SM5 Dominion Resources, Inc. (2,000,000.00) 19.44 0.56 1,999,013.34 - (2,000,000.00) - - 986.66 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 69430MU61 Pacific Gas and Electric Comp.} - 1,524,322.64 590.52 56.34 1,524,969.50 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 12665KU95 CVS Health Corp. 1,999,486.66 - - - - 317.78 135.56 1,999,940.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 05333URH5 AutoZone, Inc. 2,099,769.00 (2,100,000.00) 513.34 (282.34) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 07588MSM9 Becton, Dickinson and Company 2,099,160.00 - (2,100,000.00) - - 840.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 25471KTW2 Discovery Communications, LLC 1,998,498.34 - (2,000,000.00) - - 1,501.66 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27743KUL2 Eastman Chemical Company - 1,999,300.00 225.00 315.00 1,999,840.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 05634CUN4 Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. 1,998,933.34 - - - - 506.66 380.00 1,999,820.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 61979KRA4 Motiva Enterprises LLC 1,999,888.80 (2,000,000.00) 260.00 (148.80) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 68268UU21 ONEOK Partners, L.P. - 1,999,367.22 - - - - 595.56 37.22 2,000,000.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 61979KU69 Motiva Enterprises LLC - 1,999,402.78 477.78 79.44 1,999,960.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 05634CSL1 Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. 1,999,008.34 - (2,000,000.00) - - 991.66 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6821A3SB2 Omnicom Capital Inc. 1,999,093.34 - (2,000,000.00) - - 906.66 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 85572BTA2 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Work 1,999,316.66 - (2,000,000.00) - - 683.34 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 88513BT34 'Thomson Reuters Corporation 1,999,325.00 - (2,000,000.00) - - 675.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 96950MUE7 Williams Partners L.P. 1,999,222.22 - - - - 416.67 261.11 1,999,900.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 57163USC1 Maniott International, Inc. 1,998,908.00 (2,000,000.00) 1,298.33 (206.33) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 13638XS76 Canadian Natural Resources Limi 1,999,146.12 - (2,000,000.00) - - 853.88 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27743KRL6 Eastman Chemical Company 2,099,722.38 (2,100,000.00) 609.58 (331.96) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 13638XR77 Canadian Natural Resources Limi 1,999,910.60 (2,000,000.00) 170.00 (80.60) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 28103BR61 Edison International 1,999,866.60 (2,000,000.00) 133.33 0.07 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 96950MTG4 Williams Partners L.P. 1,999,194.44 - (2,000,000.00) - - 805.56 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 3024X3SJ4 FMC Technologies, Inc. 1,999,035.56 - (2,000,000.00) - - 964.44 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 89231NAC7 TAOT 2012-B A3 278,728.94 (141,548.70) (31.16) (23.82) 26.14 137,151.40 28.04 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 89231NAC7 TAOT 2012-B A3 61,320.37 (31,140.72) (2.17) (1.66) (2.52) 30,173.31 6.17 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 69430MR65 Pacific Gas and Electric Comp.} 1,999,940.00 (2,000,000.00) 113.89 (53.89) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 28103BTB8 Edison International 1,999,163.88 - (2,000,000.00) - - 836.12 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27886MTC7 Ecolab Inc. 1,999,217.78 - (2,000,000.00) - - 782.22 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27886MR62 Ecolab Inc. 1,999,923.40 - - (2,000,000.00) 111.11 (34.51) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 29380DR77 Enterprise Products Operating LL 1,999,863.88 (2,000,000.00) 200.00 (63.88) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 262441RF8 Duke Energy Corporation 1,999,708.34 (2,000,000.00) 388.89 (97.23) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 2925A3T81 Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P. 1,998,988.88 - (2,000,000.00) - - 1,011.12 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 44890NU65 Hyundai Capital America - 1,998,333.20 1,527.90 98.90 1,999,960.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 68268USU2 ONEOK Partners, L.P. 1,299,491.92 - (1,300,000.00) - - 508.08 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 68268UR66 ONEOK Partners, L.P. 1,999,883.34 (2,000,000.00) 202.78 (86.12) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 63946EUD4 Comcast Corporation 1,999,211.66 - - - - 501.67 186.67 1,999,900.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27805BU94 Eaton Corporation 1,999,250.00 - - - - 550.00 140.00 1,999,940.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 57163UUV6 Marriott International, Inc. - 1,999,033.88 235.00 491.12 1,999,760.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 29251 VSB3 Enbridge (U.S.) Inc. 1,998,715.56 - (2,000,000.00) - - 1,284.44 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 23384ERD1 Daimler Finance North America I 1,999,833.80 (2,000,000.00) 273.33 (107.13) 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 29380DS76 Enterprise Products Operating LL 1,999,000.00 - (2,000,000.00) - - 1,000.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 25471KS86 Discovery Communications, LLC 1,998,800.00 - (2,000,000.00) - - 1,200.00 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 55314QAC1 MMAF 2012-AA A3 180,393.97 - - - (87,984.01) (40.47) (39.70) (38.01) 92,291.78 50.59 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 03251 WS75 Anadarko Petroleum Corporation 1,999,033.34 - (2,000,000.00) - - 966.66 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 03251 WT82 Anadarko Petroleum Corporation 1,999,087.22 - (2,000,000.00) - - 912.78 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 85572BSC9 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Work 1,999,200.00 GO - (2,000,000.00) - - 800.00 Page 11 of 30 Ir leo. Riverside County ►ransponorion Commission STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account Account 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien Identifier 60920WU65 Description Mondelez International, Inc. Beginning Base Market Value - Base Purchases 1,998,875.56 Base Sales - Base Maturities and Redemptions - Base Paydowns - Net Total Realized Gain/Loss Base Amortization/A ccretion 1,002.22 Base Change In Net Unrealized Gain/Loss 82.22 Ending Base Market Value 1,999,960.00 Ending Accrued Income Balance - - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 57163UTK2 Marriott International, Inc. - 1,999,323.34 - (2,000,000.00) - - 676.66 - - - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 37790BTN1 Glencore Funding LLC - 1,998,900.00 - (2,000,000.00) - - 1,100.00 - - - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 68268US40 ONEOK Partners, L.P. 1,999,518.40 - - - - - 1,192.22 (875.07) - - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 66807N11V5 NorthWestem Corporation - 1,999,194.44 - - - - 27.78 537.78 1,999,760.00 - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 85572BR71 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Work 1,999,863.80 - - (2,000,000.00) - - 166.67 (30.47) - - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 262441T82 Duke Energy Corporation - 1,999,187.78 - (2,000,000.00) - - 812.22 - - - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6116M3VH7 Monsanto Company - 1,997,732.78 - - - - 883.33 883.89 1,999,500.00 - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 43357MS84 Hitachi Capital America Corp. - 1,999,066.66 - (2,000,000.00) - - 933.34 - - - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6362P3UQ5 National Grid USA - 1,999,387.78 - - - - 126.67 285.55 1,999,800.00 - 256350001 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 13638XTR1 Canadian Natural Resources Limi - 1,999,466.66 - (2,000,000.00) - - 533.34 - - - Subtotal-347625 LC -Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 42,281,918.66 154,515,313.05 (39,919,940.83) (107,800,000.00) (260,673.43) (73.79) 52,111.77 1,661.41 41,370,761.03 84.80 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 9AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Accoun - 26,481,649.01 (26,105,254.15) - - - - - 376,394.86 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 61747C715 MORGAN STANLEY LIQ PAID 55,980.00 10,078,749.26 (10,134,729.26) - - - - - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 77434MTA3 Rockwell Collins, Inc. - 3,098,629.99 - (3,100,000.00) - - 1,370.01 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 27805BSM8 Eaton Corporation - 2,823,901.39 - (2,825,000.00) - - 1,098.61 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 2925A3UA4 Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P. - 3,298,209.75 - - - - 1,270.50 387.75 3,299,868.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 88513BUQ1 'Thomson Reuters Corporation - 3,297,902.65 - - - - 1,001.01 766.34 3,299,670.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 1518T3UD2 CenterPoint Energy, Inc. - 3,198,760.00 - - - - 760.00 320.00 3,199,840.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 0220X1 SB2 Altria Group, Inc. - 3,298,299.58 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,700.42 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 86723BT83 Suncor Energy Inc. - 3,098,613.62 - (3,100,000.00) - - 1,386.38 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 27743KTC4 Eastman Chemical Company - 2,998,889.16 - (3,000,000.00) - - 1,110.84 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 81685MTJ2 Sempra Energy Global Enterprise - 3,097,946.25 - (3,100,000.00) - - 2,053.75 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 88513BRN2 'Thomson Reuters Corporation 2,999,613.30 - - (3,000,000.00) - - 962.49 (575.79) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 85572BTFI Starwood Hotels & Resorts Work - 3,098,408.68 - (3,100,000.00) - - 1,591.32 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 43357MR93 Hitachi Capital America Corp. 3,499,798.75 - - (3,500,000.00) - - 404.44 (203.19) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 6821A3SJ5 Omnicom Capital Inc. - 2,998,895.01 - (3,000,000.00) - - 1,104.99 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 96950MS42 Williams Partners L.P. - 3,298,991.65 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,008.35 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond CCYUSD Receivable 58.37 - - - - - - - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond CCYUSD Cash (0.00) - - - - - - - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 83701MS59 South Carolina Fuel Company, In - 3,198,711.10 - (3,200,000.00) - - 1,288.90 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 77434MVE2 Rockwell Collins, Inc. - 3,197,610.66 - - - - 512.00 1,141.34 3,199,264.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 11289RS18 Brookfield US Holdings Inc. - 3,198,844.45 - (3,200,000.00) - - 1,155.55 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 63946ET12 Comcast Corporation - 3,098,915.00 - (3,100,000.00) - - 1,085.00 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 37790BS I O Glencore Funding LLC 2,999,299.80 - - (3,000,000.00) - - 1,499.99 (799.79) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 29250BU25 Encana Corporation - 3,298,458.17 - - - - 1,488.66 53.17 3,300,000.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 60920WS43 Mondelez International, Inc. 3,199,229.44 - - (3,200,000.00) - - 1,554.68 (784.12) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 26244JRN1 Duke Energy Corporation 2,799,401.11 - - (2,800,000.00) - - 979.99 (381.10) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 12665KU95 CVS Health Corp. - 3,299,152.99 - - - - 524.34 _ 223.67 _ 3,299,901.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 05333URH5 AutoZone, Inc. 3,499,615.00 - - (3,500,000.00) - - 855.56 (470.56) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 28103BTF9 Edison International - 3,398,836.45 - (3,400,000.00) - - 1,163.55 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 64468EAZ3 NH BUS TXB-SER B 3,200,000.00 - - - - - - - 3,200,000.00 376.00 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 07588MSM9 Becton, Dickinson and Company - 2,998,800.00 - (3,000,000.00) - - 1,200.00 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 05634CUN4 Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. - 3,198,293.34 - - - - 810.66 608.00 3,199,712.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 68268UU21 ONEOK Partners, L.P. - 3,198,987.55 - - - - 952.89 59.56 3,200,000.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 05634CSL1 Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. - 3,298,597.50 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,402.50 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 61979KU69 Motiva Enterprises LLC - 899,731.25 - - - - 215.00 35.75 899,982.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 88513BT34 'Thomson Reuters Corporation - 3,298,886.25 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,113.75 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 96950MUE7 Williams Partners L.P. - 3,198,755.55 - - - - 666.67 417.78 3,199,840.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 44890NR77 Hyundai Capital America 3,399,848.02 - - (3,400,000.00) - - 238.00 (86.02) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 57163USCI Marriott International, Inc. 3,198,252.80 - - (3,200,000.00) - - 2,077.33 (330.13) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 27743KRL6 Eastman Chemical Company 2,099,722.38 - - (2,100,000.00) - - 609.59 (331.97) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 61979KRM8 Motiva Enterprises LLC 2,999,632.50 - - (3,000,000.00) - - 1,016.67 (649.17) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 25471KSM5 Discovery Communications, LLC - 3,098,558.50 - (3,100,000.00) - - 1,441.50 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 28103BR61 Edison International 3,499,766.55 - - (3,500,000.00) - - 233.33 0.12 - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 407288YD5 HAMB.TON SWR-B-REF 6,662,675.70 - - - - - - (10,100.40) 6,652,575.30 4,446.61 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 3024X3SJ4 FMC Technologies, Inc. - 3,298,408.67 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,591.33 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 89231NAC7 TAOT 2012-B A3 302,420.90 - - - (153,580.35) (33.80) (25.84) 28.36 148,809.27 30.42 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 61979KT53 Motiva Enterprises LLC - 3,298,723.99 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,276.01 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 69430MR65 Pacific Gas and Electric Company 3,199,904.00 - - (3,200,000.00) - - 182.22 (86.22) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 07588MUT1 Becton, Dickinson and Company - 3,298,267.50 - - - - 660.00 709.50 3,299,637.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 27886MTC7 Ecolab Inc. - 3,298,709.34 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,290.66 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 27886MR62 Ecolab Inc. 2,999,885.10 - - (3,000,000.00) - - 166.67 (51.77) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 29380DR77 Enterprise Products Operating LL 3,499,761.79 - - (3,500,000.00) - - 350.00 (111.79) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 3133XCQE6 FHLB SD-2015 1 118,694.30 - - - (8,298.53) (52.36) (1,029.67) (32.20) 109,281.54 47.62 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 2925A3T81 Enbridge Energy Partners, L.P. - 3,298,331.65 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,668.35 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 96950MTG4 Williams Partners L.P. - 3,398,630.55 - (3,400,000.00) - - 1,369.45 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 27805BU94 Eaton Corporation - 3,298,762.50 - - - - 907.50 231.00 3,299,901.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 57163UUV6 Marriott International, Inc. - 3,198,454.21 G"I - - - - 376.00 785.79 3,199,616.00 - Page 12 of 30 Riverside County ►ransporlorion Commission STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account Account 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond Identifier 29251 VSB3 Description Enbndge (U.S.) Inc. Beginning Base Market Value - Base Purchases 3,297,880.67 Base Sales - Base Maturities and Redemptions (3,300,000.00) Base Paydowns - Net Total Realized Gain/Loss Base Amortization/A ccretion 2,119.33 Base Change In Net Unrealized Gain/Loss - Ending Base Market Value - Ending Accrued Income Balance - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 29380DS76 Enterprise Products Operating LL - 3,298,350.00 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,650.00 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 23384ERD1 Daimler Finance North America I 3,499,709.15 - - (3,500,000.00) - - 478.33 (187.48) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 64468EAY6 NH ST BUS FEN-TXB-A 4,190,000.00 - - - - - - - 4,190,000.00 492.33 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 55314QAC1 MMAF 2012-AA A3 721,575.88 - - - (351,936.01) (114.32) (111.74) (246.70) 369,167.12 202.35 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 55314QAC1 MMAF 2012-AA A3 277,566.19 - - - (135,378.05) (53.43) (52.36) (76.06) 142,006.28 77.84 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 03251 WS75 Anadarko Petroleum Corporation - 2,798,646.68 - (2,800,000.00) - - 1,353.32 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 03251 WT82 Anadarko Petroleum Corporation - 3,298,493.91 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,506.09 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 44890NU24 Hyundai Capital America - 3,298,068.58 - - - - 1,886.50 44.92 3,300,000.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 57163UTK2 Marriott International, Inc. - 3,298,883.51 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,116.49 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 37790BTN1 Glencore Funding LLC - 3,298,240.01 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,759.99 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 68268US40 ONEOK Partners, L.P. 3,199,229.44 - - (3,200,000.00) - - 2,170.67 (1,400.11) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 2574P1RL8 Dominion Resources, Inc. 3,499,537.30 - - (3,500,000.00) - - 775.83 (313.13) - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 43357MS84 Hitachi Capital America Corp. - 3,298,459.99 - (3,300,000.00) - - 1,540.01 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 60920WU65 Mondelez International, Inc. - 2,348,678.78 - - - - 1,177.61 96.61 2,349,953.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 85572BR71 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Work 2,499,829.75 - - (2,500,000.00) - - 154.16 16.09 - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 6116M3VH7 Monsanto Company - 3,096,485.80 - - - - 1,369.17 1,370.03 3,099,225.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 26244JT82 Duke Energy Corporation - 3,098,741.06 - (3,100,000.00) - - 1,258.94 - - - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 6362P3UQ5 National Grid USA - 3,199,020.45 - - - - 202.67 456.88 3,199,680.00 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 13638XTR1 Canadian Natural Resources Limi - 3,299,119.99 - (3,300,000.00) - - 880.01 - - - Subtotal - 347628 LC-PF-2 Sales T. Revenue Bond 72,121,007.53 187,366,342.60 (36,239,983.41) (155,625,000.00) (649,192.94) (253.91) 70,926.93 (9,465.06) 67,034,323.37 5,673.17 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 9AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Accoun - 6,597,997.25 (6,463,813.08) - - - - - 134,184.17 - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 61747C715 MORGAN STANLEY LIQ PRIT 103,970.58 4,041,019.93 (4,144,990.51) - - - - - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 38144LAB6 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP IN 332,679.00 - - - - - (1,332.90) (2,918.10) 328,428.00 6,250.00 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 767201AM8 RIO TINTO FIN USA LTD 611,310.00 - _ - - - _ - (1,525.28) 685.28 610,470.00 1,708.33 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 05333URE2 AutoZone, Inc. 899,919.54 - - (900,000.00) - - 201.50 (121.04) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 38143USC6 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP IN 612,840.00 - - - - - (2,750.65) (369.35) 609,720.00 8,700.00 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31393EXC8 FNR 2003-88 TH 47,442.66 - - - (6,492.58) (254.37) (99.83) (202.08) 40,393.80 145.42 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 61979KR14 Motiva Enterprises LLC 1,099,993.84 - - (1,100,000.00) - - - 6.16 - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 05565QCC0 BP CAPITAL MARKETS PLC 299,859.00 - - - - - 446.37 (509.37) 299,796.00 630.21 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 166764AE0 CHEVRON CORP - 301,848.00 - - - - (15.20) (44.80) 301,788.00 100.22 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 36962G3H5 GENERAL ELEC CAP CORP 331,737.00 - - - - - (2,368.38) (2,689.62) 326,679.00 4,968.75 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 81685MTJ2 Sempra Energy Global Enterprise - 1,099,271.25 - (1,100,000.00) - - 728.75 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828RX0 US TREASURY NB 956,460.00 - - - - - 365.33 (1,258.33) 955,567.00 22.59 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 88513BRE2 Thomson Reuters Corporation 999,922.20 - - (1,000,000.00) - - 187.78 (109.98) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 86723BT83 Suncor Energy Inc. - 524,765.21 - (525,000.00) - - 234.79 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 89236TAYI TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CC - 505,870.00 - - - - (41.90) (1,213.10) 504,615.00 1,861.11 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 69349LAL2 PNC BANK NA 499,950.00 - - (500,000.00) - 294.81 22.55 (267.37) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 6821A3SJ5 Omnicom Capital Inc. - 1,099,480.56 - (1,100,000.00) - - 519.44 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest CCYUSD Receivable 6.04 - - - - - - - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest CCYUSD Cash (0.00) - - - - - - - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137B03 W2 FILMS K502 A2 - 553,695.31 - - - - (59.42) 610.11 554,246.00 653.58 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 63946ET12 Comcast Corporation - 999,650.00 - (1,000,000.00) - - 350.00 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 78573FR76 SABMiller Holdings Inc. 999,955.30 - - (1,000,000.00) - - 76.21 (31.51) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 37790BSI0 GLENCORE FUNDING LLC 1,099,743.26 (1,099,413.34) - - - - (36.67) (293.25) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 37790BS10 Glencore Funding LLC - 1,099,413.34 - (1,100,000.00) - - 586.66 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828UA6 US TREASURY NB 1,244,725.00 - - - - - 1,996.42 (2,096.42) 1,244,625.00 661.71 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31402RBG3 FN 735439 7,207.92 - - - (1,056.35) (46.59) (19.38) 0.88 6,086.48 29.23 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31402RBG3 FN 735439 92,621.79 - - - (13,574.04) (659.15) (269.34) 92.05 78,211.31 375.67 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 30231GAL6 EXXON MOBIL CORPORATIC - 419,525.40 - - - - 7.83 126.57 419,659.80 1,750.88 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 481210M9 JP MORGAN CHASE BANK N. 498,650.00 - (499,276.50) - - 1,798.11 462.18 (1,633.80) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31385JLF3 FN 545826 197,826.79 - - - (28,701.00) (1,212.83) (894.78) 583.07 167,601.25 810.63 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 94974BGF1 WELLS FARGO & COMPANY - 991,540.00 - - - - 115.73 (1,205.73) 990,450.00 8,898.61 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3136A8G38 FNA 2012-M13 ASQ2 794,501.52 - - - (35,275.04) 328.71 471.66 (1,062.82) 758,964.04 784.12 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 6174467U7 MORGAN STANLEY - 504,020.00 - - - - (85.25) (554.75) 503,380.00 1,947.92 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 59217GAC3 MET LIFE GLOB FUNDING I 747,259.40 - - - - - (2,947.67) (870.73) 743,441.00 4,727.78 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 84755MSV5 Spectra Energy Capital, LLC - 1,099,741.50 - (1,100,000.00) - - 258.50 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 05634CSL1 Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. - 899,617.50 - (900,000.00) - - 382.50 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 46625HJL5 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO - 497,550.00 - - - - 51.40 (1,496.40) 496,105.00 1,038.19 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 63307EAB3 NATIONAL BANK OF CANAD - 918,414.00 - - - - (1,252.24) 1,234.24 918,396.00 3,960.00 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 891145TN4 TORONTO-DOMINION BANK - 1,010,240.00 - - - - (534.69) (505.31) 1,009,200.00 4,500.00 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 48121CYK6 JP MORGAN CHASE BANK N. 332,052.00 - - - - - (2,427.49) (2,519.51) 327,105.00 4,500.00 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 407288YD5 HAMILTON SWR-B-REF 631,675.80 - - - - - - (957.60) 630,718.20 421.58 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 61746BDG8 MORGAN STANLEY 503,260.00 - (503,165.00) - - 4,071.86 236.44 (4,403.29) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828J84 US TREASURY NB - 541,814.45 - - - - 58.95 2,714.60 544,588.00 1,900.96 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828784 US TREASURY NB - 394,656.25 - - - - 67.73 1,340.02 396,064.00 1,382.51 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 68268USU2 ONEOK Partners, L.P. - 1,099,590.56 - (1,100,000.00) - - 409.44 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 02580ECC5 AMERICAN EXPRESS BK FSE 277,105.00 - - - - - (2,237.52) (1,559.98) 273,307.50 4,500.00 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 172967FD8 CITIGROUP MC 617,321.74 - a 7 - (614,000.00) - - (2,577.73) (744.01) - - Page 13 of 30 Riverside County ►ransporlorion Commission STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account Account Identifier Description Beginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base Base Change In Base Maturities Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued Base Sales and Redemptions Base Paydowns Gain/Loss ccretion Gain/Loss Market Value Income Balance 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 36162WAC1 GEET 2013-1 A3 639,345.35 (231,087.77) 121.00 109.54 (240.42) 408,247.70 54.74 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 233851AT1 DAIMLER FINANCE NA LLC 501,850.00 - - - - - 203.02 (583.02) 501,470.00 2,951.39 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 44890NRG7 Hyundai Capital America 599,906.66 - - (600,000.00) - - 119.15 (25.82) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3136A4M89 FNA 2012-M3 2A1 189,055.25 - - - (4,892.54) (19.10) (62.33) (453.30) 183,627.98 291.62 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 29251VSB3 Enbridge(U.S.) Inc. - 1,099,293.56 - (1,100,000.00) - - 706.44 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 20279WSSI Commonwealth Edison Company - 799,517.11 - (800,000.00) - - 482.89 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 57163URT5 Marriott International, Inc. 899,691.57 - - (900,000.00) - - 390.00 (81.57) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 25471KS86 Discovery Communications, LLC - 1,099,321.66 - (1,100,000.00) - - 678.34 - - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137ASNH3 FHMS K019 Al 412,301.63 - - - (11,837.30) 244.22 312.30 (1,845.86) 399,174.99 488.54 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 94980VAF5 WELLS FARGO BANK NA 997,770.00 - (998,636.00) - - 2,559.79 777.89 (2,471.68) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 2574P1RL8 Dominion Resources, Inc. 299,960.34 - - (300,000.00) - - 66.50 (26.84) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 235219/52 DALLAS-B- REF -TXBL 657,988.50 - - - - - - 962.00 658,950.50 3,901.88 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31393V2T7 FUR 2627 GY 242,009.80 - - - (30,655.65) (1,208.52) (541.18) (569.62) 209,034.83 752.67 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 89233P6J0 TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CO 801,296.00 - (800,328.00) - - 247.50 (264.05) (951.45) - - 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 78011DAC8 ROYAL BANK OF CANADA - 1,001,090.00 - - - - (43.08) (2,606.92) 998,440.00 3,400.00 256350022 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137ANLP8 FHMS K501 A2 940,231.86 - - - - - (854.74) (1,193.12) 938,184.00 1,282.63 Subtotal - 347623 LC -Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 22,021,402.36 28,099,529.50 (13,410,209.09) (17,839,000.00) (363,572.27) 6,265.43 (11,157.45) (32,332.89) 18,470,919.54 80,353.47 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Accoun - 1,845,043.90 (1,753,063.71) - - - - - 91,980.19 - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 61747C715 MORGAN STANLEY LIQ FRB 95,682.63 424,254.29 (519,936.92) - - - - - - - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 US TREASURY NB - 512,578.13 - - - - (252.95) (4,045.18) 508,280.00 4,431.98 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135GOD75 FANNIE MAE - 593,490.00 - - - _ - 179.16 _ (785.16) 592,884.00 225.00 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376GB33 GNR 2011-6 BA 360,931.20 - - - - - (749.53) (318.67) 359,863.00 1,020.83 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3134G5EK7 FREDDIE MAC 199,974.00 - - (200,000.00) - - (22.21) 48.21 - - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376G5B2 GNR 2011-120 AB 101,855.93 - - - (70,532.29) (399.39) (94.19) (185.16) 30,644.90 61.14 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A7JU5 FHMS K701 A2 345,367.43 - - - - - (1,588.73) (588.44) 343,190.25 1,051.38 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KRS0 GNR 2013-78 AG - 434,460.94 - - - - 294.03 (4,464.97) 430,290.00 895.72 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 GNR 2013-96 A - 69,743.47 - - (159.15) 4.07 20.01 335.95 69,944.36 83.27 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138E16V5 FN AL2683 150,232.50 - - - (8,046.93) (455.54) (79.29) 468.45 142,119.19 443.20 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 CCYUSD Receivable 4.66 - - - - - - - - - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 CCYUSD Cash (0.00) - - - - - - - - - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B03W2 FHMS K502 A2 45,477.63 - - - - - (0.53) (129.70) 45,347.40 53.48 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VB3 US TREASURY NB 3,481,135.00 - - - - - 5,760.77 (101,450.77) 3,385,445.00 7,822.69 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377UN20 GNR 2011-62PA 262,786.83 - (232,298.29) - (29,935.73) 1,509.66 (124.23) (1,938.23) - - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377UN20 GNR 2011-62PA 52,557.37 - (46,459.66) - (5,987.15) (1,926.22) (50.48) 1,866.14 - - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 _ FREDDIE MAC 568,755.00 - - - - - 567.66 (12,464.16) 556,858.50 6,095.83 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828UA6 US TREASURY NB 139,409.20 - (139,431.25) - - 1,588.36 100.64 (1,666.95) - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31294KZL2 _ FGE01647 56,780.81 _ - (54,423.43) - (2,106.59) (668.72) (49.45) 467.39 - - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7E3 GNR 2013-33 AC - 225,284.42 - - (449.53) 17.73 43.84 3,076.15 227,972.61 339.99 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 GNR 2010-166 GP 135,687.47 - - - (6,617.22) (119.71) (36.84) (381.42) 128,532.28 310.12 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A7MJ8 FNA 2012-M8 ASQ2 172,581.11 - - - (27,067.95) 262.66 2.82 (588.23) 145,190.42 182.74 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KSL4 GNR 2013-74 AL - 193,421.88 - - - - 70.47 (4,006.35) 189,486.00 464.12 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KSL4 GNR 2013-74 AL - 222,407.23 - - - - 43.30 (9,278.78) 213,171.75 522.13 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VK3 US TREASURY NB 3,543,190.00 - (1,948,804.68) - - 29,478.73 602.25 (32,361.81) 1,592,104.50 58.85 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A72D3 FNA 2012-M9 A2 402,327.65 - - - - - 503.21 (6,602.41) 396,228.45 816.99 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B6A2 GNR 2013-12 AB 142,497.37 - - - (3,777.04) 115.74 223.65 (1,009.59) 138,050.12 216.29 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AQT24 FHMS K708 A2 174,208.01 - - - - - (69.57) (927.14) 173,211.30 301.75 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376WA62 GNR 2010-15 PD 203,867.84 - - - (16,721.24) (830.20) (50.14) 18.46 186,284.73 585.23 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3128MMAK9 FG G18009 186,632.33 - - - (17,428.82) (831.50) (434.09) 324.64 168,262.56 660.31 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377DPX8 GNR 2010-101 NC 50,495.58 - - - (9,847.11) (266.25) (125.71) 241.88 40,498.39 83.59 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31395EZP5 FUR 2835 MD 131,103.51 - - - (12,777.14) (553.00) (239.77) (357.81) 117,175.79 420.32 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AEYG6 FNA 2013-M9 ASQ2 166,621.09 - - - (12,070.74) (61.24) (63.74) (376.19) 154,049.18 231.57 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31394DVM9 FNR 2005-43 PB 213,126.16 - - - (13,574.87) (630.69) (648.96) 2,515.93 200,787.57 793.90 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AEV77 FHMS K703 A2 261,629.35 - - - - - (415.83) (1,072.10) 260,141.42 564.54 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KXW4 GNR 2013-105A 200,299.53 - - - (1,816.26) 8.08 89.84 (612.38) 197,968.81 283.47 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377JZ89 GNR 2010-117 GK 194,518.64 - - - (16,352.54) (409.10) 32.51 (769.45) 177,020.06 495.36 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828WK2 US TREASURY FRN 149,985.00 - (149,994.11) - - 20.02 2.01 (12.92) - - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31413XVG5 FN 958815 217,798.00 - - - - - (937.21) (1,014.79) 215,846.00 751.00 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A4M48 FNA 2012-M31A1 396,702.16 - - - (11,374.52) (19.38) (54.37) (1,904.83) 383,349.06 660.34 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828UF5 US TREASURY NB - 172,730.47 - - - - 58.45 (865.42) 171,923.50 5.35 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828UF5 US TREASURY NB 94,094.65 - - - - - 121.30 (886.05) 93,329.90 2.90 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828UF5 US TREASURY NB - 228,059.38 - - - - 73.25 (2,176.03) 225,956.60 7.03 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31392JJ83 FNR 2003-17 HC 36,191.90 - - - (4,724.82) (165.33) (89.46) (81.95) 31,130.34 124.98 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381PEB0 FN 466430 284,201.90 - - - - - (583.15) (3,338.85) 280,279.90 744.21 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 FHMS K021 A2 238,826.74 - - - - - 369.28 (4,630.77) 234,565.25 469.22 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CRT6 GNR 2012-13 EG 132,158.71 - - - (4,943.77) 163.61 91.50 (1,699.68) 125,770.37 212.64 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378XP62 GNR 2014-166 PL - 482,337.21 - - (1,181.65) (14.72) 20.57 (3,677.08) 477,484.34 990.15 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A7E22 FHR3804DA 287,058.93 - - - (39,821.68) (951.03) (429.84) (701.89) 245,154.50 688.72 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135GOJA2 FANNIE MAE 454,072.50 - (453,959.10) - - 4,491.41 26.30 (4,631.11) - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135GOJA2 FANNIE MAE 126,131.25 - a2(126,099.75) - - 545.03 (27.49) (549.04) - - Page 14 of 30 Riverside County ►ronsporiorion Commission STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Account Account Identifier Description Beginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base Base Change In Base Maturities Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued Base Sales and Redemptions Base Paydowns Gain/Loss ccretion Gain/Loss Market Value Income Balance 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376T5Z1 38377RSZ9 GNR 2010-4 PD GNR 2010-162 PQ 86,302.88 94,224.67 (7,845.91) (9,91836) (342.54) (583.70) (163.83) 62.69 14.90 (67.07) 77,965.50 83,718.22 427.48 297.34 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADR7 FREDDIE MAC - 471,527.75 - - - - 81.05 (3,358.55) 468,250.25 1,088.54 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EACA5 FREDDIE MAC 877,848.00 - - - - - (3,223.40) (5,480.60) 869,144.00 7,833.33 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828KQ2 US TREASURY NB 537,890.00 - - - - - (1,668.70) (2,666.30) 533,555.00 1,995.58 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31404WTT3 FN 780962 103,155.10 - - - (12,264.82) (1,033.66) (519.47) 330.50 89,667.66 322.81 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378BX20 GNR 2012-132 AB 75,349.10 - - - (5,049.54) 111.77 13.22 (174.16) 70,250.39 74.31 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31417YKF3 FN MA0293 188,716.38 - - - (14,464.92) (746.39) 331.08 (2,217.36) 171,618.79 594.89 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31385XBG1 FN 555439 24,772.70 - - - (4,307.41) (169.62) (96.48) (23.14) 20,176.04 97.72 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31416YXJ2 FNAB3380 75,322.02 - - - (4,769.56) (194.31) (10.36) (755.76) 69,592.03 191.96 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912833KR0 STRIPS 368,957.20 - - - - - 1,348.17 (816.17) 369,489.20 - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ASNH3 FHMS K019 Al 412,301.63 - - - (11,837.30) 208.53 263.98 (1,761.86) 399,174.99 488.54 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B6ZL8 FHMS K714 Al 53,147.36 - - - (2,008.06) (29.81) (49.26) (70.91) 50,989.32 86.85 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31418AFW3 FNMA1080 273,692.99 - - - (19,580.29) (529.72) (329.72) (2,280.62) 250,972.64 603.01 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38379C2M7 GNR 2014-96 WA 56,176.85 - - - (1,940.73) (90.65) 16.14 (250.19) 53,911.42 71.99 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 GNR 2013-33B - 194,140.63 - - - - 102.74 (7,099.37) 187,144.00 378.83 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 GNR 2013-33B - 233,183.59 - - - - 66.21 680.20 233,930.00 473.54 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378TAF7 GNR 2013-71GA 266,229.06 _ - _ - - (11,159.08) 3.43 (14.08) (2,567.35) 252,491.97 514.29 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31397QUQ9 FNR 2011-6 BA 137,564.95 - (127,267.38) - (10,136.26) (2,653.60) (198.88) 2,691.16 - - 256350023 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828TJ9 US TREASURY NB 491,015.25 - - - - - 867.65 (12,039.80) 479,843.10 3,021.96 Subtotal - 347621 LC -Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 18,679,623.68 6,302,663.29 (5,551,738.28) (200,000.00) (432,596.98) 23,852.82 (1,042.17) (241,100.71) 18,579,656.99 52,735.33 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 20030NAP6 COMCAST CORP - 325,509.00 - - - - (708.51) (296.49) 324,504.00 8,991.67 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 36962G3H5 GENERAL ELEC CAP CORP - 328,362.00 - - - - (539.65) (1,143.35) 326,679.00 4,968.75 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 912828KQ2 US TREASURY NB - 638,062.50 - - - - (335.07) 2,538.57 640,266.00 2,394.70 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 21686CAD2 RABOBANK NEDERLAND - 310,389.00 - - - - (286.04) (223.96) 309,879.00 4,556.25 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 89837LAA3 PRINCETON UNIVERSITY - 496,093.57 - - - - (216.82) (1,036.75) 494,840.00 7,342.50 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 94974BEZ9 WELLS FARGO & COMPANY - 307,113.00 - - - - (181.10) (79.90) 306,852.00 350.00 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 26442CAD6 DUKE ENERGY CAROLINAS - 127,422.52 - - - - (161.95) 92.35 127,352.92 1,248.93 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 209111ET6 CONS EDISON CO OF NY - 245,828.00 - - - - (149.25) (664.75) 245,014.00 3,217.50 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 92976WBH8 WACHOVIA CORP - 221,176.00 - - - - (128.93) (163.07) 220,884.00 4,791.67 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 718172AA7 PHILIP MORRIS INTL INC - 277,717.50 - - - - (127.56) 47.56 277,637.50 1,765.63 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 084670BD9 BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY INC - 305,106.00 - - - - (127.09) (298.91) 304,680.00 2,390.83 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 063679ZT4 BANK OF MONTREAL - 304,620.00 - - - - (109.73) 247.73 304,758.00 2,453.75 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 064159CQ7 BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA - 302,034.00 - - - - (72.89) (59.11) 301,902.00 1,902.08 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 91159HHD5 US BANCORP - 303,276.00 - - - - (72.47) 411.47 303,615.00 632.50 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 313383QM6 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANI - 100,160.00 - - - - (63.16) 14.16 100,111.00 850.42 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 38141GRC0 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP In - 303,852.00 - - - - (63.13) 774.13 304,563.00 3,146.88 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 41283LAB1 HARLEY-DAVIDSON FINL SE - 256,430.00 - - - - (60.01) (767.49) 255,602.50 1,987.50 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 3134G56F7 FREDDIE MAC - 450,247.50 - - - - (37.65) 384.15 450,594.00 150.00 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 58768WAD1 MBART 2013-1 A4 - 351,066.41 - - - - (27.76) 252.85 351,291.50 175.78 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 78011DAF1 ROYAL BANK OF CANADA - 302,877.00 - - - - (27.60) 1,392.60 304,242.00 1,500.00 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 6174467U7 MORGAN STANLEY - 301,584.00 - - - - (23.33) 467.33 302,028.00 1,168.75 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 037833AM2 APPLE INC - 300,957.00 - - - - (21.85) (38.15) 300,897.00 481.25 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 17305EFE0 CCCIT 2013-A6 A6 - 331,727.34 - - - - (19.34) (44.80) 331,663.20 1,379.40 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 002799AM6 ABBEY NATL TREASURY SE] - 300,810.00 - - - - (18.54) (167.46) 300,624.00 1,237.50 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3137ANLP8 FHMS K501 A2 - 100,839.84 - - - - (18.54) 58.70 100,880.00 137.92 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 3138L1TX7 FN AM1465 - 314,731.29 - - - - (12.95) 1,428.72 316,147.06 433.41 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 59217GBH1 MET LIFE GLOB FUNDING I - 300,504.00 - - - - (11.84) 185.84 300,678.00 877.50 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 0258MODR7 AMERICAN EXPRESS CREDIT - 300,678.00 - - - - (11.75) 311.75 _ 300,978.00 1,278.75 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 822582AZ5 SHELL INTERNATIONAL FIN - 300,429.00 - - - - (11.52) 209.52 300,627.00 345.00 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 89114QAZ1 TORONTO-DOMINION BANK - 300,762.00 - - - - (11.46) 854.46 301,605.00 1,462.50 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 3133EECD0 FEDERAL FARM CREDIT BAT - 900,554.67 - - - - (11.32) 167.65 900,711.00 59.61 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 05531FAL7 BB&T CORPORATION - 251,235.00 - - - - (9.55) (377.95) 250,847.50 1,511.11 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 91324PCF7 UMTEDHEALTH GROUP INC - 300,543.00 - - - - (8.79) (1,071.21) 299,463.00 186.67 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 05565QCY2 BP CAPITAL MARKETS PLC - 300,573.00 - - - - (8.66) 485.66 301,050.00 1,925.10 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 928668AF9 VOLKSWAGEN GROUP AMEI - 300,525.00 - - - - (8.62) (237.38) 300,279.00 546.67 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 02582JGJ3 AMXCA 2013-3 A - 487,209.26 - - - - (6.51) 172.24 487,374.99 212.12 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 69349LAP3 PNC BANK NA - 300,210.00 - - - - (6.07) 183.07 300,387.00 575.00 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 00138CAA6 AIG GLOBAL FUNDING - 300,696.00 - - - - (4.53) (259.47) 300,432.00 220.00 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 07330NAG0 BRANCH BANKING & TRUST - 300,138.00 - - - - (3.79) 258.79 300,393.00 262.50 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 89233P6S0 TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CC - 200,184.00 - - - - (3.12) 329.12 200,510.00 597.22 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 47787RAD2 JDOT 2012-B A4 - 350,054.69 - - - - (2.86) 158.17 350,210.00 107.33 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 47787UAC7 JDOT 2015-A A2B - 425,066.41 - - - - (2.78) (89.13) 424,974.50 86.04 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 40434CAA3 HSBC USA INC - 300,090.00 - - - - (1.50) (232.50) 299,856.00 86.67 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 9AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Accoun - 33,123,231.78 (33,112,502.78) - - - - - 10,729.00 - 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 89153UAE1 TOTAL CAPITAL CANADA L7 - 300,000.00 - - - - - 306.00 300,306.00 2,005.83 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 842434CN0 SOUTHERN CALIF GAS CO - 249,992.50 - - - - 0.08 609.92 250,602.50 139.93 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 02582JGY0 AMXCA 2014-5A - 174,917.97 - - - - 0.10 216.68 175,134.75 36.98 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 161571FH2 CHAIT 2012-A2 A2 - 174,890.63 a A - - - - 1.41 (58.29) 174,833.75 35.43 Page 15 of 30 Ir leo. Riverside County ►ransporlorion Commission STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Source Beginning Base Base Maturities Base Base Change In Net Total Realized Amortization/A Net Unrealized Ending Base Ending Accrued Account 256350005 Account LC -Project Fund-Toll2 Identifier 02665WAT8 Description AMERICAN HONDA FINANCI Market Value - Base Purchases 299,877.00 Base Sales - and Redemptions - Base Paydowns - Gain/Loss ccretion 2.12 Gain/Loss 150.88 Market Value 300,030.00 Income Balance 1,350.00 - 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund -Toll 2 90261XHH8 UBS AG STAMFORD CT - 249,357.50 - - - - 3.87 266.13 249,627.50 1,187.50 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 06406HC76 BANK OF NEW YORK MELLC - 249,360.00 - - - - 3.89 (833.89) 248,530.00 1,078.13 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund -Toll 2 25600WAD2 _ DNB BOLIGKREDITT AS - 399,608.00 - - - - 4.87 583.13 400,196.00 1,611.I I 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 166754AK7 CHEVRON PHILLIPS CHEM C - 299,631.00 - - - - 5.22 66.78 299,703.00 694.17 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund -Toll 2 59217GAY5 MET LIFE GLOB FUNDING I - 299,646.00 - - - - 5.84 (209.84) 299,442.00 2,137.50 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 49130TRY4 KY HSG CORP-A-TXBL - 274,634.25 - - - - 6.10 (61.10) 274,579.25 1,288.38 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund-To112 30231GAL6 EXXON MOBIL CORPORATIC - 299,583.00 - - - - 6.40 167.60 299,757.00 1,250.63 256350005 LC -Project Fund-To112 31677QAV1 FIFTH THIRD BANK - 248,055.00 - - - - 9.87 95.13 248,160.00 1,238.54 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund -Toll 2 25468PCV6 WALT DISNEY COMPANY/T7 - 299,427.00 - - - - 10.07 385.93 299,823.00 275.00 256350005 LC -Project Fund-To112 74153WCE7 PRICOA GLOBAL FUNDING 1 - 299,511.00 - - - - 10.07 (469.07) 299,052.00 1,496.25 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund -Toll 2 46623EKD0 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO - 299,310.00 - - - - 11.29 (374.29) 298,947.00 1,685.83 256350005 LC -Project Fund-To112 166764AV2 CHEVRON CORP - 299,187.00 - - - - 13.08 673.92 299,874.00 1,342.25 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 69371RM52 PACCAR FINANCIAL CORP - 299,034.00 - - - - 13.34 481.66 299,529.00 501.67 256350005 LC -Project Fund-To112 747525AG8 QUALCOMM INC - 299,025.00 - - - - 13.46 28.54 299,067.00 478.33 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 233851BF0 DAIMLER FINANCE NA LLC - 299,250.00 - - - - 13.66 310.34 299,574.00 1,718.75 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 06050TLY6 BANK OF AMERICA NA - 298,968.00 - - - - 16.20 568.80 299,553.00 1,306.25 256350005 LC -Pr jea Fund-To112 532457BK3 ELI LILLY & CO - 298,908.00 - - - - 17.42 249.58 299,175.00 1,208.33 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 553794AA6 MUFG AMERICAS HLDGS CC - 298,716.00 - - - - 19.98 121.02 298,857.00 1,909.38 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund -Toll 2 90290KAD7 USAOT 2014-1 A4 - 443,991.80 - - - - 25.32 773.73 444,790.85 185.91 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 22546QAV9 CREDIT SUISSE NEW YORK - 297,495.00 - - - - 37.55 376.45 297,909.00 878.33 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund -Toll 2 912828UA6 US TREASURY N/B - 774,119.53 (656,008.60) - - 947.23 50.14 375.69 119,484.00 63.52 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 912828784 US TREASURY N/B - 591,140.63 - - - - 63.81 2,891.56 594,096.00 2,073.77 256350005 LC -Pr jea Fund -Toll 2 3137AEV69 FHMS K703 Al - 230,966.31 - - - - 84.10 (141.56) 230,908.85 358.71 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 38377LN38 GNR 2010-130 LG - 278,293.34 - - - - 112.25 (443.37) 277,962.22 785.19 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 38377UN20 GNR 2011-62 PA - 191,998.72 - - - - 158.12 (108.84) 192,048.00 471.52 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 3137AHXC7 FHR 3952 MK - 179,237.27 - - - - 172.74 (428.83) 178,981. 8 446.14 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund -Toll 2 61979KU69 Motiva Enterprises LLC - 1,399,581.94 - - - - 334.45 55.61 1,399,972.00 - 256350005 LC -Project Fund-To112 912828UZ1 US TREASURY N/B - 1,628,343.75 - - - - 382.86 6,456.39 1,635,183.00 1,737.43 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund -Toll 2 96950MUAS Williams Partners L.P. - 1,399,416.66 - - - - 408.34 119.00 1,399,944.00 - 256350005 LC -Project Fund-Toll2 88513BUP3 'Thomson Reuters Corporation - 1,399,130.45 - - - - 424.67 318.88 1,399,874.00 - 256350005 LC -Pr jest Fund-To112 29250BU74 Encana Corporation - 1,399,391.00 - - - - 473.67 107.33 1,399,972.00 - 256350005 LC -Project Fund-To112 2925A3UA4 Eubridge Energy Partners, L.P. - 1,399,265.00 - - - - 514.50 164.50 1,399,944.00 - 256350005 LC -Project Fund -Toll 2 68268UU21 ONEOK Partners, L.P. - 1,399,426.78 - - - - 547.17 26.05 1,400,000.00 - - 66,473,362.31 (33,768,511.38) - - 947.23 242.45 17,992.91 32,724,033.53 102,972.03 226 834, 89.20 480,300,077.28 (171,207,179.43) (285,964,000.00) (4,180,618.98) 21,688.10 55,302.15 (338,565.71) 238 02 ,267.73 408,978.48 65 Page 16 of 30 MEM `` Riverside Canny Transporin lion Commission STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2015 ATTACHMENT 5 60.000.000 — 40,000,000 20,000,000 — 0 AAA Asset Class cash 0.05%1 money Markut Funds 10,5.%) LFixed Income (99.4194) Industry Group Other 134.317%) 011&Gaa 46.132%)- Banlw (5.333%) F Sovereign (15.595%1 US Municipals (30-4994) ~ pipelines 7-632%) Commercial !MS (7.593%) Electric (6.759%l • Security Type Other (7.4794) FNMA CMG (3.377%) FNt•C CMO [.3.5g5%] YAON MUNI (6.906%) ----__ uS GOV (14.478%) CORP (15493961 1 Sp C4S-098%) Market Secto Other t1.2.35%11 Agency (1.216%) Financial (9.25S1t) Municipal (30.499%)-,,, jags Backed (11.931%) Government (14.4,3%) industrial (36.092%) 110 ` Utility (21.314%7 66 Riverside County Tronsporlolion Comm ssion ATTACHMENT 6 STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2015 I Other (28_638%) Auto Manufacturers (4.834%) Food (4.834%) Chemicals (9.667%) Industry Group `Electric (18.188%) PIpe8lwe (14.503R%) Oi186as (9.fi69%) Media 0.668%) Security Type FIMP[8ED (0.457,) Aps (0.528%] `CP (98.915%) Market Secto CeSh Asset Decked (0.621M) 1 Dt111tY (45.743%)= :adtuMal (53.173%1 67 Riverside County Trunspo lotion Comm ssion ATTACHMENT 7 STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2015 Credit Rating Base Market Value + Accrued 60,000,000 S0,000,000 40,000,000 30,0OO,0OO 20,000,000 10,0OO,0OO O • AA NA A-1, 1111111111111�lila! A-1 • Asset Class Meney Market Fonda 10 S61%) Fixed Income (99.4395b) Industry Group 4lr6er (32.999%) � Mlscenaneo us Manutectur (4.922%) Retell (9.4229b) Auto ManuMICturer6 (9.92294) 116 Mnnicrpeb (20.954%) Plpeltnaa (14.469%) Electric (9.546%) CAMS. (6?65%) u,tuLoC Lay'. Bo - Security Type Other CMG (0.162%] MsIEONP (0.561BM ABS (0.913S9 MUNI le 93%) VRIPM tp (77.336%f Chortralcurated Lay: Base Market Value • Accrued Market Sector Mortgage Backed (9.163%)1 Cash (D.561%( II Asset Backed 1'1 92596) faun'rci pal ••20954%)� (Minty (30.279%) i Intlpstrlel • 68 `NM= Riverside (ounly Tronsporlolmii (omission STAMP Portfolio Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2015 ATTACHMENT 8 1 Asset Class Money Market Funds (O 494%) Fixed Income (99.5eb,) Industry Group Cosh (0.494,) FGLMC Collateral (0.909%) Agency Collet CMO Agency Collet PAC [MO (6.1613%) J FNMA Collateral (6.6774%) �— Sovereign (S3.024%) Commercial MSS (29.102%) Security Type r other 0.522%01 FNMA CKO (4.151%) FNuec CMO (7,9319e)� GNMA 0.2310 FNMA (9.566%) GNMA CMC (12.566%) MI5 GOV (39.594%[ AGCY SONO (13.43%} Market Sector Cash (0.494%7 Agency (13.43%) Mortgege Sacked (46.482' Government (39.594%) 1 69 1.11. MEM` Riverside Camly Trnnsporlolion Comm ssion ATTACHMENT 9 STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2015 Credit Rating Base Market Value + Accrued 12,000,00u 10,000,000 8,000,000 — 6,000,000 — 4,000,000 — 2,000,000 — 0 ■ ■ A R- IJ� Asset Class Non. Matket nund6 (0?23%) Fixed Income (99.277%) Industry Group Other (10.726%) Insurance (4.033%) Fate Manuraclorers OosGas ($_518%)----, us Municipals (6.97,0 Commercial MRS (1 2'9740 ganka capon%) Sovereign (16.952%). Market Sector Other (0.723%) ASSet Backed (2-201%} Utility (5.518%1 —rl altio.pal (6.975%)� Irldpstrial 0.749%) � Bowmmmrt (16.95299 Rnanclal (40.871%) Mortgage Backed 08.01%) 1i•ar[ o'y' Ousc mono, uilru_.i 70 Riverside (aunty Tronsporlolmii (omission ATTACHMENT 10 STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2015 Credit Rating Base Market Value + Accrued 35,0OO,0O0 30,000,000 25,000,000 20,000,000 15,000,000 10,000,000 5,000,000 0 AA+ AA AA - Industry Group other (16.254%) -� Oil&Gas 4.5.G42%1 C p Iers (5 74%) Diversified L-lnan send (6.82%) us Municipals 110.906%I / sovereign (33.0424%) Banks (10.854%) CeaLmercial MESS U2.292%) 1 Market Sector cash 0.701%11 Utility (5.642%} Mun c pal Go toe%} Industrial (11.2%) ------ Financial (19.15914) Government (32.042%) Mortgage Backed (20,95%) 71 Riverside (Only Tronsp0(101(08 (0mm156101) STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Equity Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended June 30, 2015 ATTACHMENT 11 Asset Class Mnsev Market Funds (0-033%1 Gash (-6-559%) — Fixed Income (106.557%) ..i ii��cutl by: dasc Marr.e[ varuc *Negative cash reflects securities in transit at month end Industry Group Security Type Other (5.811%) MUNI {2.773%) AGCY. BOND (5.186%) CASH (-6.559%) US GOV (9.124%) ABS (9.832%) CP (25.587%) l CORP (48.277%) Market Secto Other p.959%) 1 Mortpepe Backed (5.778%) - Cash (•6.557%)� Government (9.124%) ASeet adeked (9.532%) Industrial (18.815%) ll[ility I21,1.]4946} Financial (26.304%) 72 ATTACHMENT 12 ROTC `•Mm. �rerside Cauntl Traaspoaooin Commission Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category for Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Account Number: 001050990415 Security Type CUSIP Category 17305EFN0 Asset -Backed Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Trade Date 03/05/2014 Original Cost 698,523.44 Base Market Value 699,678.00 Credit Rating AAA Issuer CITIBANK CREDIT CARD 1.020% 2/22/19 Final Maturity Next Call Date Unrealized Gain/Loss 1,154.56 Accrued Income 2,558.50 Coupon 1.020 Yield 1.0196 02/22/2019 36159LCN4 Asset -Backed GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.5943% 10/20/19 10/20/2019 10/21/2014 750,533.60 748,650.00 (1,883.60) 159.82 5.400 0.5952 N/A 47787UAB9 Asset -Backed JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18 02/15/2018 03/11/2015 489,968.44 490,823.20 854.76 189.47 0.920 0.8703 N/A 47787VAC5 Asset -Backed JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.920% 4/16/18 04/16/2018 04/09/2014 749,794.92 750,547.50 752.58 306.67 0.620 0.9207 N/A 89237CAD3 Asset -Backed TOYOTA AUTO RECEIV 1.270% 5/15/19 05/15/2019 06/17/2015 499,972.95 499,675.00 (297.95) 246.94 1.270 1.2702 AAA 92867VAB6 Asset -Backed VOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17 06/20/2017 03/05/2015 249,753.91 250,067.50 313.59 66.46 0.600 0.8699 N/A 31846V203 Cash FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 203,483.51 203,483.51 - 1.85 0.630 0.0060 037833AG5 Credit APPLE INC 0.5405% 5/03/18 05/03/2018 05/03/2013 250,696.74 250,347.50 (349.24) 203.84 0.500 0.5395 AA+ 037833AH3 Credit APPLE INC 0.450% 5/03/16 05/03/2016 05/03/2013 500,184.93 499,765.00 (419.93) 362.50 0.450 0.4498 AA+ 037833885 Credit APPLE INC 0.900% 5/12/17 05/12/2017 05/13/2015 119,917.20 120,033.60 116.40 144.00 0.900 0.9013 AA+ 06406HCK3 Credit BANK OF NY MTN 0.73487% 3/06/18 03/06/2018 03/06/2013 751,277.61 749,992.50 (1,285.11) 382.75 0.700 0.7349 A+ 084664CD1 Credit BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 0.5823% 1/12/18 01/12/2018 01/15/2015 250,634.45 250,310.00 (324.45) 296.80 0.550 0.5824 AA 084670BH0 Credit BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 1.550% 2/09/18 02/09/2018 02/11/2013 504,330.00 502,400.00 (1,930.00) 3,056.94 1.550 1.5419 AA 161571GS7 Credit CHASE ISSUANCE TRU 0.5055% 2/18/20 02/18/2020 03/13/2015 750,301.24 750,832.50 531.26 174.15 0.510 0.5055 AAA 166764AK6 Credit CHEVRON CORP 0.4175%11/15/17 11/15/2017 11/18/2014 250,142.36 249,630.00 (512.36) 130.47 0.430 0.4178 AA 166764AV2 Credit CHEVRON CORP 1.365% 3/02/18 03/02/2018 03/03/2015 499,970.00 499,790.00 (180.00) 2,237.08 1.370 1.3698 AA 17275RAU6 Credit CISCO SYSTEMS INC 1.650 % 6/15/18 06/15/2018 06/17/2015 399,932.00 401,420.00 1,488.00 T 256.67 1.650 1.6461 AA- 19416QDU1 Credit COLGATE PALM MTN 2.625% 5/01/17 05/01/2017 05/04/2011 522,115.03 520,336.85 (1,778.18) 2,209.38 2.630 2.5486 AA- 263901AE0 Credit DUKE ENERGY INDIAN 0.63285% 7/11/16 07/11/2016 07/11/2013 750,961.18 750,532.50 (428.68) 986.61 0.600 0.6326 A 30231GAL6 Credit EXXON MOBIL 1.305% 3/06/18 03/06/2018 03/06/2015 460,000.00 459,627.40 (372.60) 1,917.63 1.310 1.3067 AAA 36962G2G8 Credit GEN ELEC CAP CRP MTN 5.400% 2/15/17 02/15/2017 02/13/2007 112,850.40 111,135.44 (1,714.96) 2,121.60 5.630 5.0820 AA+ 36962G3H5 Credit GEN ELEC CAP CRP MTN 5.625% 9/15/17 09/15/2017 09/24/2007 554,590.00 544,465.00 (10,125.00) 8,281.25 1.130 5.1808 AA+ 459200HZ7 Credit IBM CORP 1.125% 2/06/18 02/06/2018 02/06/2015 497,700.00 496,825.00 (875.00) 2,265.63 0.870 1.1343 AA- 48125LRD6 Credit JP MORGAN CHASE 0.6857 % 6/14/17 06/14/2017 06/19/2015 750,000.00 749,850.00 (150.00) 171.43 0.690 0.6858 A+ 58933YAH8 Credit MERCK CO INC 0.6162% 5/18/18 05/18/2018 05/20/2013 752,639.82 752,550.00 (89.82) 564.85 0.540 0.6142 AA 717081DD2 Credit PFIZER INC 0.900% 1/15/17 01/15/2017 06/03/2013 501,450.00 500,530.00 (920.00) 2,075.00 0.410 0.8997 AA 717081DP5 Credit PFIZER INC 0.41488% 5/15/17 05/15/2017 05/15/2014 250,016.71 250,027.50 10.79 134.20 0.890 0.4150 AA 90331HMD2 Credit US BANK NA MTN 0.527% 1/30/17 01/30/2017 01/30/2014 12/30/2016 250,182.48 249,952.50 (229.98) 218.79 1.350 0.5274 AA- 90331HMQ3 Credit US BANK NA MTN 1.350% 1/26/18 01/26/2018 01/27/2015 12/26/2017 500,990.00 499,675.00 (1,315.00) 2,887.50 0.500 1.3529 AA- 931142DE0 Credit WAL MART STORES INC 0.600% 4/11/16 04/11/2016 04/11/2013 319,559.98 319,118.03 (441.95) 425.33 0.890 0.5993 AA 94974BFK1 Credit WELLS FARGO MTN 0.9241 % 4/23/18 04/23/2018 04/23/2013 502,743.60 501,385.00 (1,358.60) 850.14 1.150 0.9220 A+ 94974BFW5 Credit WELLS FARGO COMPANY 1.150% 6/02/17 06/02/2017 06/03/2014 500,465.56 498,735.00 (1,730.56) 463.19 1.150 1.1525 A+ 7426M2A50 Money Market PRIVATE EXP FUNDING C P 1/05/16 01/05/2016 04/14/2015 498,706.94 498,850.00 143.06 - 0.000 0.0000 3130A5EP0 Mortgage -Backed F H L B 0.625% 5/30/17 05/30/2017 05/15/2015 999,170.00 997,960.00 (1,210.00) 538.19 0.630 0.6261 AA+ 3133EEWS5 Mortgage -Backed F F C B DEB 0.2265 % 1/02/18 01/02/2018 04/02/2015 699,961.01 700,259.00 297.99 124.62 0.220 0.2264 AA+ 3134G3N55 Mortgage -Backed F H L M C MTN 1.100 % 10/05/17 10/05/2017 10/05/2012 10/05/2015 499,950.00 500,045.00 95.00 1,313.89 1.100 1.0994 AA+ 3134G7AY7 Mortgage -Backed F H L M C 1.000% 6/29/17 06/29/2017 06/29/2015 09/29/2015 519,927.20 520,192.40 265.20 28.89 1.000 1.0000 AA+ 3136AMTM1 Mortgage -Backed F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845% 9/25/18 09/25/2018 03/01/2015 468,558.54 469,606.64 1,048.10 31.52 0.380 0.3957 N/A 3137EADV8 Mortgage -Backed F H L M C 0.750% 7/14/17 07/14/2017 05/29/2015 799,376.00 799,984.00 608.00 533.33 0.750 0.7499 AA+ 13063BN73 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST VAR 1.050% 2/01/16 02/01/2016 03/27/2013 502,860.00 501,655.00 (1,205.00) 2,187.50 1.050 1.0465 AA- 13063CFD7 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST 1.250%11/01/16 11/01/2016 11/05/2013 352,605.43 352,320.50 (284.93) 729.17 1.250 1.2420 AA- 6055806F1 Taxable Muni MISSISSIPPI ST SER D 3.381 % 11/01/18 11/01/2018 11/10/2010 106,451.33 106,815.00 363.67 563.50 3.380 3.1646 AA 650119AD2 Taxable Muni NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 0.898% 7/01/17 07/01/2017 04/16/2015 200,000.00 199,778.00 (222.00) 374.17 0.900 0.8994 AA- 650119AE0 Taxable Muni NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 1.315% 7/01/18 07/01/2018 04/16/2015 120,000.00 119,842.80 (157.20) 328.75 1.320 1.3158 AA- 702282NA8 Taxable Muni PASADENA CA UNIF SCH 0.541 % 11/01/15 11/01/2015 03/20/2014 425,339.99 424,902.25 (437.74) 383.21 0.900 0.5409 A+ 91412GWU5 Taxable Muni UNIV CALIFORNIA CA 1.418% 5/15/18 05/15/2018 03/25/2015 250,000.00 251,620.00 1,620.00 945.33 2.000 1.4072 AA 91412GWV3 Taxable Muni UNIV OF CA 2.003 % 5/15/19 05/15/2019 03/25/2015 250,000.00 250,405.00 405.00 1,335.33 0.870 1.9907 AA 20772JZR6 Tax -Exempt CONNECTICUT ST SER 3.000% 3/15/17 03/15/2017 03/25/2015 470,637.00 466,911.00 (3,726.00) 3,600.00 3.000 2.8942 AA 912828D64 Treasuries USTREASURY NT 0.500% 8/31/16 08/31/2016 09/02/2014 5,004,882.81 5,007,050.00 2,167.19 8,355.98 1.000 0.4997 N/A 912828D98 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/17 09/15/2017 09/15/2014 4,972,787.50 4,988,668.80 15,881.30 14,556.52 0.380 0.9948 N/A 912828F88 Treasuries USTREASURY NT 0.375%10/31/16 10/31/2016 10/31/2014 4,991,406.25 4,996,900.00 5,493.75 3,158.97 0.880 0.3754 N/A 912828G20 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 11/15/17 11/15/2017 11/15/2014 2,982,875.39 2,995,621.20 12,745.81 3,341.41 0.500 0.8736 N/A 912828H78 Treasuries USTREASURY NT 0.500% 1/31/17 01/31/2017 02/02/2015 3,145,508.78 3,149,023.50 2,033.27 6,482.73 0.880 0.5002 N/A 912828H94 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 2/15/18 02/15/2018 02/17/2015 3,033,920.31 3,028,969.40 (4,950.91) 11,179.01 1.000 0.9970 N/A 912828K25 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 0.750% 4/15/18 04/15/2018 04/15/2015 1,241,556.92 1,243,462.50 1,905.58 1,972.34 0.750 0.7536 N/A 912828SS0 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/17 04/30/2017 04/30/2012 1,373,744.94 1,376,959.60 3,214.66 2,019.63 0.750 0.8711 N/A 912828WT3 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 7/15/17 07/15/2017 07/15/2014 1,003,828.13 1,004,140.00 311.87 4,036.60 1.420 0.8719 N/A 7R 50,059,736.53 50,074,132.62 12,914.64 104,468.03 ATTACHMENT 13 %rreSHdr COYrnr Ton097113lipn Commis -son Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Transaction Settlement Date Trade Date Date CUSIP Descri.tion Units Price Miscellaneous Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Amount Short Term Federal Tax Cost Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount 04/01/2015 04/01/2015 04/01/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (108,008.7500) 1.000000 - - - 108,008.75 (108,008.75) - - - - 04/01/2015 31846V203 INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 SHARES DUE 3/31/2015 INTEREST FROM 3/1/15 TO 3/31/15 - - - - - 98.35 - 04/01/2015 03/27/2015 04/01/2015 6055806F1 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF MISSISSIPPI ST SER D 3.381 % 11/01/18 /PIPER JAFFRAY/100,000 PAR VALUE AT 106.6 % 100,000.0000 1.066000 - - - (106,600.00) 106,600.00 - - 04/01/2015 04/01/2015 6055806F1 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF MISSISSIPPI ST SER D 3.381 % 11/01/18 - - - - - (1,408.75) - - - 04/02/2015 03/25/2015 04/02/2015 3133EEWS5 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F F C B DEB 0.00001 % 1/02/18 /BONY/TORONTO DOMINION SECURITI/700,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.99443 % 700,000.0000 0.999944 - - - (699,961.01) 699,961.01 - - 04/02/2015 04/02/2015 04/02/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (868,396.1400) 1.000000 - - - 868,396.14 (868,396.14) - - 04/02/2015 04/02/2015 04/02/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 144,312.9600 1.000000 - - - (144,312.96) 144,312.96 - - 04/02/2015 04/01/2015 04/02/2015 912828H94 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000 % 2/15/18 /NOMURA SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/3,020,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.46093742 % 3,020,000.0000 1.004609 (3,033,920.31) 3,033,920.31 - - 04/02/2015 04/02/2015 912828H94 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 2/15/18 - - - - - (3,837.57) - - - 04/02/2015 912828UR9 ACCREDITED DISCOUNT ON U S TREASURY NT 0.750% 2/28/18 MARKET DISCOUNT - - - - - 855.57 - - 04/02/2015 04/01/2015 04/02/2015 912828UR9 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.750% 2/28/18 /NOMURA SECURITIES INTL., FIXED/3,020,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.71875 % (3,020,000.0000) 0.997188 - - (2,993,250.88) 18,255.37 - - 3,011,506.25 04/02/2015 04/02/2015 912828UR9 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.750% 2/28/18 - - - - - 2,031.11 - - - 04/06/2015 03/31/2015 04/06/2015 20772JZR6 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF CONNECTICUT ST SER 3.000% 3/15/17 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./450,000 PAR VALUE AT 104.586 % 450,000.0000 1.045860 - - - (470,637.00) 470,637.00 - - 04/06/2015 04/06/2015 20772JZR6 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF CONNECTICUT ST SER 3.000% 3/15/17 - - - - - (412.50) - - - 04/06/2015 04/06/2015 04/06/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (107,934.9000) 1.000000 - - - 107,934.90 (107,934.90) - - 04/06/2015 03/31/2015 04/06/2015 912828SS0 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/17 /RBS SECURITIES INC /310,000 PAR VALUE AT 100574219 % (310,000.0000) 1.005742 - 311,780.08 (310,910.99) 869.09 - 04/06/2015 04/06/2015 912828SS0 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/17 - - - 1,176.42 - - - 04/06/2015 912828SS0 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875 % 4/30/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - (365.25) - - 04/06/2015 912828WQ9 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (49.05) - - 04/06/2015 04/02/2015 04/06/2015 912828WQ9 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 /NOMURA SECURITIES INTL., FIXED/50,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.183594 % (50,000.0000) 1.001836 - - - 50,091.80 (50,073.24) 18.56 04/06/2015 04/06/2015 912828WQ9 RECENED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 - - - - - 66.30 04/09/2015 17304UD31 INTEREST EARNED ON CITIBANK NA NE C 0.25449% 4/09/15 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/9/2015 4/9/15 INTEREST ON MATURITY - - - - - 109.79 - - - 04/09/2015 17304UD31 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CITIBANK NA NE C 0.25449% 4/09/15 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (22.36) - - 04/09/2015 04/09/2015 04/09/2015 17304UD31 MATURED PAR VALUE OF CITIBANK NA NE C 0.25449% 4/09/15 500,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 % (500,000.0000) 1.000000 - - - 500,000.00 (500,000.00) - - 04/09/2015 04/09/2015 04/09/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 109.7900 1.000000 - - - (109.79) ' 109.79 - - 04/09/2015 04/09/2015 04/09/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 500,000.0000 1.000000 - - - (500,000.00) 500,000.00 - - 04/10/2015 04/10/2015 13063CFD7 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF CALIFORNIA ST 1.250%11/01/16 - - - - - (1,932.29) - - - 04/10/2015 04/07/2015 04/10/2015 13063CFD7 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF CALIFORNIA ST 1.250% 11/01/16 /SOUTHWEST SECURITIES INC./350,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.773 % 350,000.0000 1.007730 - - - (352,705.50) 352,705.50 - - 04/10/2015 04/10/2015 04/10/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOUT OBLIG FUND CL Y (354,637.7900) 1.000000 - - - 354,637.79 (354,637.79) - - 04/13/2015 084664CD1 INTEREST EARNED ON BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 0.541% 1/12/18 $1 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/13/2015 - - - - - 338.13 - - - 04/13/2015 084664CD1 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 0.541% 1/12/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (10.55) - - 04/13/2015 263901AE0 INTEREST EARNED ON DUKE ENERGY INDIAN 0.59197% 7/11/16 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/11/2015 - - - - - 1, 128.94 - - - 04/13/2015 263901AE0 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON DUKE ENERGY INDIAN 0.59197% 7/11/16 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (61.32) - - 04/13/2015 04/13/2015 04/13/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 1,295.1300 1.000000 - - - (1,295.13) 1,295.13 - - 04/13/2015 04/13/2015 04/13/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOUT OBLIG FUND CL Y 1,128.9400 1.000000 - - - (1,128.94) 1,128.94 - - 04/13/2015 931142DE0 INTEREST EARNED ON WAL MART STORES INC 0.600% 4/11/16 $1 PV ON 319000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/11/2015 - - - 957.00 - - - 04/13/2015 931142DE0 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON WAL MART STORES INC 0.600% 4/11/16 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (55.69) - - 04/14/2015 04/14/2015 04/14/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 203,665.7700 1.000000 - - - (203,665.77) 203,665.77 - - 04/14/2015 04/10/2015 04/14/2015 7426M2A50 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF PRIVATE EXP FUNDING C P 1/05/16 /PERSHING LLC/500,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.741388 % 500,000.0000 %4 0.997414 - - - (498,706.94) 498,706.94 - - Page 25 of 30 ZvKSitle- \OYMj' Ton -spa -Whim Icrnmiwun Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COM Transaction Date Trade Date Settlement Date CUSIP Description Units Price Commissions SEC Fees Miscellaneous Fees Net Cash Amount Federal Tax Cost Amount Short Term Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount 04/14/2015 912828WQ9 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - (700,000.0000) - - - 1.001953 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - (64.08) - 360.17 - - - 04/14/2015 04/13/2015 04/14/2015 912828WQ9 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./XOTC 700,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.195313% 701,367.19 (701,007.02) 04/14/2015 04/14/2015 912828WQ9 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 - 1,005.52 - - 04/15/2015 161571GS7 INTEREST EARNED ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUS 0.5456 % 2/18/20 $1 PV ON 341.0000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2015 $0.00045/PV ON 750,000.00 PV DUE 4/15/15 - 341.00 - - - 04/15/2015 161571GS7 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUS 0.5456% 2/18/20 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - (49.34) - - 04/15/2015 04/15/2015 04/15/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 341.0000 1.000000 - - - (341.00) 341.00 - - 04/15/2015 04/15/2015 04/15/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 37,667.8800 1.000000 (37,667.88) 37,667.88 - - 04/15/2015 47787UAB9 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18 $1 PV ON 402.6200 SHARES DUE 4/15/2015 $0.00082/PV ON 490,000.00 PV DUE 4/15/15 - - - - 402.62 - - 04/15/2015 47787VAC5 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.920% 4/16/18 $1 PV ON 575.0000 SHARES DUE 4/15/2015 $0.00077/PV ON 750,000.00 PV DUE 4/15/15 - - - - - 575.00 - - - 04/15/2015 89236VAC4 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 $1 PV ON 525.8400 SHARES DUE 4/15/2015 $0.00074/PV ON 709,000.00 PV DUE 4/15/15 - - - - - 525.84 - - - 04/15/2015 89236VAC4 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (60.29) - - 04/15/2015 04/15/2015 04/15/2015 89236VAC4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 (36,164.4200) 955.295598 - - - 36,164.42 (36,206.55) (42.13) - 04/16/2015 04/16/2015 04/16/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (320,000.0000) 1.000000 - - - 320,000.00 (320,000.00) - - 04/16/2015 04/10/2015 04/16/2015 650119AD2 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 0.898% 7/01/17 /MORGAN STANLEY & CO. LLC/200,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 % 200,000.0000 1.000000 - - - (200,000.00) 200,000.00 - - 04/16/2015 04/10/2015 04/16/2015 650119AE0 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 1.315% 7/01/18 /MORGAN STANLEY & CO. LLC/120,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 % 120,000.0000 1.000000 - - - (120,000.00) 120,000.00 - - 04/20/2015 04/20/2015 04/20/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 181.2500 1.000000 - - - (181.25) 181.25 - - 04/20/2015 04/20/2015 04/20/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 404.2900 1.000000 - - - (404.29) 404.29 - - 04/20/2015 36159LCN4 INTEREST EARNED ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.64687% 10/20/19 $1 PV ON 404.2900 SHARES DUE 4/20/2015 $0.00054/PV ON 750,000.00 PV DUE 4/20/15 - - - - - 404.29 - - - 04/20/2015 36159LCN4 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.64687 % 10/20/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (15.68) - - 04/20/2015 92867VAB6 INTEREST EARNED ON VOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17 $1 PV ON 181.2500 SHARES DUE 4/20/2015 $0.00073/PV ON 250,000.00 PV DUE 4/20/15 1.25 04/23/2015 04/23/2015 04/23/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 1,108.8800 1.000000 - - - (1,108.88) 1,108.88 - - 04/23/2015 94974BFK1 INTEREST EARNED ON WELLS FARGO MTN 0.8871 % 4/23/18 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/23/2015 - - - - 1,108.88 - - - 04/23/2015 94974BFK1 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON WELLS FARGO MTN 0.8871 % 4/23/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (126.40) - - 04/27/2015 3136AMTM1 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845 % 9/25/18 $1 PV ON 165.5500 SHARES DUE 4/25/2015 $0.00033/PV ON 500,000.00 PV DUE 4/25/15 - - - - - 165.55 - - - 04/27/2015 04/25/2015 04/27/2015 3136AMTM1 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845 % 9/25/18 (30,446.5500) 0.000033 - - - 30,446.55 (30,438.75) 7.80 - 04/27/2015 04/27/2015 04/27/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 30,612.1000 1.000000 - - - (30,612.10) 30,612.10 - - 04/30/2015 04/30/2015 04/30/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 18,868.7500 1.000000 - - - (18,868.75) 18,868.75 - - 04/30/2015 04/30/2015 04/30/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 302.8800 1.000000 - - - (302.88) 302.88 - - 04/30/2015 90331 HMD2 INTEREST EARNED ON US BANK NA MTN 0.485% 1/30/17 $1 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/30/2015 - - - - 302.88 - - - 04/30/2015 90331HMD2 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON US BANK NA MTN 0.485% 1/30/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - (10.02) - - 04/30/2015 912828F88 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 0.375% 10/31/16 $1 PV ON 5000000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/30/2015 - - - - - 9,375.00 - - - 04/30/2015 912828SS0 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/17 $1 PV ON 2170000.0000 SHARES DUE 4/30/2015 - - - - - 9,493.75 - - - 04/30/2015 912828SS0 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (201.19) - - 05/01/2015 13063CFD7 INTEREST EARNED ON CALIFORNIA ST 1.250% 11/01/16 $1 PV ON 350000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/1/2015 - - - - - 2,187.50 - - - 05/01/2015 13063CFD7 AMORTIZEDPREMIUMONCALIFORNIAST 1.250%11/01/16 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (100.07) - - 05/01/2015 19416QDU1 INTEREST EARNED ON COLGATE PALM MTN 2.625% 5/01/17 $1 PV ON 505000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/1/2015 - - - - - 6,628.13 - - - 05/01/2015 19416QDU1 ACCREDITED DISCOUNT ON COLGATE PALM MTN 2.625% 5/01/17 CURRENT YEAR OID _ - - - - - - 47.60 - 05/01/2015 19416QDU1 ACCREDITED DISCOUNT ON COLGATE PALM MTN 2.625% 5/01/17 CURRENT YEAR ACQ. PREMIUM OID - 74 - - - - (47.60) - - Page 26 of 30 Zrreudo- Cuumy Ton -spa -Whim Icrnmiwun Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COM t Transaction Date 05/01/2015 Trade Date Settlement Date CUSIP Description Units - Price - Commissions - SEC Fees - - - - - - - - Miscellaneous Fees - - - - Net Cash Amount Federal Tax Cost Amount Short Term Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount 19416QDU1 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON COLGATE PALM MTN 2.625 % 5/01/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - (1,009.42) - - 05/01/2015 05/01/2015 05/01/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 11,655.7600 1.000000 - (11,655.76) 11,655.76 - - 05/01/2015 31846V203 INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 SHARES DUE 4/30/2015 INTEREST FROM 4/1/15 TO 4/30/15 - - - 0.89 - - - 05/01/2015 6055806F1 INTEREST EARNED ON MISSISSIPPI ST SER D 3.381 % 11/01/18 $1 PV ON 100000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/1/2015 - - - 1,690.50 - - - 05/01/2015 6055806F1 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON MISSISSIPPI ST SER D 3.381 % 11/01/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - (148.67) - - 05/01/2015 702282NA8 INTEREST EARNED ON PASADENA CA UNIF SCH 0.541 % 11/01/15 $1 PV ON 425000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/1/2015 - - - - 1,149.63 - - - 05/01/2015 702282NA8 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON PASADENA CA UNIF SCH 0.541 % 11/01/15 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - (97.76) - - 05/04/2015 037833AG5 INTEREST EARNED ON APPLE INC 0.49751% 5/03/18 $1 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/3/2015 - - - - 310.94 - - - 05/04/2015 037833AG5 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON APPLE INC 0.49751 % 5/03/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (23.26) - - 05/04/2015 037833AH3 INTEREST EARNED ON APPLE INC 0.450% 5/03/16 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/3/2015 - - - - - 1,125.00 - - - 05/04/2015 037833AH3 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON APPLE INC 0.450 % 5/03/16 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (30.07) - - 05/04/2015 3133EEWS5 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 0.21625 % 1/02/18 $1 PV ON 700000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/2/2015 - - - - - 126.15 - - - 05/04/2015 05/04/2015 05/04/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 1,562.9800 1.000000 - - - (1,562.98) 1,562.98 - - 05/08/2015 05/06/2015 05/08/2015 3134G3N55 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L M C M T N 1.100 % 10/05/17 /PERSHING LLC/500,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.99 % 500,000.0000 0.999900 - - - (499,950.00) 499,950.00 - - 05/08/2015 05/08/2015 3134G3N55 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF F H L M C M T N 1.100%10/05/17 - - - - - (504.17) - - - 05/08/2015 05/08/2015 05/08/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 1,288.8500 1.000000 - - - (1,288.85) 1,288.85 - - 05/08/2015 912828WQ9 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (137.23) - - 05/08/2015 05/07/2015 05/08/2015 912828WQ9 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 /DEUTSCHE BANK SECURITIES, INC./400,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.171875 % (400,000.0000) 1.001719 - - - 400,687.50 (400,544.07) 143.43 - 05/08/2015 05/08/2015 912828WQ9 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 - - - - - 707.18 - - - 05/08/2015 05/07/2015 05/08/2015 912828WQ9 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 /DEUTSCHE BANK SECURITIES, INC./100,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.17154 % (100,000.0000) 1.001715 - - - 100,171.54 (100,136.02) 35.52 - 05/08/2015 05/08/2015 912828WQ9 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 - - - - - 176.80 - - - 05/13/2015 05/06/2015 05/13/2015 037833BB5 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF APPLE INC 0.900% 5/12/17 /GOLDMAN, SACHS & CO./120,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.931 % 120,000.0000 0.999310 - - - (119,917.20) 119,917.20 - - 05/13/2015 05/13/2015 05/13/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (119,917.2000) 1.000000 - - - 119,917.20 (119,917.20) - - 05/15/2015 161571GS7 INTEREST EARNED ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUS 0.5015% 2/18/20 $1 PV ON 313.4400 SHARES DUE 5/15/2015 $0.00042/PV ON 750,000.00 PV DUE 5/15/15 - - - - - 313.44 - - - 05/15/2015 161571GS7 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUS 0.5015% 2/18/20 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (62.91) - 05/15/2015 05/14/2015 05/15/2015 3130A5EP0 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L B 0.625% 5/30/17 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./1,000,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.917 % 1,000,000.0000 0.999170 - - - (999,170.00) 999,170.00 - - 05/15/2015 05/15/2015 05/15/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 70,958.7800 1.000000 - - - (70,958.78) 70,958.78 - - 05/15/2015 05/15/2015 05/15/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 930.2500 1.000000 - - - (930.25) 930.25 - - 05/15/2015 47787UAB9 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18 $1 PV ON 355.2500 SHARES DUE 5/15/2015 $0.00073/PV ON 490,000.00 PV DUE 5/15/15 - - - 355.25 - - - 05/15/2015 47787VAC5 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.920 % 4/16/18 $1 PV ON 575.0000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2015 $0.00077/PV ON 750,000.00 PV DUE 5/15/15 - - 05/15/2015 89236VAC4 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 $1 PV ON 499.0200 SHARES DUE 5/15/2015 $0.00074/PV ON 672,835.58 PV DUE 5/15/15 - - - - - 499.02 - - - 05/15/2015 89236VAC4 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - - - (55.20) 05/15/2015 05/15/2015 05/15/2015 89236VAC4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 (54,786.0100) - - - - 54,786.01 (54,845.34) (59.33) - 05/15/2015 912828G20 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 11/15/17 $1 PV ON 2990000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2015 - - - - - 13,081.25 - - - 05/15/2015 05/14/2015 05/15/2015 912828H78 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 1/31/17 /NOMURA SECURITIES INTL., FIXED/1,000,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.007478 % (1,000,000.0000) 1.000075 - - - 1,000,074.78 (997,773.44) 2,301.34 - 05/15/2015 05/15/2015 912828H78 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 1/31/17 - - - - 1,436.46 - - - 05/18/2015 05/18/2015 05/18/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 1,143.5100 76.000000 - - - (1,143.51) 1,143.51 - - Page 27 of 30 Zvr.Htle- iYYMY Cunmiwun Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Transaction Settlement r. Tr.. - r. - r. - IP - ri.tion Units Miscellaneous Price Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Amount Short Term Federal Tax Cost Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount 05/1R/2015 05/1R/2015 313 4400 (313.441 05/18/2015 58933YAH8 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCK CO INC 0.6162 % 5/18/18 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/18/2015 - - - - - 1,142.54 - - - - - 05/18/2015 58933YAH8 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON MERCK CO INC 0.6162 % 5/18/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (160.18) 05/18/2015 717081DP5 INTEREST EARNED ON PFIZER INC 0.41116 % 5/15/17 $1 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/15/2015 - - - - - 252.23 - 05/18/2015 717081DP5 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON PFIZER INC 0.41116 % 5/15/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (0.79) - 05/20/2015 TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 02/01/2015 THRU 02/28/2015 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT - - - - - (37.17) - - 05/20/2015 05/20/2015 05/20/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 181.2500 1.000000 - - - (181.25) 181.25 - - 05/20/2015 05/20/2015 05/20/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 356.9200 1.000000 - - - (356.92) 356.92 - 05/20/2015 36159LCN4 PV ON 94 EARNED R GE DEALER FLOORPLA 3/PV O5 % 1750,0 9.0 PV ON 394.0900 SHARES DUE 5/20/2015 $0.00053/PV ON 750,000.00 PV DUE 5/20/15 - - - - - 394.09 - - 05/20/2015 36159LCN4 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.63055 % 10/20/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (18.30) 05/20/2015 92867VAB6 INTEREST EARNED ON VOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17 $1 PV ON 181.2500 SHARES DUE 5/20/2015 $0.00073/PV ON 250,000.00 PV DUE 5/20/15 - - - - - 181.25 - - - 05/21/2015 TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 03/01/2015 THRU 03/31/2015 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT - - - - - (521.46) - - - 05/21/2015 166764AK6 INTEREST EARNED ON CHEVRON CORP 0A175% 11/15/17 $1 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/17/2015 - - - - - 258.04 - - - 05/21/2015 166764AK6 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHEVRON CORP 0.4175% 11/15/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (7.64) - - 05/21/2015 05/21/2015 05/21/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (521.4600) 1.000000 - - - 521.46 (521.46) - - 05/21/2015 05/21/2015 05/21/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 258.0400 1.000000 - - - (258.04) 258.04 - - 05/26/2015 TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 04/01/2015 THRU 04/30/2015 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT - - - - - (521.61) - - - 05/26/2015 3136AMTM1 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845 % 9/25/18 $1 PV ON 151.6300 SHARES DUE 5/25/2015 $0.00032/PV ON 469,553.45 PV DUE 5/25/15 - - - - - 151.63 - - - 05/26/2015 05/25/2015 05/26/2015 3136AMTM1 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845% 9/25/18 (462.7700) - - - - 462.77 (462.65) 0.12 - 05/26/2015 05/26/2015 05/26/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (125,638.0500) 1.000000 - - - 125,638.05 (125,638.05) - - 05/26/2015 05/26/2015 05/26/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 138,081.6700 1.000000 - - - (138,081.67) 138,081.67 - - 05/26/2015 05/22/2015 05/26/2015 912828K25 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.750% 4/15/18 /DEUTSCHE BANK SECURITIES, INC./1,250,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.3245536 % 1,250,000.0000 0.993246 - - - (1,241,556.92) 1,241,556.92 - - 05/26/2015 05/26/2015 912828K25 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.750% 4/15/18 - - - (1,050.20) - - - 05/26/2015 912828WQ9 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (73.47) - - 05/26/2015 05/22/2015 05/26/2015 912828WQ9 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 /NOMURA SECURITIES INTL., FIXED/1,250,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.194978 % (1,250,000.0000) 1.001950 - - - 1,252,437.23 (1,251,626.76) 810.47 - 05/26/2015 05/26/2015 912828WQ9 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 6/30/16 - - - - - 2,520.72 - - - 05/29/2015 05/28/2015 05/29/2015 3137EADV8 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L M C 0.750% 7/14/17 /NOMURA SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/800,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.922 % 800,000.0000 0.999220 - - - (799,376.00) 799,376.00 - - 05/29/2015 05/29/2015 05/29/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 5,204.2000 1.000000 - - - (5,204.20) 5,204.20 - - 05/29/2015 912828SS0 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (243.93) - - 05/29/2015 05/28/2015 05/29/2015 912828SS0 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/17 /GOLDMAN, SACHS & CO./XOTC 800,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.503571 % (800,000.0000) 1.005036 - - - 804,028.57 (802,186.83) 1,841.74 - 05/29/2015 05/29/2015 912828SS0 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/17 - - - - - 551.63 - - - 06/01/2015 3130A5EP0 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L B 0.625% 5/30/17 $1 PV ON 1000000.0000 SHARES DUE 5/30/2015 _ - - - - - 260.42 - - - 06/01/2015 06/01/2015 06/01/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 260.4200 1.000000 - - - (260.42) 260.42 - - 06/01/2015 31846V203 INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 SHARES DUE 5/31/2015 INTEREST FROM 5/1/15 TO 5/31/15 - - - - - 0.72 - - - 06/02/2015 3133EEWS5 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 0.221 % 1/02/18 $1 PV ON 700000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/2/2015 - - - - - 133.21 - - - 06/02/2015 06/02/2015 06/02/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 3,008.9300 1.000000 - - - (3,008.93) 3,008.93INTEREST - - 06/02/2015 ' 94974BFW5 EARNED ON WELLS FARGO PV ON 5000 0 0000 SHARES DUE 6/2/ 01 COMPANY 1.150% 6/02/17 $1 - 2,875.00 - - - 06/02/2015 94974BFW5 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON WELLS FARGO COMPANY 1.150% 6/02/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - (54.44) - - 06/03/2015 17275RAS1 INTEREST EARNED ON CISCO SYSTEMS INC 0.54185% 3/03/17 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/3/2015 %% - - - 1,038.55 - - - Page 28 of 30 ZvKSitle- \OYMj' Ton -spa -Whim Icrnmiwun Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COM Transaction Date 06/03/2015 Trade Date Settlement Date CUSIP 17275RAS1 Description AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CISCO SYSTEMS INC 0.54185% 3/03/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION Units - Price - Commissions - SEC Fees - - - - - - Miscellaneous Fees - - - - Net Cash Amount Federal Tax Cost Amount Short Term Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount - (226.49) - - 06/03/2015 06/03/2015 06/03/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 1,038.5500 1.000000 - (1,038.55) 1,038.55 - - 06/08/2015 06406HCK3 INTEREST EARNED ON BANK OF NY MTN 0.73487% 3/06/18 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 6/6/2015 - - - 1,377.88 - - - 06/08/2015 06406HCK3 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON BANK OF NY MTN 0.73487% 3/06/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - * (87.39) - - 06/08/2015 06/08/2015 06/08/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 1,377.8800 1.000000 - (1,377.88) 1,377.88 06/15/2015 161571GS7 INTEREST EARNED ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRU 0.52245% 2/18/20 $1 PV ON 326.5300 SHARES DUE 6/15/2015 $0.00044/PV ON 750,000.00 PV DUE 6/15/15 - - 326.53 - 06/15/2015 161571GS7 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRU 0.52245% 2/18/20 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (55.26) - - 06/15/2015 17275RAS1 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CISCO SYSTEMS INC 0.54185% 3/03/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (40.18) 06/15/2015 06/10/2015 06/15/2015 17275RAS1 SOLD PAR VALUE OF CISCO SYSTEMS INC 0.54185% 3/03/17 /GOLDMAN, SACHS & CO./XOTC 750,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.35 % (750,000.0000) 1.003500 - - - 752,625.00 (752,120.58) 504.42 06/15/2015 06/15/2015 17275RAS1 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF CISCO SYSTEMS INC 0.54185% 3/03/17 - - - - - 140.63 - 06/15/2015 06/15/2015 06/15/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 803,031.3500 1.000000 - - - (803,031.35) 803,031.35 - 06/15/2015 06/15/2015 06/15/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 326.5300 1.000000 - - - (326.53) 326.53 - - 06/15/2015 47787UAB9 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18 $1 PV ON 355.2500 SHARES DUE 6/15/2015 $0.00073/PV ON 490,000.00 PV DUE 6/15/15 - - - - - 355.25 - - 06/15/2015 47787VAC5 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.920% 4/16/18 $1 PV ON 575.0000 SHARES DUE 6/15/2015 $0.00077/PV ON 750,000.00 PV DUE 6/15/15 - - - - - 575.00 - - - 06/15/2015 89236VAC4 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 $1 PV ON 458.3900 SHARES DUE 6/15/2015 $0.00074/PV ON 618,049.57 PV DUE 6/15/15 - - - - - 458.39 - - - 06/15/2015 89236VAC4 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION _ _ _ _ _ - (50.36) - - 06/15/2015 06/15/2015 06/15/2015 89236VAC4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 (48,877.0800) 0.949561 - - - 48,877.08 (48,926.03) (48.95) - 06/16/2015 06/16/2015 06/16/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 618,523.5600 1.000000 - - - (618,523.56) 618,523.56 - - 06/17/2015 06/10/2015 06/17/2015 17275RAU6 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF CISCO SYSTEMS INC 1.650% 6/15/18 /GOLDMAN, SACHS & CO./400,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.983 % 400,000.0000 0.999830 - - - (399,932.00) 399,932.00 - - 06/17/2015 06/17/2015 06/17/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 618,523.5600 1.000000 - - - (618,523.56) 618,523.56 - - 06/17/2015 06/17/2015 06/17/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (1,518,428.5100) 1.000000 - - - 1,518,428.51 (1,518,428.51) - - 06/17/2015 06/10/2015 06/17/2015 89237CAD3 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF TOYOTA AUTO RECEIV 1.270% 5/15/19 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./500,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.99459 % 500,000.0000 0.999946 - - - (499,972.95) 499,972.95 - - 06/19/2015 06/19/2015 06/19/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (399,794.0500) 1.000000 - 399,794.05 (399,794.05) - - 06/19/2015 06/16/2015 06/19/2015 48125LRD6 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF JP MORGAN CHASE 0.6857% 6/14/17 /J.P. MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/750,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 % 750,000.0000 1.000000 - - - (750,000.00) 750,000.00 - - 06/19/2015 89236VAC4 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (1.50) - - 06/19/2015 06/11/2015 06/16/2015 89236VAC4 SOLD PAR VALUE OF TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 /MORGAN STANLEY & CO. LLC/REVS REPOST FACTOR ADJ SPO OFFSET (569,172.4900) 1.000742 - - - 569,594.92 (569,740.98) (146.06) - 06/19/2015 06/16/2015 89236VAC4 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF TOYOTA AUTO REC 0.890% 7/17/17 _ _ _ _ _ 14.07 - - - 06/19/2015 06/16/2015 06/19/2015 912828H78 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 1/31/17 /JEFFERIES LLC/XASE 350,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.866853 % (350,000.0000) 0.998669 - - - 349,533.99 (349,220.70) 313.29 - 06/19/2015 06/19/2015 912828H78 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 1/31/17 - - - - - 671.96 - - - 06/22/2015 06/22/2015 06/22/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 181.2500 1.000000 - - - (181.25) + 181.25 06/22/2015 06/22/2015 06/22/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (48,478.6900) 1.000000 - - - 48,478.69 (48,478.69) - - 06/22/2015 36159LCN4 INTEREST EARNED ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.6974% 10/20/19 $1 PV ON 435.8800 SHARES DUE 6/20/2015 $0.00058/PV ON 750,000.00 PV DUE 6/20/15 - - - - 435.88 - 06/22/2015 36159LCN4 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.6974% 10/20/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION - - - - - - (18.36) - - 06/22/2015 92867VAB6 INTEREST EARNED ON VOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17 $1 PV ON 181.2500 SHARES DUE 6/20/2015 $0.00073/PV ON 250,000.00 PV DUE 6/20/15 - - - - - 181.25 - - - 06/24/2015 06/24/2015 06/24/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 500,506.2000 1.000000 - - - (500,506.20) 500,506.20 - - 06/24/2015 06/23/2015 06/24/2015 912828H78 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 1/31/17 /NOMURA SECURITIES INTL., FIXED/500,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.902344 % (500,000.0000) 0.999023 - - - 499,511.72 (498,886.72) 625.00 - 06/24/2015 06/24/2015 912828H78 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.500% 1/31/17 - - - - - 994.48 - - - 06/25/2015 TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 05/01/2015 THRU 05/31/2015 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT _ 78 _ _ _ (521.92) - - - Page 29 of 30 ZvKSitle- \OYMj' Ton -spa -Whim Icrnmiwun Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended June 30, 2015 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COM , Short Term Long Term Transaction Settlement Miscellaneous Federal Tax Cost Gain/Loss Gain/Loss Date Trade Date Date CUSIP Description Units Price Commissions SEC Fees Fees Net Cash Amount Amount Amount Amount INTEREST EARNED ON FNMA GTD REMIC 0.3845% 9/25/18 $1 PV ON 157.7600 SHARES DUE 6/25/2015 $0.00034/PV ON 469,090.68 PV 06/25/2015 3136AMTM1 DUE 6/25/15 157.76 06/25/2015 06/25/2015 06/25/2015 3136AMTM1 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF FNMA GTD REMIC 0.3845 % 9/25/18 (412.0200) 412.02 (411.91) 0.11 06/25/2015 06/25/2015 06/25/2015 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y 47.8600 1.000000 (47.86) 47.86 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L MC 1.000 % 6/29/17 /BONY/TORONTO DOMINION SECURITI/520,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.986 06/29/2015 06/12/2015 06/29/2015 3134G7AY7 % 520,000.0000 0.999860 (519,927.20) 519,927.20 06/29/2015 06/29/2015 06/29/2015 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y (519,927.2000) 1.000000 519,927.20 (519,927.20) Total 87,703.66 25,789.96 79 Page 30 of 30 ATTACHMENT 14 LOGAN CIRCLE P A R TNER S Riverside County Transportation Commission SHORT DURATION FIXED INCOME Second Quarter 2015 Review Logan Circle Partners, L.P. ■ 25 Deforest Avenue Summit, NJ 0790810 ■ 908-376-0550 MARKET REVIEW Outlook and Current Themes ➢ GDP — Stagnant household incomes and a jobs market where labor force participation rate remains at multi - decade lows will continue to temper economic activity. Sustained dollar strength dampens exports while higher spending on healthcare drives services consumption. Moderate trend in GDP continues due to softer retail sales and non-residential fixed investment, pointing to another year of 2% growth. ➢ Consumer— Gap in median vs. mean household income data highlights income inequality and constraints on discretionary spending for all but the top strata. Lower gas prices increases disposable personal income but has not translated into a significant pickup in consumer spending. Continued student and auto loan debt growth bodes ill for future household formation, spending and savings. ➢ Business — Stronger U.S. dollar and weaker international growth continues to pressure revenues and earnings of select industrial sub -sectors (technology, consumer non-cyclicals, capital goods manufacturers). Impact of a sustained drop in energy prices creates winners (airlines, trucking, retailers, paper companies) and losers (oil and gas producers, oil field service, offshore drillers, energy -dependent regional economies). Financials continue to build capital, maintain substantial liquidity, improve balance sheets due to regulatory pressure and restrictions. Employment — Difference between U-6 (highlighting the underemployed) and the headline unemployment rate underscores continued slack in labor market. Employment gains continue to be supported by part-time and lower -paying positions. Certain service sectors (leisure, retail, business) average hourly earnings outpace goods and government year over year changes. Trend towards increasing hourly wages will not impact overall income growth. • Housing — Annual home price appreciation will remain in the 5% range but may move higher in the short run due to the supply limitations in certain markets. Seasonal factors and FHA's mortgage insurance premium reduction may temporarily accelerate existing home sales. First-time homebuyer demand remains weak and recently launched affordability loan programs to benefit a limited number of new buyers. New construction is gaining momentum, however new home sales as a proportion of total home sales remains below historical norms. The risk of regulatory -induced volatility in the RMBS market will continue as lawmakers push for increased access to mortgage credit. • Inflation — Core PCE continues to run below Fed's long-term 2% target. Sustained dollar strength has disinflationary implications. Consistent with trends in other developed economies, decline in commodity and energy prices as well as limited wage growth keeps inflation in check. ➢ International — Interest rates in many developed markets will remain low given central bank stimulus measures. Desired impact of competitive devaluation policies unlikely to be realized as global growth remains anemic. ECB QE stimulus program complicated by the evolving Greek debt crisis. China's slowing economic growth continues to be a headwind for other emerging and commodity -based economies. ➢ Monetary and Fiscal Policy — Global monetary conditions will remain loose. Monetary stimulus requires accompanying fiscal measures to engineer sustainable recoveries. U.S. congressional construct shapes the fiscal policy agenda for the next few years including corporate tax and regulatory reform. Federal Reserve's efforts to achieve policy normalization move closer despite limited support from current economic data. Fed's forecast for growth, inflation and funds rate trajectory continue to move lower. The views pre,%nted above are Logan Qrde's and are subject to change over time. There can be no assurance that the views expressed above will prove accurate and should not be relied upon as a reliable indicator of future events 81 1 LOGANCIRCLE I' AR TN ER 5 PORTFOLIO REVIEW — Construction Fund Portfolio Characteristics Asset Allocation As of July 11, 2013 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 0.67% Duration 1.48 Years Average Quality (Moody's) Al As of June 30, 2015 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 0.55% Duration 0.43 Years Average Quality (Moody's) Aa2 Municipal 4% ABS 1A‘i/ Corporate 53% Treasury 2% ABS 3% RMBS 1% CMBS 1% Agency 1% Commercial Paper 77% Corporate 11% CP 30% Portfolio Performance.' 2Q 2015 YTD Since Inception (Annualized) Total Construction Fund (Gross of Fees) 0.12% 0.23% 0.44% Total Construction Fund (Net of Fees) 0.10% 0.19% 0.35% C itigroup 3-1Vbnth Treasury Bill 0.00% 0.01% 0.03% Past Perfonmance is not inchoative of future results. Performance returns for periods greater than one year are annualized. The performance benchmark shown for the Fdverside County Construction Find is the atigroup 3-IVbnth Treasury Bill, which tracks the retum of one three-month Treasury bill until maturity. 82 LOGANCIRCLE 2 I' AR TN ER 5 PORTFOLIO REVIEW — Construction Fund Portfolio Characteristics Asset Allocation Agency RMBS CMBS As of June 30, 2015 Actual Portfolio Municipal 5% 2% 4% 3% Yield to Maturity 1.07%o Duration 1.62 Years Average (duality (Moody's) Al Fast Performance is not indicative of future results Performance returns for periods greater than one year are annualized. The perfortraxe benchmark shown for the Riverside County Construction Find is the Bank of America Merrill Lynch 1-3 Year US Treasury Index which is a toad -based index consisting of US Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater than or equal to $250 pillion and a maturity range from one to three year reflecting total retum. 83 3 LOGANCIRCLE I' AR TN ER 5 PORTFOLIO REVIEW — Capitalized Interest Fund Portfolio Characteristics Asset Allocation As of July 11, 2013 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 1.00% Duration 2.39Years Municipal 3% Average Quality (Moody's) Aa1 As of June 30, 2015 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 1.03% Duration 1.99 Years Average Quality (IV odys) Aa1 Municipal 10% ABS 2% Money Markets 12% ABS 1% Money Markets 1 % Portfolio Performance' 2Q 2015 YTD Since Inception (Annualized) Total Capitalized Interest Fund (Gross of Fees) 0.19% 0.58% 1.25% Total Capitalized Interest Fund (Net of Foes) 0.17% 0.52% 1.14% B of AM_ U.S. Treasury Index 0-2 Year 0.11% 0.30% 0.36% Fast Performance is not indicative of future results Performance returns for periods greater than one year are annualized. The performance benchmark shown for the Faverside County Capitalized Interest Fund is the Bank ofArrierica IVbrrill Lyres US 0-2 Year Treasury Index, which is a broad bawd index that measures short-term Treasury !Votes and Bonds with a maturity range between zero and two years, and is presented for discussion purposes only. 84 4 LOGANCIRCLE I' AR TN ER 5 PORTFOLIO REVIEW — Debt Reserve Fund Portfolio Characteristics Asset Allocation CMBS As of July 11, 2013 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 1.98% Duration 5.04 Years Average Quality (Moody's) Aaa As of June 30, 2015 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 1.86% Duration 4.41 Years Average Quality (IV odys) Aaa Portfolio Performance' 2Q 2015 YTD Since Inception (Annualized) Total Debt Service Fund (Gross of Fees) -0.61 % 0.95% 2.70% Total Debt Service Fund (Net of Fees) -0.63% 0.90% 2.60% B of A ML U.S. Treasury Index 3-7 Year -0.51 % 1.22% 2.14% Past Performance is not indicative of future results. Performance retums for periods greater than one year are annualized. The performance benchmark shown for the fd verside County Capitalized Interest Fund is the Bank of America Until Lynch US Treasury 3-7 Year, which is a broad -based index consisting of U.S Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater or equal to $25 million and a maturity range from three to seven year indusive, reflecting total retum. 85 LOGANCIRCLE I' AR TN ER 5 PORTFOLIO REVIEW Portfolio Market Value Portfolio Market Value (7/3/2013) Net Outflows Market Value Change in (6/30/2015) Market Value Construction (Sales Tax) $332,687,595 $267,706,808 S67,035,332 +$2,054,545 Construction (Toll Revenue) $122,120,571 $81,130,%4 S41,365,173 +$375,566 Total Construction Funds $454,808,167 $348,837,772 $108,400,505 +$2,430,110 Portfolio Market Value (6/10/2015) Net Outflows Market Value Change in (6/30/2015) Market Value Project Fund $32,793,399 $0 $32,827,325 +$33,926 Portfolio Market Value (7/3/2013) Net Outflows Market Value Change in (6/30/2015) Market Value Capitalized Interest (Sales Tax) $103,683,353 $45,945,237 S59,999,582 +$2,261,466 Capitalized Interest (Toll Revenue) S31,416,498 $13,606,992 $18,548,889 +$739,383 Total Capitalized Interest Funds $135,099,851 $59,552,229 $78,548,471 +$3,000,849 Portfolio Market Value (7/3/2013) Net Outflows Market Value Change in (6/30/2015) Market Value Debt Service Deserve Fund $17,667,869 $0 $18,632,369 +$964 500 86 LOGANCIRCLE I' AR TN ER 5 DISCLAIMERS In general. This disclaimer applies to this document and the verbal or written comments of any person presenting it. This document, taken together with any such verbal or written comments, is referred to herein as the "Presentation." Logan Circle Partners, L.P., a Fortress Investment Group LLC company, is referred to herein as "Logan Circle". No offer to purchase or sell securities. This Presentation is being provided to you at your specific request. This Presentation does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any security and may not be relied upon in connection with the purchase or sale of any security. Projections. Projections contained in this Presentation are based on a variety of estimates and assumptions by Logan Circle, including, among others, estimates of future operating results, the value of assets and market conditions at the time of disposition, and the timing and manner of disposition or other realization events. These estimates and assumptions are inherently uncertain and are subject to numerous business, industry, market, regulatory, competitive and financial risks that are outside of Logan Circle's control. There can be no assurance that the assumptions made in connection with the projections will prove accurate, and actual results may differ materially, including the possibility that an investor may lose some or all of its invested capital. The inclusion of the projections herein should not be regarded as an indication that Logan Circle or any of its affiliates considers the projections to be a reliable prediction of future events and the projections should not be relied upon as such. Neither Logan Circle nor any of its affiliates or representatives has made or makes any representation to any person regarding the projections and none of them intends to update or otherwise revise the projections to reflect circumstances existing after the date when made or to reflect the occurrence of future events, if any or all of the assumptions underlying the projections are later shown to be in error. For purposes of this paragraph, the term "projections" includes "targeted returns". Past performance. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results and should not be relied upon as the basis for making an investment decision. The information presented is only available for institutional client use and is presented for use only as a one-on-one presentation. No reliance, no update and use of information. You may not rely on this Presentation as the basis upon which to make an investment decision. To the extent that you rely on this Presentation in connection with any investment decision, you do so at your own risk. This Presentation is being provided in summary fashion and does not purport to be complete. The information in the Presentation is provided to you as of the dates indicated and Logan Circle does not intend to update the information after its distribution, even in the event that the information becomes materially inaccurate. Certain information contained in this Presentation, includes performance and characteristics of Logan Circle's strategies and any represented benchmarks, which may derive from calculations or figures that have been provided by independent third parties, or have been prepared internally and have not been audited or verified. Use of different methods for preparing, calculating or presenting information may lead to different results for the information presented, compared to publicly quoted information, and such differences may be material. Knowledge and experience. You acknowledge that you are knowledgeable and experienced with respect to the financial, tax and business aspects of this Presentation and that you will conduct your own independent financial, business, regulatory, accounting, legal and tax investigations with respect to the accuracy, completeness and suitability of this Presentation should you choose to use or rely on this Presentation, at your own risk, for any purpose. Risk of loss. An investment in the strategy will be highly speculative and there can be no assurance that the strategy's investment objectives will be achieved. Investors must be prepared to bear the risk of a total loss of their investment. Distribution of this Presentation. Logan Circle expressly prohibits any reproduction, in hard -copy, electronic or any other form, or any redistribution to any third party of this Presentation without the prior written consent of Logan Circle. This Presentation is not intended for distribution to, or use by, any person or entity in any jurisdiction or country where such distribution or use is contrary to local law or regulation. No tax, legal or accounting advice. This Presentation is not intended to provide, and should not be relied upon for (and you shall not construe it as) accounting, legal, regulatory, financial or tax advice or investment recommendations. Any statements of U.S. federal tax consequences contained in this Presentation were not intended to be used and cannot be used to avoid penalties under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code or to promote, market or recommend to another party any tax -related matters addressed herein. Confidentiality. By accepting receipt or reading any portion of this Presentation, you agree that you will treat the Presentation confidentially. This reminder should not be read to limit, in any way, the terms of any confidentiality agreement you or your organization may have in place with Logan Circle. 87 LOGANCIRCLE I' AR TN ER 5 ry P ATTACHMENT 15 -, Payden&Rygel Quarterly Portfolio Review ... Riverside County Transportation Commission 2nd Quarter 2015 I li PAYDEN.COM LOS ANGELES I BOSTON I LONDON I PARIS Payden & Rygel July 2015 Here we are at mid -year, looking around the world trying to assess what the investment horizon might look like in another six months. At this juncture, we would like to share with you feedback we have received from our clients and prospects globally. They are increasingly interested in absolute returns, rather than performance relative to a benchmark. Although comparisons with indices still matter, our philosophy has always been preservation of capital, particularly during volatile markets. In the last six months, stories about Greece, a stronger US dollar, and the Fed's first interest rate hike have dominated headlines. But often times the topics which are popular to focus on today, are not what matter in the longer run. You have heard us frequently talk about the importance of taking a global approach to investing, as all assets are affected by changing world conditions. Along those lines, an interesting fact is that world GDP is now over $110 trillion, with nearly 85 percent of total output coming from outside of the US. This is a dramatic change from 10 or 15 years ago. What is the most important thing you should focus on? Consistent with our clients' shift in focus to absolute returns, we will continue to provide stability of principal, diversification and liquidity. The ability for an organization to provide this depends a lot on its culture. For the past 32 years that we have been in business, we have had the same governance and ownership structure. Our culture is based on a team approach with our focus on finding solutions, not selling products. In closing, we believe there are many favorable factors in the world today, even though there are many challenging geopolitical situations. What will dominate the headlines in the second half of the year will invariably be different from what grabbed attention in the first half of the year. We will continue to be in close touch with you. My very best wishes to you and your family for the summer. Joan A. Payden President & CEO 89 2812 ABJ AOC Riverside County Transportation Commission Portfolio Review - 2nd Quarter 2015 Portfolio Characteristics (6/30/2015) Portfolio Market Value $50.2 million Weighted Average Credit Quality AA+ Weighted Average Duration 1.5 years Weighted Average Yield to Maturity 0.7°/0 Sector Allocation 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% �� a` �a e5 m` �5 Saco G's� osao`F �0 ��``-' �a�e �t P�y6� P .C• �o Duration Distribution 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 0-1 1-2 Years Ad 2-3 3+ Portfolio Returns - Periods Ending 6/30/2015 7 RCTC Operating Portfolio Bank of America Merrill Lynch 1-3 Treasury Periods over one year annualized Since 2nd Inception Quarter (3/1/15) 0.13% 0.34% 0.15% 0.38% pPayden & Rygel • 333 South Grand Avenue • Los Angel*California goo7i • (213) 625-igoo • www.payden.com 2812 ABJ AOC Riverside County Transportation Commission The second quarter proved to be difficult for fixed -income markets. A benign April gave way to a volatile May and June that pushed the Treasury curve higher and steeper. Economic data continues to improve with stronger employment data, encouraging wage growth, and optimistic leading indicators in support of a hike in 2015. However, quantitative easing from the European Central Bank (ECB), uncertainty with Greece, a stronger US dollar and contained inflation have given the Fed reason to remain "patient" in hiking rates. The 2-year Treasury yield traded between 0.41 % and 0.73% before ending the quarter higher at 0.65%. Payden & Rygel View Payden & Rygel Action Portfolio Impact Economic Environment Moderate US economic growth with interest rates fluctuating primarily on data interpretation and ECB action. The Fed would not raise short-term rates until later in 2015. Positioned portfolio with a short duration profile and maintained long -maturity corporate bonds in lieu of Treasuries. Positive: The short duration position contributed to performance as Treasury yields rose. Credit The fundamental outlook for issuers remains favorable and front-end technical factors are positive. Banks would issue debt to achieve required capital levels. We continue to participate in new issue corporate offerings and selectively added 3-year maturity fixed-rate bonds. Negative: The income advantage from investment -grade corporates was more than offset by credit spread widening due to the ongoing Greece crisis. Asset -Backed Securities Asset -backed securities provide diversification and yield. Periodic pay downs allow for reinvestment, a positive for when the Fed raises short-term rates. Added to the portfolio's exposure to high -quality asset -backed debt with shorter duration profiles. Positive: The additional yield from asset -backed bonds benefited the portfolio. The US Treasury Yield Curve Steepened 2.0 1.5 -0 1.0 a) i 0.5 0.0 0 - 6/30/2015 - 3/31 /2015 Source: Bloomberg 1 2 3 4 Maturity (years) 5 2nd Quarter Sector Total Return: 1-3 Year Maturity 5.0 4.0 a? 3.0 C 3 �7 f�1} 0} 2.0 CL 06 t 1.0 0.0 1.05 0.15 0.16 0.23 0.13 -0.12 Tsy Agcy MBS ABS Corp High -1.0 Yie 4.13 EM Source: BofA Merrill Lynch and JP Morgan pPayden & Rygel • 333 South Grand Avenue • Los Ange1N-California goo7i • (213) 625-igoo • www.payden.com THE MAIN STORY Q2 2015 The June Federal Reserve meeting came and went without a rate hike. Policymakers' worries about the first quarter slowdown in US economic activity delayed the first change to the policy rate in nearly seven years. However, we think that the US economy remains, and will remain in good health. Our conjecture is based both on market signals and economic fundamentals. In the US, the Treasury yield curve has been the best historical predictor of recessions. When the curve inverts (front-end rates are higher than long -end rates), recessions have followed roughly 1.5-2.0 years later (in all but one case). While the yield curve flattened over the past year, as measured by 10-year Treasury yield minus the Federal Funds rate, it remains steep by historic standards. A steep yield curve is a good sign for the future, as it implies market expectations of growth. Despite volatile quarterly gross domestic product data, there is evidence that the US economy is rebounding; a strong labor market, a housing market recovery, improving retail sales and higher levels of government spending should support US economic performance in the medium term. As a forward looking measure, we like the Conference Board's Leading Economic Index (chart below). In May, 9 of 10 components from the index were positive. Building permits, healthy financial market conditions, and low initial claims for unemployment insurance helped keep the index strong and rising. With eyes trained on the horizon, we continue to see good things ahead for the US albeit, buffeted by an uncertain global economy. Our Recession Warning System: the US Economy is Walking on Sunshine 15% =co • 10% ea s v 5% +� 5 ▪ 0 ai a a • -5%N • -10% c a -15% • s p -20% -25% • • Recession Warning Level �M — Composite Index of 10 Leading Indicators Recession Periods - United States 1959 1962 1965 1968 1971 1974 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 2013 Source: Conference Board* *The Conference Board's Leading Economic Index° incorporates ten data series from various sectors to detect turns in the business cycle, including average weekly hours for manufacturing workers, building permits for houses, stock prices, and consumer expectations for the future. 92 WnRI n'S PULSE THRMIGH WFR FARCH TRFNM Is it possible to peer into the minds of investors and the general public? No, but using "Google Trends" we can take a peek into search trends over the last year. The charts below track search volume based on key search terms. Together and separately they tell a story of market worries over the past quarter. ■ Q2 2015 Search Terms 100 80 60 40 20 0 EU-Greece Talks On Bailout Break Down, Setting Up Showdown - WSJ Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Greece Fears Hit- Stocks; IMF to Cut Growth Outlook - CNBC Feb Mar Apr May Jun 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 100 80 60 40 20 . California Labor Commision Rules Uber Driver Is An Employee, Not a Contractor - NPR Uber Eyel $50 Billion Valuation in New Funding - WSJ 0• Jun 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 AA 100 80 60 40 20 Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Fed Drops Patient Stance, Opening Door to June Rate Increase - Bloomberg Apr May Jun Fed: No Rate Hike in June; But More Hints For September - CNN money 0 Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 100 Firms Alter Bond Portfolios as Liquidity Concerns Mount - P&I Bond Market Liquidity Dominates 80 Conversation-- Financial Times 60 �m mm 40 20 "GREXIT" Greece's debt crisis and gridlock in negotiations with its creditors create fears of default and subsequent exit from the Eurozone. "UBER" Despite legal battles, the ride -sharing app is on track to be the most valuable start-up backed by venture capital ever. "RATE HIKE" The Fed is on track to raise rates this year, but is still uneasy due to Q1 weakness. "BOND LIQUIDITY" Impending rate hikes and "grexit" fears spooked investors who are worried about the lack of liquidity in the bond o market. Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2014 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 2015 Source: Google Trends 93 County of Riverside Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund "The Grey Swans of Summer" With the summer of 2015 now in full swing, a number of so-called grey swans, or events with potential to have a sizable impact on the health of the financial markets have presented themselves. They range from the Grexit, or the Greek exit from the Euro, a Chinese stock market meltdown, continued Middle East tensions, cyber terrorism and an emboldened Russia. While all eyes at the moment remain firmly fixed on Greece, as well as when the FED may start to raise short term rates, a potentially much more significant financial event is developing to the east. Yet the theater of the Greek debt talks, together with will they or won't they leave the euro has relegated the China story to little more than a scrolling headline. More than a third of Chinese listed companies have now suspended trading on their main equity indices due to a 30% loss in value since June, largely fueled by borrowed money (margin investing); additionally, a real estate bubble has also played a major role in this outbreak of speculative excess. China has packed more development into a few short decades than any country in recorded history before it, thus creating worldwide excesses in industrial capacity that even global demand is strug- gling to deal with. Their stock market boom has only succeeded in adding debt. As we all know, the damage done in financial crises is not just the crash itself as far as equity valuations are concerned, but also by a collapsing banking sector. Whether any of this turns into contagion depends on the government's response, but we can see little evidence for China's political leaders as having the situa- tion under control, at least at this juncture. Meanwhile, the front page news of late was Greek voters rejecting their creditors' proposed economic reforms. Polls ahead of the referendum suggested that voters would accept and swallow some medicine, but the "no" vote prevailed. They have been left with little choice; default on its July 20t $3.9 billion payment to the ECB and become a failed state subject to social chaos, or, go along with the reforms to keep Greece in the European Union (EU). Both parties have a strong interest to remain in the EU, and negotiations may resume but yet trust between the parties has so eroded that cooperation could fail. The fallout may see bond yields rise for the other big debtor nations of Europe including Portugal, Italy and Spain while the euro and equity markets will weaken. U.S. equity markets have seen some selling as a spillover from the drama as a result. In the longer term, the strength of the U.S. ATTACHMENT 16 June 2017 dollar and safety appeal of Treasuries, as well as other G7 mar- kets, will probably continue to attract investors looking for perceived safe havens. Over the past several FOMC meetings, Chairman Janet Yellen has hinted on numerous occasions that the FED will begin increasing the ovemight lending rate sometime in 2015. They actually started the process of priming the markets last October by ending QE3, or the third rendition of the quantitative easing programs which in- duced massive amounts of liquidity into the financial markets. The FED has now turned its focus towards the near zero level of the FED funds rate. Yellen has been adamant that the Federal Re- serve has been watching the data closely to determine the appro- priate timing of short term rate increases. One of the important factors for continued economic expansion, and required to offset any drag caused by tighter monetary policy, is an increasing rate of wage growth to support expansion in spending as our economy is almost 70% driven by consumption. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the U.S. labor force totals about 157 million people. The June BLS report states that 8.3 million of our citizens were unemployed, 6.5 million were working part time but wanted a full-time job and 1.9 million were marginally attached, meaning not employed but would likely take a full-time job if available. That means nearly 10.6 % of the labor force in the U.S. are either unemployed or under- employed and partially helps to explain why wages are not rising as much as many desire. Last week's employment report should help shed some light on the mindset of the FED as it showed wage growth is minimal and the supply of labor is larger than most realize. Under these conditions, the FED shouldn't be in a hurry to raise rates but being caught zero bound leaves few options for them whenever another slowdown or recession occurs. Indeed, Yellen & Co. has their hands full and has a very difficult challenge ahead, kind of like being caught between a rock and a hard place. We will be prepared for whatev- er eventuality comes our way in terms of interest rates and the TPIF. Don Kent Treasurer —Tax Collector Capital Markets Team Don Kent Treasurer -Tax Collector Jon Christensen Asst. Treasurer -Tax Collector Giovane Pizano Investment Manager Isela Licea Asst. Investment Manager Investment Objectives The primary objective of the treasurer shall be to safeguard the principal of the funds under the treasurer's control, meet the liquidity needs of the depositor, and achieve a return on the funds under his or her control. COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER'S POOLED INVESTMENT FUND IS CURRENTLY RATED: Aaa-bf BY MOODY'S INVESTOR'S SERVICE AND AAA/V1 BY FITCH RATINGS Month End Market Value ($)* Month End Book Value ($) Paper Gain or Loss ($) Paper Gain Book Yrs to Modified or Loss (%) Yield (%) Maturity Duration June 6,066,709,103.68 6,066,193,436.81 May 515,666.87 6,231,402,163.99 6,230,332,224.20 0.01 1,069,939.79 0.02 April 6,834,465,478.09 6,833,283,754.08 1,181,724.01 0.02 0.44 1.10 0.42 1.09 1.07 1.07 0.40 1.04 1.02 March 5,730,402,540.40 5,728,600,174.74 1,802,365.66 0.03 0.46 1.25 1.22 February 5,517,030,770.65 5,517,608,884.48 (578,113.83) (0.01) 0.48 1.35 1.32 January 5,536,152,467.50 5,532,205,553.13 3,946,914.37 0.07 0.44 1.26 1.23 The Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund is comprised of the County, Schools, Special Districts9ind other Discretionary Depositors. Current Market Data Economic Indicators Release Date Indicator Consensus Actual 06/05/2015 Non -Farm Payrolls M/M change: Counts the number of paid employees working part- time or full-time in the nation's business and government establishments. 06/05/2015 Employment Situation: Measures the number of unemployed as a percentage of the labor force. 220,000 280,000 5.4% 5.5% 06/23/2015 Durable Goods Orders - M/M change: Reflects the new orders placed with domestic -0.6% -1.80/0 manufacturers for immediate and future delivery of factory hard goods. 06/24/2015 Real Gross Domestic Product - Q/Q change: The broadest measure of aggregate economic activity and encompasses every sector of the economy. GDP is the country's most comprehensive economic scorecard. -0.2 % -0.2% 06/26/2015 Consumer Confidence: Measures consumer attitudes on present economic conditions 94.6 96.1 and expectations of future conditions. 06/02/2015 Factory Orders M/M change: Represents the dollar level of new orders for both -0.1 % -0.4% durable and nondurable goods. 06/18/2015 Consumer Price Index - M/M change: The Consumer Price Index is a measure of the 0.5% 0.4% average price level of a fixed basket of goods and services purchased by consumers. Stock Indices Change Dow Jones (DJIA) S&P 500 Index NASDAQ (NDX) Commodities 17,619.51 $ (391.17) 2,063.11 $ (44.28) 4,396.76 $ (111.49) Value Nymex Crude Gold (USD/OZ) 59.47 $ (0.83) $ 1,172.42 $ (18.13) US Treasury Curve (M/M) Fed Funds Target Rate Fed Funds Rate: 0-0.25% Fed Move Probability for FOMC Dates: 07/29/2015 09/17/2015 Decrease to 0.00% Increase to 0.25 % 46.0 % 54.0 % 36.8 % 52.4 % Increase to 0.50% 0.0 % 10.8 % Increase to 0.75% Increase to 1 % 0.0 % 0.0 % FOMC Meeting Schedule 0.0 % 0.0 % Release Risk Assessment 29-Apr 17-Jun 0-.25 % 0-.25 % Growth Growth iM;[tE[/OZZ.7111Y r EIS US Tress" Fcives Curve 06rJ0/15 • DS US Trafary 4Ri4es Grre 05124l15 3.00 250 2.00 L56 L06 o. PAP ?M 12I25 06/30/15 25 45/29115 } 6 6-T 4r 10Y 0.008 0.003 • 0267 0.247 i011Or Pe! a.a4s• 0.6071 3) Show All Tenors > 3Yi Sri, 1.065, 1.640. 2.080 2.354 1.124' 0.926 1.466 1267 2.122 2.882 7.9 16.3' 2L4 232 242 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR95 TIMMI The Treasurer's Institutional Money Market Index (TIMMI) is compiled and reported by the Riverside County Treasurer's Capital Markets division. It is a composite index derived from four AAA rated prime institutional money market funds. Similar to the Treasurer's Office, prime money market funds invest in a diversified portfolio of U.S. dollar denominated money market instruments including U.S. Treasuries, government agencies, commercial paper, certificates of deposits, repurchase agreements, etc. TIMMI is currently comprised of the five multi billion dollar funds listed below. AAA Rated Prime Institutional Money -Market Funds Fidelity Prime Institutional MMF Federated Prime Obligations Fund Wells Fargo Advantage Heritage Symbol ay Yield FIPXX 0.11 % PO IXX WFJXX 0.07% 0.11 % Morgan Stanley Institutional Prime Liquidity Fund M PFXX 0.08% JP Morgan CJPXX 0.10% 1.00% - 0.50% - 0.00% Pool Yield f TIMMI 0.42% 0.41% 0.42% 0.44% 0.44% 0.46% 0.43% 0.44% 0.48% 0.46% 0.40% 0.42% 0.44% :��: ........• 0.05% 0.05% 0.05% 0.04% 0.05% 0.05% 0.06% 0.06% 0.07% 0.08% 0.09% 0.08% 0.09% a Li ❑ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ M ■ ■ Jun-14 Aug-14 Oct-14 Dec-14 Feb-15 Apr-15 Jun-15 Cash Flows Required Actual Available Monthly Monthly Matured Investments to Invest > th Receipts Disbursements Difference Investments Balance Maturing 1 Year 06/2015 07/2015 1,100.00 1,050.00 50.00 08/2015 725.00 850.00 (125.00) 123.03 173.03 1,178.51 48.03 347.34 09/2015 800.00 1,000.00 (200.00) 151.97 - 346.00 10/2015 975.00 1,150.00 (175.00) 175.00 - 410.89 11/2015 1,150.00 900.00 250.00 250.00 50.00 12/2015 1,900.00 975.00 925.00 1,175.00 0.00 01/2016 901.94 1,593.66 (691.72) 483.28 650.07 02/2016 875.00 1,000.00 (125.00) 358.28 550.99 03/2016 1,100.00 970.00 130.00 04/2016 1,611.36 970.00 641.36 05/2016 06/2016 712.44 1,150.00 1,350.00 1,550.00 (637.56) (400.00) 488.28 40.00 1,129.64 10.00 492.08 639.73 92.08 374.00 TOTALS 13,000.74 13,358.66 (357.92) 326.97 4,812.73 4,597.53 5.39% 75.79% 5,739.22 94.61 % * All values reported in millions ($). The Pooled Investment Fund cash flow requirements are based upon a 12 month historical cash flow model. Based upon projected cash receipts and maturing investments, there are sufficient funds to meet future cash flow disbursements over the next 12 months. COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOR6 3 Asset Allocation Assets (000's) Scheduled Par Scheduled Book REPO 200,000.00 MMKT 410,000.00 CALTRUST FND 54,000.00 DDA/PASSBK 260,000.00 LOCAL AGCY OBLIG 365.00 365.00 US TREAS BONDS 550,000.00 FHLMC DISC NOTES 400,000.00 FHLMC BONDS 694,593.00 FNMA DISC NOTES 337,000.00 FNMA BONDS 433,179.00 433,104.52 FHLB DISC NOTES 334,593.00 FHLB BONDS 738,292.14 FFCB DISC NOTES 155,061.00 FFCB BONDS 680,616.00 680,589.64 FMAC DISC NOTES 50,000.00 49,878.49 FARMER MAC 203,850.00 MUNI ZERO CPNS 138,834.00 MUNI BONDS 33,560.00 COMM PAPER 394,000.00 otals (000's): 6,067,943.14 200,000.00 Scheduled Market Mkt/ Sch 200,000.00 Book 100.00% 410,000.00 54,000.00 260,000.00 410,000.00 54,000.00 260,000.00 100.00% 100.00% 100.00% Yield WAL (Yr) Mat (Y 0.14% .100 0.50% 0.09% .003 .003 .003 .003 ) .003 .003 .003 .003 365.00 100.00% 0.92% 4.964 4.964 0.35 % .890 0.15 % .390 1.24% 3.325 0.15 % .350 433,161.60 100.01% 0.78 % 1.934 2.150 0.20% .530 .530 0.53 % 1.084 1.392 0.18 % .478 .478 680,651.02 100.01% 0.32% .967 .967 49,965.25 100.17% 0.26% .510 .510 1.15 % 1.486 3.051 0.15 % .192 .192 33,536.90 99.95% 0.34% .438 .438 393,901.80 100.02% 0.14% .128 .128 6,066,709.10 100.01% 0.44% 550,189.56 399,588.74 694,673.45 336,667.87 550,521.50 399,801.50 694,127.46 336,859.01 100.06% 100.05 % 99.92% 100.06% 334,055.28 738,235.33 154,867.52 334,320.62 100.08 % 738,097.79 99.98% 154,957.55 100.06% 203,837.00 138,770.50 203,645.91 99.91 % 138,796.19 100.02% 33,552.92 393,817.63 066,193.44 .890 .390 1.459 .350 800.000.00 600,000.00 400.000.00 200.000.00 0.00 111111111111TVIIIIIInw� 1110111 iin n iiii�n�6� D 0. W OC CALTRUSTiND DDA/PASSOK LOCAL AGCY OBLIG US TREAS BONDS FHLMC DISC NOTES FHLMC BONDS DISC NOTES s f Z r FNMA BONDS FMB DISC NOTES Scheduled Book 11.11 Market FHLB BONDS fiCB DISC NOTES FFCB BONDS FMAC DISC NOTES FARMER MAC MUM ZERO CPNS MUM! BONDS COMM PAPER s e 0 SCHEDULED PAR °fa REPOS - 345, MMKT -73,• CAL TRUST FND•I4b DOA/ PASSAK-4% LOCAL AGCY OBLIG - Q3/4 US TRF 4S BONDS - q36 F NL MC DISC NOTES •7% FHLMCBONDS -11% FNMA DISC NOTES - 6% FNMA BONDS - 776 - FHLB DISC NOTES • 6% im FHLB BONDS -12% Ia F F CB DISC NOTES- 3%. p FFCB BONDS -11% © FMAC DISC NOTES - 1 a'a p FARMER MAC - 3?'a mi MUNI ZERO CPNS - 73'a mi mum BONDS - 1?u - COMM PAPER - 6% COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER -TAX COL- 97 Maturity Distribution jarduled Par (000's) 0-1 Mos 1- 1-2 Yr 2-3 Yr >3 Yr Totals (000's) REPOS 200,000.00 200,000.00 MMKT 410,000.00 CALTRUST FND 54,000.00 DDA/PASSBK 260,000.00 410,000.00 54,000.00 260,000.00 LOCAL AGCY OBLIG 365.00 365.00 US TREAS BONDS - 475,000.00 65,000.00 10,000.00 550,000.00 FHLMC DISC NOTES 15,000.00 52,000.00 333,000.00 400,000.00 FHLMC BONDS FNMA DISC NOTES FNMA BONDS - - 120,366.00 80,130.00 117,550.00 376,547.00 694,593.00 191,000.00 146,000.00 - 337,000.00 - - 15,000.00 166,642.00 231,562.00 19,975.00 433,179.00 334,593.00 25,000.00 444,500.00 86,285.71 120,000.00 62,506.43 738,292.14 FHLB DISC NOTES 75,000.00 259,593.00 FHLB BONDS FFCB DISC NOTES 15,061.00 140,000.00 155,061.00 FFCB BONDS FMAC DISC NOTES FARMER MAC 25,000.00 10,000.00 79,000.00 481,616.00 40,000.00 5,000.00 50,000.00 680,616.00 - 50,000.00 - - 50,000.00 65,000.00 8,850.00 120,000.00 203,850.00 MUNI ZERO CPNS 32,450.00 51,000.00 55,384.00 138,834.00 MUNI BONDS COMM PAPER - 8,335.00 75,000.00 269,000.00 25,225.00 50,000.00 33,560.00 394,000.00 Cumulative 18.07% 12.37% 18.07% 30.44% 43.85% 7.22% 74.28% 81.50% 438,057.71 492,962.00 8.12% 89.63 % 629,393.43 ,R�P94. 10.37% 100.00 % SCISE DU L E D P YEAR IN MATURITY mimeo, REPOS -Scheduled Par IIREINF MM RT-Scheduled Per RiM CALTRUST FND - Sd+edhded Par DON PASSER[ -Scheduled Par LOCAL AGCY OBLIG -Scheduled Par US TREAS BONDS • Scheduled Per FHLMC DISC NOTES- Scheduled Per a� FHLMC BONDS- Scheduled Par aaaaaa� FNMA DISC NOTES • Scheduled Par FNMA BONDS • Scheduled Par FHLB DISC NOTES - Scheduled Par aa� FHLB BONDS -Scheduled Par FFCB DISC NOTES -Scheduled Par IR�I1 FFCB BONDS -Scheduled Par a_ FMAC DISC NOTES • Scheduled Par FARMER MAC • Scheduled Par MUNI 2E RD CPNS- Sdheduled Par MUNI BONDS -Scheduled Par COMM PAPER • Scheduled Par COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOl�8 5 Credit Quality (000's Market Yield Aaa 4,820,799.14 4,819,425.86 4,819,960.19 100.01 % 0.47 % Aa 5,000.00 4,998.50 4,998.75 100.01 % 1.01 % Aa1 58,335.00 58,306.43 58,301.08 99.99 % 0.14 % Aa2 259,904.00 259,798.65 259,826.93 100.01 % 0.16 % Aa3 209,690.00 209,583.51 209,645.99 100.03 % 0.15 % NR 714,215.00 714,080.49 713,976.16 99.99 % 0.42 % Elk)00' MOODY'S BOOK 1.1n•79% MOM-1% NM 4% ■A�•096 IMM1.496 ■M!•1191 S&P BOOK % �ASA4% pAA- -3an �AA4 72k4 AMR-11% AAA-4yo Boo Market MKT/Boo AAA 511,465.00 511,446.06 511,482.19 10 0.01% 0.17% AA+ 4,377,669.14 4,376,276.46 4,376,803.68 10 0.01% 0.50 % AA 254,904.00 254,806.92 254,801.08 100.00 % 0.15 % AA- 209,690.00 209,583.51 209,645.99 100.03 % 0.15 % NR 714,215.00 714,080.49 713,976.16 99.99 % 0.42 % COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER -TAX COLLECTOO L NO.LJHTIOJ XV.L-2I32If1SVDLL HQISRIHARI 10 kthlf10J IL8' 8981 80SZ 9E8'b IL8' 9E81 IL8' 016' ILS' /EL'b IL9'b ESL'/ ObL'b ObL'b b£L'b 10L'b 9991 /IVZ 95I'Z 685.1 17191 685.1 1051 1051 /EL'I /L/'I 98/1 IL8' 56E'b Z1£1 Sfi5' Zb£'I L99. 5991 ZbL'Z Z£9'b L98' 031, L98' 906' L98' 9151 L09'b LOS'b ZZS'b ZZS'b 0051 LGb'b Bbb'b ELSZ LU Z L951 9Zb'b bG5'I b0E'b 681,1 EIL'T 8Sb'T 60E1 L98' 9ZZ'b LZE1 6£S' LZET LI'991'8- ZS'L£T'bhE'LZ 0009£ISOI 69709'ZSE'LZ 00'000'LOSLZ 51E' 005' 9I0Z/6I/50 ail JYX1113 60av3GEIE 00'009'E8- 00'001/916'6 0001,91'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 0051 0051 OZOZ/II/50 9.1AIP aiS JYX1113 50A901EIE 00.000'0Z- 00'000'086'6 000008'66 00'000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T °Sri 05Z1 RIOZ/OZ/b0 901A1PWi£ JYX1113 901901EIE 00.96E19- 00'909'981'SE 0001,15'66 00'000'05Z'EI 00.000'057'£I 0051 0051 (Ca /6Z/b0 90Y£PWAS JYX1113 £a11901EIE LV6661- 17VOTZ'L90'9 0009£ISOI IL'6£Z'690'9 00.000'650'9 51,£' 005' 9I0Z/6I/50 .U.I JYX1113 60av3GEIE 00'0SZ'ZST- 00'05L'L181,I 000596'86 00'000'000'9I 00.000'000'9T 0551 0551 (Ca /6Z/b0 901AIPW S JYX1113 SAy901ElE 00.009'Z 00'0001£0'9Z 0009£ISOI 00'0051£0'SZ 00.000'000'9Z SHE' 005' 9I0Z/6I/50 all JYX1113 60av3GElE 00'0£Z'E- 00.956'86i/6 000696'66 00'98I'ZOS'6 00.000'009'6 ORE' 00V 9IOZ/a/50 all JYX1113 Haoteic 00.9a 00'000'LIS'ZI 0009£ISOI 00'9Z9'9I9'ZI 00.000'009V ORE' 005' 9I0Z/6I/50 all JYX1113 60av3GElE 00'00L'9Z 00'00L'9I0'0I 000L9ISOI 00'000'066'6 00'000'000'0T 9191 SZ91 OZOZ/£Z/EO 901AIPWCS JYX1113 IIJ19ObEIE WOW'S 00'01,0'900'Z OOOZGOSOI 00'000'000'L 00'000'000'L 0051 0051 OZOZ/OZ/b0 901A1PN AS JW1H3 E9d9O6£lE 00'000'9I- 00'000'98611 000006'66 00'000'000'9T 00'000'000'9T 0581 0581 OZOZ/OE/E0 901A1PWAS JYV1H3 1,1VA9ODE LE OOZLZ'EI 00ZLZ'E16'L 000891'001 00.000'006'Z 00.000'006'Z SZ91 SZ91 OZOZ/SZ/EO 901A1PWiS JYAIIH3 17/019017M 00'00Z'9Z 00'00Z'9ZO'SI 000891'001 00.000'000'9T 00.000'000'9T SZ91 SZ91 OZOZ/SZ/EO 901AIPWiS JYX1113 17/0190/£I£ 00'00E% 00.00S600'0I 000E60SOI 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T OSG'I 05G1 OZOZ/£Z/EO 901X£01‘PC6 JYX1Hd Hi90/EIE 00'006'9Z 00'006'9Z0'OZ OOOZ£ISOI 00.000'000'0Z 00.000'000'0Z OOG'I 00G1 OZOZ/ZI/EO 901AIPN.R5 JYV1Hd 5X0901E1E 00'006'L- 00'009'Z66'6 000%6'66 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 0091 0091 OZOZ/GZ/Z0 901AIPWAS JW1H3 8va901ElE 00'009'6I 00'009'610'9T OOOOEISOI 00.000'000'9T 00.000'000'9T SZI'I GUI LIOZ/a/II 9cIAI9NxTSL'Z JYXI113 619901E1E 00'00Z'ZI 00'00Z'ZIO'OI OOOZZISOI 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 0001 0001 LIOZ/SZ/80 301AIPW.ISZ JYXI113 199901E1E 00.00T- 00.006'666'6 000666'66 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T OOL' OOG' LIOZ/OE/IO 30YXPWXZ JYXI113 IVV901ElE 00'009'61- 00.009'0;6'6 000505'66 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 0091 0091 OZOZ/6I/Z0 90YX£31PAS JYX1113 90tl901EIE 00.00T- 00.006'666'6 000666'66 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 00f OOG' LIOZ/OE/IO 30YX931PXZ JYXI113 IVV901ElE 00'001,'ZG- 00.009'Z/6'6 0009LV66 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 0091 0091 6I0Z/OE/ZI 90YX£31PAS JYX1113 IXH501E1E 00'05Z'9£ 00.057'9E0'9Z 0005/ISOI 00.000'000'9Z 00.000'000'g OSG' 05G' 9I0Z/OE/ZI 3.V.I01‘PiZ JYX1Hd 6VMSObEIE GES691,1 5811S'ZIS'S OOOL£ISOI 09'078'L61,'S 00.000'09'9 606' 059' LIOZAVEO 901A19NxTSZ'Z JYX1Hd EISSOKIE 00.059'9Z 00.059110'9T 000L6OSOI 00.000'88611 00.000'000'ST 06C 05G' 9I0Z/6I/ZI 90YX£31PXZ JYX1Hd Z95501E1E 00'001,1,b 00.001,110'0Z OOOZZZSOI 00.000'000'0Z 00.000'000'0Z 009.1 0091 6I0Z/bZ/ZI 901/£931PAS JYX1Hd GUSSObEIE 00'00S1Z- 00'0001£0'SZ 0009EISOI 00'00S'SSO'SZ 00.000'000'g OS£' 005' 9I0Z/EI/50 ..11 JYX1Hd 60av3LElE 66'Zb1'OI 66'ZWEL8'S OOOELISOI 00'000'E98'S 00'000'E98'S 0051 0051 6I0Z/OZ/II SZ'9811 OS'L8L'E£91 000061.001 SZ'IOS6Z91 00'000'SZ91 009' SZS 9I0Z/I0/II 00.001'9 00'00I'900'S OOOZZISOI 00.000'000'S 00.000'000'S OSV 05V 9I0Z/SI/I0 00'008'LZ 00.000'610'0T 000061.001 00'00Z166'6 00.000'000'0T L19. SZS 9I0Z/I0/II 119' Ib9' Ib9' Ib9' 9Z£' 9Z£' 655' 655' 655' Ib9' GO£' I19' OTC GO£' LOC LOC 580' /El' LZO' 0 6£9' 6£9' 6£9' 9ZE' 9ZE' 8SS' 8SS' 8SS' 6£9' 90E' 609' 60£' 90E' 90£' 90£' S80' b£T' LZO' b88' Z96' S56" LL8' £L8' £001 L66 LLS' ELS Z96' 9S6' LLS' £L8' SbS' OK' LLS' £L8' SbS 019' 68S Z89' LL8' ELS 899' 899' Z6SI 9991 LL8' ELS LL8' ELS LL8' ELS LL8'1 9981 LL8' ELS SOS' 019' SOS' 019' SOS' 019' £OOZ 0861 £LI'Z ObIZ 00'069'E G9'996'Z G9'996'Z /V6I0'E 00'O5Z- 00'6EL- 8L'LLR'E 8L'Z59'LI 8L'Z59'LI OS'690'SI OS'ZIE'6 8L'LLZ'ZZ 8Z'065'ZI G9'I6Z'EI OS'Z6Z'EI GL'bSB'bl G9'968'LI ZZ'ZZ9'Z£ OS'Z9I'ZZ !11- L£SZ8'ZI OS'Z9 o8uo'Z- £9'068'I- 69'b08'Z- altY'L£ 99109'0Z SL'£b8'0S ZVES6'S SZ'906'S 00'SL8'L SL'Eb8'6 61'L98'8 ISOLS'OZ 9S'9LVI,Z 9S'9LVI,Z %TWO/ I£'OLS'OZ 6T'L9£'ZZ- I£'S69'8- 9S'109'ZI- 00'SL8'L£ Z9'06Z'bS 6SS'Z 1961, 6STZ 00.0 00'009'108'66£ 00.017S'Z86'LI 00.00S066'6 00.00S066'6 00.00S066'6 OOSSL1661Z OOSSL1661Z 00'001'Z66'6 00.057'0861Z 00.057'0861Z 00'0SL'SalZ 00'05Z'Z661Z 00'0SL'9L61Z 00'05Z'Z661Z 00'05Z'Z661Z OOSSZ'Z661Z OOSSZ'Z661Z 00'09S6661£ 00.000'666'61 001/S8'66611 00'00S'IZS'OSS 00.000'GVO'SZ OOSSZ'Z661Z 00'0091,Z0'SI 00'09Z'Z661,Z 00'000'Lb0'SZ 00'00S1,86'61, 00'097'S£0'SZ 00'09Z'Z661,Z OOSSZ'S£0'SZ 00'0SZ'££0'SZ OOSSZ'Z661,Z OOSSL'£IO'SZ 00'0SL'8£T'SZ OOSSZ'Z661,Z OOSSZ'Z661,Z OOSSZ'Z661,Z 00'0SZ'LIT'SZ OOSSZ'Z661,Z OOSSZ'S£0'SZ OOSSZ'S£0'SZ OOSSZ'S£0'SZ OOSSL'600'S 00'001,1661, SL£OS6'66 00%06'66 000E06'66 000E06'66 000E06'66 OOOL96'66 OOOL96'66 0001Z6'66 0001Z6'66 0001Z6'66 000E06'66 000696'66 00=6'66 000696'66 000696'66 000696'66 000696'66 000866'66 OOOS66'66 000666'66 00088L:OOi 000696'66 000191.00T 000696'66 00088ISOI 000696'66 OOOIVLSOI 000696'66 OOOT/ISOT OOOE£VOOT 000696'66 OOOSSOSOT OOOSSS'OOT 000696'66 000696'66 000696'66 000691.001 000696'66 OOOT/ISOT OOOT/ISOT OOOT/ISOT 000961.00T 0008Z8'66 60'£1L'885'66£ OOSS8'8L6'LI £EE£E'L86'6 £E'E£E'L86'6 9S'08Z'L86'6 00'000'Z661Z 00.688'1661Z ZZ'ZZZ'886'6 llaS'8961Z llaS'8961Z OSS89'0961Z OS'L£6'Z861Z ZZ'Zal,S6'1,Z ZL'659'6L61Z £ESS6'8L61Z 09'LS6'8L61Z £8'96E'LL61Z £EEI91861£ 8L'LLS996'6I OS'L89'LL6'11 91,19S'681'0% 69.6GCt£0'SZ OS'L8I'Z661,Z 081L9'9Z0'SI £9'01/1,661,Z 69108'610'9Z £9'99Z'Lb6'61, bb'8b9'bI0'SZ 97'901,1% ,Z 88'96Z'6Z0'SZ SL'£b£'LZO'SZ 00'9L£1,861,Z 97'906'£00'SZ ISZ88'6ZT'SZ 69'6L9'1L61,Z bb'£LL'L961,Z bb'£LL'L961,Z /V8/I'LLO'SZ 69'6L9'1L61,Z 6I'LI9'LSO'SZ TVS/6'00'5Z 991S8'L10'SZ 00'9L8'1L61, 8£'60I'L£61, 00'000'000'00V 00'000'000'81 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'g 00.000'000'g 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'g 00.000'000'g 00.000'000'g 00.000'000'g 00.000'000'g 00.000'000'g 00.000'000'g 00.000'000'g 00.000'000'g 00'000'000'Z£ 00.000'000'0Z 00.000'000'ST 00'000'000'OSS 00 000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'9I 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'0S 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'9 00'000'000'S 901A1PN.x6 JYX1Hd EM1SJbEIE � xb JYX1Hd OSS£Ob£I£ 3.,xVN.x£JYX1Hd 6u£E0bEIE � xb JYX1Hd OSSEObEIE SUNOS 31/.I1H3 08I' OR 9I0Z/6I/Z0 310N JSIa DI/£1H3 80196££1£ 06I' 061' 9I0Z/6I/Z0 310N JSIa JYX1Hd 80196££IE 06I' 061' 9I0Z/6I/Z0 310N JSIa JYX1Hd 80196£EI£ 06I' 061' 9I0Z/6I/Z0 310N JSIa JYX1Hd 80196£EIE ORO' ORO' SIOZ/GZ/OI 310N JSIa JYX1Hd ININ96£EIE ORO' ORO' SIOZ/GZ/OI 310N JSIa JYX1Hd IYVN96£EIE 09I' 091' 9IOZ/OZ/I0 310N JSIa JYX1H3 ZVS96£EIE Oa OW 9IOZ/OZ/I0 310N JSIa JYX1H3 ZVS96£EIE Oa OW 9IOZ/OZ/I0 310N JSIa JYX1H3 ZVS96£EIE 06I' 061' 910Z/61/Z0 310N JSIa JYX1Hd 80196££1£ SEI' SEI' SIOZ/OZ/OI 310N JSIa JYX1Hd 63N96££1£ OZZ' OZZ' 910Z/80/Z0 310N JSIa JYX1Hd 9AS96££1£ 51l' S,I. SIOZ/IZ/OI 310N JSIa JYX1Hd 91N96££1£ OSI' OSI' SIOZ/OZ/OI 310N JSIa JYX1Hd 63N96££1£ OSI' OSI' SIOZ/OZ/OI 310N JSIa JYX1Hd 63N96£EIE OSI' OSI' SIOZ/OZ/OI 310N JSIa JYX1Hd 63N96££IE 9I18II' SIOZ/IE/LO Oa OLI' SIOZ/8I/RO OSI' OSI' ;la/Wm b9£' I8Z' Sb£' £LZ' IZ£' 6Z£' OZ£' SIb' L9Z' 8LZ' Z6Z' 8£Z' Ib9' /Z£' SEC SEC ZSG /Z£' 68I' LEZ' SZZ' ZE6' £IO'I 00'000'99£ 000000'001 00'000'99£ 00'000'S% 816' OOS' OSZ' 00S' OSZ' 00S' OSZ' SL£' OSZ' SL£' SL£' OSZ' OSZ' SLS OSZ' OSZ' OSZ' SLS OSZ' SL£' SL£' SL£' 09C SZS 3ION JSIa-JYX1Hd 9Af96££IE 310N JSIa JYX1Hd LdN96££I£ 3.LON JSIa JYX1H3 ZAH96£EIE SSION JSla JNI1H3 9LOZ/SI/90 9I0Z/SI/SO 910Z/0E/90 9I0Z/SI/SO 910Z/SI/90 910Z/SI/SO 910Z/SL/LO 910Z/SI/SO 9IOZ/ST/TO 9IOZ/IE/IO 9IOZ/5I/50 9I0Z/6Z/ZO °NOS lunSVHu.L'Sn aN08 ,0111SV321,L'S11 aNOg IunSV3u,L'S11. aNOS xuflSV1111 'n aNOB zunSV1111 n aNOB zunSV1111 n aNOB zunSV1111 n aNOS xuflSV1111 'n aNOg IunSV3ul'S11 aNOg IunSV3ul'S11 aNOg IunSV3ul'S11 aNOg IunSV3u,L'S'H LIOZ/IE/IO aNOg Iunsvaul 5'H 9IOZ/SI/SO aNOg IunSV3u,L'S11. 9I0Z/SI/50 aNOg IunSV3u,L'S11. 9I0Z/SI/50 aNOg IunSV3u,L'S11. LIOZ/SI/SO aNOg Iunsvaul 5'H 9IOZ/SI/SO allog ,0111SV3uL'S11. 9I0Z/SI/I0 ONOg ,0111SV3ul'S11 9I0Z/SI/I0 aNOg IunSV3uL'S11 9I0Z/SI/I0 aNOg IunSV3uL'S11 LIOZ/0E/90 aNOg /0111SV3ul'S11 9918Z8Z16 LIOZ/IE/80 aNOg lunsvaxa'S'H ZYXy8Z8Z16 SONOS Sv3la SR ZJARZRZ16 1DA8Z8Z16 60M8Z8ZI6 IJASZSZI6 ZDASZSZI6 IJASZSZI6 £0n8ZSZ16 IJASZSZI6 £0H8Z8ZI6 IVS8Z8Z16 IJA8Z8ZI6 Z8g8Z8Z16 SJS8Z8ZI6 IJA8Z8ZI6 IJA8Z8ZI6 TJA8Z8Z16 6HM8Z8Z16 IJA8Z8Z16 £0H8Z8Z16 £0H8Z8Z16 £0H8Z8Z16 00'000'59£ 000000'00i 00'000'59£ 00'000'99£ 816' 816' OZOZ/ST/90 3SHOHISIIOJ.LSIG Sn Ov1 onao LJOV1V301 Mir £00' OM. 00'000'000'09Z 000000'001 00'000'000'09Z 00'000'000'09Z 580' S80' £00' £00' 00.0 00.000'000'09Z 000000'0U 00.000'000'09Z 00.000'000'09Z 580' 580' SIOZ/IO/GO TINS aHOVNVW 81 HSVJ massva/VQa £00' 00'000'000'1S 000000'001 00'000'0001S 00'000'000'1S £05' SOS' £00' £00' 00.0 00'000'00015 000000'00T W000'000'1'5 W000'000'1'5 £OS' £05. SIOZ/IO/LO WBH.I IHS.LSnuylvJ 2IL1J GNI ISRN.L1V3 11, £00' 00'000'000'0IV 000000'001 00'000'000'0IV 00'000'000'0IV %0' - £00' E00' 00.0 00.000'000'08 000000.00i 00.000'000'08 00'000'000'08 S60' S60' SIOZ/I0/L0 HVdIgd NV01101X dl XX3IJ £00' E00' 00'0 00.000'000'0Z 000000.00T 00.000'000'0Z 00.000'000'0Z 6L0' 6L0' SIOZ/10/LO 3YXIud 181NVIS NV01101X XXJAIAI £00' £00' 00'0 00'000'000'0G 000000'00I 00'000'000'0G 00'000'000'0G ZLO' ZLO' SIOZ/I0/L0 3YXRId a3.lvu3a3d XXIOd £00' £00' 00'0 00'000'000'SG 000000'00I 00'000'000'SG 00'000'000'SG III' III' SIOZ/I0/L0 3YXRId 7,1111ald XXJH3 £00' £00' 00'0 00'000'000'SII 000000'00I 00'000'000'SII 00'000'000'SII bII' iII' SIOZ/I0/L0 3Ov.LIu3H ISCIIIIIVD XXIdM .IxNII1 £00' 00'0 00'000'000'00Z 000000'00T 00'000'000'00Z 00'000'000'00Z Obi' I I. £00' £00 00 0 00 000'000'00Z 000000 0 0 I 00 000'000'00Z 00 000'000'00Z Obi 0I' SLOZ/IO/LO d dM - Od3u Odail SOd3x aNR3100J 64pn/eISI uoyema °y sreax Pa1.1P01A1 ssol/ule0 an1eA and an1eA an1eA 4u6Ie1nI uodnop Neu uoydpasaa PazII¢amR 4a3Ire1AI ',mew loog red °y P1.1A L/pn/elnl aunnoH ono;vod Pug Immi l 8 NaLJHTIOJ XVI-?IH?IfISVINI HQISRIHARI 10 kthlf10J TOT L9'580'LS £6'1709'I9I'££17 1786566.66 Z£'6IS'b0L'££17 ` 00'000'6GL'££17 SSG' _ 6SI'I 8111 00'005'5i 00'05Z'090'5Z OOOLDZ'OOL 00'05L'1760'5Z 00'000'000'5Z LLD' SZ9' 681.1 LGL1 £1'08'EZ S6'0£Z'68Z'OZ 000691'00T Z8'06E'99Z'OZ 00'000'99Z'OZ 6L17' OZS' 9101 6001 00'000'Z 00'0SL'E6617 0009L6'66 00'0SL'L66'17 00'000'000'9Z SOB' SL£' G179'17 Ibb'fi 097L8'09- 097ZI176'6 0000617'66 00'000'9L6'6 00'000'9L6'6 OOS'I OOS'L GZ9'17 ZZ1717 00'00Z'99- 00'008'E176'6 000807'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 0091 00S'L £567 L067 00'008'00T 00'00E710'0T OOOEZI'OOT 00'0091L6'6 00'000'000'0T Z0£1 000'L 91171 00171 179'96811 1797L1'ISL 000Z88'66 00'9LZ'6£L 00'0007SL 6001 00S. I8£1 99E1 00'0017- 00'009'666'6 000966'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 009' 009' I8£1 99E1 00'001't 00'009'666'6 000966'66 00'005'866'6 00'000'000'0T 1709' 009' I8£1 99E1 0175171- 091,58'1759'E 000966'66 00'000'559'E 00'000'959'E 009' 009' 9111 170171 00'008'L- 00'00Z'886'6 000Z88'66 00'000'966'6 00'000'000'0T Zig 00S. 8987 EI87 00'95I'6 00551'6SL'1Z 000770'00T 00'000'0SL'IZ 00'000'0SL'IZ 006' 006' 9E87 E6L7 00'0907- 00'0967661 000696'66 00'000'000'9 00'000'000'9 088' 088' I8£1 99E1 00.00Z- 00'008'660 000966'66 00'000'000'9 00'000'000'9 009' 009' I8£1 99E1 00'001,- 00'009'666'6 000966'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 009' 009' I8£1 99E1 00.00Z- 00'008'6661 000966'66 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'S 009' 009' I8£1 99E1 00.00Z- 00'008'6661 000966'66 00'000'000'9 00'000'000'9 009' 009' I8£1 99E1 00.00Z- 00'008'6661 000966'66 00'000'000'9 00'000'000'9 009' 009' 9611 Z81,1 00'008'0i- 00'008'966'11 000996'66 00'009'9007I 00'000'0007I S99' 089' 8987 EI87 00'00I'Z 00'00.1700'9 000770'00T 00'000'000'9 00'000'000'9 006' 006' I851 99E1 00'0017- 00'009'666'6 000966'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 009' 009' £087 9SL7 091797- 055LVL09'S 000996'66 00'000'0L9'S 00'000'0L9'S OZI'I OZ.11 I851 99E1 00'0017- 00'009'666'6 000966'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 009' 009' 9E87 E6L7 00'00.117- 00'006'966'6 000696'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 088' 088' SDG7 TOLZ 00'006'8L- 00'001'1861 000ZZ9'66 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'S 000.E 0001 57G7 1897 00'00L'6 00'0S6'900'S 00061100i 00'057'9661 00'000'000'S ZZO1 0001 SDG7 LOL7 00'0517'9 00'0517'90n 0006ZI'00I 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'S 000.E 0001 SDG'Z LOL'Z 00'001'S 00'00I'900'S OOOZOI'OOI 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'S 098' 098' IZG'Z L997 00'00071 00'000710'01 OOOOZI'OOI 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T OZVI. OZ11 IZG'Z L997 00'000'9 00'000'900'S OOOOZI'OOI 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'S OZVI. OZ11 IZG'Z L997 00'00071 00'000710'01 OOOOZI'OOI 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T OZVI. OZ11 IZG'Z L997 00'057'L 00'000'900'S OOOOZI'OOI 00'057'8661 00'000'000'S 8ZL'L OZ11 S897 E£97 00'00L'L 00'00L'L00'01 OOOLLO'OOI 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 0001 0001 G1,97 9697 00'096'L 00'00L'I00'S 00017E0'00i 00'057'5661 00'000'000'S Z1701 0001 8997 9197 00'057 00'05L'86617 0009L6'66 00'009'8661 00'000'000'S 9001 0001 8997 LI97 00'009'Z- 00'009766'6 0009L6'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 0001 0001 6897 9157 00'5707 00'5707091 000540'00T 00'000'0091 00'000'0091 OSL 09L' 6897 L1E7 00'00L17- 00'005'9L6'6 000557'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 008' 008' 9897 1175'Z 00'009 00'009'000'0T 000900'001 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 008' 008' 68S7 8157 00'96Z'I 00'96Z'IOZ7 0008.10'00T 00'000'00Z7 00'000'00Z7 00C OOL' £6177 Z91,7 001O0L7 001O0L700'01 OOOLLO'OOI 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 09C OSL' 56177 179177 0578 09780'057'8 000100'00T 00'000'09n 00'000'09n 00L' 00L' 8917 EZ177 00'05 1 00'0571,00'S 000980'00T 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'S 008' 008' 9617 99177 00'0997- 00'091/L661 0006176'66 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'S 008' 008' 56177 19177 001OOL'81- 00'005'186'6 000518'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 09C OSL' IL177 8£177 9L688'6- 17'01L'ZDL'8 000L88'66 00'000'ZSL'8 00'000'ZSL'8 098' 0S8' 8917 EZ177 00'09Z'17 00'09Z1700'S 000980.00T 00.000'000'S 00.000'000'S 008' 008' LL1'7 8E177 00'0051I- 00'00L'886'6 000L88'66 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 098' 058' ZL£' LIE' OS'L£0'£ 00.000005 000MO'OOL 09799/005 00.000'000'9 681' OOS' 009' E69' 00'009'8I 00'009'800'0I 000980.00T 00'000'066'6 00.000'000'0i Lib' 60£' 9LOZ/9Z/80 '1A5Z1 dWN3 L3A005EIE 9LOZ/90/60 dWN3 17OS33£EIE 9L0Z/SO/L0 xA1 dWN3 EJX00SEIE OZOZ/OZ/ZO 3o1A,190N'TAS dWN3 17MQZ09EIE OZOZ/£T/ZO 9oW90NxA5 dWN3 GOQZ09EIE 8L0Z/ZI/90 9o1A,19>Nx11.5 dWN3 011W109E1E 9I0Z/SZ/TL 3.1KPNx1195 dWN3 111109E1E 9IOZ/SI/II 3.1KPNIA95 dWN3 ESMOOSEIE 9IOZ/SI/II 3.1KPNx1195 dWN3 ESMOOSEIE 9I0Z/SI/II 9xAL0NxA5E dWN3 ESMOOSEIE 9I0Z/8Z/II 9xAT0NxA5E tlWN3 111109E1E 8IOZ/80/90 floW9>Nx1L9 dWN3 8MN109EIE 8I0Z/0E/170 3oW9>Nx115 dWN3 LIN109EIE 9IOZ/SL/LI 3xA10NiAS'E dWN3 8SM005EIE 9IOZ/SL/LI 3xAL0N+1C5'E dWN3 8SM005EIE 9IOZ/SL/LI 3x1Ll0N+1C5'£VW% 8SM005EIE 9I0Z/9I/II PKPNiA5£dWN3 ESMOOSEIE 9I0Z/9I/II 3+AI01\1A115'£YIN% ESMOOSEIE 9I0Z/LZ/ZI 9oW90N.1AS'£ dWN3 £317109EIE BIOZ/80/SO 901A19�N1A5 dWN3 8M01109EIE 9LOZ/5I/IL 9+AI0N7115.£ dWN3 ESMOOSEIE BLOZ/8I/170 90W9�NaAS dWN3 OMI109EIE 9TOZ/5I/IL 991AI90N7A5'£ dWN3 ESMOOSEIE 8TOZ/0£/170 901AIWN1A5 dWN3 LIJIL09EIE 8TOZAZ/£0 9iAI0N-1115 dWN3 GdH109EIE 8TOZAZ/£0 9oW90NiAS dWN3 Z31-1109EIE 8TOZAZ/£0 9iAI0N-1115 dWN3 89H1099K 8TOZAZ/£0 9iAPN1,15 dWN3 9JH109EIE 810Z/61/80 901/11WN11,5 dWN3 17M31.09EIE 810Z/61/80 901/11WN11,5 dWN3 17M31.09EIE 810Z/61/80 901/11WN11,5 dWN3 17M31.09EIE 8TOZ/6I/£0 901/11WN11,5 dWN3 17M31.09EIE 810Z/90/£0 901AIWN115 dWN3 ZIH109EIE 8TOZ/OZ/Z0 91APN1A5 dWN3 GA1J109EIE 8TOZAZ/Z0 91APN1A5 dW1\13 WCIT09EIE 8TOZ/8Z/Z0 41111L0N+7,5 dWN3 WCIT09EIE 13TOZ/0£/I0 9.111L0N+7,5 dWN3 SAtl109EIE 8TOZ/0£/I0 9111PN+7,5 dWN3 8Itl109EIE 810Z/6Z/I0 91APN+A5 dW1\13 95J109EIE 8TOZ/0£/I0 901AIWN+7,5 dWN3 Z0VT09EIE LTOZ/9Z/Z1 9111PN+7,5 dWN3 99'1109E1E LTOZ/9Z/Z1 9111PN+7,5 dWN3 OLT09EIE LTOZ/EI/ZT 9.1APN+7,5 dWN3 9S£T09EIE LTOZ/LZ/ZT 111)1P SAS dWN3 EI9L09EIE LIOZ/9Z/ZI 9.1AI0NIA5 dW1\13 6017109EIE 9.1AL0N1X5 dW1\13 53ZI09EIE 9PAPNIA5 dWN3 9S£I09EIE 9.1APNIA5 dWN3 53ZI09EIE 91,LLaN.1,1£ dWN3 Zfl0005£1£ .1A5 dWN3 OX9d39£1£ SQN00 tlWN3 I9'£17Yia 00'0I0'658'9E£ £919S6'66 61'998'L99'9E£ 00'000'000'L££ �. 99S999' 117174117 000917'646'5Z 000IZ666 9558Z'546'5Z 00000'000'9Z 517I' 5171' 910Z/61/10 955' 555' L17'£SG'OL 00'OSZ'0861,Z 000IZ6'66 ES'961'696'K 00'000'000'SZ SLI' SGL' 910Z/61/10 6179' 819' 005L811 00'00S'SL617 000Z06'66 00'SZ9'£9617 00'000'000'SZ 08I' 081' 910Z/ZZ/Z0 6Z£' RE' 09'9917'S 00'0017'£66'61 000L96'66 01,£E6786'61 00.000'000'0Z OZI' OK STOZ/8Z/OT 6179' L179. 11711,6'6Z 00'00S'SL617 000Z06'66 9S'S99'07617 00'000'000'SZ 917' 917' 910Z/ZZ/Z0 61,9 L179. ZG1,8Z'OE 00'00S'SL617 000Z06'66 8Z'STZ'SD617 00'000'000'SZ 917' OK' 910Z/ZZ/Z0 SLI' SGI' LI1,0911 00'09Z76617 000686'66 E85179'98617 00'000'000'SZ OEI' 0£1' STOZ/Z0/60 SLI' SW LI1,0911 00'09Z76617 000686'66 E8'SD9'98617 00'000'000'SZ OEV 0£1' STOZ/Z0/60 SLI' SGL' 1$1,6911 00'09Z76617 000686'66 99 SSS'S861,Z 00'000'000'SZ OEI' 0£1' STOZ/Z0/60 G6I' L6L' 176'95Z71 00'0007661Z 000886'66 90'£6L'178617 00'000'000'SZ OEI' 0£1' STOZ/OI/60 KZ. EIZ' 9051I'81 00'09L'96617 000L86'66 176'LE9'8L617 00'000'000'SZ Oa OLT. STOZ/9I/60 310N 0SIQ dWN3 L111885EIE Ur LIZ' 0978S'GL 00'0917'9661E COOL%66 097987L6'17E 00.000'000'SE Ott OIL' STOZ/SI/60 310N JSIQ dWN3 031885£1£ 8LI' BIT' 98'6LG'ST 00.0917'866'0E 000966.66 WOL9786'0E 00.000'0001E SLI' SIT' STOZ/ZI/80 310N JSIQ dWN3 LHN889ELE S330N JSIQ tlWN3 310N JSIQ dWN3 310N JSIC1 dW N3 310N OSIQ dW N3 310N OSIQ dW N3 310N OSIQ dW N3 310N OSIQ dW N3 310N OSIQ dW N3 310N OSIQ dW N3 310N OSIQ dW N3 310N OSIQ dW N3 OZ21985E1E OZ21985E1E IN3885EIE LNN885EIE IN3885EIE IN3885EIE E31885EIE 8318858TE 13196£EIE EN1985EIE ZZ£.8 E6r S17'686'S17S 0L'LS17 al P69 9L6ZE6'66 SL'L1717 EL 1769 Z66'b 8bL'b 09.859'Z 09'£59'Z8Z'b 000Z90.001 00'000'08Z'b 00'000'08Z'17 008.E 0081 OZOZ/9Z/90 9.NPN+A5 JIMIH3 IH990DE18 Z66'D Z6617 000.E 1867 1867 Z661 Z66b 17861 17861 £00'S £00'S 17861 LDO'Z LDO'Z LDO'Z 9681 99617 99617 9687 S16'17 118' 5161 9117.E 51617 ZL617 01617 51617 ZI617 9681 9881 9681 EZL'b EZL'17 EZ6'Z 17I6'Z SI6'Z 6ZL'17 EZL'17 E£L17 E£L17 S9L17 S9L17 E£L17 ZIO'Z ZIO'Z ZIO'Z 9G9'D 60L'D 60L'D 6Z8Z EL9'D L98' 6L9'D E17EE 999'D 60LD 90LD 969'D 60LD Z69'D SZ9'D Z691 00'00£'Z 00'00£'Z00'0L 000£Z0'00I 00'000'000'1K 00'000'000'0T OOOZ 000'Z OZOZ/5Z/90 801A1E>NxA9 JIM1H3 00'0917'£ 00'0917'£00'ST 000£Z0'00I 00.000'000'ST 00.000'000'ST OOOZ 0007 OZOZ/9Z/90 9o1A190NxA9 JW1113 00'05E5I 00'05EZTO'SI 000180'001 00'000'L6611 00'000'000'5T LEVI 08171 810Z/6Z/90 901A1E0N.LA£ JIMIH3 00'09Z'£T 00'000'L00'SZ 0008Z0'00I 00'09L'£66'177 00'000'000'SZ 69Z1 OS71 SIOZ/ZZ/90 3oW90N.AE JW"1HL 00.00ELT- 00'00L'696'11 00086L'66 00.008'986'M 00.000'000'9T OEZ'L 00Z'1 SIOZ/ZZ/90 3iA5L0NxAE JWIH3 00.009.E 00'00£'L00'0I 000£L0'00I 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 0961 0961 OZOZ/SZ/90 301A190Ns1L5 JW11-13 00'066'Z 00'066700'U 000£70'00T 00'000'000'U 00.000'000'U OOOZ 0007 OZOZ/SZ/90 301/19>NsAS JW11-13 09761'9- 09 09'117'£ 0001E8'66 00'000'09Z'£ 00'000'09Z'£ 0981 0981 OZOZ/ZZ/90 flo1\19>NsAS JW"IH3 09798'61- 09717I'OEL'IT 0001E8'66 00'000'09L'IT 00'000'09L'II 0981 0981 OZOZ/ZZ/90 floW9>1\LxAS JW'IH3 00'096'6 00'096'600'9 000661'001 00'000'000'9 00'000'000'9 OSL'L 09L1 OZOZ/6Z/90 901N90NxAS JW1H3 9171Z97I S171Z97L8'8 000661.001 00'000'998'8 00'000'998'8 OSL'L OSL'I OZOZ/6Z/90 901A190NxAS J1N11-13 00'006'91- 00'001'E86'6 0001E8'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 0981 0981 OZOZ/ZZ/90 901\1901NiAS JW11-13 00'009'L 00'008'666'6 000866'66 00'00Z766'6 00'000'000'0T LSE OSL' GIOZ/17I/GO xAZ JW"IH3 00'00171i 00'00L'666'11 000866'66 00'00£'886'17I 00'000'000'9T LSE OSL' GIOZ/17I/GO .,AZ JW'IH3 00'009'L 00'008'666'6 000866'66 00'00Z766'6 00'000'000'0T LSE OSL' GIOZ/bl/GO .,AZ J1A11113 00'086'£17- 00'0Z0'996'9 000G9Z'66 00'000'000'9 00'000'000'9 SZ91 SZ91 OZOZ/IZ/SO floW£ON. JW1H3 00188'6 00188'608'5 000LLI'OOI 00'000'008'5 00'000'008'5 008.E 0081 OZOZ/II/90 4193A19Ni115 JW1H3 00'00L'LI 00'00L'LIO'OI OOOLLL'OOL 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 008.E 0081 OZOZ/IT/90 4199A19Ni115 JW1H3 0016'1'9 001601175'Z 000Z88'66 00'006'1785'Z 00'000'055'L 89Z1 Cal SIOZ/IZ/50 flo,1191W£JW1H3 00'006'Zi7- 00'00I'L56'6 0001L5'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 008.E 0081 OZOZ/8Z/50 41o11181\PA5 JW1113 00'00L'E- 00'009'EI0'0T 0009£1'OOT 00'00E'LIO'OI 00'000'000'0T 0££' 005' 9I0Z/£1/50 iAI JW1113 00105'69- 00'9617'0£E'9 0001'16'86 00'000'00E9 00'000'00E9 OSL'L OSL'I OZOZ/SZ/SO fl01A1£O1\1iA5 JW11-13 SLOLS'Z- 5Z'6Z17'ZLZ7 001088'66 00'000'5LZ'Z 00'000'5LZ'Z 000.E 000.E 810Z/8Z/tI floW£ONiA£JW1H3 00'058'LI- 00'05Y7861 000E179'66 00'000'000'5 00'000'000'5 OOL'L OOL'I OZOZ/8Z/50 flo AIPM1XS JW11-13 00'00Z'88- 00'008196'17 000%7'66 00'000'000'5 00'000'000'5 005E 0051 OZOZ/LZ/50 999AI£0N1X5 JW1H3 00'000'L8- 00'000'816'17T 000077'66 00.000'000'SI 00'000'000'g 005E 0051 OZOZ/9Z/S0 floW£OM.AS JW1H3 00'099'9I- 00'09E18617 000L89'66 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'9 SZ91 S791 OZOZ/8Z/90 9oWPNIAS 0W1H3 00'00Z'8£- 00'00819617 0009£7'66 00'000'000'9 00'000'000'9 OOSZ 0091 OZOZ/LZ/SO VIAIPNIAS 0W1H3 091ZE'E- 017'8L9'981'5 000986'66 00'000'061'5 00'000'061'5 0051 0051 OZOZAZ/50 VIAIPN17,5 JW1H3 01'5LZ'£9- 0617ZL'OL1'9 000586'86 00'000'17En 00'000'178n 0951 6551 OZOZ/6Z/170 VIAIPN17,5 JW11-13 00'000'9Z- 00'0001L61 0000817'66 00'000'000'5 00'000'000'5 005. 0051 OZOZAZ/50 901ATPN.1A5 JW11-13 EH8L0bEL£ £H9L017£L£ SH£9017£I£ OW99017£I£ L3tlL017ELE ZQ9L0b£IE EHSL017EIE 1059015W 1705901ELE 8NZ9017£L£ SNZ9015LE 17059015W 8AQtl3LELE 8AQtl3LEIE 8AQtl3LElE SVA9017ELE 179J9017ELE 179J9017ELE Ef1M9017ELE 15419015LE 60Qd3LELE 0509017ELE 6SQ9015LE LL99017EIE OZA9017EIE E3Z9017EIE SXA9017EIE OZA9017EIE LNA9017EIE SA.19017EIE LIX9017EIE ,Elpmew uopemQ sso-l/ule0 oy sma A pal;rpoW paz leamQ anlYA la'I+eW a�. e W anlYA loog 1e1 dlpn/ew uodno0 apci uopdpasaQ dISRJ oy PlalA LLpnIYW s9ulPloH ollo3Vod Pu3 wow 6 NOIDHTIOa XVI-2I32If1SVINI HQISRIHARI 10 kthlflOD ZOT b8S6LS' 00'00Z'I 00'0517'L6617I 000£86'66 00'05Z'966171 00'000'000'ST OSZ' 0£Z' 9I0Z/6Z/10 +ASZ'I flail EXZCIRCIE b8S' 6LS' 00'008 00'00£'866'6 000£86'66 00'009'L66'6 00'000'000'0T OSZ' 0£Z' 910Z/6Z/10 +ASZ'I flail EX2Q3EEIE Z8Z'b 9SZ'b 00'017L'ZI 00'00£'0I0'0I 000£0VOOI 00'099'L66'6 00'000'000'0T I9Z' SSZ' 610Z/01/01 +A5 flail OaXa3£EIE KG 6ZS' 00'000'9I- 00'05Z'000'SZ 000I00'00T 00'05Z'9I0'SZ 00'000'000'9Z 81Z' OLZ' 9I0Z/II/I0 +ASZ'I 9J13 ObNa3EElE Z8Z'b 9SZ'b 00'09L'SZ 00'05L'SZO'SZ 000£0I'OOI 00'000'000'9Z 00'000'000'5Z SSZ' SSZ' 6I0Z/OI/OI +AS 9J13 OaXa3EElE Z8Z'b 9SZ'b 00'096'9I 00'096'SIO'SI 000£0I'OOI 00'000'000'ST 00'000'000'ST SSZ' SSZ' 6I0Z/OI/OI +AS flail OaXa3EElE SSZ' bSZ' 00'009'£ 00'000'Z00'OZ OOOOIO'OOI 00'0017'866'61 00'000'000'0Z 86I' 06I' SIOZ/I0/0I +AI gall f4MQ3EEIE 660' 860' 00'8i 00 OW00017 000L00'00I 00'Z9Z'00017 00'000'000'17 UV 081' StOZ/SO/80 iASZ'L gall IMNa3EElE Zbl' Zbl' 00'OSZ'Z 00'09Z'Z00'SZ 000600'00I 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 081' 08L' SLOZ/LZ/80 +AL gall 89Ia3EElE 960' 960' 00'0 00'000'000'SZ 000000'00I 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ 06I' 06L' StOZ/b0/80 +AL 9a31 9AiIa3EEI£ SZO' SZO' 00'00171 00'00I'000'01 000100'00I 00'00L'866'6 00'000'000'01 £9I' OSL' SLOZ/60/L0 +AL 9a31 OLaa3EElE LL9' EL9' 00'009'£ 00'000700'01 0009170'00I 00'000100'01 00'000'000'01 OL£' SL£' 9IOZ/£0/£0 +AZ 9a31 E90a3EEIE L6I' L61' 00'00I'S 00'006100'01 0006I0'00I 00'008'966'6 00'000'000'01 OLZ' OSZ' SIOZ/OI/60 +Ai 9a31 bN3a3EEIE et I L£b'L 00'008'L 00'00£'000'S 000900'00I 00'009'Z6617 00'000'000'9 IEL' 089' 9IOZ/60/ZI V+AIaN+A£ 9a31 LN9a3EEIE £SI' ESL' 00'OSS'Z 00'OSS'Z00'SI OOOLIO'OOI 00'000'000'ST 00'000'000'ST 08Z' 08Z' StOZ/SZ/80 +.I9L'19a11 91Va3EEIE 990' 990' SZ'8£I'S 00'00Z100'SI 000800'00I SL'190'96611 00'000'000'ST US' LZZ' SIOZ/bZ/LO xAS'Z 9a31 IVfla3EEIE 909' b08' 00'009'91 00'009'I10'0L 00091100/ 00'000'566'6 00'000'000'01 LIE' LSZ' 9L0Z/OZ/b0 xAS 3D3d SAHNIE£I£ SONOS 9a11 EV LLb' OL19Z0'06 6£'6bS'LS61SI b8Z£E6'66 6911ZS'LSir. 00'000190'9Si 009' 865' 8CLL9'b 00006'066'6 00060666 ZZ ZZZ'986'6 00000'000'0L OOZ' 00Z' 9L0Z/170/Z0 9.ION aSla 9add ZBSZIE£I£ 009' 869' 8CLL9'b 00'006'066'6 000606'66 ZZ'ZZZ'986'6 00 000'000'0L OOZ' 00Z' 9L0Z/170/Z0 3.LON aSla /add ZBSZL£EI£ b9S' £99' 9S'SOVVI 00'000'08617Z 0000Z6'66 1171769'99617Z 00'000'000'SZ OOZ' 00Z' 9LOZ/ZZ/10 3ION aSla Bald SaSZ1£EIE 179S' £99' bb'bbb'bi 00'000'080Z 0000Z6'66 99'999'990Z 00'000'000'SZ OOZ' 00Z' 9IOZ/ZZ/10 3ION aSla 9a11 SJSZL££IE 69S' 8S9' 00'SL8'ZI 00'05Z'08617Z 000IZ6'66 00'SL£'L9617Z 00'000'000'SZ 081' 08i' 9IOZ/OZ/10 3ION aSla 9a11 6VSZL£EI£ 69S' 8S9' 00'05Z'£I 00'05Z'08617Z 000IZ6'66 00'000'L9617Z 00'000'000'SZ 081' 08i' 9IOZ/OZ/10 3ION aSla 9a31 6VSZL££1£ LLZ' 9LZ' ii'I1S'II 00'00171766'6T 000ZL6'66 68'888'Z86'61 00'000'000'0Z NT Obi' SIOZ/60/0I 3ION aSla flail 17INIZI££L£ LZO' LZO' £0'L8Z17i 6£'6178'090'SI 000666'66 9£'Z99'9170'SI 00'000190'ST OW OLT' SIOZ/01/L0 3I0N aSla flail ZAH96£EIE S3ION aSIO gall E'I 86'SES'LEI- SZ'LSL'L60'SEL ' EZ'9Z£'SEVSEL 9S7b1'Z6Z'SEL £001 L66' OO 001'Z OO 00I'Z00'5L 00017'0'00i 00000'000'5L 00'000'000'SL 09b' OSb' 910Z/0090 VINPN+AI 911-11 biNSVOEIE £001 L66' 00'0061 00'006100'9£ 00017L0'00T 00'000'000'9£ 00'000'000'9£ 05b' OSb' 910Z/0£/90 flolAIPN+AI 91H1 biNSVOEIE £001 L66' 00'000'S 00'05Z'06617Z 000196'66 00'05Z'98617Z 00'000'000'9Z SL£' OZ£' 910Z/0£/90 ,II 91111 SQOSVOEIE L96' 196' 00'000'6- 00'000160Z 0001796'66 00'000'000'9Z 00'000'000'SZ 09£' 09£' 910Z/LI/90 +AL 911-11 LO3SVOCI£ L96' 196' 00'000'6- 00'000160Z 0001796'66 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'9Z 09£' OS£' 910Z/L1/90 +A1911-11 L039VOEIE L96' 196' 00'099'L- 00'09£'Z66171 0006176'66 00.000'000'S1 00.000'000'91 00b' 006' 910Z/L1/90 3.INON+A1911-11 bM3SVOCI£ 9Ib'£ £bE'E 00'9E01 00'9E019L'S 000810'00T 00'000'09L'9 00'000'09L'9 000'i 000'1 8IOZ/8Z/I1 floWE>N+A£91H1 08aSV0EIE 078' Zb8' 00'00£ 00'099'96611 00OLL6'66 00'09Z'96611 00.000'000'91 SZ£' OK 9IOZ/170/S0 +A191H1 63V6VOEIE S16'b TILT 00.05I'L1- 00'058'Z86'b 000L99'66 00'000'000'9 00'000'000'9 OOS'I 005'I OZOZ/8Z/S0 floINPN+AS 31111 IJJSVOEIE 9Ib'£ £17E'E 00'0081 00'008'100'01 000810'00T 00.000'000'01 00.000'000'01 000'I 000'1 8I0Z/8Z/I1 floINPN+AE 911-11 08aSVOCI£ OTC 906' 00'00S'S 00'009'900'g 000ZZO'001 00'000'000'g 00'000'000'g OOb' OW 9I0Z/LZ/S0 floWE>N+A191H1 ZLJSVOEIE OTC 906' 00'09L'£` 00'09Z'966'n 000586'66 00'000'000'g 00'000'000'g OOb' OOb' 9I0Z/LZ/S0 floWE>N+AL 911-11 ENJSVOEIE OTC 906' 00'00Z'Z 00'00Z'Z00'OI OOOZZO'OOI 00.000'000'01 00'000'000'01 OOb' OOb' 9I0Z/LZ/S0 3INPN+AI 111111 ZLJSVOEIE 986' 186' 00'0Ob$- 00'09Z'8661Z 000£66'66 00'099'Z00'SZ 00'000'000'g 99£' 9E' 910Z/17Z/90 +ASZ'I 91H1 61I6£8£EIE 106' 868' 00'00Z1- 00'008'866'K 000Z66'66 00'000'000'S1 00.000'000'S1 09£' OSE' 910Z/17Z/50 30419>N+AI 91111 IVLSVOEIE IOC 868' 00'008- 00'00Z'666'6 000Z66'66 00.000'000'01 00.000'000'01 09£' 05E' 910Z/17Z/50 301,19>N+AI 31111 IVLSVOEIE IOC 868' 00'008- 00'00Z'666'6 000Z66'66 00'000'000'01 00.000'000'01 OS£' 05E. 910Z/17Z/50 301,19>N+AI 31111 IVLSVOEIE S99' 6179' 00.000'Z- 00'00L'966'6 000L96'66 00'00L'866'6 00.000'000'01 917Z' 0£Z' 9I0Z/17Z/Z0 °NOI 31111 909SVOEIE 617Z' 6bZ' 00'5Z9'5I 00'09Z'9661Z 000586'66 00'5Z9'0861Z 00.000'000'5Z 170£' 051' 510Z/6Z/60 0419 91111 6Hb[bBEEIE 8£Z' 8£Z' E£'80Z'S1 00'09Z'9661Z 000586'66 L9'Ib0186'17Z 00'000'000'5Z 170£' 051' 510Z/SZ/60 041931111 8a1AIb8EEI£ 06Z' 06Z' OH 00'0b0'£00'6I 000910'00T 00'0b0'£00'6I 00'000'000'61 £91. 061' 510Z/bl/01 01,1L 31111 9aa£VOEIE £SL'b L0517 00'00I'bZ 00'00I'bZ0'01 000L6Z'O0I 00'000'000'01 00'000'000'01 058'I 058'1 OZOZ/0£/£0 1101AIPN+AS 31111 Ll1fbVO£I£ 88Z' L8Z' 00'£1b'£ 00'000'000'5Z 000000'00T 00'L85'9661Z 00'000'000'5Z £8I' 091' 510Z/EI/01 WIZ 91H1 L9NbVO£I£ 96Z' 96Z' 00'0817- 00'095'000'b OOObIO'OOI 00'0b0100'b 00'000'000'b KV 00Z. 510Z/9I/01 +A191H1 S1117EVO£I£ 81L' 171L' 00'001/5 00'00b'500'5I 0009E0'00I 00'000'000'51 00'000'000'51 OOb' OOb' 910Z/8I/£0 301,19+N+AI 31111 63abVO£I£ 099' 1759' 00'00517- 00'005'5661Z 000Z86'66 00'000'000'5Z 00'000'000'5Z 00£' 00£' 910Z/9Z/Z0 floINE+N+A191H1 6AZ£VOEIE 099' 1759' 00'00517- 00'005'5661Z 000Z86'66 00'000'000'5Z 00'000'000'5Z 00£' OK 9IOZ/9Z/Z0 flOWPNI,Al 91H3 6AZ£VOEIE 68S'b 98£'b 00186'517- 00'6I0'6LL'6 000Z£5'66 00'000'5Z8'6 00'000'5Z8'6 OOS'I 0091 OZOZ/0£/I0 301,49>N+A591H3 bZA£VOEIE L9S'b 8b£'b 09'££8'91- 017'99I'£17£'f 0006617'66 00'000'09£'£ 00'000'09f'f SZ91 SZ91 OZOZ/ZZ/IO g01A19>N+A591113 sancvOEIE 899' L99' 00'0£0'b 00'0E0109'9 000Z90'00I 00'000'005'9 00'000'009'9 OS£' 05£' 9I0Z/6Z/ZO +AI 91111 ZbMEVOEIE SLS' 1LS' 00'0SZ'9 00'0SZ'900'9Z 0005Z0'00I 00'000'000'5Z 00'000'000'9Z 00£' 00£' 910Z/9Z/10 +AI 91H1 03MEVOEIE I'Z” 1LZ17 00'00Z1I IL'98b'SZL'S 000961'001 ICS8Z'bIL'5 ICSSZ't1L'S 008'I 0081 610Z/61/Z1 901193N+AS 91111 9a1EVOElE bOS'I 6817'1 00'0LL'9I 00'0LL'9I0'L OOOI£Z'OOI 00'000'000'L 00'000'000'L 09C 05C 910Z/0£/ZI 3+APIN+AZ Hall IfINVOEIE IZS' 9L9' 00'005 00'005'000'5Z 000Z00'001 00'000'000'5Z 00'000'000'5Z 01C OTC' 910Z/90/IO 9oINL>N+AI fl1H3 ZcINVOEIE b8S' 6L9' 00'0SZ'6 00'057'1700'5Z OOOLIO'OOL 00'000'000'5Z 00'000'000'5Z 09Z' 05Z' 910Z/6Z/LO +AI Hall I8d£VO£I£ b8S' 6L5' 00'095'Z 00'095700'5T OOOLIO'OOL 00'000'000'5I 00'000'000'5I 05Z' 05Z' 910Z/6Z/LO +AI fl1H1 18d£VOEIE 1705'b 9£EI 00'008'Lb- 00'00Z796'6 000ZZ5'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 0051 0091 6I0Z/OE/ZI 90IN93N+AS fl11-11 811NEVO£I£ I05'Z 89bZ 00.00nI 00.00VtI0'OI OOOZbi'OOL 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 090'i 0501 LIOZ/6Z/ZI +A£fl1H1 E8N£VO£I£ tail bLZ'b 00'009'5 98'ZbL7987 000961'00T 98'Z6T'L987 9876I'L987 008'I 0081 610Z/6L/ZI 90IN£0N+15 f111-11 9a1£VO£I£ 5L6'Z 806Z 00'006'6E- 00'001'096'6 000109'66 00'000'000'01 00'000'000'01 OSZ'I 0971 810Z/0Z/90 901N£>N+A5 fl1113 Zd3£8f£I£ 5L6'Z LZ6Z 00'009'Z 00'009700'U 0000Z0'001 00'000'000'U 00'000'000'U 0001 0001 810Z/OZ/90 9oINE3N+AS fl1H3 LN3£8f£I£ 5L6'Z 9Z6Z 00'009'9- 00'00b'i66'b 0008Z8'66 00'000'866'1, 00'000'000'5 806' 006' 810Z/0Z/90 901X93N+AS fl1H3 61A13£8f£I£ £L6'Z bZ6Z 00'005'0E- 00'005'696'6 000569'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 5L8' SL8' 810Z/61/90 901X£3WAS fl1H3 bda£8£EIE £L6'Z bZ67 00'0SZ'SI- 00'0SL'1786'17 000569'66 00"000'000'S 00"000'000'S 5L8' SL8' 810Z/61/90 901A1P SAS fl1H3 bda£8£EIE £L6'Z bZ67 00'05Z'SI- 00'0SL'178617 000569'66 00.000'000'S 00.000'000'S 5L8' SL8' 810Z/61/90 f1.1A1 >N.RS fl1H3 bda£8£EIE £L6'Z bZ67 00'05V51- 00'0SL'178617 000569'66 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'S 5L8' SL8' 810Z/61/90 9.IAI£>N.L1S fl1H3 bda£8£EL£ £96'Z 606Z 00"OWL 00'008'LOO'OL 0008L0'001 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T OW 008' 8I0Z/Z1/90 9.L1PN.L1S fl1H3 9N9£8££IE £96'Z 606Z 00'008'L 00'008'LOO'OL 0008L0'001 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T OW 008' 8I0Z/Z1/90 9.L1PN.L1S fl1H3 9N9£8£EI£ 51.6.Z UST 00'0S1'Z 00'091700'S 000070'001 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'S OW 088' 810Z/6Z/S0 9.IAI9>N+AS fl1113 0IM17£8£EI£ b067 b98'Z 00'009'8 00'009'800'0T 000980'001 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 09C 05C 810Z/SZ/S0 9oNI9>N+A5 91H3 8I££8£EIE 6687 658T 00'008'51- 00'00Z1786'6 000Z178'66 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T 09C 05C 810Z/£Z/90 fl.1AION+A5 81H3 INIEf8f£L£ £68'Z Z58'Z 00'09E 00'09£'000'ZL 000£00'001 00'000'000V 00'000'000V 098' 098' 810Z/LZ/90 3.IAIWWAS fl1H3 IEAZ8££L£ SKI LLZ'L IC989%- 6Z'8Z0'Z8V17 0001716'66 0017IL'98V17 00'bIL'98Z'17 00C OOC 9I0Z/II/OI WIAI£>N,Ab fl1H3 L9S08f£I£ SON0991H1 I9'Ibf'SSZ 099' L65. 6Z6' 9Z6' 619' 565' 619' 1785. bI9' 099' 06Z. 565' SLI' £L£' 660' 859' 969' SZ6' £Z6' LI9' £69. LI9' Z89. ZI9' 859' 06Z. E65' SLL' ZLE' 860' 80'000'6 Zb'Eb9'S 6E'9ZVIL L9'Ib0'6 £8 OLL'9Z 68'88£'ZZ L9'916'9Z L9'9b1'EZ ZZ'Lb9'0L b8ZZVL Z8'9SS'Z 00'009'9£ SCE69'9L SZ'L69'SZ I1'688'1£ 6VOZ91OZ£$££ 54'999'990Z 19'17EVL£6'9 00'0SCZ£6'17Z 00'000%£6'17Z 05L£6'986'17Z 00'005'98617Z 05L£6'986'17Z 00'08Z'L86'EZ 00'9U/1766'6 8E'E£6'08ria SE'99E'1SE'17 00'005'986'bZ 05'L89'866'bZ 00'9LE'1766'bZ 00'8Z0'666'6b 169816'66 L99998'66 05L5b6'66 0001£C66 OOOZ£C66 O5LEb6'66 0009b6'66 05L£b6'66 OOOLb6'66 OSZbb6'66 L99998'66 L1bS86'66 0009b6'66 05Lb6666 OOSLL6'66 990866'66 88'SLZ'SSO'b££ L9'999'45617Z 60'169'1E6'9 I9'EZ17'76'bZ £E'856'EZ6'bZ L9'991'656'n I1'1I1196'n E8'0Z0'6S6'n £EE£1196'EZ 8L'LLL'E86'6 175'0I9'ELZ'bl £9'808'8bE'17 00'000'056'17Z SCE60'Z86'17Z SCLLL'896'n 68'8£1'L96'61' 00'000'000'9Z 00'0001b6'9 00'000'000'9Z 00'000'000'9Z 00'000'000'9Z 00'000'000'9Z 00'000'000'9Z 00'000'000'17Z 00'000'000'0T 00'000'00E14 00'000'ZSE'17 00'000'000'9Z 00'000'000'9Z 00'000'000'9Z 00'000'000'0S OK' ObZ' 9I0Z/9Z/Z0 3I0N aSia 91113 17d1178£EIE OOZ' OOZ' 910Z/£0/Z0 3ION aSia 81113 £05178££IE IL£' OL£' 9LOZ/£0/90 3ION aSia 911-13 92IXb8f£I£ IOC' 00£' 910Z/Z0/90 3ION aSIO fl1H3 L0X178f£IE OLT OIZ' 910Z/L1/ZO 3ION aSI0 fl1H3 9ASb8f£I£ 061' 061' 910Z/ZO/Z0 3ION aSia 8.1H3 9dSb8££I£ OLT OIZ' 9I0Z/I1/Z0 3ION aSla 81H3 97,5178£EIE OOZ' OOZ' 910Z/6Z/10 3ION aSla fl1H3 9NS178£EIE OOZ' OOZ' 910Z/60/Z0 3ION aSIO fl1H3 OMS178££I£ 5LZ' Sir 9I0Z/9Z/Z0 3ION aSIO fl1H3 bdlb8£EIE OSI' OSI' SIOZ/bI/OI 3ION aSIO fl1H3 Z7,1AI178£EIE OK' ObZ' 9I0Z/ZO/Z0 3ION aSIO fl1H3 9dSb8£EIE 5EI' SEI' SLOZ/Z0/60 091' 091' OCT' OEI' SIAZ/£L/LL SIAZ/SO/80 3ION aSIO fl1H3 L31178£EIE 3ION aSIO fl1H3 £3d178£EIE 3ION aSI0 fl1H3 9VN178£EIE 53ION aSIO 91H1 Ripmelll uopema sso-l/ule0 oI smaA palppolll paz leamn anleA 1ai+eNl anleA +loog Awn1eb1l uodnoa apci uopdp>saa dlSfla 0I PPIA L11+n1e19 %801PI0H 01103p0d P03 wow OI NOIDHTIOJ XVI-1I31IfISV3?II HQISRIHARI 30 kthlfIOJ £01 48'999'81S 99'101'60L'990'9 E996L6'66 18'9E4'861'990'9 W191'846'490'9 6£6' IE6' 1e461 PueiO I0I'I OL0'I L8'999'SIS 99'£0I'60L'990'9 £996L6'66 I8'9£1'£6I'990'9 9SZFI'E166'L90'9 9ZI' KV IVOLI'49 96'008'106'86£ 9LOSL6'66 E8'0£9'LI8'£6£ 00'000'000'96E I6I' Va. ELZ' 68'£IS'II- 001100'L96'64 0004£6'66 68'£I5'8L6'64 00'000'000'05 OEI OEISIOZ/80/0I d210J N021A3HJ I500ILL99I 80Z' 80Z' 09'916'6 09'99I'6L6'64 £E£856'66 00'05Z'696'64 00'000'000'05 081' 08L' SIOZ/4I/60 d2I0J 2T010IN VIOAOI 03MHEEZ68 S80' 580' 6£'S5S'S OS.916766'61' ££SS86'66 II'I9£'L86'64 00'000'000'05 OOI OOL' SIOZ/I£/LO IIIVIN-1VM OX1134IT£6 KV 4£T' 06'661'S 06'66I'E66'6Z £E£LL6'66 00'000'886'6Z 00'000'000'0E OZI OW SIOZ/8I/80 31IS3N 8fAHSOT49 ZII' M. 6917LL'9 6I7ZS1766'8Z 111186'66 OS'LVL'L86'8Z 00'000'000'6Z OW 0£I' SIOZ/OI/80 OD V-10J-VJOJ 4VMHZL6L STI 51.T' I9'0£4'4I OS'61£'066'64 6E9086'66 68'888'SL6'64 00'000'000'05 OK' OK' SIOZ/II/80 OD VIOJ-VJOJ Z9A9TZT6T LOT' TOT' 00'006'6 00'00066'6Z 000E86'66 00'000'S86'6Z 00'000'000'0E OSI' OSI' STOZ/90/80 d2TOJ 2T0101AI VIOAOI 89AHEEZ68 £60' 660' LL'IM'II 0I'SZ£'966'6Z LI4486'66 £E££I'486'6Z 00'000'000'0£ 091' 09I STOZ/£0/80 &TOJ 1V-LIdVJ a0 4£Af6S69E 090' 090' 49'604'11 5COZS'L6617 £80066'66 li'Ili'98617 00'000'000'SZ 09.1 09.1 STOZ/ZZ/LO &TOJ 1V-LIdVJ a0 INRf6S69E 8E0' 8£0' 09'90£'IZ 09'0£6'966'64 198E66'66 00'SZ9'9L6'64 00'000'000'05 OSI' OST' STOZ/4I/L0 d2TOJ 2T0101AI VIOAOI Z3HH££Z68 113dVd ININOJ Puna le/° OWS68'9£S'E£ 99I1E6'66 SZ5I6'ZSS'E£ 00'000'099'SE 06Z' 68Z' 08'I51 08151'069 OOOZZO OOI 00000'069 00000'069 OS£' OSE' SIOZ/4I/0L 3QIS2I3AI2I 30 KLNROJ LOVV1169L 880' 880' 06791'9 SI'£80'4££'8 000686'66 57'9T6'LZ£'8 00'000'SE£'8 OEZ' OST' STOZ/T0/80 3IVIS NOIONIHSVM 9d11Q4L6£6 SSZ' 157' 64'£II3,- 66'988'099V 000L96'66 00'000'699'ZT 00'000'6997T OTZ' OTT STOZ/TO/OT 3IVIS SVX3d 9Hd£ZLZ88 LLS' IL8' OL'SZZ'8T- 0£'4LL'ISO'ZT 000699'66 00'000'OLO'ZT 00'000'OLO'ZT 04S' 04S' 9TOZ/SI/SO 3,IVZ5 VNVISIH01 U19I69175 SON08 INI11V Z6.1' 161' SI'989'8Z 08'881'96L'8EI 99LZL6'66 5970S'Oa MI 00'000'6E6'BEI NI' 88Z. L8Z LI6L4"Z 00.000'000'S OOOOOO.00I £8.0ZS"4661, 00.000'000'S OSI' 051' SIOZ/£I/OI SIN30321 Jf1 ZQXfl Il4l6 99Z' 59Z' 00'SL£'4 00'00S'6861Z 000856'66 00'SZI'S861Z 00'000'000'SZ SRI' 081' SLOZ/50/01 Sd.N30321 Jfl E8XRLIbl6 99Z' 59Z' TV95- 08'8£0'0L£'SZ 000S46'66 TZ'S60'OL£'SZ 00'00018£'SZ OLI OLT' STOZ/50/0T SIN3032IJf1 65XRLIT,I6 9T0' 910' L9'999'I 00'006'666'6 000666'66 E£'£E£'866'6 00'000'000'0T OSI' OST' STOZ/90/LO SIN30321 Jfl 0911RTI416 440' 440' 0917TL'4 00'000'05177Z 000000'00T 09'98Z'SWZZ 00'000'05,7Z OZI OZT' STOZ/9I/L0 SIN30321 Jfl 8ORRTI416 LZZ' LZZ' 44'69 00'05L'98617 000L/'6'66 99'089'9861Z 00'000'000'SZ OTT Of't STOZ/TZ/60 SIN30321 Jfl EYVMRLIT,I6 Z61 T6T' 8CLES7I 00'000'000'9Z 000000'00T ZZ794'L86'SZ 00'000'000'9Z OTT Of't STOZ/80/60 SSN30321 JR h8MRTI4T6 SMID 02I3Z INI1161 840'£ 8167 IL8'4 4991, Ii8'4 L09'4 6SL'4 9IS4 859' TS9' 106' L68' £09'4 58E7, £09'4 40417, £09'4 16E17, 98S'4 LLE'4 £7S'4 89Z'4 S841' 06Z17 9817 Ibl'Z £LS' L95' I8S' SLS' SOO' SOO' 805' 8£9' 9£9" I8£' 08£" 00'990'161- 00'116'999'80Z 989668'66 00'000'LE8'80Z 00'000'088'80Z 6911 7 00.0S4'SI- 00.0SS1,8611 000468.66 00.000"000"SI 00.000'000"SI 0051 OOSL OZOZ/ZI/SO 9°YX9aNPAS VJWVd ZSVOXZEIE 00'05016- 00.056'S06'4L 000£L£•66 00'000'000'SL 00.000'000'ST OOS'I 005'I. OZOZ/OZ/40 9°4NC .NPAS VJWVd 6VVOXZEIE 00'05S'S6- 00'0511061T 000£9£'66 00'000'000'ST 00'000'000'ST 008'I 008'T OZOZ/T0/40 991V9aNIAS VJWVd 4d£dSIEIE 00'00n- 00'008'966'6T 0001'86'66 00'000'000'0Z 00'000'000'0Z OSE' OSE' 9TOZ/5Z/Z0 .IXI VJINV3 061d5IEIE 00'00I'IL 00'00L'110'ST 0004L0'00I 00'000'000'ST 00'000'000'ST 00V 00V 9TOZ/17/S0 .IXI VJIIV3 EEI<ISIEIE 00'05019- 00'056'SE6'4T 000£LS'66 00'000'000'ST 00'000'000'ST 009'I 009'T OZOZ/40/Z0 991AIE NiAS VJWV3 453dSIETE 00'00Z'£T- 00'008'986'6 000898'66 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T OSVI OST71 OZOZ/40/Z0 991AIE NiAS VJWV3 I.LQdSIEIE 00'00S'4E- 00'00S'S96'6 000S59'66 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T OSS'I OSSI OZOZ/40/Z0 9°1V£aN.XS VJWV3 LILJSIEIE 00'0061Z- 00'001'8L6'6 00018C66 00.000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 009'I 009'1 OZOZ/6Z/LO 991V9aN.IAS VJWV3 E3LdSIEIE 00'000'E 00'000'£00'ST OOOOZO'OOL 00'000'000'ST 00'000'000'ST OSL'I OSL'I OZOZ/90/10 991V9a1\PAS VJWV3 ZAMSIETE 00'004'44 00'004'”O'ST 00096Z'001 00'000'000'ST 00'000'000'ST OSL'I OSL'T 6TOZ/EZ/ZT 991V9aNaAS VJWV3 84Ad51E1E 00'49L'85 00'49L'806'8 0001799'001 00'000'058'8 00'000'058'8 OZI'I OZVI LTOZ/50/60 aA£VJWV3 1/NZ<ISIEIE 00'05L'8I 00'05L'9T0'57 000L90'001. 00'000'866'4Z 00'000'000'SZ OLE' 59E' 9TOZ/5Z/10 iAS'L VJWV3 SLIdSIEIE 00'00L'£ 00'00L'£00'S 0004L0'00I 00'000'000'S 00'000'000'S 5V SZ4' 9TOZ/8Z/10 Ii£VJWV3 6CWSIEIE 00.001.1I 00'00I'000'U 000I00'00T 00'000'686'6 00'000'000'0T L8S' 055' STOZ/ZO/LO iA£ VJVQV3 8>10‘15IEIE JVIV IIaPRIV3 681.11W 00'0SZ'S96'6b 111F0E6'66 II'98V8L8'6b 00'000'000'08 8SC 68'8£9'9S 00'0SL'SL6'4Z 000E06'66 II'III'6161Z 00.000'000'SZ TU. OZ£' 910Z/81/Z0 310N JSIR VJWV3 GAINSIEK 00.SZI'0£ 00.00S'6861Z 0008S6.66 00.SLV6S6'4Z 00.000'000'SZ S6V S6L' SLOZ/91/IL 310N JSIH VJWVI LHdASI£I£ Sa.ION JSIO JVLV3 ^' W98819 8E17Z0'IS9'089 941S00'001 96'LE9'685'089 00'000'9L9'089 SL6' 696' 00'068'I- 00'068100'Z OOOLZO'OOI 00'08L'£00'L 00'000'000'L 96£' 057' 910Z/0Z/90 xiI 9J33 LSNQ3£EIE L06' E06' 00'00S'OT- 00'00S'686'41 0000E6'66 048'T 00'00L'IT- 00'00£'6L6'M 000Z98'66 .186' 00'05Z'ZI 00'05L'L00'SZ 000IE0'00T T86' 00'0Z£'L 00'0ZL'£007T 000IE0'00T 46CI 00'0001Z- 00'000'6L6'6 00006C66 T86' 00'005'IT 00'OSL'L00'S7 000IE0'00T SOZ'T 00'006'6- 00'001'066'6 000106'66 848' 00'0SL'S- 00'000'000'57 000000'00T 848' 00'0SL'£- 00'000'000'57 000000'00T 886' 00'OSZ'5£ 00'OSZ'5£0'57 000IV100I 9L9' 00'0SO'L- 00'0S6766'1I 000£S6'66 459' 00'008'T 00'00E000'0T 000100'00T 459' 00'009 00'009'000'5I 000100'00T 6Z9' 00'0S9'T- 00'0S8'6601 000666'66 Z847 00'0 00'0SZ'8861' 00059C66 848' 00'0 00'000'000'57 000000'00T L98' 89'899'8- 8Z'6£T'56Z7I 000E66'66 L98' 00'00L 00'00L'000'0I 000L00'00I L8S' SL'£8I- 0578S184Z'S 000E6'66 LOW 00:009'E- 00'004'966% 0001796'66 848' 00'0 00'000'001AZ 000000'00i LSS' 00'00S'6- 00'00S'0661Z 000Z96'66 09S' 097E7 097IL7LO'SI 0008I0'00I OTT 001/SL 00'OSL'000'SZ 000£00'00I 6LS' 00'0571- 00'0SL'566'17 000E86'66 858'I 986' 986' ITS'I 986' 9IZ'I ZS8' ZS8' 566' 6L9' 099' 099' 9E9' ZE5Z ZS8' ILS' LLS' S6S' 4I9' ZS8' Z9S' 1795" SIS" 178S 00'000'000'ST 00'000'000'ST 00£' 00E' 9TOZ/9Z/S0 CAI 9J33 00'000'166'1'T 00'000'000'ST 089' 059' LTOZ/80/S0 .IAZ 9J33 00'00S'S66'4Z 00'000'000'SZ 99£' OSE' 9TOZ/17/90 S3ION 9J31 00'001'966'1T 00'000'0007T 9L£' OSE' 9TOZ/17/90 .IASZ'I 9J31 00'000'000'0T 00.000'000'0T 009' 009' LTOZ/TZ/40 .IAZ 9J31 00'0SZ'966'1Z 00'000'000'SZ £9£' OSE' 9TOZ/17/90 S3ION 9J31 00'000'000'0T 00'000'000'0T OSV OW 910Z/91/60 A57'T 9J31 00'0SL'500'57 00'000'000'57 6Z£' 05£' 910Z/90/50 A57'I 9J33 00'0SL'£00'57 00'000'000'57 9E£' 05£' 910Z/90/50 A57'T 9J33 00'000'000'5Z 00'000'000'5Z 005' 00S' 910Z/LZ/90 A57'1 flJ33 00'000'000'5I 00'000'000'5T 08Z' 08Z' 9I0Z/40/£0 .AI 51J33 00'009'866'6 00'000'000'0T 46Z' 08Z' 9I0Z/9Z/Z0 .AI 51J33 00'000'000'5T 00'000'000'5I OSZ' 08Z' 9I0Z/9Z/Z0 .I IflJ33 00'005100'5T 00'000'000'5I OTC OZ£' 9I0Z/LT/Z0 .I I 51J33 00'057'886'6 00'000'000'5 LS6' SL8' 8I0Z/60/TO .IA£flJ33 00'000'000'57 00'000'000'57 OSE' 05£' 910Z/90/50 A57'1 flJ33 96'L08'EOE'ZI 00'000'96Z7I OSE' 004' 9I0Z/£T/50 .V:i flJ33 00'000'000'0f 00'000'000'0f SL£' SL£' 9I0Z/£I/S0 DI-R,NPA£flJdd SZ'99L'84Z'S 00'000'OSZ'S 4LZ' OSZ' 9I0Z/ZO/Z0 .‘,LI Enid 00'000'000'0f 00'000'000'0f OSZ' OSZ' 9I0Z/60/Z0 ..,LI 00d3 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ OS£' OS£' 9I0Z/90/S0 iASZ'I flid 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ ObZ' OK' 9IOZ/IZ/I0 aAl Enid 00'000'OLO'SI 00'000'OLO'SI 0£Z' 0£Z' 9I0Z/ZZ/I0 CAI flJ13 00'000'000'SZ 00'000'000'SZ OZZ' Mt 9I0Z/40/I0 aAl 0013 00'000'000'SZ 00.000'000'9Z OCT OCT 9I0Z/6Z/TO ,ASZ'I flJ3d 68Na3££IE £4IH3££i£ 04J3a£EI£ 04J3a£EI£ 421Z33£EI£ 04J3a£EI£ 69Z3a£EI£ 9SW33£EI£ 9SW33£EI£ £9A3a£EI£ O(Saa£EI£ 892I33£EI£ 892I33££I£ I3.d33££I£ 93N33£EI£ 9SW33£EI£ 42ISQa££I£ 66dJa££T£ Z04Vaa£ET£ DiNaa££T£ 9S4Vaa££T£ ERxaa£ET£ LVZQa£ET£ OJaaa££IE £XZQ3££I£ dlpn/eyV uopemQ sso-1/ule0 a81eA oI smai P81.1P°IV pazReamfl 48,1.1AI anleA "FA 64pu/ew uodnop apa uopdpasaQ dISRJ I.i WI% 300g ,ed °I PPIi .Ulm/eyV .sunnoil 0II03p0d }ma wow Full Compliance The Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund was in FULL COMPLIANCE with the Treasurer's Statement of Investment Policy. The County's Investment Policy is more restrictive than the Califor- nia Government Code. This policy is reviewed annually by the County's Investment Oversight Committee and approved by the County Board of Supervisors. MUNICIPAL BONDS (MUNI) U.S. TREASURIES LOCAL AGENCY OBLIGATIONS (LAO) FEDERAL AGENCIES COMMERCIAL PAPER (CP) CERTIFICATE & TIME DEPOSITS (NCD & TCD) REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS (REPO) REVERSE REPOS MEDIUM TERM NOTES (MTNO) CALTRUST SHORT TERM FUND MONEY MARKET MUTUAL FUNDS (MMF) LOCAL AGENCY INVESTMENT FUND (LAIF) CASH/DEPOSIT ACCOUNT 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 5 YEARS NO LIMIT AAA 270 DAYS 40% A1/P1 5 YEARS 30% NA 1 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 92 DAYS 20% NA 5 YEARS 30 % A NA NA NA 60 DAYS (1) 20% AAA/Aaa (2) NA NA NA NA NA NA 3 YEARS 15% AA-/Aa3/AA- 5 YEARS 100% NA 3 YEARS 2.5% INVESTMENT GRADE 5 YEARS 100% NA 270 DAYS 40% A1/P1/F1 1 YEAR 25% Combined A1/P1/F1 45 DAYS 40% max, 25% in term repo over 7 days A1/P1/F1 60 DAYS 10% NA 3 YEARS 20% AA/Aa2/AA DAILY LIQUIDITY 1.0% NA DAILY LIQUIDITY 20% AAA by 2 Of 3 RATINGS AGC. DAILY LIQUIDITY Max $50 million NA NA NA NA I Mutual Funds maturity may be interpreted as weighted average maturity not exceeding 60 days. 2 Or must have an investment advisor with not less than 5 years experience and with assets under management of $500,000,000. THIS COMPLETES THE REPORT REQUIREMENTS OF CALIFORNIA GOVERNMENT CODE 53646 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER -TAX COLLECT0k04 13 AGENDA ITEM 8D RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Marla Dye, Procurement Analyst Matt Wallace, Procurement Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Single Signature Authority Report BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the fourth quarter ended June 30, 2015. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Certain contracts are executed under single signature authority as permitted in the Commission's Procurement Policy Manual adopted in December 2012. The Executive Director is authorized to sign service contracts that are less than $100,000 individually and in an aggregate amount not to exceed $1 million in any given fiscal year. Additionally, in accordance with Public Utilities Code Section 130323(c), the Executive Director is authorized to sign contracts for supplies, equipment, materials, and construction of all facilities and works under $50,000 individually. The attached report details all contracts executed for the fourth quarter ended June 30, 2015, under the single signature authority granted to the Executive Director. The unused capacity of single signature authority for services at June 30, 2015 is $329,205. Attachment: Single Signature Authority Report as of June 30, 2015. Agenda item 8D 105 CONSULTANT AMOUNT AVAILABLE July 1, 2014 All Security Services HDR, Inc. All Security Services Mathis Consulting Group Security Guard Services for Commission Owned Property on the SR- 91 CIP Railroad Coordination Services on SR-91 HOV Project Security Guard Services for Commission Owned Property on the SR- 91 CIP Management Consulting Services California Highway Patrol SAFE Call Box Coordinator Koff & Associates Compensation, Classification & Benefits Study Security Guard Services for Commission Owned Property on the SR- 91 All Security Services CIP Katherine Padilla & Associates Facilitating an Interactive Session for the Commission Workshop Engineering Resources US Bank Custodian Services for the Commission Funds A&E Sheep Co., Inc Release and Settlement Agreement for the PVL Inland Empire Resource Conservation Deposit Agreement for the SR-91 CIP Downtown Riverside Station TVM Relocation Plans and Sepecifications Update SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY AS OF June 30, 2015 DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES ORIGINAL CONTRACT PAID AMOUNT REMAINING AMOUNT CONTRACT AMOUNT $1,000,000.00 60,000.00 59,340.00 660.00 0,00 0,00 0,00 35,000.00 2,855.60 32,144.40 20,000.00 19,380.00 620.00 100,000.00 51,589.66 48,410.34 7,800.00 2,871.62 4,928.38 65,000.00 26,992.26 38,007.74 70,000.00 69,375.00 625.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 0.00 77,325.00 0.00 77,325.00 35,000.00 0.00 35,000.00 10,170.00 0.00 10,170.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 0.00 Beacon Economics, LLC Benefit Analysis for the 1-15 Express Lanes Project 86,000.00 54,000.00 32,000.00 Jeffery Rome Associates Update Construction Drawings, Permits and RFIs at the Riverside Downtown Metrolink Station 4,500.00 0.00 4,500.00 Alvarado Smith Legal Representation 75,000.00 45,344.96 29,655.04 Lucky's Two -Way Radios, Inc. FSP Digital Radio Frequencies Services 10,000.00 1,928.00 8,072.00 AMOUNT USED 670,795.00 AMOUNT USED 670,795.00 AMOUNT REMAINING through June 30, 2015 $329,205.00 None Agreements that fall under Public Utilities Code 130323 (C) NIA $ $ $ Marla Dye Prepared by Theresia Trevino Reviewed by Note: Shaded area represents new contracts listed in the forth quarter. 106 AGENDA ITEM 8E RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Audit Ad Hoc Committee Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2013/14 Transportation Development Act and Measure A Audit Results AUDIT AD HOC COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Transportation Development Act (TDA) and Measure A audit results report for Fiscal Year 2013/14. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In May 2011, Thompson, Cobb, Bazilio & Associates, P.C. (TCBA) and Macias Gini O'Connell LLP (MGO) were selected to perform the financial and compliance audits and agreed -upon procedures (audits) of Riverside County's TDA claimants and Measure A recipients, respectively, except for the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), and the city of Beaumont (Beaumont). The RTA, SunLine, and Beaumont audits were completed by their respective auditors. The FY 2013/14 audits represent the fourth year TCBA and MGO performed these audits for the Commission. The firms and the other agencies' auditors completed the audits of and issued the audit reports. The following is a summary of the 61 audits performed: Funding Type Type of Procedure TCBA (Western County) MGO (Eastern Other County & Auditors Riv. Co.) Total TDA Article 3 (bicycle and pedestrian projects) TDA Article 4 (transit) TDA Article 8 (local streets and roads) Measure A specialized transit Measure A local streets and roads Financial and compliance audit Financial and compliance audit Financial and compliance audit Agreed -upon procedures Agreed -upon procedures 10 4 0 14 3 1 3 7 0 1 0 1 11 17 0 11 0 11 0 28 Based on a review of the reports, the following are highlights of the results of these audits. Staff will follow up on matters noted as necessary. Agenda Item 8E 107 TDA Article 3 (Bicycle and Pedestrian Projects) • Six jurisdictions — the cities of Cathedral City, Corona, Indio, Lake Elsinore, Riverside, and the County of Riverside — have fund balances aggregating $47,575 that have not been expended. Since funding is based on approved projects, remaining funds should have been expended by June 30, 2014, or for completed projects, returned to the Commission. A significant portion of this amount appears to be related to transfers from other funds to provide matching funds and to accumulated interest; however, staff will review any amounts that should be returned to the Commission or work with the respective jurisdictions to ensure such funds are expended on eligible projects or returned to the originating fund(s). • One jurisdiction, the city of Desert Hot Springs, has a liability to the Commission for the return of $3,091 in excess funds that were used during FY 2012/13 for projects that were not approved by the specific project grant allocation. Staff will arrange for the collection of these funds. TDA Article 4 (Transit) • All transit operators met the fare ratio requirement. • One transit operator, SunLine restated its beginning net position as a result of prior period adjustments aggregating $225,850 which are related to revenue recognition, overstatement of its net pension obligation, and understatement of its blended component unit, SunLine Services Group. • The report on internal control and compliance based on an audit of the financial statements for SunLine included a significant deficiency related to inventory of capital assets and material weaknesses related to lack of comprehensive accounting manual, exclusion of blended component unit, financial accounting and reporting on pensions, payroll, and overall internal control over financial reporting. Management responded that it has taken or will take actions during FY 2014/15 to ensure proper internal control practices and procedures are in place. • The report on compliance and internal control related to federal awards for SunLine included two significant deficiencies, which were also determined to instances of noncompliance related to direct labor allocations for program activities and inventory of capital assets. Management responded it has taken actions during FY 2014/15 to ensure that proper practices and procedures are in place to be in compliance in future periods. Measure A Specialized Transit • Two agencies — Care -A -Van and Riverside County Regional Medical Center — receiving Measure A and federal funds did not have certain written policies required by the federal funds; however, no instances of noncompliance were noted. • Three agencies — Care -A -Van, Friends of Moreno Valley, and Independent Living Partnership — had potential excess funds approximating $32,007 as of June 30, 2014, that the Commission may request be returned or may approve to be carried over if requested by the agencies. This reflects an increase from the FY 2012/13 results. Agenda Item 8E 108 Measure A Local Streets and Roads • Two jurisdictions — the cities of Murrieta and Perris — met their maintenance of effort (MOE) requirements using the prior year carryover, as permitted under the MOE Guidelines. • Eight jurisdictions — the cities of Corona, Eastvale, Murrieta, Norco, San Jacinto, Palm Desert, Palm Springs, and Rancho Mirage — have fund balances in excess of three years of revenues. The Commission policy suggests such amounts should not exceed three years. • Two jurisdictions — the cities of Calimesa and the County of Riverside — recorded overhead costs in excess of 8 percent of revenues. The Commission's policy states overhead should not exceed 8 percent of revenues. • Three jurisdictions — the cities of La Quinta, Menifee, and San Jacinto — expended Measure A funds on project or indirect costs that were not included on the approved five-year capital improvement plans (CIPs). The jurisdictions may be required to amend their CIPs. Attached is the summary of transportation and transit fund operations and related audit results for the various types of TDA (Articles 3, 4, and 8) and Measure A (specialized transit and local streets and roads) funding. Each schedule provides information for each claimant and recipient regarding the revenues, expenditures/expenses, and change in fund balance/net assets for the year ended June 30, 2014, and other financial and compliance information. Attachments: 1) FY 2013/14 Transportation Development Act Article 3 Schedule 2) FY 2013/14 Transportation Development Act Article 4 Schedule 3) FY 2013/14 Transportation Development Act Article 8 Schedule 4) FY 2013/14 Measure A Specialized Transit Schedule 5) FY 2013/14 Measure A Local Streets and Roads Schedule Agenda Item 8E 109 ATTACHMENT 1 Transportation Development Act Article 3 Schedule Year Ended June 30, 2014 Desert Cathedral Hot Lake Moreno San County of Banning City Corona Springs Eastvale Hemet Indio Elsinore Valley Perris Riverside Jacinto Wildomar Riverside Revenues: Intergovernmental allocations: Article 3 $ 26 $ - $ - $ - $ 47,014 $ - $ 84,000 $ 87,908 $216,284 $48,931 $ - $ - $201,230 $ Other - - - - - - - - Interest income - 2 - - 178 178 - 778 - 227 Total revenues 26 2 - 47,014 - 84,178 88,086 216,284 48,931 778 - 201,230 227 Total expenditures 222,059 - - 47,014 46,536 168,000 105,810 216,284 48,931 - 30,000 201,230 Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures (222,033) 2 (46,536) (83,822) (17,724) - 778 (30,000) - 227 Transfers in (out) 66,639 - - - 84,000 - - - Excess (deficiency) of revenues and transfers in over (under) expenditures (155,394) 2 - - (46,536) 178 (17,724) - 778 (30,000) 227 Prior period adjustment - - - - - - - - Fund balances at beginning of year 13,259 49 166 (3,091) - - - 22,737 - - 1,403 - (62,305) 39,759 Fund balances at end of year $(142,135) $ 49 $ 168 $ (3,091) $ - $ (46,536) $ 178 $ 5,013 $ - $ - $ 2,181 $(30,000) $ (62,305) $ 39,986 Deferred revenues at end of year $ - $ $ - $ $ $ $ - $ - $ 62,305 $ Due to RCTC $ - $ $ 3,091 $ $ $ $ - $ - $ - $ Source: 2014 Financial Statements Section 99234 6/14/2015 110 ATTACHMENT 2 Transportation Development Act Article 4 Schedule Year Ended June 30, 2014 Banning Beaumont Corona Riverside PVVTA SunLine RTA Total operating revenues $ 163,258 $ 217,529 $ 406,202 $ 382,963 $ 102,458 $ 5,552,730 $ 10,872,928 Operating expenses: Depreciation and amortization 271,342 396,358 312,507 828,651 215,586 5,746,876 9,186,073 Other operating expenses 1,441,840 1,862,023 2,042,898 3,219,899 893,448 26,035,864 56,029,735 Total operating expenses 1,713,182 2,258,381 2,355,405 4,048,550 1,109,034 31,782,740 65,215,808 Operating loss (1,549,924) (2,040,852) (1,949,203) (3,665,587) (1,006,576) (26,230,010) (54,342,880) Nonoperating revenues (expenses): Grants: Local Transportation Funds 1,142,339 1,636,434 1,632,263 2,709,330 852,920 11,922,846 28,719,227 State Transit Assistance 119,476 206,426 12,217 986,216 69,898 1,293,507 13,151,757 Federal - - 14,650 8,610,768 22,428,666 Measure A specialized transit - - 5,217,000 2,741,111 Proposition 1B 78,184 1,227,510 399,601 7,334,170 31,878,273 Other 319,640 850,598 1,264,474 Interest income 821 307 16,578 5,070 26 1,724 40,019 Interest expense (13,371) - (20,029) Transfers in (out) Gain (loss) on sale of property - - 60,077 1,059 Other 2,323 27,753 10,503 1,192,578 Total nonoperating revenue (expense) 1,264,959 1,949,104 2,888,568 3,697,748 1,656,735 35,290,690 101,397,135 Net increase (decrease) (284,965) (91,748) 939,365 32,161 650,159 9,060,680 47,054,255 Prior period adjustment - - 225,850 Net assets at beginning of year 708,596 1,196,154 2,377,609 2,503,626 1,514,590 42,848,776 34,046,656 Net assets at end of year $ 423,631 $ 1,104,406 $ 3,316,974 $ 2,535,787 $ 2,164,749 $ 52,135,306 $ 81,100,911 Deferred revenue at end of year: Operating $ 2,944 $ 132,436 $ 54,654 $ - $ 24,919 $ 68,734 $ 5,488,945 Capital 306,465 460,700 - 2,082,337 27,290 8,767,077 9,960,805 Total deferred revenue at end of year $ 309,409 $ 593,136 $ 54,654 $ 2,082,337 $ 52,209 $ 8,835,811 $ 15,449,750 Required fare ratio Actual fare ratio 10.00% 10.00% 20.00% 10.00% 10.00% 17.94% 17.55% 11.32% 11.40% 20.06% 11.14% 13.68% 19.72% 26.55% Fare ratio compliance status Met Met Met Source: 2014 Financial Statements Note 1 The audits for RTA, SunLine, and Beaumont were completed by other auditors hired by each entity. Met Met Met Met Section 99260 6/14/2015 111 ATTACHMENT 3 Transportation Development Act Article 8 Schedule Year ended June 30, 2014 Revenues: Intergovernmental allocations: Article 8 Other revenues Interest income Total revenues Total expenditures Excess (deficiency) of revenues over Transfers in (out) Excess (deficiency) of revenues over Prior period adjustments Fund balances at beginning of year Fund balances at end of year Source: 2014 Financial Statements (under) expenditures (under) expenditures Blythe $ 100,255 (100,255) 704,823 604,568 (604,568) $ Section 99400 (a) 6/14/2015 112 ATTACHMENT 4 Measure A Specialized Transit Schedule Year Ended June 30, 2014 Boys & Riverside Girls Club County of Friends of Independent Regional United States Blindness Southwest Care Community Moreno Living Inland AIDS City of Medical Vetrans Support County Care -A -Van Connexxus Connect Valley Partnership Project Norco Center Initiative Operating revenues: Measure $ 62,571 $ 210,163 $ 342,057 $ 250,000 $ 175,351 $ 54,936 $ 555,871 $ 77,204 $ 59,971 $ 151,740 $ 43,291 In -kind match 6,000 49,639 6,667 68,322 4,446 818,180 - 30,894 - Cash match: federal JARC/NF - 42,825 - - - - - - 149,589 Cash match: other revenue 26,771 122,550 99,750 140,274 22,011 23,854 10,089 39,772 - 231,619 22,302 Total operating revenues 95,342 332,713 534,271 396,941 265,684 83,236 1,384,140 116,976 90,865 532,948 65,593 Operating expenses -in kind 6,000 49,639 6,667 68,322 4,446 818,180 - 30,894 - - Operating expenses -salaries & benefits 56,900 176,415 301,921 194,623 44,775 205,504 51,282 43,470 421,209 46,090 Operating expenses-nonpersonnel 30,366 156,298 167,796 166,742 132,905 78,790 358,912 65,694 11,701 111,739 20,303 Operating expenses -administrative overhead - 28,909 19,680 - - 4,800 - Capital expenditures 2,076 - - - Total operating expenses/capital expenditures 95,342 332,713 519,356 396,941 265,682 83,236 1,382,596 116,976 90,865 532,948 66,393 Change in net assets 14,915 2 1,544 - - - (800) Prior period adjustment Net assets at beginning of year - 10,875 - 4,673 Net assets at end of year $ - $ - $ 25,790 $ - $ 2 $ 4,673 $ 1,544 $ - $ - $ - $ (800) Match requirement -cash $ 32,486 $ 140,165 $ 189,350 $ 134,941 $ 19,624 $ 30,098 $ 9,300 $ 42,483 $ - $ 237,573 $ 22,309 Match requirement -in kind $ 9,025 $ - $ 52,000 $ 6,667 $ 75,327 $ 4,500 $ 835,000 $ - $ 30,911 $ - $ Actual match -cash $ 26,771 $ 122,550 $ 142,575 $ 140,274 $ 22,011 $ 23,854 $ 10,089 $ 39,772 $ - $ 231,619 $ 22,302 Actual match -in kind $ 6,000 $ - $ 49,639 $ 6,667 $ 68,322 $ 4,446 $ 818,180 $ - $ 30,894 $ - $ Match requirement compliance status Source: 2014 Financial Statements Met based on Met based on Met based on partial Measure partial Measure partial Measure A funding A funding A funding received received received Met Met based on Met based on Met based on Met based on Met based on Met based on Met based on partial Measure partial Measure partial Measure partial Measure partial Measure partial Measure partial Measure A Afunding Afunding Afunding Afunding Afunding Afunding funding received received received received received received received Measure A Specialized Transit 6/16/2015 113 Measure A Local Streets and Roads Schedule Year Ended June 30, 2014 Revenues: Intergovernmental allocations: Measure A Reimbursements Other revenues Interest income Other financing sources -transfers in Other financing sources -Measure A loan proceeds Total revenues Expenditures and other financing uses: Construction and maintenance Engineering and Other Administrative overhead/overhead allocations/indirect costs Capital outlay Debt service: Principal Interest Transfers out Total expenditures and other financing uses Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures and other financing uses Prior period adjustment/rounding Fund balances at beginning of year Fund balances at end of year Fund balance by year received: 2014 2013 2012 2011 & Prior Total fund balances by year received Cash and investments MOE Base Year requirement Amount of Excess MOE at end of year MOE compliance status Source: 2014 Financial Statements ATTACHMENT 5 Western County Canyon Banning Calimesa Lake Jurupa Corona Eastvale Hemet Valley Lake Elsinore Moreno Menifee Valley Murrieta Norco Perris Riverside San Jacinto Temecula Wildomar $ 495,479 $ 139,742 $ 158,056 $ 3,465,341 12,852 1,227,552 66,605 35 1,364 784 160,292 7,694 17,159 $ 1,014,395 $ 1,506,313 $ 1,639,801 $ 1,062,444 $ 1,343,604 $ 3,033,996 $ 1,930,756 $ 559,830 $ 1,264,973 $ 6,193,057 $ 721,358 $ 2,565,082 $ 505,151 2,256,358 - - 275 - 1,090 6,192 24,150 - 5,592 24,380 732 12,377 12,344 158,958 46,628 2,979 15,274 26,355 805,813 161,639 16,976 17,233 520,332 153,958 225,445 4,853,220 1,019,987 1,530,968 1,640,533 1,075,911 1,355,948 5,470,778 2,001,534 562,809 1,291,328 7,160,509 738,334 2,582,315 505,151 28,827 3,056 2,918,920 647,717 2,232,959 459,369 794,907 3,773,772 1,713,205 242,140 - 1,015,342 413,545 14,263 14,124 163,464 - 215 185,179 - - 102,573 66,638 266,080 128,704 4,296 42,951 136,056 3,082,384 102,573 647,717 2,233,174 41,914 100,880 180,318 385,573 4,573 11,653 - 400,000 3,401,255 728,725 886,856 1,295,787 7,366,998 2,446,503 242,140 177,397 9,109,145 177,397 9,109,145 42,580 224,726 3,201,762 40,400 267,306 4,217,104 453,945 254,252 111,007 89,389 1,770,836 917,414 883,251 (592,641) 4,343 1 1,327,110 467,087 92,086 12,445,715 1,697,417 2,205,657 $ 1,581,362 $ 578,094 $ 181,475 $ 14,220,894 $ 2,614,832 $ 3,088,908 189,055 60,161 (1,896,220) (1) 2,452,992 940,218 3,200,181 $ 1,860,350 $ 1,129,273 $ 3,260,342 (444,969) 320,669 1,113,931 (1,948,636) 471,028 (1,634,789) 51,206 58,126 10,735,674 7,959,180 2,696,610 $ 8,897,580 $ 7,514,211 $ 3,017,279 (2) 2 1 1,846,923 19,278,697 2,944,741 6,127,703 1,062,258 $ 2,960,852 $ 17,330,063 $ 3,415,769 $ 4,492,915 $ 1,113,464 $ 520,332 $ 153,958 $ 181,475 $ 4,853,220 $ 1,019,987 $ 1,530,968 $ 1,640,533 $ 1,075,911 $ 1,355,948 $ 5,470,778 534,222 380,009 - 3,860,151 897,365 1,455,671 219,817 53,362 1,288,687 3,426,802 526,808 44,127 - 4,903,356 676,827 102,269 - 615,707 - - 604,167 20,653 - - - - $ 1,581,362 $ 578,094 $ 181,475 $ 14,220,894 $ 2,614,832 $ 3,088,908 $ 1,860,350 $ 1,129,273 $ 3,260,342 $ 8,897,580 $ 1,508,273 $ 1,147,392 $ 164,979 $ 12,601,055 $ 2,467,207 $ 3,213,528 $ 1,744,675 $ 988,891 $ 2,705,841 $ 7,364,695 $ 2,001,534 $ 562,809 $ 1,291,328 $ 7,160,509 $ 738,334 $ 2,582,315 $ 505,151 1,890,711 $ 544,006 1,208,986 6,261,027 776,090 1,910,600 509,759 1,794,491 428,667 460,538 3,908,527 937,345 - 98,554 1,827,475 1,481,797 964,000 - - $ 7,514,211 $ 3,017,279 $ 2,960,852 $ 17,330,063 $ 3,415,769 $ 4,492,915 $ 1,113,464 $ 7,383,408 $ 2,923,829 $ 2,778,823 $ 15,891,487 $ 180,820 $ 4,089,015 $ 1,148,239 $ 164,325 $ 2,401 $ 28,873 $ 2,208,200 N/A $ 18,924 N/A $ 149,179 $ 4,149 $ 68,144 $ 7,115,480 N/A $ 17,192 N/A Met Met Met Met N/A Met N/A $ 960,771 $ 214,225 $ 1,459,153 $ 595,702 $ 22,536 $ 1,218,470 $ 12,449,203 $ 156,391 $ 1,431,799 $ $ 3,279,721 $ 680,265 $ 2,481,361 $ 939,550 $ 45,930 $ 399,205 $ 25,254,739 $ 417,059 $ 5,579,876 $ Met Met Met Met with use Met Met with use Met Met Met Met of carryover of carryover 114 Measure A Local Streets and Roads Schedule Year Ended June 30, 2014 Coachella Valley Cathedral City Desert Hot Coachella Springs Indian Wells Indio La Quinta Palm Desert Palm Springs Rancho Mirage Palo Verde Valley Blythe Revenues: Intergovernmental allocations: Measure A $ 1,310,879 $ 572,347 $ 462,570 $ 228,502 $ 1,603,628 $ 632,843 $ 2,542,352 $ 1,915,235 $ 742,140 Reimbursements - 786,328 145,007 Other revenues - - - - 86,809 - 41,642 Interest income 6,902 6,287 44 660 5,300 664 87,345 122,403 67,521 Other financing sources -transfers in 82,982 - Other financing sources -Measure A loan proceeds Total revenues 1,400,763 578,634 462,614 229,162 1,695,737 633,507 3,416,025 2,182,645 851,303 892,300 6,752,065 $ 885,474 6,826 County of Riverside $ 6,722,264 29,801 Expenditures and other financing uses: Construction and maintenance 913,854 157,593 231,000 464,275 7,863,829 802,720 783,730 9,525,125 Engineering and Other 285,146 - Administrative overhead/overhead allocations/indirect costs 104,870 69,263 Capital outlay - - Debt service: 673,382 Principal Interest - - Transfers out - 1,109,235 268,542 - - - - - - 472,344 Total expenditures and other financing uses 1,018,724 1,109,235 426,135 231,000 1,137,657 285,146 7,863,829 802,720 783,730 541,607 9,525,125 Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures and other financing uses 382,039 (530,601) 36,479 (1,838) 558,080 348,361 (4,447,804) 1,379,925 67,573 350,693 (2,773,060) Prior period adjustment/rounding - 17,633 2 1 - - - 167,887 (1) - Fund balances at beginning of year 517,345 1,138,100 58 76,600 1,183,205 117,968 22,986,048 8,530,138 3,215,271 3,318,396 9,042,891 Fund balances at end of year $ 899,384 $ 607,499 $ 54,170 $ 74,764 $ 1,741,286 $ 466,329 $ 18,538,244 $ 9,910,063 $ 3,450,731 $ 3,669,088 $ 6,269,831 Fund balance by year received: 2014 $ 899,384 $ 578,634 $ 54,170 $ 74,764 $ 1,695,737 $ 466,329 $ 3,416,025 $ 2,182,645 $ 851,303 $ 892,300 $ 6,269,831 2013 28,865 45,549 2,600,270 2,760,400 919,030 1,184,307 2012 - - 3,146,265 4,490,271 826,064 1,592,481 2011 & Prior - - - - 9,375,684 476,747 854,334 - Total fund balances by year received $ 899,384 $ 607,499 $ 54,170 $ 74,764 $ 1,741,286 $ 466,329 $ 18,538,244 $ 9,910,063 $ 3,450,731 $ 3,669,088 $ 6,269,831 Cash and investments $ 762,302 $ 472,158 $ $ 36,892 $ 1,497,821 $ 349,763 $ 19,278,099 $ 10,222,469 $ 3,263,069 $ 3,556,830 $ 6,266,375 MOE Base Year requirement $ 391,688 $ 92,205 $ 75,147 $ 963,640 $ 2,048,564 $ 937,007 $ 2,398,146 $ 1,498,732 $ 674,811 $ 520,192 $ Amount of Excess MOE at end of year $ 701,002 $ 1,511,458 $ 999,809 $ 11,607,778 $ 5,173,372 $ 420,613 $ 5,638,916 $ 6,234,876 $ 3,023,252 $ 348,677 $ MOE compliance status Met Met Met Met Met Met Met Met Met Met Met Source: 2014 Financial Statements 115 AGENDA ITEM 8F RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Audit Ad Hoc Committee LoreIle Moe -Luna, Senior Staff Analyst Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Federal Transit Administration Triennial Review Results AUDIT AD HOC COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file a report on the 2015 Triennial Review of the Commission performed by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Pursuant to Chapter 53 of Title 49, United States Code Section 5307, the FTA is required to conduct a review at least every three years for recipients of Urbanized Area Formula Grant funds. The last review was completed in September 2012. FTA does not consider this an audit, but rather an assessment of an agency's compliance with federal requirements, determined by examining a sample of grant management and program implementation practices. The Triennial Review examined 17 areas, as follows: 1) Financial Management and Capacity 2) Technical Capacity 3) Maintenance 4) Americans with Disabilities Act 5) Title VI 6) Procurement 7) Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) 8) Legal 9) Satisfactory Continuing Control 10) Planning/Program of Projects 11) Public Comment on Fare Increases and Major Service Reductions 12) Half Fare 13) Charter Bus 14) School Bus 15) Security 16) Drug Free Workplace and Drug and Alcohol Program 17) Equal Employment Opportunity Agenda Item 8F 116 The Triennial Review process includes eight basic steps: 1) pre -review assessment; 2) review package; 3) scoping enhanced review module (ERM); 4) site visit; 5) finding summary; 6) draft report; 7) final report; and 8) corrective actions. As part of this year's Triennial Review, FTA incorporated ERMs in the procurement and DBE areas. An ERM is a more comprehensive review of underlying or contributing issues identified during the preassessment stage of the Triennial Review. Triennial reviewers met with staff on -site in April 2015, and determined there were no deficiencies in 13 areas. Findings were identified in the following 4 areas, as summarized below: • Technical Capacity: o Incorrect federal financial reporting of unliquidated obligations. o Inadequate oversight of the Southern California Regional Rail Authority as a subrecipient. • Procurement: o Procurement policies and procedures or certain elements missing or incomplete. o Written standards of conduct for conflict of interest provisions and gift provisions missing or incomplete. o Lacking required price/cost analysis for one construction change order reviewed. o Insufficient documentation, regarding a final determination that additional work performed was within base contract's general scope of work, to support a construction change order reviewed. o Lacking independent cost estimate for a construction contract prior to receipt of bids. o Insufficient solicitation elements related to use of brand names without discussion of salient characteristics for a construction contract. • DBE: o DBE uniform reports not submitted semi-annually. This finding was closed as of May 4, 2015. o Shortfall analysis or corrective action steps inadequate. Closure pending FTA review of submittal. • Satisfactory Continuing Control: o Failure to notify FTA prior to the disposal of the La Sierra commuter rail Station excess property, as this property was originally purchased with federal funds. Each finding has a respective corrective action plan and a completion date, which are detailed in the attached report. Staff is fully committed to continuing to work with FTA to ensure the Commission is in compliance. In the coming months, staff will bring to the Commission for approval revised policies related to some of the findings above. Fiscal Impact There is no fiscal impact for this item. Attachments: FY 2015 FTA Triennial Review Final Report Agenda Item 8F 117 C3 U.S, Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration Ms. Anne Mayer Executive Director Riverside County Transportation Commission P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, California 94502 REGION IX Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, and the territories of Guam, American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands JON 9 2015 201 Mission Street Suite 1605 San Francisco, CA 94105-1839 (415)744-3133 (415) 744-2726 (fax) Re: FY 2015 Final Triennial Review Report The enclosed final report documents the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) Trienunial Review of the Riverside County Transpiration Commission (ROTC) in California. This review is required by Chapter 53 of Title 49, United States Code, Section 5307. Although not an audit, the Triennial Review is the FTA's assessment of the RCTC's compliance with federal requirements, determined by examining a sample of grant management and program implementation practices. As such, the Triennial Review is not intended as, nor does it constitute, a comprehensive and final review of compliance with grant requirements. The Triennial Review focused on the RCTC's compliance in 17 areas. No deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements in 13 areas. Deficiencies were found in four areas: Technical Capacity, Procurement, Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE), and Satisfactory Continuing Control. The RCTC had no repeat deficiencies from the 2012 Triennial Review. As part of this year's Triennial Review of the RCTC, FTA incorporated Enhanced Review Modules (ERMs) in the Procurement and DBE areas. The purpose of an ERM is to conduct a more comprehensive review of underlying or contributing issues identified during the pre - assessment stage of the Triennial Review. Deficiencies resulting from the ERM are presented in the Procurement and DBE sections of the report that follows. Subsequent to the site visit, RCTC provided sufficient documentation to address the corrective action and close the following deficiency in the DBE area: 327 DBE uniform reports not submitted semi-annually RCTC also submitted documentation to address deficiency 563-,shortfall auialysis or corrective action steps inadequate. This submission is being reviewed by FTA; therefore the deficiency remains open pending acceptance. 118 We greatly appreciate your commitment to making public transportation America's mode of choice. Thank you for your personal contribution, cooperation, and assistance during this Triennial Review since we realize that the review involved effort, time and planning. If you need any technical assistance or have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Roxana Hernandez by phone at 415-744-2658 or by email at roxanahernandez@dot.gov. dot.gov. Enclosure Sincerely, Gq- Leslie T. Rogers Regional Administrator 119 FINAL REPORT FY2015 TRIENNIAL REVIEW of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Riverside, California Recipient ID: 5807 Performed for: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION REGION IX Prepared By: Milligan & Company, LLC Scoping Meeting Date: January 13, 2015 Site Visit Dates: April -7, 2015 Final Report Date: June 09, 2015 120 Table of Contents I. Executive Summary 1 II. Review Background and Process 2 1. Background 2 2. Process 2 3. Metrics 2 III. Grantee Description 4 IV. Results of the Review 6 1. Financial Management and Capacity 6 2. Technical Capacity 6 3. Maintenance 7 4. Americans with Disabilities Act 7 5. Title VI 7 6. Procurement 8 Enhanced Review Module Results 8 7. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise 10 Enhanced Review Module Results 11 8. Legal 12 9. Satisfactory Continuing Control 12 10. Planning/Program of Projects 13 11. Public Comment on Fare Increases and Major Service Reductions 13 12. Half Fare 13 13. Charter Bus 13 14. School Bus 13 15. Security 14 16. Drug Free Workplace and Drug and Alcohol Program 14 17. Equal Employment Opportunity 14 V. Summary of Findings 15 VI. Attendees 18 VII. Appendices 19 121 I. Executive Summary This report documents the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) Triennial Review of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC). The review was performed by Milligan and Company, LLC. During the site visit, administrative and statutory requirements were discussed and documents were reviewed. The RCTC's transit facilities were toured to provide an overview of activities related to FTA-funded projects. The Triennial Review focused on the RCTC's compliance in 17 areas. Deficiencies were found in the areas listed below. Review Area Deficiencies Code Description 2. Technical Capacity 122 Incorrect FFR reporting 208 Inadequate oversight of subrecipient 6. Procurement 22 Procurement policies and procedures not evident 91 No written standards of conduct 271 Lacking required cost/price analysis 277 Insufficient documentation to support change orders 340 Lacking independent cost estimate 346 Insufficient solicitation elements 7. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) 327 DBE uniform reports not submitted semi-annually (closed) 563 Shortfall analysis or corrective action steps inadequate 9. Satisfactory Continuing Control 99 Failure to comply with property disposal requirements As part of this year's Triennial Review of the RCTC, FTA incorporated Enhanced Review Modules (ERMs) in the Procurement and DBE areas. The purpose of an ERM is to conduct a more comprehensive review of underlying or contributing issues identified during the pre - assessment stage of the Triennial Review. Deficiencies resulting from the ERMs are presented in the Procurement and DBE sections of this report. Subsequent to the site visit, RCTC provided sufficient documentation to address the corrective action and close the following deficiency in the DBE area: 327 DBE uniform reports not submitted semi-annually RCTC also submitted documentation to address deficiency 563-shortfall analysis or corrective action steps inadequate. This submission is being reviewed by FTA; therefore the deficiency remains open pending acceptance. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 1 1 P a g e 122 II. Review Background and Process 1. Background The United States Code, Chapter 53 of Title 49, requires the FTA of the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) to perform reviews and evaluations of Urbanized Area Formula Grant activities at least once every three years. This requirement is contained in 49 U.S.C. 5307(0(2). This review was performed in accordance with FTA procedures (published in FTA Order 9010.1B, April 5, 1993). At least once every three years, the Secretary shall review and evaluate completely the performance of a grantee in carrying out its program, specifically referring to compliance with statutory and administrative requirements. The Triennial Review includes a review of the grantee's compliance in 17 areas. The basic requirements for each of these areas are summarized in Section IV. This report presents the findings from the Triennial Review of the RCTC. The review concentrated on procedures and practices employed during the past three years; however, coverage was extended to earlier periods as needed to assess the policies in place and the management of grants. The specific documents reviewed are referenced in this report and are available at FTA's regional office or at the grantee's office. 2. Process The Triennial Review process includes a pre -review assessment, a review scoping meeting with the FTA regional office, and an on -site visit to the grantee's location. The review scoping meeting was conducted with the Region IX Office on January 13, 2015. Necessary files retained by the regional office were sent to the reviewer electronically. A grantee information request and review package was sent to the RCTC advising it of the site visit and indicating information that would be needed and issues that would be discussed. The site visit to the RCTC occurred on April - 7, 2015. The onsite portion of the review began with an entrance conference, at which the purpose of the Triennial Review and the review process were discussed. The remaining time was spent discussing administrative and statutory requirements and reviewing documents. A tour of the RCTC's transit facilities was conducted to provide an overview of activities related to FTA- funded projects. The review team visited the Metrolink North Main Corona station to view FTA- funded equipment. A sample of maintenance records for FTA-funded equipment was also examined during the site visit. Upon completion of the review, a summary of preliminary findings was provided to the RCTC at an exit conference. The individuals participating in the review are listed in Section VI of this report. 3. Metrics The metrics used to evaluate whether a grantee is meeting the requirements for each of the areas reviewed are: 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 2 1 P a g e 123 • Not Deficient: An area is considered not deficient if, during the review, no findings were noted with the grantee's implementation of the requirements. • Deficient: An area is considered deficient if any of the requirements within the area reviewed were not met. • Not Applicable: An area can be deemed not applicable if, after an initial assessment, the grantee does not conduct activities for which the requirements of the respective area would be applicable. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 3 1 P a g e 124 III. Grantee Description Organization Formed in 1976, the RCTC is a Joint Powers Agency governed by a 34-member board consisting of one representative from each city in Riverside County, all five County supervisors, and one non -voting state representative. The commission provides short-range transportation planning and programming for Riverside County, which includes administration of the Local Transportation Fund (LTF) and the State Transit Assistance (STA) program. The LTF is derived from a one -quarter cent State sales tax and the STA funds are derived from a statewide sales tax on gasoline and diesel fuel. The RCTC was empowered in 1988, through Measure A, to collect a one-half of one percent sales tax for the purpose of improving the transportation system of the County. Measure A was extended in 2002 for an additional 30 years. In 1990 the California legislature required the RCTC and other transportation commissions of the counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, and San Bernardino to join together and jointly develop a plan for regional transit services within the multi -county region. The effort resulted in the formation in August 1991 of the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA), a Joint Powers Agency (JPA). The SCRRA plans, designs, constructs, and administers the operation of the regional passenger rail lines servicing the counties of Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, and Ventura. The SCRRA operates the regional rail system Metrolink. The RCTC primarily passes local, state, and federal funds directly to SCRRA for operation and capital support of Metrolink. Also, the RCTC has directly participated in the construction management of the La -Sierra rail station and the North Corona rail station and parking structure. In addition, the RCTC is the project lead for the development and construction of the Perris Valley Line (PVL). There is FTA funding in the PVL stations and the North Main Corona parking facility. The RCTC does not directly operate any rail service. There are three commuter rail lines that directly serve western Riverside County including the Inland Empire -Orange County Line, the Riverside Line, and the 91 Line. The rail lines are located in the cities of Riverside, Corona, and the unincorporated areas of the County. The service area population numbers approximate 900,000. There are five transit centers in the RCTC service area: Riverside -Downtown, the Pedley Station, Riverside-LaSierra, North Main Corona, and West Corona. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission Wage 125 Grant Activity Below is a list of the RCTC's open grants at the time of the review. Grant Number Grant Amount Year Executed Description CA-03-0812 $73,039,999 2013 Perris Valley Line Section 5309 Small Starts CA-05-0268 $10,366,791 2012 Commuter Rail Five -Year Rehabilitation, Section 5309 CA-95-X202 $32,091,263 2013 Perris Valley Line Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) Construction Funding Completed Projects There were no FTA-funded projects that were completed in the last three years. Projects Underway The RCTC has one project underway, the Perris Valley Line. This is an FTA Small Starts project that will extend Metrolink service from Riverside to Perris via Moreno Valley, along the Commission -owned San Jacinto Branch Line. This is anticipated to be completed by the end of 2015. Future Projects The RCTC will be coordinating with SCRRA on upcoming projects in the next three to five years. Projects may include but are not limited to: rehabilitation/renovation/improvements of rail tracks, guideways, signals and rail crossings, rehabilitation/renovation/improvements to rail facilities and stations, improvements/upgrades to communication equipment, implementation of positive train control (PTC), and rehabilitation/expansion of rolling stock. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 5 1 P a g e 126 IV. Results of the Review 1. Financial Management and Capacity Basic Requirement: The grantee must demonstrate the ability to match and manage FTA grant funds, cover cost increases and operating deficits, cover maintenance and operational costs for FTA funded facilities and equipment, and conduct and respond to applicable audits. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Financial Management and Capacity. 2. Technical Capacity Basic Requirement: The grantee must be able to implement FTA funded projects in accordance with the grant application, Master Agreement, and all applicable laws and regulations, using sound management practices. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Technical Capacity. Incorrect FFR reporting (122) The RCTC passes through FTA funds to the SCRRA through a memorandum of understanding (MOU) dated October 5, 1991. The funds are used by SCRRA for the rehabilitation of commuter rail assets to keep the infrastructure and equipment in a good state of repair. When the RCTC commits these funds to SCRRA through FTA grant CA-05-0268, RCTC does not report the unliquidated obligation on line "I" of the associated Federal Financial Report (FFR) for the amounts committed. Inadequate oversight of subrecipient (208) As discussed above, RCTC passes FTA funds to SCRRA. The 1991 MOU does not outline oversight responsibilities for those funds by RCTC, nor was RCTC able to demonstrate that it monitors SCRRA to ensure compliance with Federal requirements in areas such as ADA, Maintenance, Procurement, DBE, etc. Corrective Actions and Schedules: • For the deficiency incorrect FFR reporting (122), perform the following: o By June 30, 2015, submit to the FTA regional office procedures for providing all required information in future reports. o By July 30, 2015, submit FFRs that include the missing information in TEAM -Web. • For the deficiency inadequate oversight of subrecipient (208), perform the following by September 9, 2015: o Submit to the FTA regional office procedures for monitoring SCRRA for compliance with FTA requirements. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 6 1 P a g e 127 o Submit to the FTA Region IX Civil Rights Officer an agreement of understanding that delineates the responsibilities of RCTC and SCRRA in accounting for pass - through FTA dollars in the implementation of the DBE program, including goal setting, outreach, monitoring, and reporting. 3. Maintenance Basic Requirement: Grantees and subrecipients must keep federally funded vehicles, equipment and facilities in good operating condition. Grantees and subrecipients must keep ADA accessibility features on all vehicles, equipment and facilities in good operating order. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Maintenance. 4. Americans with Disabilities Act Basic Requirement: Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) provide that no entity shall discriminate against an individual with a disability in connection with the provision of transportation service. The law sets forth specific requirements for vehicle and facility accessibility and the provision of service, including complementary paratransit service. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the USDOT requirements for ADA. 5. Title VI Basic Requirement: The grantee must ensure that no person shall, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participating in, or be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance without regard to whether specific projects or services are federally funded. The grantee must ensure that federally supported transit services and related benefits are distributed in an equitable manner. Note: The 2015 Triennial Review covers a three-year period in which the FTA issued a revised circular for Title VI, which provided more information on how to comply and changed requirements for some grantees with populations over 200,000. FTA Circular 4702.1B became effective October 1, 2012. Title VI programs submitted to FTA after this date must comply with the requirements of this circular. The Triennial Review will look at compliance with the requirement of FTA Circular 4702.1A for the period prior to October 1, 2012, and compliance with the revised circular for activities after this date. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Title VI. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 7 1 P a g e 128 6. Procurement Basic Requirement: Grantees use their own procurement procedures that reflect applicable state and local laws and regulations, provided that the process ensures competitive procurement and the procedures conform to applicable federal law, including 49 CFR Part 18 (specifically Section 18.36) and FTA Circular 4220.1F, "Third Party Contracting Guidance." Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, deficiencies resulting from the ERM conducted were found with the FTA requirements for Procurement. Enhanced Review Module Results FTA conducted a Procurement System Review (PSR) of the RCTC in 2012, issuing a final report. The report contained a number of deficiencies and all deficiencies were closed in mid- 2014. As a follow-up to the PSR, a procurement enhanced review was conducted as a part of this Triennial Review. Procurement policies and procedures not evident (22) As a part of the ERM a detailed review was conducted of RCTC's policies and procedures. Based on this review, the following elements were identified as missing or incomplete: • No justification for contract duration for procurements other than rolling stock. • No prohibition of arbitrary actions. • No inclusion of a statement that procurement method for design -build contracts be based on the preponderance of the work. • No inclusion of veteran's hiring preference for construction contracts. • Sealed bid procedures (see below) • Competitive requests for proposals (RFPs) procedures (see below) • Architecture and engineering (A&E) contracting requirements (see below) • Cost and price analysis required for all procurements (see below) • Independent cost estimate required prior to submission of bids (see below) In addition to the foregoing, the RCTC's procedures for sealed bids, competitive RFPs, A&E procurements, cost and price analysis, and independent cost estimates, were missing elements. • The sealed bid procedure requires public openings for construction only, and includes a minimum ten (10) day lead time for bid openings without specifying the requirement for adequate bid time. This procedure also included three provisions for tie bids, two of which provide for methods of determining the low bidder other than the objective based lottery type methodology. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 8 1 P a g e 129 • In the other procedures: RFPs, A&E procurements, cost/price analysis, and independent cost analysis, there were several examples where key requirements were noted as "should" be required rather than "must" be required. These areas must be updated to ensure that staff understands the absolute nature of all key requirements. After the 2012 PSR, the RCTC implemented a detailed construction management procedure for the Perris Valley line extension contract which includes change order handling. The construction procurement was reviewed, and although it does contain some findings, the procurement shows improvement based upon the implementation of the corrective actions from the PSR. A review of change order documentation revealed specific findings as outlined below (under deficiency codes 271, 277 and 346), even though the overall procedure addresses the items in question. An overview of construction management documentation including progress reports and contract payments was reviewed with the RCTC project manager with no additional deficiencies noted. No written standards of conduct (91) A review of the RCTC's standards of conduct found the following missing or incomplete requirements: • The conflict of interest provisions did not include the required elements for prohibition for the solicitation, award, and administration of FTA funded contracts by those parties that have a financial or other interest in such contract (FTA C. 4220.1F, III, l.a.b.c.). • The gift provisions do not include the required prohibitions for the solicitation of acceptance of gifts or anything of monetary values from the applicable parties from contractors, potential contractors, or parties to sub -agreements (FTA C. 4220.1F, III, l.a.b.c.). Lacking required price/cost analysis (271) A change order reviewed for the construction contract did not include a fully detailed price/cost analysis. The labor, equipment, and apparatus costs were not fully evaluated. Insufficient documentation to support change orders (277) The change order reviewed for the construction contract did not include a final determination that the additional work performed was within the general scope of work of the base contract. Lacking independent cost estimate (340) The construction contract file did not contain an independent cost estimate dated prior to the receipt of bids. Insufficient solicitation elements (346) The construction contract reviewed (the base contract and a change order), included use of brand names without discussion of the salient characteristics. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 9 1 P a g e 130 Corrective Actions and Schedule: • For the deficiency policies and procedures not evident (22), by September 9, 2015 submit to the FTA regional office revised procurement procedures that include all required elements. • For the deficiency no written standards of conduct (91), by September 9, 2015 submit to the FTA regional office revised policies and procedures to include complete standards of conduct. • For the deficiency lacking required cost/price analysis (271), by September 9, 2015 submit to the FTA regional office documentation that the RCTC has updated its procurement procedures to strengthen the language in Appendix B of the construction management procedure to ensure the proper evaluation of all individual costs in change orders. • For the deficiency insufficient documentation to support change orders (277), by September 9, 2015 submit to the FTA regional office revised procurement procedures to ensure that a final determination is made that additional work to be performed under change orders was within the general scope of work of the base contract. • For the deficiency lacking independent cost estimate (340), perform the following: o By September 9, 2015 submit to the FTA regional office documentation that the RCTC has updated its procurement procedures to include development of independent cost estimates prior to receipt of bids or proposals. o In addition, for the next procurement action and by September 9, 2015, submit to the FTA regional office documentation that the required process was implemented. • For the deficiency insufficient solicitation elements (346), by September 9, 2015 submit to the FTA regional office a check list to document the implementation of relevant brand name or equal procurement procedures. 7. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Basic Requirement: The grantee must comply with 49 CFR Part 26 to ensure nondiscrimination in the award and administration of DOT -assisted contracts. Grantees also must create a level playing field on which DBEs can compete fairly for DOT -assisted contracts. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, deficiencies resulting from the ERM conducted were found with the USDOT requirements for DBE. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 10 1 P a g e 131 Enhanced Review Module Results DBE uniform reports not submitted semi-annually (327) The RCTC had not submitted the Uniform Report of DBE Commitments/Awards and Payments for fiscal years 2012 and 2013. In addition, the reports due June 1 and December 1, 2014, were uploaded on November 12, 2014 in TEAM -Web as portable document formats (PDFs) and paper clipped to the RCTC's grantee profile module. For fiscal year 2013, the RCTC had established an overall race neutral project goal of 12.4 percent. In discussions, the RCTC reported awarding one FTA funded procurement with DBE subcontracting opportunities on August 20, 2013 for the Perris Valley Line Construction Project. The contract award totaled $132,202,749 with DBE committed dollars of $9,063,748.01, resulting in a DBE goal attainment of 6.86 percent. As its fiscal year 2013 project goal was 12.4 percent, there was a goal attainment shortfall of 5.54 percent. This contract award should have been reported on the fiscal year 2013 Uniform Report of DBE Commitments/Awards and Payments due December 1, 2013 and not the fiscal year 2014 report. Additionally, the 6.86 percent attainment and the Total Dollars to DBEs were reported in the race conscious column. Prior to the scheduled site visit, RCTC's Procurement Manager/DBE Liaison Officer obtained TEAM -Web access for reporting in the DBE module and was subsequently provided technical assistance on how to correctly input and submit all outstanding semi-annual DBE reports for fiscal years 2012, 2013, and 2014. As a result, the reports for the three fiscal years were submitted and are awaiting FTA approval as of April 7, 2015. Subsequent to the site visit, RCTC submitted documentation to address this deficiency. RCTC submitted in TEAM -Web delinquent DBE Reports for fiscal years 2012, 2013 and 2014, along with procedures to ensure that future reports are submitted. RCTC also notified the FTA Region IX Civil Rights Officer when this was completed. This deficiency is closed. Shortfall analysis or corrective action steps inadequate (563) Beginning with reports due in fiscal year 2011, if awards and commitments shown on a grantee's Uniform Report of Awards or Commitments and Payments for the end of any fiscal year are less than the overall goal applicable to that three-year period, the grantee must analyze in detail the reasons for the difference between the overall goal and the DBE awards and commitments in the last fiscal year and establish specific steps and milestones to correct the problems identified in the analysis to enable the grantee to fully meet the goal for the new fiscal year. As discussed above, the RCTC established its fiscal years 2012, 2013, 2014 overall triennial DBE Goal as a race -neutral goal of 12.4 percent. A single contract was awarded August 20, 2013 in the amount of $132,202,749 for the Perris Valley Line Construction Project (a multi -year contract). The committed DBE dollars for the contract totaled $9,063,748.01, representing a DBE goal attainment of 6.86 percent and a goal shortfall of 5.54 percent. Because it did not complete fiscal years 2012 and 2013 reports, the RCTC was unable to determine whether the goals were attained for those years; consequently, the RCTC could not determine whether a shortfall analysis was required to be completed. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 11 1 P a g e 132 The RCTC uploaded a brief shortfall analysis in TEAM -Web for fiscal year 2014, however, the document is incomplete in that it does not provide a detailed analysis of the reasons for the difference between the overall goal and the DBE awards and commitments nor does it list steps undertaken to correct the shortfall. Prior to the site visit, the RCTC was provided a copy of the FTA's training document on shortfall analysis preparation, and additional guidance in what is required for the analysis. During the site visit the RCTC provided a revised version of their analysis and requested a preliminary review prior to re -submitting to TEAM -Web for FTA review and approval. Subsequent to the site visit, RCTC submitted a revised shortfall analysis with a description of steps taken to implement corrective actions. As of the final report, the analysis is under review, therefore, this deficiency remains open pending acceptance by FTA. 8. Legal Basic Requirement: The grantee must be eligible and authorized under state and local law to request, receive, and dispense FTA funds and to execute and administer FTA funded projects. The authority to take actions and responsibility on behalf of the grantee must be properly delegated and executed. Grantees must comply with Restrictions on Lobbying requirements. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Legal. 9. Satisfactory Continuing Control Basic Requirement: The grantee must ensure that FTA-funded property will remain available to be used for its originally authorized purpose throughout its useful life until disposition. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, a deficiency was found with the FTA requirements for Satisfactory Continuing Control. Failure to comply with property disposal requirements (99) The RCTC sold FTA-funded property at the La Sierra Metrolink Station in fiscal year 2014 without obtaining prior approval from the FTA. Prior to the site visit the RCTC began working with the FTA regional office to take the necessary steps to comply with FTA property disposition requirements. Corrective Action and Schedule: • For the deficiency failure to comply with property disposal requirements (99), by September 9, 2015, submit to the FTA regional office procedures for obtaining FTA approval for the method of disposition of FTA funded real property. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 12 1 P a g e 133 10. Planning/Program of Projects Basic Requirement: The grantee must participate in the transportation planning process in accordance with FTA requirements, MAP-21, and the metropolitan and statewide planning regulations. Each recipient of a Section 5307 grant shall develop, publish, afford an opportunity for a public hearing on, and submit for approval, a program of projects (POP). Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Planning/POP. 11. Public Comment on Fare Increases and Major Service Reductions Basic Requirement: Section 5307 grantees are expected to have a written, locally developed process for soliciting and considering public comment before raising a fare or carrying out a major transportation service reduction. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Public Comment on Fare Increases and Major Service Reductions. 12. Half Fare Basic Requirement: For fixed route service supported with Section 5307 assistance, fares charged elderly persons, persons with disabilities or an individual presenting a Medicare card during off peak hours will not be more than one half the peak hour fares. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Half Fare. 13. Charter Bus Basic Requirement: Grantees are prohibited from using federally funded equipment and facilities to provide charter service if a registered private charter operator expresses interest in providing the service. Grantees are allowed to operate community based charter services excepted under the regulations. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Charter Bus. 14. School Bus Basic Requirement: Grantees are prohibited from providing exclusive school bus service unless the service qualifies and is approved by the FTA Administrator under an allowable exemption. Federally funded equipment or facilities cannot be used to provide exclusive school bus service. School tripper service that operates and looks like all other regular service is allowed. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 13 1 P a g e 134 Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for School Bus. 15. Security Basic Requirement: As recipients of Section 5307 funds, grantees must annually certify that they are spending at least one percent of such funds for transit security projects or that such expenditures for security systems are not necessary. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Security. 16. Drug Free Workplace and Drug and Alcohol Program Basic Requirement: All grantees are required to maintain a drug -free workplace for all transit - related employees and to have an ongoing drug -free awareness program. Grantees receiving Sections 5307, 5309 or 5311 funds that have safety -sensitive employees must have a drug and alcohol testing program in place for such employees. Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Drug -Free Workplace and Drug and Alcohol Program. 17. Equal Employment Opportunity Basic Requirement: The grantee must ensure that no person in the United States shall on the grounds of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, or disability be excluded from participating in, or denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination in employment under any project, program, or activity receiving Federal financial assistance under the Federal transit laws. (Note: EEOC's regulation only identifies/recognizes religion and not creed as one of the protected groups.) Finding: During this Triennial Review of the RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO). 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 14 1 P a g e 135 V. Summary of Findings Review Area Finding Deficiency Corrective Action Response Date Date Closed 1. Financial Management and Capacity ND 2. Technical Capacity D-122 Incorrect FFR reporting Submit to the FTA regional office procedures for providing all required information in future reports. June 30, 2015 Submit FFRs that include the missing information in TEAM- Web. July 30, 2015 D-208 Inadequate oversight of subrecipient Submit to the FTA regional office procedures for monitoring SCRRA for compliance with FTA requirements. September 9, 2015 Submit to the FTA Region IX Civil Rights Officer an agreement of understanding that delineates the responsibilities of RCTC and SCRRA in accounting for pass - through FTA dollars in the implementation of the DBE program, including goal setting, outreach, monitoring and reporting. September 9, 2015 3. Maintenance ND 4. ADA ND 5. Title VI ND 6. Procurement D-22 Procurement policies and procedures not evident Submit to the FTA regional office revised procurement procedures that include all required elements. September 9, 2015 D-91 No written standards of conduct Submit to the FTA regional office revised policies and procedures to include complete standards of conduct. September 9, 2015 D-271 Lacking required cost/price analysis Submit to the FTA regional office documentation that the RCTC has updated its procurement procedures to strengthen the language in Appendix B of the construction management procedure to ensure the proper evaluation of all individual costs in change orders. September 9, 2015 D-277 Insufficient documentation to support change orders Submit to the FTA regional office revised procurement procedures to ensure that a final determination is made that additional work to be performed under change orders was within the general scope of work of the base contract. September 9, 2015 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 15 'Page 136 Review Area Finding Deficiency Corrective Action Response Date Date Closed 1)-340 Lacking independent cost estimate Submit to the FTA regional office documentation that the RCTC has updated its procurement procedures to include development of independent cost estimates prior to receipt of bids or proposals. September 9, 2015 For the next procurement action, submit to the FTA regional office documentation that the required process was implemented. September 9, 2015 D-346 Insufficient solicitation elements Submit to the FTA regional office a check list to document the implementation of relevant brand name or equal procurement procedures. September 9, 2015 7. DBE D-327 DBE uniform reports not submitted semi - annually Submit to the FTA Region IX Civil Rights Officer procedures to ensure that future reports are submitted on time. May 21, 2015 May 4, 2015 Submit in TEAM -Web delinquent DBE Reports for fiscal years 2012, 2013 and 2014 and continue to submit reports semi-annually (June 1 and December 1, 2015 for fiscal year 2015) and notify the FTA Region IX Civil Rights Officer when this has been completed. June 1, 2015 May 4, 2015 D-563 Shortfall analysis or corrective action steps inadequate Submit to the FTA Region IX Civil Rights Officer a revised shortfall analysis with a description of steps taken to implement corrective actions. April 30, 2015 May 26, 2015 submission under review by FTA 8. Legal ND 9. Satisfactory Continuing Control D-99 Failure to comply with property disposal requirements Submit to the FTA regional office procedures for obtaining FTA approval for the method of disposition of FTA funded real property. September 9, 2015 10. Planning/ POP ND 11. Public Comment on Fare Increases and Major Service Reductions ND 12. Half Fare ND 13. Charter Bus ND 14. School Bus ND 15. Security ND 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 16 'Page 137 Review Area Finding I Deficiency Corrective Action Response Date Date Closed 16. Drug -Free Workplace/ Drug and Alcohol Program ND 17. EEO ND 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 17 1 P a g e 138 VI. Attendees Name Title Phone Number E-mail Address Riverside County Transportation Commission Lorelle Moe -Luna Senior Planning Analyst 951-787-7934 LMoe-Luna@rctc.org Marla Dye Procurement Analyst 951.787.7967 mdye@rctc.org Grace Alvarez Programming Manager 951-787-7924 galvarez@rctc.org Eric DeHate Staff Analyst 951-778-1095 edehate@rctc.org Beth Gutierrez HR Administrator 951-787-7966 bgutierrez@rctc.org Dan Mathers Facilities Administrator 951-787-7922 dmathers@rctc.org Anne Mayer Executive Director 951-787-7141 amayer@rctc.org Sheldon Peterson Rail Manager 951 787 7141 speterson@rctc.org Brenda Ramirez Staff Analyst 951-787-7141 bramirez@rctc.org Theresia Trevino Chief Financial Officer 951-787-7926 ttrevino@rctc.org Matt Wallace Procurement Manager 951-787-7908 mwallace@rctc.org Hector Casillas Senior Staff Analyst 951-787-4141 hcasillas@rctc.org FTA Bernardo Bustamante Director of Program Management and Oversight 415-744-3113 Bernardo.bustamante@dot.gov Roxana Hernandez Program Manager 415-744-2658 Roxana.hernandez@dot.gov Milligan & Company, LLC Jim Buckley Reviewer 410-404-7443 jbuckley@milligancpa.com Peter Silow Reviewer 215-496-9100 psilow@milligancpa.com Alan Stapler Procurement Subject Matter Expert 215-496-9100 astapler@milligancpa.com Lillie Claitt DBE Subject Matter Expert 215-496-9100 lclaitt@milligancpa.com 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 18 1 P a g e 139 VII. Appendices No appendices included in this report. 2015 Triennial Review - Riverside County Transportation Commission 19 1 P a g e 140 AGENDA ITEM 8G RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: CaIPERS Delegation of Authority to Request Disbursements BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Designate the Chief Financial Officer, Deputy Executive Director, and Deputy Director of Finance to request disbursements from the CaIPERS pre -funding plan; and 2) Authorize the Chair to execute the Delegation of Authority to Request Disbursements. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In June 2007, the Commission approved a plan to pre -fund the Commission's post retirement health benefits liability; approved a policy to fund 100 percent of the annual required contributions; adopted Resolution No. 07-005, "Agreement and Election of Riverside County Transportation Commission to Pre fund Other Post Employment Benefits through Ca1PERS"; designated the Chief Financial Officer and the Accounting and Human Resources Manager to request disbursements from the CaIPERS pre -funding plan; and authorized the Chair to execute the Delegation of Authority to Request Disbursements on behalf of the Commission. Since the Commission is a member of the Public Employees' Medical and Hospital Care Act (PEMHCA), it is required to periodically update CaIPERS forms. In September 2014, the Commission updated the designations for a position title change and addition of the Deputy Executive Director as a third designee. As a result of a position title change effective in July 2015, CaIPERS requested the Delegation of Authority to Request Disbursements form be updated for the change in position title from Finance Manager/Controller to Deputy Director of Finance. Staff recommends the Chief Financial Officer, Deputy Executive Director, and Deputy Director of Finance be designated to request disbursements from the pre -funding plan and the Chair be authorized to execute the Delegation of Authority to Request Disbursements, which is included as an attachment. This staff report has no financial impact. Attachment: Delegation of Authority to Request Disbursements Agenda Item 8G 141 DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY TO REQUEST DISBURSEMENTS Ca1PERS RESOLUTION OF THE Board of Commissioners (GOVERNING BODY) OF THE Riverside County Transportation Commission (NAME OF EMPLOYER) Board of Commissioners The delegates to the incumbents (GOVERNING BODY) in the positions of Chief Financial Officer (TITLE) Deputy Executive Director (TITLE) Deputy Director of Finance (TITLE) and and/or authority to request on behalf of the Employer disbursements from the Other Post Employment Prefunding Plan and to certify as to the purpose for which the disbursed funds will be used. By Commission Chair Title Witness Date OPEB Delegation of Authority (1l13) 142 AGENDA ITEM 8H RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Matthew Wallace, Procurement Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Revisions to Procurement Policy Manual BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the revised Riverside County Transportation Commission Procurement Policy Manual (PPM) for the procurement and contracting activities undertaken by the Commission, pursuant to legal counsel review as to conformance to state and federal law; and 2) Adopt Resolution No. 15-017, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding the Revised Procurement Policy Manual". BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission's initial PPM was adopted in April 2007, in response to the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA) 2006 Triennial Review. At its July 2012 meeting, the Commission adopted a revised PPM that was comprehensive and incorporated key elements to comply with the FTA, Federal Highway Administration, Caltrans, other state and federal, and Commission regulations. In December 2012 the PPM was revised to include FTA's recommendations resulting from its Procurement System Review of the Commission. Staff updated the PPM as a result of the following: • FTA Triennial Audit completed June 2015; • Office of Management and Budget's issuance of the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards (Uniform Grant Guidance) in December 2013, which became effective on December 26, 2014; and • Other best practices. Agenda Item 8H 143 PPM Revision Highlights The primary revisions to the PPM include the following areas: 1) Chapter 1 Procurement Process 2) Chapter 2 Procurement Generally; 3) Chapter 3 Competitive Sealed Bids; 4) Chapter 4 Design Build Contracts; 5) Chapter 5 Competitively Negotiated Procurements; and 6) Chapter 8 References to Applicable Laws/Regulations. FTA corrective action recommendations to the Commission's PPM involved changing references of "should" to "shall." Other FTA corrective action recommendations regarding supporting documentation for change orders, change order evaluation, and brand name or equal were made to the Commission's Perris Valley Line Construction Management Project Procedures Manual. Revised drafts of the PPM were submitted to FTA for review, and additional comments have been incorporated in the attached draft PPM following legal consultation. The presentation to the Budget and Implementation Committee is attached and provides a summary of the general nature of the revisions. The revised PPM continues to provide the Commission with a comprehensive, formal set of policies and procedures that assists all aspects of the organization with guidance regarding best procurement practices. With the increasing number of projects using federal funding sources, the PPM provides a framework to ensure compliance with federal regulations. Attachments: 1) Procurement Policy Manual (Revision No. 2) 2) Resolution No. 15-017 3) Budget and Implementation Committee PowerPoint Agenda Item 8H 144 ATTACHMENT 1 Riverside County Transportation Commission Procurement Policy Manual (December 12, 2012September 9, 2015) Riverside County Transportation Commission CHAPTER 1- PROCUREMENT PROCESS 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE 1 2.0 PROCUREMENT POLICY STATEMENT 1 3.0 PROCUREMENT STANDARDS 1 4.0 TYPES OF CONTRACTS 6 5.0 OPTIONS 10 6.0 COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS 12 7.0 RECURRING CONTRACTS 13 CHAPTER 2 - PROCUREMENT GENERALLY 15 1.0 IMPLEMENTATION BY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR; COMMISSION CONTROLS AND LIMITATIONS 15 2.0 PROCUREMENT OFFICERDESIGNATION AND DELEGATION 17 3.0 PROCUREMENT OFFICER -DUTIES 17 4.0 IMPLEMENTATION OF PROCUREMENT PROCEDURES AND GUIDELINES 18 5.0 AUTHORIZED METHODS OF PROCUREMENT; SELECTION 18 6.0 INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE 19 7.0 COST/PRICE ANALYSIS 20 8.0 VENDOR CONTACTS PRIOR TO ISSUANCE OF A SOLICITATION 20 9.0 ADVERTISING/PUBLICIZING PROCUREMENTS 21 10.0 NON-DISCRIMINATION IN PROCUREMENT 21 11.0 ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST 21 12.0 DUTIES OF COMMISSION STAFF REGARDING PROCUREMENTS 22 13.0 INSURANCE 24 14.0 SUBCONTRACTING 25 15.0. DETERMINATION OF FAIR AND REASONABLE PRICE 25 16.0 CONTRACT APPROVAL, AWARD, AND EXECUTION 26 17.0 PROTEST PROCEDURES 27 18.0 PUBLIC RECORDS REQUESTS 28 CHAPTER 3 - COMPETITIVE SEALED BIDS ("LOW BID") 29 CHAPTER 4 - DESIGN -BUILD CONTRACTS 32 1.0 PURPOSE 32 2.0 PROCEDURES FOR DESIGN -BUILD CONTRACTS 32 CHAPTER 5 - COMPETITIVELY NEGOTIATED PROCUREMENTS 33 1.0 NEGOTIATED PROCUREMENTS -GENERAL 33 2.0 SOURCE SELECTION TECHNIQUES 33 3.0 PROPOSAL EVALUATION 34 4.0 REJECTION OF PROPOSALS 35 5.0 NEGOTIATION; SELECTION 35 6.0 SPECIAL PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO ARCHITECT -ENGINEER AND RELATED SERVICES 35 Procurement Policy Manual i September 2015 Revision: 2 146 Riverside County Transportation Commission CHAPTER 6 - SIMPLIFIED PURCHASE PROCEDURES 37 1.0 GENERAL 37 2.0 REQUIREMENTS FOR MICROPURCHASES 37 3.0 USE OF SMALL PURCHASE PROCEDURES 37 4.0 PROHIBITED USE OF SMALL PURCHASE PROCEDURES 38 CHAPTER 7 - NON-COMPETITIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCUREMENTS AND REMEDIAL MEASURES 39 1.0 NON-COMPETITIVE PROCUREMENTS 39 2.0 EMERGENCY PROCUREMENTS; REMEDIAL MEASURES 40 3.0 WRITTEN JUSTIFICATION FOR EMERGENCY AND OTHER NON- COMPETITIVE PROCUREMENTS 41 CHAPTER 8 - REFERENCES TO APPLICABLE LAWS /REGULATIONS 43 1.0 GENERAL 43 2.0 REFERENCES 43 3.0 FTA/FHWA-FUNDED PROCUREMENT BY NON-COMPETITIVE (SOLE SOURCE) PROPOSALS 46 4.0 DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS47 5.0 GEOGRAPHICAL PREFERENCES 47 6.0 REVENUE CONTRACTS 47 7.0 STATUTORY AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS 48 CHAPTER 9 - DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS PROPERTY 50 1.0 DEFINITIONS 50 2.0 DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY 50 3.0 DISPOSAL OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 50 CHAPTER 10 - OTHER PROCUREMENT MATTERS 51 1.0 DISPUTES, CLAIMS, AND CHANGESDEFINITIONS 51 2.0 DISPUTES, CLAIMS, AND CHANGES -GENERAL 51 3.0 TERMINATION 51 4.0 BONDS, OTHER SECURITIES AND INSURANCE 53 5.0 CONTRACT CLOSEOUT 54 CHAPTER 11- PAYMENT 55 1.0 COMMISSION PAYMENT PROCESS 55 2.0 PROGRESS PAYMENTS 55 3.0 PROMPT PAYMENT TO SUBCONTRACTORS -FEDERALLY FUNDED AGREEMENTS 56 4.0 PAYMENT OF RETENTION ON PUBLIC WORKS CONTRACTS 56 5.0 REQUEST FOR PAYMENT CERTIFICATION 56 Procurement Policy Manual ii September 2015 Revision: 2 147 CHAPTER 1- PROCUREMENT PROCESS 1.0 PURPOSE AND SCOPE A. The Riverside County Transportation Commission (hereinafter "RCTC" or "Commission") procures goods and services using public funds. It has a responsibility to uphold the public trust and maximize the value of public funds by using them as efficiently and cost-effectively as possible. B. This Procurement Policy Manual (Manual) sets forth a general procurement policy and set of standards that will govern the conduct of Commission procurement activities and of Commission personnel engaged in those activities. The policies contained herein are advisory, not mandatory, and any deviation therefrom shall not render any contract of the Commission void or voidable. This manual is for Commission internal purposes only and shall not create any rights in any third parties. C. This Manual is intended to supersede, in its entirety, the Commission's Procurement Policies Manual which was adopted on April 11, 2007, and Resolution No. 98-013, adopted December 9, 1998, entitled Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Authorizing the Executive Director to Sign Certain Commission Contracts. 2.0 PROCUREMENT POLICY STATEMENT A. The Commission procurement policies establish the guidelines and policies for procuring the goods and services necessary for the Commission to carry out its responsibilities and duties. The policies are intended to maintain the integrity of the Commission's procurement process, while ensuring that purchases are made in a cost effective, timely manner; with fair and open competition; and in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations. B. The objectives of the Commission's Procurement Policy Manual are to: 1. Maximize the value received for the Commission's expenditure of public funds; 2. Protect assets and/or services purchased with public funds and ensure their application in the Commission's interests; 3. Provide all vendors an equal opportunity to provide needed goods and/or services; and 4. Protect the integrity and reputation of the Commission, its officers, and its employees. 3.0 PROCUREMENT STANDARDS A. General 1. Contract Administration System. The Commission will maintain a contract administration system that helps ensure that contractors perform Procurement Policy Manual 1 September 2015 Revision: 2 148 in accordance with the terms, conditions, and specifications of their respective contracts. a. Contract administration activities may include the following: i. Receive, evaluate, and act on value engineering and other change proposals. ii. Negotiate cost and schedule impact related to change orders and other contract modifications. iii. Process disputes under the contract's disputes clause. iv. Review and approve payments under any progress payments clause. v. Monitor progress and ensure timely notification of anticipated overrun. vi. Monitor financial status and advise if contract performance is jeopardized. vii. Issue task orders. viii. Perform property administration. ix. Ensure contractor compliance with quality assurance requirements. x. Evaluate, for adequacy, the contractor's engineering efforts and management systems that relate to design, development, production and testing. xi. Evaluate and make recommendations on contractor requests for waivers and deviations. xii. Monitor contractor's small and disadvantaged business subcontracting. xiii. Ensure timely submission of required reports. xiv. Administer special clauses such as drug and alcohol testing. xv. Receive, inspect, and accept or reject partial deliveries and final deliveries of all contract deliverables. xvi. Assist in contract close out. b. The administration of construction contracts may be further supplemented by the Caltrans Construction Manual or other manual developed for a specific project, as required. 2. Avoid Duplicative Purchases. Commission staff should regularly review proposed and planned procurements to avoid purchase of unnecessary or duplicative items. Procurement Policy Manual 2 September 2015 Revision: 2 149 3. Lease vs. Purchase Analysis. Where appropriate, an analysis should be made of lease versus purchase alternatives and any other appropriate analysis to determine the most economical procurement approach. 4. Value Engineering. When appropriate and in the Commission's best interests, the Commission will encourage the use of value engineering by including applicable clauses in contracts for appropriate equipment purchases and construction projects. 5. Award to Responsive and Responsible Contractors. The Commission will make awards only to responsive and responsible contractors, as determined by the Commission, possessing the ability to perform successfully under the terms and conditions of a proposed contract. Consideration will be given to such matters as contractor integrity, compliance with public policy as implemented by applicable laws and regulations, record of past performance, and financial and technical resources. a. In connection with the responsibility determination for federally funded procurements, a check of debarment and suspension must be performed and documented in the procurement records. 6. Commission Rejection of Bids, Quotes, and/or Proposals. The Commission, to the extent permitted by applicable laws, may reject any and all bids, quotes and/or proposals and re -advertise at its sole discretion. The Commission should ensure that such rights are clearly stated in all Commission bid documents. 7. Procurement Records. Records sufficient to document the significant history of each procurement activity should be maintained and retained by the Commission in accordance with the Commission's records retention policy. At a minimum, these records should include: a. The rationale for the method of procurement; b. Selection of contract type; c. Reasons for contractor selection or rejection; and d. The basis for the contract price. 8. Specifications. The Commission will have clear and accurate contract specifications or statements of work that identify all requirements that offerors must fulfill. Additionally, written selection procedures for formal procurements shall be prepared to help ensure fair, unbiased evaluation of competing proposals. a. For Federal Transit Administration (FTA)-funded procurements, the Commission is prohibited from unduly restricting competition or placing unreasonable requirements on firms in order for them to qualify to do business (e.g., unnecessary experience and excessive bonding requirements). Procurement Policy Manual 3 September 2015 Revision: 2 150 9. Brand Name or Equal. The use of "brand name or equal" purchase descriptions may be permitted: a. Only when an adequate specification cannot be provided without performing an inspection and analysis in time for the acquisition under consideration; and b. When minimum needs are carefully identified and those salient physical and functional characteristics of the brand name product are clearly set forth in the solicitation. c. For non -federally funded procurements, as otherwise permitted by state law. This section is not intended to impose limitations on the Commission's ability to require a brand name when the procurement is not federally funded and is not a "public work" subject to the requirements contained in the California Public Utilities Code (PUC). 10. Conflicts of Interest. All Commission members, employees and other agents must conduct the procurement process so as to avoid conflicts of interest, real or apparent. To maintain full and open competition, no Commission member, employee or other agent is permitted to give any Commission transaction in which such person has a financial interest. All procurements must be conducted in accordance with the Commission's Resolution No. 10 038, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Amcnding the Appendix of the Conflict of Interest Code Pursuant to the Political Reform Act of 1974 (as anienfle inay_he-amended 11. Lobbying and Gifts. Commission officers, employees, agents and Commission members must comply with applicable state and federal law regarding acceptance of gifts, gratuities, or favors from contractors, potential contractors, or parties to subcontractor agreements. 4-2,10. Audit Provisions. Every Commission contract wherein contractor or other entity is receiving Commission funds in excess of $10,000 should include a provision allowing examination and audit of records related to the contract by the Commission's auditor for a period of three years after final payment under the terms of the contract. 4-3,11. Violations or Breach of Contract. All contracts exceeding $100,000 should include administrative, contractual, or legal remedies for violations or breach of the contract by the contractor. 4-4,12. Termination Clause. All contracts in excess of $25,000, and public works contracts in excess of $2,000, should provide for the termination of the contract for the Commission's convenience, and all contracts should provide for the termination of the contract for default in cases of contractor breach or non-performance Federally funded contracts in Procurement Policy Manual 4 September 2015 Revision: 2 151 excess of $10,000 must provide for both termination for convenience and cause. 13. Issues not Included in the Procurement Policy Manual. If a policy, procedure or particular strategy or practice is in the best interest of the Commission and is not specifically addressed, nor prohibited by statute or case law, users of this Manual should not assume it is prohibited. Rather, the absence of direction should be interpreted as permitting the Executive Director to innovate and use sound business judgment that is otherwise consistent with law and within the limits of his or her authority. B. Written Standards of Conduct 1. Conflicts of Interest. All Commission members, officers, employees and other agents must conduct the procurement process so as to avoid conflicts of interest, real or apparent. To maintain full and open competition, no Commission member, officer, employee or other agent, or his or her immediate family member, partner, or organization that employs or is about to employ any of the foregoing individuals may participate in the selection, award, or administration of any Commission contract if a conflict of interest, prohibited by law, would be involved. For FTA- funded contracts, the foregoing shall also apply when any of those individuals previously listed has a financial or other interest in the firm selected for award. In addition to the foregoing, all procurements must be conducted in accordance with the most current version of the "Conflict of Interest Code for the Riverside County Transportation Commission" adopted pursuant to the Political Reform Act of 1974 (as amended). 2. Lobbying and Gifts. Commission officers, employees, agents and Commission members must comply with applicable state and federal law regarding acceptance of gifts, gratuities, or favors from contractors, potential contractors, or parties to subcontractor agreements. For FTA- funded procurements, Commission officers, employees, agents, or Commission members may neither solicit nor accept gifts, gratuities, favors, or anything of monetary value from contractors, potential contractors, or parties to subcontracts; provided that exceptions may apply if, as determined by the Executive Director, the financial interest is not substantial or the gift is an unsolicited item of nominal intrinsic value. For FTA-funded procurements, nominal value shall mean under fifty dollars ($50). 3. Violations. a. The violation of these Standards of Conduct by Commission employees will subject the violator to any disciplinary proceedings or action deemed appropriate by the Executive Director. Employees may correct a violation in any manner provided for under the Political Reform Act, and its implementing regulations. Procurement Policy Manual 5 September 2015 Revision: 2 152 b. The violation of any of these Standards of Conduct by Commission members or officers will require correction of the violation in any manner provided for under the Political Reform Act, and its implementing regulations. c. Contractors or subcontractors that violate these Standards of Conduct as relates to an active FTA-funded procurement may be prohibited from bidding on the procurement, or may be subject to other action as deemed appropriate by the Executive Director. d. Agents of the Commission that violate these Standards of Conduct as relates to FTA-funded procurements may be prohibited from participation on behalf of the Commission on federally funded projects, or subject to other action as deemed appropriate by the Executive Director. 4. Prohibited Communications. To avoid any appearance of impropriety, instructions to bidders in solicitation documents should prohibit contacts of any kind from proposers/bidders with any Commission member or any Commission staff, other than the Procurement Officer, during an open procurement. Violation of this condition may result in immediate disqualification of a bid or proposal. This provision is not meant to prohibit communications between Commission staff and existing consultants/contractors related to existing business which the consultant/contractor is under contract to perform on behalf of the Commission. 4.0 TYPES OF CONTRACTS A. General Provisions 1. The Procurement Officer should use the types of contracts described in this Chapter for most types of procurement, except as otherwise provided for certain small purchases described hereunder in Chapter 6. Innovative contracting arrangements are not prohibited, but require the advance approval of the Executive Director or the Commission, as specified herein. 2. The "cost -plus -percentage -of -cost" method of contracting shall not be used for state or federally funded contracts. 3. The Procurement Officer, in consultation with the project manager, should select the type of contract that is most appropriate to the circumstances of each procurement, in accordance with the provisions of this Chapter. 4. In procurements by other than competitive sealed bidding, the Procurement Officer may negotiate a contract type and price (or estimated cost and fee) that will result in reasonable contractor risk and provide the contractor with the greatest incentive for efficient and economical performance. Procurement Policy Manual 6 September 2015 Revision: 2 153 B. Selecting Contract Types 1. The type of contract to be used should be determined prior to the solicitation, and the solicitation should inform bidders of the type of contract that will be used. 2. When procurement is by competitive sealed bidding, the Procurement Officer must use a firm fixed -price contract. 3. Except when procurement is by competitive sealed bidding as required by law, the Procurement Officer should select the most effective contract type and should consider contract type together with the issues of price, risk, uncertainty, and responsibility for costs. The type of contract used should reflect the cost risk and responsibility assumed by the contractor or supplier. 4. The Procurement Officer should avoid the continued use of a cost reimbursement or time -and -materials contract after experience provides a basis for firmer pricing. 5. The Procurement Officer should include documentation in each contract file to show why the particular contract type was selected, except for purchase orders under the small purchase threshold. C. Fixed -Price Contracts 1. Fixed -price contracts may provide for a firm price or, in appropriate cases, an adjustable price. 2. Fixed -price contracts providing for an adjustable price may include a ceiling price, a target price (including target cost), or both. Unless otherwise specified in the contract, the ceiling price or target price will be subject to adjustment only by operation of contract clauses providing for equitable adjustment or other revision of the contract price under stated circumstances. 3. A firm -fixed -price contract should provide for a price that is not subject to any adjustment on the basis of the contractor's cost experience in performing the contract. 4. A firm -fixed -price contract should be used for acquiring commercial products or commercial -type products, or for acquiring other supplies or services, on the basis of reasonably definite functional or detailed specifications if the Procurement Officer can establish fair and reasonable prices at the outset, including the following circumstances: a. When there is adequate price competition; b. When there are reasonable price comparisons with prior purchases of the same or similar supplies or services made on a competitive basis; c. When available cost or pricing information permits realistic estimates of the probable costs of performance; Procurement Policy Manual 7 September 2015 Revision: 2 154 d. When performance uncertainties can be identified and reasonable estimates of their cost impact can be made, and the contractor is willing to accept a firm -fixed -price contract; or e. When required by law unless a sole source exception applies. D. Cost Reimbursement/Cost-Plus-Fixed-Fee Contracts 1. Cost reimbursement contracts provide for payment of the contractor's reasonable, allocable and allowable incurred costs plus a negotiated fixed fee, to the extent prescribed in the underlying contract and Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Part 31. 2. A cost reimbursement contract establishes an estimate of total cost for the purpose of obligating funds and establishing a ceiling on expenditures that the contractor may not exceed without the approval of the Commission. 3. Cost reimbursement contracts are suitable for use when the uncertainties of performance do not permit costs to be estimated with sufficient accuracy to use a fixed -price contract. 4. The Commission must determine the adequacy of the contractor's accounting system for cost -type contracts before awarding such a contract. E. Time -And -Materials Contracts 1. A time -and -materials contract should be used only after the Procurement Officer determines. a. In writing, that no other type of contract is suitable; and b. A ceiling price to be included in the contract that the contractor shall not exceed except at its own risk. 2. A time -and -materials contract should be used only when it is not possible at the time of executing the contract to estimate accurately the extent or duration of the work or to anticipate costs with any reasonable degree of certainty or confidence. 3. A time -and -materials contract should include direct labor hours at specified fixed hourly rates that include wages, overhead, general and administrative expenses, profit, and materials required at cost. 4. The user department/project manager should ensure that there is adequate surveillance of contractor performance when a time -and -materials type contract is used. F. Labor -Hour Contracts 1. When materials are not required, the Procurement Officer may use a labor - hour contract, a variation of the time -and -materials contract. 2. The use of a labor -hour contract should be in accordance with the above - referenced provisions related to time -and -materials contracts. Procurement Policy Manual 8 September 2015 Revision: 2 155 G. Letter Contracts (Letter Of Intent Contracts) 1. A letter contract is an interim type of contractual agreement that gives the contractor a limited notice of award for the delivery of the required goods/supplies or the performance of services. 2. The Procurement Officer may use a letter contract when the Commission's interests demand that the contractor be given a binding commitment so that work can start immediately and executing a definitive contract is not possible in sufficient time to meet the requirement. Each letter contract should be as complete and definitive as possible under the circumstances and should include clauses approved and required by the Procurement Officer. 3. The estimated cost of the definitive contract should determine the type and level of review and approval required for approval of a letter contract. 4. A letter contract may not be entered into without competition except as provided for under Non -Competitive and/or Emergency Procurements provisions of this Manual. 5. A letter contract may not be amended to satisfy a new requirement unless the new requirement is inseparable from the existing contract. Any amendment should be subject to the same requirements as a new letter contract. 6. The total value of the letter contract should be the estimated sum necessary to cover the contractor's requirement for funds before execution of the definitive contract. However, the total value of a letter contract should not, under any circumstances, exceed fifty percent (50%) of the overall price ceiling for the term of the final negotiated (i.e., definitive) contract. 7. A letter contract should contain a negotiated schedule for execution of the definitive contract, including dates for submission of the contractor's price proposal, cost or pricing data (if required), a date for start of negotiations, and a target for execution of the definitive contract. 8. The letter contract should provide that if the Procurement Officer and the contractor cannot negotiate a definitive contract because of failure to reach agreement regarding price or fee: 1) the Procurement Officer may terminate the letter contract; or 2) if a "contract definitization" clause is included in the letter contract, the Commission may unilaterally require the contractor to continue the work and the Procurement Officer may, with the approval of the Executive Director, determine a reasonable price or fee. H. Multiple Year Contracts Multiple year contracts may be used with competitive sealed bids, competitive proposals, or by non-competitive procurement. The contract term, and any extensions thereof, shall be established based on sound business judgment of the Procurement Policy Manual 9 September 2015 Revision: 2 156 1 Commission. Multiple year contracting is a method by which the Commission awards a contract for a base period of one or more years, with option provisions for future years' requirements. The option provision in the contract should provide for unilateral exercise at the discretion of the user department/project manager, as additional requirements and funding become available. See below under Section 5.0 of this Chapter for further information regarding Options. For FTA-funded procurements, the procurement file shall document the rationale for determining the term. Considerations should include the time necessary to accomplish the purpose of the contract, competition, pricing, and fairness. I. Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) Contracts 1. The Procurement Officer may use an ID/IQ type of contract when the Commission anticipates a recurring requirement, but cannot predetermine the precise quantities of supplies or services at the time of contract award. 2. ID/IQ contracts should specify maximum or minimum estimated quantities that the Commission may require during the term of the agreement. An ID/IQ contract should make no promise of exclusivity and may in fact be one of several (multiple) contracts awarded for the same item or service. 3. There are several types of ID/IQ contracts, including: a. Definite -quantity contracts b. Requirements contracts c. Indefinite quantity (IQ) contracts (commodities) d. Task order contracts (services) 4. If possible under the circumstances, the Procurement Officer should ensure that original solicitation and resultant ID/IQ contract contain both a minimum and a maximum quantities, which represent the reasonably foreseeable needs of the parties to the solicitation, and a clause stating that the estimate is not a representation to a bidder, offeror, or consultant that the estimated quantity or dollar amount above the estimated minimum will actually be required or ordered by the Commission. 5.0 OPTIONS A. General 1. When it is in the best interest of the Commission, a contract option may be included providing the Commission the unilateral right to extend the term of the contract and/or to purchase additional supplies or services called for by the contract. 2. Any written findings required for a contract option shall specify both the base requirement(s) and the increase permitted by subsequent options. Contract provisions setting forth the cost of the option may include, but are not limited to, the following: Procurement Policy Manual 10 September 2015 Revision: 2 157 a. A specific dollar amount; b. An amount to be determined by applying provisions (or a formula) provided in the basic contract, but not including renegotiation of the price for work in a fixed -price type contract; c. In a cost -type contract, a stated fixed or maximum fee, or a fixed or maximum fee amount determinable by applying a formula contained in the basic contract; d. A specific price that is subject to an economic price adjustment provision; or e. A specific price that is subject to change as a result of changes to the prevailing labor rates provided by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) or the California Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) prevailing rates, whichever is applicable. B. Solicitation of Contracts with Options 1. If a contract provides for an option, the solicitation should include appropriate option clauses. 2. Each contract should state the period within which an option may be exercised. 3. In order to meet the requirements of this Manual for full and open competition, the option should be evaluated as part of the initial competition and be exercisable at an amount specified from the terms of the basic contract. When options have not been evaluated as part of the award, the exercise of such options will be considered a non-competitive procurement and must comply with the non-competitive procurement policies in described in this Manual. C. Exercise of Options 1. The user department/project manager, in cooperation with the Procurement Officer, should initiate the exercise of an option only after determining the following: a. That sufficient budget authority is available; b. That the requirement covered by the option fulfills an existing Commission need; and c. That the exercise of the option will be the most advantageous method of fulfilling the Commission's needs, when price and other factors are considered. 2. The Procurement Officer, after considering price and other factors, should make the determination whether to recommend exercising the option on the basis of one of the following: a. A new solicitation fails to produce a better price or a more advantageous offer than that offered by the option; provided, that if it Procurement Policy Manual 11 September 2015 Revision: 2 158 is anticipated that the best price available is the option price (or that the option provides the more advantageous offer), the Procurement Officer should not use this method to test the market; b. An informal analysis of prices or an examination of the market indicates that the option price is better than prices available in the market or that the option is the most advantageous offer; or c. The short time between the award of the contract containing the option and the exercise of the option indicates that the option price is the lowest price obtainable or the most advantageous. 3. The contract modification or other written document, which notifies the contractor of the exercise of the option, shall cite the option provision as authority for the action and should be issued within the time period specified in the contract. 6.0 COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS A. Policy on Intergovernmental or Inter -entity Agreements To promote economy and efficiency, the Commission may enter into state and local intergovernmental agreements or inter -entity agreements, where such agreements are in the best interest of the Commission and are appropriate for procurement or use of common or shared goods and services. The use of purchasing schedules may be prohibited for federally funded procurements. Out- of-state purchasing agreements are prohibited for FTA-funded procurements. B. Memorandum of Understanding A memorandum of understanding (MOU) is a contract document describing a bilateral or multilateral agreement outlining the terms and details of an arrangement between the parties to the MOU, including each party's requirements and responsibilities. An MOU is used when substantial involvement is expected between the Commission and another agency or entity when carrying out the activity contemplated in the MOU, and there exists some public or mutually beneficial purpose in carrying out this activity. RC. Piggybacking 1. Piggybacking is the post -award use of an acceptable contract/solicitation process that allows an entity not contemplated in the original procurement to purchase the same supplies or equipment under the original contract/solicitation process. 2. Piggybacking is permissible when: a. The underlying solicitation document and the resultant contract contain an assignability clause that provides for the assignment of all or part of the specified deliverables as originally advertised, competed, evaluated, and awarded; and b. For federally funded agreements, the original solicitation and resultant contract contain a minimum and a maximum quantity, which represent Procurement Policy Manual 12 September 2015 Revision: 2 159 the reasonably foreseeable needs of the parties to the solicitation. CD. California Multiple Award Schedule and State Master Agreements 1. A California Multiple Award Schedule (CMAS) and State Master Agreements are agreements established between the California Department of General Services (DGS) and multiple vendors who agree to the State of California terms and conditions, and may be used by the Commission. 2. Acquisitions based on CMAS or State Master Agreements shall be competitively bid so as to result in offers from three or more vendors including one small business, if available. If less than three offers are received, documentation of solicitation methods must be included with the contract documentation. 3. Three offers are not required for CMAS and State Master Agreements based on competition, such as Cal -Store, the Master Rental Agreement, Western States Contracting Alliance (WSCA), etc. Information on specific CMAS and State Master Agreements are available on DGS-PD's website at: www.dgs.ca.gov/pd. 4. Notwithstanding PUC section 130232(a), Public Contract Code (PCC) sections 10298(b) and 10299(a) provide authority for the Commission to use CMAS or State Master Agreements for acquiring supplies, equipment and materials that exceed $25,000 without engaging in further competitive bidding. E. Recognized Government Purchasing Cooperatives; National Purchasing Agencies 1. U.S. Communities is a national government purchasing cooperative program that competitively solicits contracts that can be utilized by local government entities. The Commission may acquire supplies and equipment through U.S. Communities or other similar, recognized government purchasing cooperatives, approved by the Procurement Officer, that utilize competitive solicitation methods. 2. National Joint Power Alliance (NJPA) is a national public service agency that provides competitively solicited purchasing contracts to its member agencies. The Commission may utilize NJPA for appropriate procurements, as determined by the Procurement Officer, however, NJPA may not be utilized for FTA-funded procurements. 4,3. The Commission may join the above specified joint powers authorities for the purpose of participating in procurements as a member agency. 7.0 RECURRING CONTRACTS A. The Commission may, on an annual basis, evaluate existing contracts for professional services that are due to expire within the next fiscal year. While some of these contracts may be placed on the calendar for a new procurement solicitation or allowed to expire because they are no longer required, notwithstanding any other provision herein, some contracts may be included in an Procurement Policy Manual 13 September 2015 Revision: 2 160 annual recurring contracts list that must be approved by the Commission. Most contracts for professional services should be subject to a competitive process; however, there may be limited circumstances in which staff believes it is more efficient and cost effective to retain such consultants on the recurring contracts list rather than rebidding the services. Those circumstances generally are due to the consultant's historical knowledge, unique experience, and understanding of the Commission and/or specific Commission projects. Approval of the recurring contracts list allows the Commission to continue work on existing projects without interruptions and maintain consistency. 1. FTA-funded contracts may not be included in the annual recurring contracts list. Procurement Policy Manual 14 September 2015 Revision: 2 161 CHAPTER 2 - PROCUREMENT GENERALLY 1.0 IMPLEMENTATION BY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR; COMMISSION CONTROLS AND LIMITATIONS A. Final authority for purchasing actions and decisions rests with the Commission, except as delegated by the Commission to the Executive Director. B. The Commission authorizes the Executive Director to execute contracts approved by the Commission. The Executive Director may designate the Deputy Executive Director, Chief Financial Officer or Directors to execute contracts under his or her signature authority on his/her behalf. C. The policies set forth herein will be implemented by the Chief Financial Officer. The Chief Financial Officer has primary responsibility for ensuring that the Commission's procurement process is in accordance with applicable laws and regulations, as interpreted by the General Counsel and Commission policy. D. The Executive Director is authorized to approve and enter into contracts on behalf of the Commission under his/her single signature authority as follows: 1. When the expenditure is less than fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) for the purchase of all supplies, equipment, materials and for the construction of all facilities and works in accordance with PUC § 130232; and 2. When the expenditure is less than one hundred fifty thousand dollars ($4-007000150,000) for the purchase of services; however, (i) the aggregate amount of contracts executed under the single signature authority shall not exceed $1,000,000 in any given fiscal year; (ii) the aggregate value of all contracts awarded to any one entity under the Executive Director's single signature authority shall not exceed $150,000 in any fiscal year; and (iii) the Executive Director may execute contract amendments for existing contracts that do not exceed $4-007000150,000. Such authority however, may not be exercised more than once during the life of any contract and may not be used to amend contracts originally executed under the Executive Director's single signature authority. The Commission's fiscal year is from July 1 to June 30. E. The powers of the Executive Director pursuant to Paragraph "D" above are subject to: (i) the existence and provisions of a Commission approved budget; and (ii) applicable laws and regulations. F. The Executive Director must provide the Commission with a regular report of all contracts entered into pursuant to the single signature authority provided in Paragraph "D" above, and must report to the Commission at its next regularly scheduled meeting each new contract awarded on an emergency basis or other contracts in excess of the Executive Director's single signature authority. Procurement Policy Manual 15 September 2015 Revision: 2 162 G. Approval Limits and Solicitation Types 1. Supplies, Equipment, and Materials (PUC § 130232). PURCHASE AMOUNT SOLICITATION TYPE SOLICITATION PROCESS APPROVER Less than $1,000 Micro -purchase Informal: Commercial availability, Procurement Officer* Rotate Vendors $1,000 to $25,000 Small Purchase Informal: Three (3) Quotes Procurement Officer* $25,001 to $50,000 Formal Procurement Formal: Advertisement, Clauses, Executive Director Competitive Sealed Bids Greater than $50,000 Formal Procurement Formal: Advertisement, Clauses, Commission Competitive Sealed Bids 2. Public Works (PUC § 130232). PURCHASE AMOUNT SOLICITATION TYPE SOLICITATION PROCESS APPROVER Less than $1,000 Micro -purchase Informal: Commercial availability, Procurement Officer * Rotate Vendors, Non -Collusion Declaration, Insurance $1,000 to $25,000 Small Purchase Informal: Three (3) Quotes, Procurement Officer* Prevailing Wage, Clauses, Insurance, License, Non -Collusion Declaration $25,001 to $50,000 Formal Procurement Formal: Advertisement, Clauses, Executive Director Prevailing Wage, Insurance, License, Competitive Sealed Bids, Payment Bond, Non -Collusion Declaration Greater than $50,000 Formal Procurement Formal: Advertisement, Clauses, Commission Prevailing Wage, Insurance, License, Competitive Sealed Bids, Payment Bond, Non -Collusion Declaration As delegated by the Executive Director Procurement Policy Manual 16 September 2015 Revision: 2 163 3. Services. PURCHASE AMOUNT SOLICITATION TYPE SOLICITATION PROCESS APPROVER Less than $3,000 Micro -purchase Informal: Commercial availability, Procurement Officer* Rotate Vendors, Insurance $3,000 to $50,000 Small Purchase Informal: Three (3) Quotes, Clauses, Procurement Officer* Insurance $50,001 to $100,000150,000** Small Purchase Informal: Three (3) Quotes, Clauses, Executive Director Insurance; or Formal: Advertisement, Clauses, Insurance, and Negotiated Agreement, or Competitive Sealed Bids, or A/E Contract procedures Greater than $100,000150,000** Formal Procurement Formal: Advertisement, Clauses, Commission Insurance, Certifications, and Negotiated Agreement, or Competitive Sealed Bids, or A/E Contract procedures As delegated by the Executive Director ** For federally -funded purchases, the small purchase threshold is $100,000 for federal grants awarded prior to December 26, 2014 H. In addition to the authority granted above, and except as otherwise prohibited by applicable state or federal law, the Executive Director is authorized to approve and enter into contracts on behalf of the Commission, under his/her single signature authority, where the relevant contract is directly related to and necessary to implement a project that has been approved by the Commission, the contract is within the approved project budget and, based on the circumstances, exercise of this authority is in the best interest of the Commission. 2.0 PROCUREMENT OFFICER —DESIGNATION AND DELEGATION A. The Chief Financial Officer is the designated "Procurement Officer" for the Commission. The Chief Financial Officer may delegate all or part of the Procurement Officer duties described in this Manual. 3.0 PROCUREMENT OFFICER —DUTIES A. The Procurement Officer has the duty to oversee all procurement activities of the Commission, and to implement the policies and standards set forth in this Manual, subject to the limitations of the authority that has been delegated to the Procurement Officer by the Commission or the Executive Director. B. The Procurement Officer may issue instructions for the implementation of Commission procurement policies. C. The Procurement Officer has the duty to ensure Commission contracts, purchase orders, modifications, and supplemental agreements are executed in accordance with established thresholds and delegated authority. Procurement Policy Manual 17 September 2015 Revision: 2 164 D. The Procurement Officer, subject to the review of the Commission's General Counsel, has the authority to draft and determine the final form of the contract to be used for each procurement. E. The Procurement Officer should ensure that a complete record of each procurement action is maintained in accordance with the Commission's records retention policy by establishing files containing the records of all major procurements and contractual actions pertinent to that office's responsibilities. 1. The Procurement Officer is responsible for maintaining the original contract file pursuant to applicable state and/or federal records retention policies. 2. The documentation in each contract file maintained by the Procurement Officer should be sufficient to constitute a complete history of the transaction for the following purposes: a. Providing a complete background as a basis for informed decisions at each step of the procurement process; b. Supporting actions taken; c. Providing information for reviews, audits, and investigations; and d. Furnishing essential facts in the event of litigation. 4.0 IMPLEMENTATION OF PROCUREMENT PROCEDURES AND GUIDELINES A. The Procurement Officer, in his or her discretion and subject to the review and concurrence of the Commission's General Counsel, may adopt procurement and materials management procedures and guidelines needed to implement and supplement the policies and standards set forth in this Manual. Any such procedures and guidelines shallould_ provide for timely review and processing of all procurement actions, and should ensure that procurements proceed timely, efficiently and economically, while adhering to principles of good public policy practices and sound business judgment. 1. Provide for timely review and processing of all procurement actions; 2. Ensure that procurements proceed timely, efficiently and economically; 3. Ensure that procurements adhere to principles of good public policy practices and sound business judgment; and -1,4. Prohibit arbitrary actions. An example of an arbitrary action is the award of a construction contract, using the competitive sealed bids method of procurement, to a bidder other than the lowest responsive, responsible bidder. 5.0 AUTHORIZED METHODS OF PROCUREMENT; SELECTION A. Selection Procurement Policy Manual 18 September 2015 Revision: 2 165 As part of the procurement initiation process, the Procurement Officer will determine which method of procurement is appropriate. B. Authorized Methods The following methods of procurement may be used, as appropriate, in accordance with the policies and procedures included in the Procurement Manual for all federal and non-federal procurement actions contemplated under this Procurement Manual: 1. Micro Purchase Procedures, pursuant to Chapter 6 of this ManualCompetitive Sealed Bid ("Low Bid"), pursuant to Chapter 3 of this Manual; 2. Design build, pursuant to Chapter 4 of this ManualSmall Purchase Procedures, pursuant to Chapter 6 of this Manual; 3. Competitive Sealed Bid ("Low Bid"), pursuant to Chapter 3 of this ManualCompetitively Negotiated Procurement, pursuant to Chapter 5 of this Manual; 4. Competitively Negotiated Procurement, pursuant to Chapter 5 of this ManualSmall Purchase Procedures, pursuant to Chapter 6 of this Manual; and 5. Non -Competitive and Emergency Procurement, pursuant to Chapter 7 of this Manual; and 6. Design -build, pursuant to Chapter 4 of this Manual. 6.0 INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE A. An independent cost estimate is a determination of price reasonableness. The An estimate should shall be completed prior to the receipt of bids or proposals. Key elements of the independent cost estimate include, but are not limited to: 1. Date of the independent cost estimate; 2. Basis for the independent cost estimate, including applicable supporting documentation; and -1,3. The value determined by the independent cost estimate. B. The method and means of establishing the estimate may vary based on the circumstances and can range from checking historical records or published price guides to a detailed estimate in the same level of detail that is required for contractors submitting proposals. Estimates can be obtained from a design firm or in-house technical personnel for construction work or from independent third - party staff (not impacted by final procurement). C. The estimate provides the Procurement Officer with essential input during the solicitation process. Independent cost estimates may be used by the Commission to: 1. Provide a determination of value (i.e., do benefits warrant the cost); Procurement Policy Manual 19 September 2015 Revision: 2 166 2. Support procurement planning; 3. Determine the appropriate solicitation type and process based on the approval limits set forth in Chapter 2, 1.0(G); 4. Establish the competitive range and supplement the evaluation process; 5. Provide a basis for a price analysis, which may eliminate the need for a more burdensome cost analysis; 6. Provide a basis for development of a pre -negotiation objective; 7. Support the Commission's negotiation position with contractor; and/or 8. After contract award, provide essential input with respect to contract amendments, change orders and claims. 7.0 COST/PRICE ANALYSIS A. The Procurement Officer should perform aA cost/price analysis shall be performed in connection with every federally funded procurement action, including contract modifications, and should be conducted for non -federally funded procurements. The method and degree of analysis is dependent on the facts surrounding the particular procurement situation. B. If the contract being awarded is a cost -reimbursement type, the cost/price analysis should shall address the realism of the various cost elements proposed, and where the costs are unrealistically low, an adjustment should shall be made to reflect what the Commission believes the effort will actually cost given that offeror's specific technical approach as well as its direct and indirect cost rates. 1. The Commission shouldshall, when applicable, or must, if required by law, utilize the guidelines provided in the FAR Part 31 to determine whether of the contractor's proposed costs are reasonable, allowable and allocable. C. As applicable, the Commission shall negotiate profit as a separate element of the price for each contract in which there is no price competition and in all applicable cases where cost analysis is performed. To establish a fair and reasonable profit, consideration must be given to the complexity of the work to be performed, the risk borne by the contractor, the contractor's investment, the amount of subcontracting, the quality of its record of past performance, and industry profit rates in the surrounding geographical area for similar work. 8.0 VENDOR CONTACTS PRIOR TO ISSUANCE OF A SOLICITATION A. Informational and market research contacts with prospective contractors/vendors should be circumscribed based upon legitimate, identifiable business purposes and guided by the exercise of sound judgment. The primary pitfalls to be avoided are promises or implications from Commission staff of a future contract, development by a vendor of a specification or scope of services to be used as part of a Commission solicitation that vendor intends to participate in, requests from Commission staff for complimentary services or supplies, and other activities that Procurement Policy Manual 20 September 2015 Revision: 2 167 may create a real or apparent conflict of interest or the impression of an obligation on the part of the Commission. 9.0 ADVERTISING/PUBLICIZING PROCUREMENTS A. The Procurement Officer should use the most efficient and effective means to publicize contract actions to increase competition in accordance with the requirements of the specific procurement. B. PUC § 130232, applicable to the purchase of all supplies, equipment, materials and for the construction of all facilities and works when the expenditure exceeds twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000), requires that notice requesting bids shall be published at least once in a newspaper of general circulation. The publication must be made at least 10 days before the date for the receipt of the bids. The Commission, at its discretion, may reject any and all bids and re -advertise. C. PUC § 130238 for the purchase of computers, telecommunications equipment, microwave equipment, and other related electronic equipment and apparatus that is not available in substantial quantities to the general public requires (i) the procurement be conducted through competitive negotiation, after a finding by the Commission by a two-thirds vote that this particular procurement qualifies under PUC § 130238, and (ii) notice of the request for proposals be published at least twice in a newspaper of general circulation, at least 10 days before the date for receipt of the proposals. D. Federal Transit Administration Section 9.c of FTA Circular 4220.1F requires that invitations for bids are to be "publicly" advertised, and Section 9.d of FTA Circular 4220.1F requires that requests for proposals are to be publicized. E. Caltrans and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Chapter 15, paragraph 15.3 Project Advertisement, of the Caltrans Local Assistance Procedures Manual provides detailed guidance regarding advertising of FHWA- and/or Caltrans-funded projects. F. Pre -solicitation advertising prescribed in this section is not required for non- competitive, sole source, or emergency procurements processed in accordance with this Manual. 10.0 NON-DISCRIMINATION IN PROCUREMENT A. All formal contracts entered into by the Commission should contain appropriate clauses prohibiting discrimination by the contractor against any person or group of persons on account of race, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, physical handicap, medical condition, age, marital status, sex or sexual orientation in the performance of the contract. 11.0 ORGANIZATIONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST A. An unfair competitive advantage could result if a contractor were allowed to submit a bid or proposal for work described in a specification or statement of Procurement Policy Manual 21 September 2015 Revision: 2 168 work that the contractor itself developed. For the purpose of eliminating a potential unfair competitive advantage, and in compliance with applicable state and federal laws and regulations, a contractor that develops or assists in developing specifications, requirements, statements of work, invitation for bids, and/or request for proposals for a Commission procurement is excluded from competing for the resultant procurement, unless an appropriate waiver is issued by the Commission. All waivers will be assessed by the Commission on a case -by - case basis. 12.0 DUTIES OF COMMISSION STAFF REGARDING PROCUREMENTS A. General Procuring goods, services, and contracts for the Commission must be a cooperative effort, and it will be the responsibility of all Commission staff involved in procurement to employ sound business judgment and appropriate standards of ethics and fairness to procure goods and services in a manner most advantageous to the Commission. All employees and departments are instructed to follow the procedures set forth in the Manual, as well as any instructions issued by the Procurement Officer regarding procurements. 1. For FTA-funded procurements, the user department should consider use of the FTA checklists provided in FTA Circular 4220.1F, Appendix C, which address, among other things, undue restrictions on competition, when use of brand name or equal is permitted, and other FTA requirements and limitations. B. In order to initiate a procurement action (including amendments, procurements, exercising of available options, etc.), the user department/project manager should, at a minimum, provide the Procurement Officer with the following items, as applicable: 1. Specification, Scope of Services, or Statement of Work. For a new procurement, a complete and clearly written specification, purchase description, or statement of work suitable for either competition or for negotiation with a sole source contractor, if justified. For competitive procurements, the description must not (for federally funded procurements) and should not (for non -federally funded procurements) contain features which unduly restrict competition. The description may include a statement of the qualitative nature of the material, product or service to be procured and, when necessary, must set forth those minimum essential characteristics and standards to which it must conform if it is to satisfy its intended use. For federally funded procurements, detailed product specifications should be avoided. When it is impractical or uneconomical to make a clear and accurate description of the technical requirements, a "brand name or equivalent" description may be used as a means to define the performance or other salient requirements of procurement. The specific features of the named brand which must be Procurement Policy Manual 22 September 2015 Revision: 2 169 met by offerors must (for federally funded procurements) and should (for non -federally funded procurements) be clearly stated. 2. Changes. Changes to existing contracts, including amendments and construction change orders, should comply with the following. a. Amendments If a contract amendment has been negotiated based upon an existing advanced pricing arrangement or labor rates/categories included in the underlying agreement, the user department/project manager should provide the Procurement Officer with a copy of the final negotiated scope of services for the extra work, associated pricing terms, and/or schedule. b. Construction Change Orders Construction change orders should follow the procedures established by the Capital Projects Department and applicable contract specifications. Documentation of the change order does not need to be provided to the Procurement Officer, but should be maintained by the user department/project manager as specified herein. If a construction change order has been negotiated based upon an existing advanced pricing arrangement or labor rates/categories included in the underlying agreement, the user department/project manager should maintain a record of the change order and supporting documentation in the project files including an independent cost estimate and cost and/or price analysis, as applicable. i. All change orders must be signed by a Commission employee who is a registered civil engineer. ii. Any change order in excess of $100,000 also requires approval by the Executive Director. iii. Any change order that will increase the total contract value to an amount that exceeds the contractual authority approved by the Commission may not be executed until additional contractual authority has been obtained through the Commission. iv. The Capital Projects Director is responsible for determining that change orders are processed and approved in accordance with departmental and contractual requirements. c. Changes to Federally Funded Contracts For federally funded contracts, findings must be included in the project file that the change is in the general scope of the original contract. A significant change in contract work that causes a major deviation from the original purpose of the work or the intended method of achievement, or causes a revision of contract work so extensive, Procurement Policy Manual 23 September 2015 Revision: 2 170 significant, or cumulative that, in effect the contractor is required to perform very different work from that described in the original contract, is considered a "cardinal change" or "tag -on" contract, and is not permitted unless it meets the requirements of Chapter 8, Section 3.0. 3. Agreement Summary Sheet. The user department/project manager must provide a complete and executed Agreement Summary Sheet for all procurement actions, including applicable small purchases, formal procurements, MOUs, agreements, change order modifications and the like. The Agreement Summary Sheet identifies the nature of funding for the subject goods/services, provides a record that the requirement was budgeted and properly approved before the procurement process began, and ensures that the procurement action is assigned a unique agreement number for purposes of contract administration, payment, and recordkeeping. 4. Cost Estimate. The user department/project manager should shall provide the Procurement Officer with a cost estimate for the anticipated procurement of goods/services. See paragraph 6.0 above for additional guidance regarding the development of an independent cost estimate. 45. Justification for Sole Source/Non-competitive Procurement (if applicable). The user department/project manager must prepare and submit to the Procurement Officer a written statement recording all the facts that provide justification for avoiding mandated competitive procurement practices explicitly defined in this Manual and/or required by relevant state and federal law in favor of a non-competitive/sole source award. The Procurement Officer must approve the sole source procurement methodology before the procurement can proceed. 13.0 INSURANCE A. Contractors providing goods and services should be required to carry sufficient insurance to protect the Commission from third party lawsuits for personal injury (including death) and property damage. Insurance may also be required for damage to Commission property and for errors and omissions in the provision of professional services. B. The following types of procurement actions should be reviewed by the Procurement Officer for appropriate levels, types and limits of coverage on a case -by -case basis: 1. All operations and non -operational construction contracts. 2. All professional services contracts. 3. All contracts where work will be performed within "50 feet" of railroad. 4. All environmental contracts, including engineering services. Procurement Policy Manual 24 September 2015 Revision: 2 171 5. All procurement contracts and/or purchase agreements where outside vendors will be conducting work or performing installation services on Commission premises. 6. All procurement contracts and/or purchase agreements where outside vendors will be delivering products to a Commission facility. C. The contract documents should ensure that Commission contractors will be required to comply with insurance requirements imposed by state and local governments. D. At a minimum, the contract documents should require the contractor and subcontractor to carry general liability, workmen's compensation, and automobile insurance coverages for public works contracts. E. In certain limited cases, the Procurement Officer may permit the contractor to substitute an approved program of self-insurance in order to obtain such approval. The contractor will have to demonstrate that it can sustain the potential losses being self -insured. F. The Procurement Officer should include insurance and indemnification provisions in equipment, supply, and services contracts in accordance with Commission policies described herein. 14.0 SUBCONTRACTING A. The Commission may consider requiring a prime contractor to perform certain tasks or a minimum percentage of the work, in order to ensure that the prime contractor maintains a specified degree of control over the project. B. Approval of contractor proposed subcontractors usually involves an evaluation of three primary areas: 1. Assurance that the prime contractor has included the required "flow - down" provisions (clauses) from the prime contract in the subcontract. 2. The prime contractor's compliance with the Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) requirements in its prime contract. 3. Assurance that the prime contractor has selected its critical subcontractors in a prudent fashion, so as to protect the Commission's interests. 15.0. DETERMINATION OF FAIR AND REASONABLE PRICE A. The Procurement Officer should determine, in writing, that the price to be paid to the successful offeror is fair and reasonable. Typically, adequate price competition is sufficient to establish price reasonableness; however, price reasonableness may also be established through: 1. Prices established by law or regulation; 2. Published catalog or market price for commercial product sold to the public in substantial quantities; 3. Previous or relevant historical pricing for same or similar terms; Procurement Policy Manual 25 September 2015 Revision: 2 172 4. Valid cost estimate; 5. Value analysis; or 6. Cost/price analysis. B. Single Offer/Lack of Adequate Competition 1. Upon receiving a single bid or single proposal in response to a solicitation, the Procurement Officer should determine if competition was adequate. a. Such determination should include a review of the specifications for undue restrictiveness and may include a survey of potential sources that chose not to submit a bid or proposal. b. If the results of the review are that the scope of work was so restrictive that only one firm could have responded, then there is a lack of competition. The Procurement Officer should (1) cancel and re - procure the solicitation or (2) treat the solicitation as a sole source procurement, if it meets the requirements of Chapter 7 of this Manual. c. If the results of the review are that the scope of work was not restrictive and more than one firm could have responded, then there is adequate competition. The Procurement Officer may recommend an award of the agreement to the single offeror, as determined by the Commission, in accordance with this Manual and in accordance with applicable legal requirements. 2. When the price variance between multiple responses reflects a lack of adequate competition, the Procurement Officer may re -solicit quotes or, if appropriate, recommend an award of the agreement to the lowest or best offeror, as determined by the Commission, in accordance with this Manual and in accordance with applicable legal requirements. 3. A recommendation for award under either of the above circumstances should include a statement in the contract file giving the basis for the determination (e.g., that there was adequate competition and/or the pricing terms are fair and reasonable). 16.0 CONTRACT APPROVAL, AWARD, AND EXECUTION A. Following authorization for contract award by the Commission, the following actions should be taken: 1. The Procurement Officer requests all Commission required documents and contract contingency requirement (e.g., bonds, proof of insurance) from the successful contractor. 2. The Procurement Officer conforms and sends copies of the final contract or amendment to the contractor for signature, and obtains the appropriate Commission authorization by ensuring full execution of the contract. 3. After full execution of the contract and the contractor's submittal of the required contract contingency items, unless otherwise agreed, the Procurement Policy Manual 26 September 2015 Revision: 2 173 Procurement Officer coordinates with the user department/project manager to prepare a "Notice to Proceed" letter, if required. 4. The Procurement Officer transmits a fully executed original copy of the contract to the contractor. Conformed copies should be sent to the project manager for use in the administration of the contract. 5. Contract Administration Responsibilities a. The user department/project manager conducts all further coordination on technical issues between the contractor and the Commission, subsequent to the issuance of the "Notice to Proceed" letter. b. Issues affecting the business or legal terms in the contract and/or requests for modification or supplemental agreements to the contract should immediately be brought to the attention of the Procurement Officer. c. The contract and all documents pertaining thereto should be maintained by the Procurement Officer, except for construction change orders which will be maintained by the project management team. 17.0 PROTEST PROCEDURES A. Under formal procurement processes described under this Manual, an interested party that has timely submitted a bid or proposal in response to any procurement of the Commission may file a protest objecting to the award of a contract. B. In order for a protest to be considered properly and timely filed, the protest must: 1. Be filed in writing with the Executive Director of the Commission, within seven (7) calendar days after (i) all requests for clarifications and requests for approved equals have been answered by the Commission or, if no requests for clarification or approved equals are received, after the period for requests for clarifications or approved equals has closed; (ii) after the Commission takes action, or such other time period as may be specified in the solicitation document; or (iii) the date certain contained in the solicitation for any solicitation for which a contract award is not made by the Commission. 2. Be filed by an actual bidder or proposer responding to the procurement and signed by a properly authorized representative. No other party has standing to protest or is considered an interested party. 3. Identify the specific procurement number involved. 4. Identify the specific recommended action or decision being protested. 5. Specify in detail the grounds for the protest, the facts supporting the protest and the status of the protester. 6. Include all relevant supporting documentation with the protest at the time of submittal. 7. Describe the resolution to the protest desired by the protesting party. Procurement Policy Manual 27 September 2015 Revision: 2 174 If a protest does not comply with each of the seven (7) requirements listed above, the protest will not be considered and will be returned to the protester. C. The Procurement Officer will attempt to resolve a properly filed protest or perform additional fact-finding, including establishing a protest evaluation team to evaluate the merits of the protest. The Procurement Officer, in consultation with the Commission's General Counsel, will prepare a recommended resolution of the protest for consideration by the Executive Director. The Executive Director will review the recommendation of the evaluation team and will render a determination to uphold or deny the protest. D. If the Executive Director's decision is to deny the protest, the solicitation may be continued without further delay or the contract will be recommended to the Commission for award, or executed, if previously awarded by the Commission subject to resolution of the protest. If the Executive Director's decision is to uphold the protest, a recommendation will be made to the Commission to amend the solicitation and the date for receipt of proposals or bids, reject all proposals or bids, cancel the request for proposals or invitation for bids and solicit new proposals or bids, award the contract to another proposer, or other such actions as he/she deems appropriate. E. The Executive Director's decision shall be final, and there shall be no further administrative recourse at the local level, except for protests related to federally funded procurements. F. The procedures set forth in this Chapter 2, Section 17.0 are not intended to reduce or restrict protest rights specifically provided under applicable funding agreements, or state or federal laws authorizing the use of money funding applicable contracts. 1. In any procurement involving FTA funds, the Procurement Officer shall disclose information regarding the protest to FTA and shall keep FTA informed about the status of the protest. 2. An interested party that has filed a protest must exhaust all administrative remedies with the Commission before pursuing a protest with FTA. G. A debrief will be available for proposers to whom award was not made, for a period of ten (10) days following award of the contract by the Commission. 18.0 PUBLIC RECORDS REQUESTS A. All requests for procurement related records and/or information must be submitted to the Commission's Office and Board Services Manager for appropriate action. Procurement related records should not be disclosed as public information until staff recommendation for award has been forwarded to all interested parties or as otherwise appropriate under the California Public Records Act and applicable state and federal laws, guidelines and requirements. Procurement Policy Manual 28 September 2015 Revision: 2 175 CHAPTER 3 — COMPETITIVE SEALED BIDS ("LOW BID") A. PUC § 130232 requires that the purchase of all supplies, equipment, and materials, and the construction of all facilities and works, when the expenditure required exceeds twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000), must be by competitive sealed bidding, also known as "low bid", contracting, with the contract let to the lowest responsive, responsible bidder. Notice requesting bids must be published in at least one newspaper of general circulation. The publication must be made at least ten (10) days before the date for receipt of bids; however, based on the nature of the procurement, a longer period of time shall be provided, as necessary, to ensure that bidders are allowed adequate and sufficient time to prepare bids before the date of bid opening. The resulting contract will be a fixed price contract. B. In order for competitive sealed bidding to be most effective, the following conditions should be present in the development of an Invitation for Bids (IFB): 1. A complete, adequate and sufficiently generic specification is developed; 2. Adequate competition is available in the marketplace (two or more responsive and responsible bidders will compete); and 3. The procurement lends itself to a firm -fixed price contract. C. Discussions and Communications 1. Bids shall be evaluated without discussions with bidders. 2. Information concerning proposed procurements should not be released outside the Commission before an IFB is released, except for pre - solicitation notices and publicly available general project information. D. Pre -Bid Conferences 1. The Contracting Officer may use pre -bid conferences to explain procurement requirements. 2. If the Commission requires any type of mandatory pre -bid conference, site visit, or meeting, the IFB should include the time, date, and location of the mandatory pre -bid site visit, conference or meeting, and when and where project documents, including final plans and specifications are available. Any mandatory pre -bid site visit, conference or meeting should be no sooner than a minimum of five (5) calendar days following the publication of the IFB. E. Bid Addenda 1. If it becomes necessary to make changes in quantity, specifications, delivery schedules, opening dates, or other items, or to correct a defective or ambiguous IFB, the change should be accomplished by addendum of the IFB. 2. Addenda to an IFB should be identified as such and should require the bidder to acknowledge receipt of all addenda issued. Procurement Policy Manual 29 September 2015 Revision: 2 176 F. Time Of Bid Receipt The IFB should specify a time for receipt of bids. Bids must be received in the office designated in the IFB not later than the time identified in the IFB. G. Late Bids Unless otherwise specified in a particular bid solicitation, bids are considered late based on the time clock at the 3rd floor Commission Receptionist Desk, located at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, CA 92501. Bids are considered late if the time stamped by the Commission upon receipt of the bid is later than the deadline/time identified in the IFB. Late bids will not be accepted by the Commission, unless a bid is late owing solely to Commission mishandling or some other legitimate extenuating factor, as determined in the Commission's sole discretion. H. Receipt Of Bids As bids are received, the Procurement Officer should secure and safeguard the bids until the established time for bid opening. I. Opening Of Bids The Procurement Officer will coordinate the bid opening. All bids over $25,000 for supplies, equipment, and materials and the construction of all facilities and works received prior to the bid opening submission deadline will be publicly opened, read aloud to the persons present, and recorded. Bid opening documentation should include the date, time, and place of bid opening and a tabulation of bidder names and related bid amount. Such bid opening documentation should include the signature of at least one witness. J. Recording Of Bids Construction bids over the small purchase threshold of $25,000 that are publicly opened will be recorded on a bid summary or bid tabulation sheet. The Procurement Officer should certify the accuracy of the bid summary sheet by placing his/her signature thereon. The Commission's Procurement Officer should ensure that these results are posted on the Commission interne site within a reasonable time after bid opening. K. Tie Bids If two or more responsible and responsive bids are received for the same total or unit price, quality and service being equal, the Commission shall following: Accept the one it chooses; Accept the lowest bid made by negetiatien-t- the ie bidEler e . Bestablish a date and time to draw lots, which may shall be accomplished by tossing a coin or pulling bidder names out of a hat, to determine the winner. If this process is selectedUsing the lottery method, the Commission shouldshall: 1. Advise the tied bidders in writing that a tie has occurred, advise them a winner will be determined by drawing lots, and invite them to attend the drawing. Procurement Policy Manual 30 September 2015 Revision: 2 177 1 2. Conduct the drawing of lots on the date and time previously established with at least two individuals as witnesses. The procurement file should reflect the names, titles, and departments of the witnesses. If the witnesses are not Commission staff, the name, organization, address, and telephone number of the individuals should be listed. 3. Declare the winner of the drawing of lots as the apparent low bidder for bid evaluation and award purposes. L. Alternative Sources of Procurement Authority Notwithstanding the requirements of PUC § 130232, and the provisions set forth in this Chapter, the Commission may use Cooperative Agreements (as described in Chapter 1, Section 6.0) where such use is otherwise permitted by law. Procurement Policy Manual 31 September 2015 Revision: 2 178 CHAPTER 4 - DESIGN -BUILD CONTRACTS 1.0 PURPOSE A. As set forth in Public Contract Code (PCC) Section 6800 et seq., the legislature has determined that the design -build method of procurement should be evaluated for the purposes of exploring whether the potential exists for reduced project costs, expedited project completion, or design features that are not achievable through the traditional design -bid -build method. The Commission has beenwas selected, as one of a limited number of participants, to participate in the Design - Build demonstration program with the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project (SR- 91 CIP). B. As set forth in PCC Section 6820, et. seq., the Commission is authorized to utilize Design -Build for projects on or adjacent to the state highway system, including related non -highway portions of the project, based on either best value or lowest responsible bid. C. For the purposes of this Chapter, "Design -Build" means a method of procuring design and construction from a single source. The selection of the single source occurs before the development of complete plans and specifications. 2.0 PROCEDURES FOR DESIGN -BUILD CONTRACTS A. The Executive Director may adopt any lawful methods, procedures and criteria that he or she determines are in the best interest of the Commission. B. The Toll Program Director, through coordination with the Procurement Officer, will prepare documents for the solicitation of proposals for the SR 91 CIPhighway-related dDesign-bBuild procurements. C. The documents prepared for the SR 91 CIP dDesign-bBuild procurements shall control over any conflicting provisions contained herein. D. The Commission shall use a procurement method permitted by law and appropriate for the elements of the services (design v. construction) representing the preponderance of work and having the greatest cost, even though other necessary services would not typically be procured by that method. For example, the construction costs of a Design -Build project are usually predominant, so the Commission would use competitive negotiations or sealed bids for the entire procurement rather than the qualification -based "Brooks Act" procurement procedures. 1. The use of the Design -Build procurement method for FTA-funded projects shall comply with FTA Circular 4220.1 F, Section VI.3.h. Procurement Policy Manual 32 September 2015 Revision: 2 179 CHAPTER 5 - COMPETITIVELY NEGOTIATED PROCUREMENTS 1.0 NEGOTIATED PROCUREMENTS —GENERAL A. This Chapter outlines the Commission's procedures for competitively negotiated procurements for contracts: 1. Not legally required to be procured through the low -bid competitive procurement method pursuant to PUC § 130232; and 2. Intended to be awarded on the basis of both price and non -price factors. B. A procurement is "negotiated" if discussions, negotiations, or other exchanges between the Commission and the offerors are anticipated and planned in order to maximize the Commission's ability to communicate, understand, and obtain the best value for contract award. 1. The exchanges involve bargaining, persuasion, alteration of assumptions and positions, and give-and-take applied to price, schedule, technical requirements, type of contract, and other proposed terms. 2. The exchanges after establishment of the competitive range of price and terms are done with the intent of allowing the offeror to revise its proposal, once and potentially several times. C. Though not an all-inclusive listing, competitively negotiated procurements can be used for the following types of procurements: 1. Professional services contracts for non -architect -engineer related services; miscellaneous service contracts; 2. Architect -Engineer and related services contracts as further defined and subject to the limitations specified in Section 6.0 of this Chapter; 3. Specialized equipment, computers, telecommunications equipment, microwave equipment and other related electronic equipment and apparatus; or 4. Best Value, Design -Build contracts described in Chapter 4. 2.0 SOURCE SELECTION TECHNIQUES A. The Procurement Officer can choose from a range of source selection techniques for the competitively negotiated process based on: 1. What is suitable for the specific circumstances of a requirement, and 2. Which technique provides the best opportunity to tradeoff price/cost and qualitative benefits in order to gain the best value for the Commission. B. In acquisitions where the requirement is clearly definable and the risk of unsuccessful contract performance is minimal, and excluding contracts for Architect -Engineer and related services, cost or price may play a dominant role as a significantly important evaluation factor for award. Procurement Policy Manual 33 September 2015 Revision: 2 180 C. On the other hand, the less definitive the requirement, a requirement for technical superiority, more development work required, or the greater the performance risk, then the technical or past performance considerations play a more dominant role as significantly important evaluation factors for award. D. The Commission obtains best value in negotiated acquisitions by using any one or a combination of selection approaches wherein the relative importance of cost or price may vary with other non -cost or price factor(s). The Procurement Officer and user department/project manager should shall select an approach that will provide the Commission with the best offer based on the requirements, and on applicable legal requirements. E. All evaluation factors associated with a particular proposal should shall be identified along with their relative importance. The Procurement Officer, in cooperation with the user department/project manager, may utilize explicit factors, price performance trade off, technically qualified/lowest price or other reasonable and appropriate means of evaluating proposers. F. Proposals will be solicited from an adequate number of qualified sources. In determining sources to solicit, the Procurement Officer should use all reasonable means available to ensure that an adequate number of potential qualified proposers receive the solicitation in order to obtain maximum fair and open competition. 3.0 PROPOSAL EVALUATION A. The evaluation factors that will be considered in evaluating proposals should shall be tailored to each procurement and should shall include only those factors that will have an impact on the source selection decision. The evaluation factors that apply to a particular procurement and the relative importance of those factors are within the broad discretion of the Procurement Officer and/or the user department/project manager. B. The Procurement Officer may shall establish a formal evaluation committee, of at least two persons, referred to as the "Evaluation Committee," ." which The size of an evaluation committee should be (1) based on the size and complexity of the goods or services being_ procured and (2) well balanced and represented by individuals involved with the procurement and/or affected by the goods or services being procured. The Evaluation Committee will be charged with responsibility for evaluating proposals, short listing firms, establishing a competitive range, and/or recommending a firm or firms for contract award. 1. Personnel engaged in the evaluation process should shall not discuss or reveal information concerning the evaluations except to those individuals participating in the same proceedings and only to the extent that information is required in connection with such proceedings. 2. Divulging information during the evaluation, selection, and negotiation phases to offerors or to personnel not having a need to know is prohibited as it could jeopardize the evaluation process and resultant award. Procurement Policy Manual 34 September 2015 Revision: 2 181 C. The Evaluation Committee will evaluate each proposal in accordance with the evaluation criteria in the solicitation. The Evaluation Committee's selection decision is subject to the final approval of the Commission or the Executive Director, as required under this Manual. 4.0 REJECTION OF PROPOSALS A. The Evaluation Committee may reject all proposals received that are determined not to be in the competitive range, including those proposals made by offerors who refuse to execute any reasonably required representations and/or certifications. B. The Commission, based upon the recommendation of the Evaluation Committee or the Executive Director, may reject any or all proposals received. The Evaluation Committee or Executive Director may recommend rejection by the Commission because: 1. All otherwise acceptable proposals received are at unreasonable prices; 2. The proposals were not independently arrived at in open competition, were collusive or were submitted in bad faith; or 3. For other reasons, rejection is clearly in the Commission's best interest. 5.0 NEGOTIATION; SELECTION A. The methods and procedures for selection and negotiation will be determined by the Procurement Officer, in coordination with the user department/project manager, and set forth in the request for proposals. 6.0 SPECIAL PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO ARCHITECT -ENGINEER AND RELATED SERVICES A. This Section prescribes guidelines and requirements for the procurement of Architectural -Engineering ("A-E") and related services. A-E Services are defined as professional services of an architectural or engineering nature that are required by law to be performed by a registered or licensed architect or engineer. Related services include: land surveying and construction project management. For the procurement of A-E and related services, the Procurement Officer should shall follow the procedures set forth in this Section 6.0, in addition to the pertinent procedures set forth elsewhere in this Chapter. B. If the procurement is for A-E and related services, the selection must be based on the demonstrated competence and qualifications of prospective contractors, and should follow the procedures set forth inshall comply with Government Code 4525, et seq., and, when applicable, the laws and regulations that govern the procurement of design -related services with federal funds (see e.g., Title 23 U.S.C. 112, Letting of Contracts and 23 CFR 172, Administration of Engineering and Design Related Service Contracts). These services should shall be acquired based on a two-step, sealed bidding procedure, whereby qualifications are presented in a separate sealed envelope from a firm's price proposal. The proposals should shall be initially evaluated based on qualifications only, and Procurement Policy Manual 35 September 2015 Revision: 2 182 price negotiations should shall then be commenced with the proposer determined by the Commission to be most qualified. If the Commission is unable to negotiate satisfactory terms, at a fair and reasonable price, with the proposer considered to be most qualified, then negotiations should shall be terminated with that proposer and commenced with the next most qualified proposer. This process shall be continued with successive qualified proposers until agreement is reached that is determined to be fair and reasonable. Procurement Policy Manual 36 September 2015 Revision: 2 183 CHAPTER 6 - SIMPLIFIED PURCHASE PROCEDURES 1.0 GENERAL A. Procurement of materials, supplies, or services by the Commission should adhere to the procedures in this Manual, as described in Chapter 2, Section 1.G. The procedures ensure that the appropriate authorizations are secured for the type of procurement made, and that the minimum requirements associated with the materials, equipment, supplies or services requested are procured in a fair and open manner. B. This Chapter sets forth the procedures for small purchases and other simplified purchase procedures. These purchases should be made competitively except where it is in the best interests of the Commission to accomplish such purchases non -competitively. Justification for such non-competitive procurement should be made, in writing, and maintained in the procurement record. 2.0 REQUIREMENTS FOR MICROPURCHASES A. If the purchase price for required supplies, equipment, services and/or materials is considered a micropurchase as defined in Chapter 2, Section 1.G, then multiple quotes are not required; however, such purchases should be fairly priced using a purchase technique that best serves the needs of the Commission, and rotated among commercial vendors offering competitive pricing. B. Micropurchases may be accomplished by securing one proposal or quotation from a commercial vendor offering supplies, equipment or materials to the public in substantial quantities and the price is deemed to be fair and reasonable. a. For FTA-funded procurements, the determination that the price is fair and reasonable and how the determination was derived must be included as documentation in the procurement file. C. If oral quotes are obtained, written record of the quotes should be retained. The record should include, at a minimum, vendor name, telephone number and address, name of person providing the quote, and terms. 3.0 USE OF SMALL PURCHASE PROCEDURES A. For small purchases as defined in Chapter 2, Section 1.G, staff should obtain a minimum of three (3) written quotations with reasonable efforts to include at least one Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) vendor and, when practicable and appropriate, an award should be made on the basis of lowest price. B. For public works projects (i.e., maintenance, repair or construction work) and planned solicitations for services defined as small purchases in accordance with Chapter 2, Section 1.G, review by the Procurement Officer prior to the solicitation of quotes is required in order to ensure compliance with relevant insurance requirements, applicable legal mandates, e.g., insurance, bonding, prevailing wage, and payroll records. Procurement Policy Manual 37 September 2015 Revision: 2 184 C. The Procurement Officer should use and/or authorize the Small Purchase Procedures that are most suitable, efficient, and economical based on the circumstances of each procurement and determine that the price is fair and reasonable. 4.0 PROHIBITED USE OF SMALL PURCHASE PROCEDURES A. The Procurement Officer and or Commission staff may not divide, split or fragment a procurement totaling more than the Commission's small purchase limitation into several purchases that are less than the limit in order to use the Small Purchase Procedures. Procurement Policy Manual 38 September 2015 Revision: 2 185 CHAPTER 7 - NON-COMPETITIVE AND EMERGENCY PROCUREMENTS AND REMEDIAL MEASURES 1.0 NON-COMPETITIVE PROCUREMENTS A. The non-competitive procurement of non -federally funded goods and services, which otherwise require competitive procurement may be authorized under one or more of the following circumstances, subject to any minimum Commission vote required by applicable law: 1. The Commission has advertised the contract as required by this Manual and has undertaken reasonable efforts to solicit potential contractors, but has determined that competition is inadequate; 2. There is only a single source of supply available, or only one contractor is qualified to provide the service or product; 3. The goods or services are to be provided by a government or other public entity; 4. The goods or services are to be provided pursuant to an amendment of an existing contract that does not materially alter the terms and conditions of the contract (other than to extend the term and/or increase compensation to provide for the extended term or for additional goods/services to be provided under substantially the same terms of the original contract), provided that such renewal, extension or amendment is authorized or permitted by the contract; 5. The equipment to be purchased is of a technical nature and the procurement thereof without advertising is necessary in order to assure standardization of equipment and interchangeability of parts; 6. The item to be purchased is a capital maintenance item that is available only from the original manufacturer or supplier or is required to maintain system operational compatibility and connectivity with the existing system(s); 7. The contract is for employment services; 8. The contract is one for which only per diem and travel expenses are paid and there is no payment for services rendered; 9. The Commission is piggybacking on an existing agreement between a contractor and any public agency or entity within the County of Riverside and/or the County of San Bernardino, or other public entities if: (a) the proposed Commission contract is for the same material scope of work as the other contract; (b) the proposed Commission contract contains substantially the same terms as the other contract; and (c) the other contract was competitively procured in accordance with requirements applicable to such other agency's procurements; Procurement Policy Manual 39 September 2015 Revision: 2 186 10. The provisions listed under Chapter 8, Section 3.0 regarding federally funded sole source, non-competitive, sole source procurements are applicable; or 11. Except as may otherwise be limited by applicable law, the Commission determines that a non-competitive procurement is in the public interest and in the best interest of the Commission. B. Except as limited by applicable law, the Executive Director shall have authority to determine that non-competitive procurements are permitted under paragraph A, subparagraphs (1) through (11) for contracts for amounts less than or equal to $100,000150,000. Commission approval is required for contracts over $100,000150,000. Each decision to proceed with a non-competitive procurement must be supported by a written justification that is approved by the Executive Director or Procurement Officer, as required under this Manual. C. The Procurement Officer will take action, whenever possible and in coordination with the user department/project manager, to avoid the need to continue to procure the same supply, service, or construction without competition. D. A non-competitive or sole source procurement, where competition is legally required, should not be justified on the basis of any of the following circumstances: 1. The lack of adequate advance planning for the procurement of the required commodities, services, or other items; 2. Delays in the procurement caused by administrative delays, lack of sufficient procurement personnel, or improper handling of procurement requests or competitive procedures; or 3. Pending expiration of budget authority. E. The Procurement Officer should ensure that each non-competitive contract contains all of the required clauses, representations, and certifications, in accordance with the applicable laws, regulations, or Commission adopted policy. F. The Procurement Officer should ensure that proper records of each non- competitive procurement are maintained. 2.0 EMERGENCY PROCUREMENTS; REMEDIAL MEASURES A. The Commission may award a contract on an emergency basis if the requirement is essential to deal with an existing emergency condition, as defined below in Paragraph `B", and the Executive Director may award a contract when necessary as a remedial measure as defined below in Paragraph "C". The emergency procurement of supplies or services and procurements as a remedial measure should be limited to quantities and time periods sufficient to meet the immediate threat and should not be used to meet long-term requirements. B. For purposes of an emergency procurement under this Chapter, an "emergency condition" is a situation (such as a flood, epidemic, riot, equipment failure, or any other reason declared by the Commission) which creates an immediate threat to Procurement Policy Manual 40 September 2015 Revision: 2 187 the public health, welfare, or safety. The existence of an emergency condition creates an immediate need for supplies, services, or construction which cannot be met through normal procurement methods, and the lack of which would seriously threaten one (1) or more of the following: 1. The health or safety of any person; 2. The preservation or protection of property; 3. The continuation of necessary Commission functions; or 4. Contract delays that could result in an increase to the cost of the project. In the case of contracts for services, the Executive Director may declare the emergency condition. C. The Executive Director may authorize the expenditure of funds previously appropriated by the Commission for the direct purchases of goods and services, without following bid requirements (i) when a finding is made that immediate remedial measures are necessary to avert or alleviate damage to property, or to replace, repair, or restore damaged or destroyed property, of the Commission and are necessary in order to ensure that the facilities of the Commission are available to serve the transportation needs of the general public, and upon determining that available remedial measures, including procurement or construction in compliance with PUC § 130232, 130233, and 130234, are inadequate. D. A contract procured on an emergency basis or as a remedial measure should not be modified to expand the scope or extend the time of the procurement unless a limited number of additional commodities, services, or other items are needed to fill an ongoing emergency requirement until regular procurement action procedures initiated under other Chapters in this Manual can be completed. E. The Executive Director must, after an emergency expenditure in excess of his/her delegated signature authority, and after an expenditure necessary as a remedial measure, submit to the Commission a procurement summary explaining the necessity for the expenditure. F. The Procurement Officer should ensure that each emergency procurement contract and/or contract entered into as a remedial measure contains the required clauses, representations, and certifications, in accordance with the requirements of this Manual. G. The Procurement Officer should ensure that proper records of each non- competitive procurement are maintained in accordance with the requirements of this Manual. 3.0 WRITTEN JUSTIFICATION FOR EMERGENCY AND OTHER NON- COMPETITIVE PROCUREMENTS A. In each instance where the non-competitive procurement procedures set forth in this Chapter are used, the user department/project manager is required to prepare a written statement recording all of the facts that provide justification for proceeding with the non-competitive or emergency procurement. Procurement Policy Manual 41 September 2015 Revision: 2 188 B. The Procurement Officer must approve the justification for all non-competitive procurements described under this chapter before such a procurement can proceed. Procurement Policy Manual 42 September 2015 Revision: 2 189 CHAPTER 8 — REFERENCES TO APPLICABLE LAWS /REGULATIONS 1.0 GENERAL A. This Manual lists references to the various federal, state, and local regulations, to which the Manual was written to conform and/or comply. B. The Procurement Officer will be responsible, in cooperation with the Commission's General Counsel, for reviewing these references from time to time in order to review new requirements and to note updates to the existing regulations. 2.0 REFERENCES A. For the Commission's capital projects and contracts for goods and services utilizing FTA or FHWA funds, the provisions included in the Manual will apply only to the extent that they do not conflict with FTA or FHWA requirements, including the standards of FTA Circular 4220.1F, or the most current version thereof, entitled "Third Party Contracting Requirements" or FHWA Form FHWA-1273 entitled "Required Contract Provisions Federal -Aid Construction Contracts." In case of any conflict, the applicable federal standards shall govern. The foregoing documents, though not all-inclusive, set forth requirements that the Commission must comply with in the solicitation, selection and administration of contracts funded by the FTA and FHWA, respectively. B. For projects funded by Caltrans and/or FHWA, the selection process shall be in accordance with Chapter 10 of Caltrans' Local Assistance Procedures Manual. http://www.dot.ca.gov/hq/LocalPrograms/lam/prog_p/plOcons 1.pdf. C. FTA Circular 4220.1F (or the most current version thereof) sets forth the requirements the Commission must adhere to in the solicitation, award, and administration of its third party contracts. FTA Circular 4220.1F applies to all FTA grantees and subgrantees subrecipients that contract with third parties under FTA assistance programs. a. In addition to the requirements set forth in this Chapter 8, the FTA standards for competition are set forth generally in Chapter 1 hereof and the FTA procedures for competitive sealed bid ("low bid") procurements and competitively negotiated procurements are set forth in Chapters 3 and 5 hereof, respectively. D. Some of the requirements include the following: 1. Pre -Award Audits. A pre -award (pre -negotiation) audit shall be completed, as required based on the participating state or federal funds, for each consultant contract, including those contracts where the consultant was previously identified as a "high -risk" recipient as described in 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 18.12. 2. Brooks Act Provisions. The provisions of the Brooks Act (40 U.S.C. 544) require local agencies to award federally funded engineering and design Procurement Policy Manual 43 September 2015 Revision: 2 190 contracts on the basis of fair and open competitive negotiations, demonstrated competence, and professional qualifications (23 CFR, Section 172). 3. Required Contract Provisions/Forms. a. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise i. Notice to Proposers Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Information ii. Standard Agreement for Subcontractor/DBE Participation iii. Local Agency Proposer UDBE DBE Commitment (Consultant Contracts) iv. Local Agency Proposer DBE Information (Consultant Contract) v. Final Report -Utilization of DBE, First -Tier vi. Subcontractor Listing b. Federal Lobbying Restrictions, Title 31 U.S.C. Section 1352 i. Non -lobbying Certification for Federal -aid Contracts ii. Disclosure of Lobbying 4. Caltrans/FWHA Authorization to Proceed. FHWA or Caltrans acting in FHWA's behalf must give the local agency an "Authorization to Proceed" with a project prior to the performance of any work for which federal reimbursement is to be requested, including the pre -award audit. Copies of the "Authorization to Proceed" and the consultant contract must be retained in the project files for future audit purposes. 5. Certification of Consultant and Local Agency. The Procurement Officer will be responsible for ensuring that, when required, the certifications shown in Exhibits 10-F, "Certification of Consultant," and 10-G, "Certification of Local Agency" of the Caltrans Local Assistance Procedures Manual are incorporated into the solicitation and executed by the appropriate signatories. a. The certifications must be executed by a principal or authorized corporate official of the consultant, and by a principal administrative officer of the governmental agency responsible for the selection of the consultant. It is essential that these certifications be preserved in the project files. 6. Veterans Employment. Pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 5325(k), the Commission shall ensure that contractors working on an FTA-funded capital project give a hiring preference, to the extent practicable, to veterans (as defined in Section 2108 of Title 5) who have the requisite skills and abilities to perform the construction work required under the contract. This subsection shall not be understood, construed or enforced in any manner that would require an employer to give Preference to any veteran over any Procurement Policy Manual 44 September 2015 Revision: 2 191 equally qualified applicant who is a member of any racial or ethnic minority, female, an individual with a disability, or former employee. For FHWA-funded capital projects, the Commission shall comply with the veteran's preference requirement, as set forth in 23 U.S.C. 114. E. Though not an all-inclusive listing, the following laws, regulations and code sections are applicable to Commission contracts: Federal Statute, Regulations, Policies, and Agreements Subject 49 CFR Part 18 Administrative Requirements for Grants & Cooperative Agreements 49 CFR Part 26 FTA Circular 4220.1 x FTA Circular 5010.1x Master Agreement FAR Participation by Minority Business Enterprises; DBE Program Third Party Contracting Requirements Grant Management Guidelines Terms & Conditions of Grantee Administration of Projects Supported & Funded by the FTA FAR Part 31 — Contract Cost Principles and Procedures 23 U.S.C. 114 / 23 CFR 633 — Form FHWA-1273 entitled "Required Contract Provisions 23 U.S.C. 315 / 49 CFR 1.48 Federal -Aid Construction Contracts." CA State Codes Civil Code Civil Code Code of Civil Procedure Government Code Government Code Government Code Labor Code Labor Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Section(s) 3247-3248 3320 Subject Payment Bond Payments to Prime Design Professionals 995.311 4525 et seq. 6250 - 6270 Bond Issuer Requirements Architect & Engineering Services Public Records Disclosure 5956 et seq. Infrastructure Projects 1777.1 1770-1780 Debarment by California Labor Commissioner Prevailing Wage, Work Hours, Certified Payroll Records, Apprentices 1103 Responsibility on Public Works Contracts 1104 Plans and Specifications 3300 3400 Contractor's License Brand Name OR Equal; Restrictive Clauses 4100 - 4114 Subcontracting 5100 - 5107 6100 - 6610 6800-6813 7100 - 7200 7103 9201 - 9203 Procurement Policy Manual 45 Relief of Bidders Awarding of Contracts Design/Build Demonstration Program Contract Clauses, Non -Collusion Affidavit Payment Bond for Public Works >$25,000 Claims and Disputes September 2015 Revision: 2 192 CA State Codes Section(s) Sub'ect Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Contract Code Public Utilities Code Public Utilities Code Public Utilities Code Public Utilities Code 10335 et seq. 20101 20103.6 20103.8 20104 Service Contracts Prequalification Limitation on Architect's Indemnity Obligation Alternative Bids Resolution of Construction Claims 20104.50 22300 Progress Payments on Public Works Substitution of Securities 130221 130232 130239 130232(c) 130232(d) Contracting With Other Government Agencies and Other Persons Award of Contracts Based On Price or Price and Other Factors; Bid Security; Emergency Procurements; Advertising; Immediate Remedial Measures; Rejecting Bids Authorization of Executive Director for Bid Expenditures <$50,000. Bid Security for Construction Work >$25,000 3.0 FTA/FHWA-FUNDED PROCUREMENT BY NON-COMPETITIVE (SOLE SOURCE) PROPOSALS A. Notwithstanding any other provision herein, federally funded contracts must comply with the federal requirements for non-competitive or sole source procurements. Non-competitive or sole source procurements are accomplished through solicitation of a proposal from only one source, or after solicitation of a number of sources, competition is determined inadequate. A contract change that amounts to a "cardinal change" or a "tag -on" as defined in FTA Circular 4220.1 f that involves a major deviation from the original purpose is considered a sole source procurement on a federally funded contract that must comply with this paragraph. 1. Procurement by noncompetitive proposals may be used only when the award of a contract is infeasible under small purchase procedures, competitive sealed bids, or competitive proposals and at least one of the following circumstances applies: a. The item is available only from a single source; b. The public exigency or emergency for the requirement will not permit a delay resulting from competitive solicitation; c. FTA/FHWA, as applicable, authorizes noncompetitive negotiations e.g., if FTA/FHWA, as applicable, provides a joint procurement grant or a research project grant with a particular firm or combination of firms, the grant agreement is the sole source approval; d. After solicitation of a number of sources, competition is determined inadequate; Procurement Policy Manual 46 September 2015 Revision: 2 193 e. The item is an associated capital maintenance item as defined in 49 U.S.C. §5307(a)(1) that is procured directly from the original manufacturer or supplier of the item to be replaced. The grantee must first certify in writing to FTA: i. that such manufacturer or supplier is the only source for such item; and ii. that the price of such item is no higher than the price paid for such item by like customers; or f. Any other circumstance justifying sole source procurement set forth in the applicable federal rules and regulations. 2. A cost analysis, i.e., verifying the proposed cost data, the projections of the data, and the evaluation of the specific elements of costs and profit, is required. 4.0 DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS A. In order to ensure the Commission's compliance with the federal DBE Program on all applicable procurements funded with United States Department of Transportation (DOT) dollars, the Commission will make reasonable efforts to utilize disadvantaged business enterprises in compliance with applicable federal regulations. B. The Commission's procurement process is structured to ensure that its DBE Program supports the Commission's commitment to promote, foster and utilize disadvantaged business enterprises as required and defined by applicable federal regulations. C. As a condition of funding assistance, and in accordance with DOT DBE regulations published in applicable federal regulations, the Commission is required to submit for approval a DBE Program and regular DBE goals, which it will make good faith efforts to achieve through procurement actions carried out under this Manual. D. Pursuant to 2 CFR Part 200.321, the Commission shall also take affirmative steps to assure that minority businesses, women's business enterprises, and labor surplus area firms are used when possible on federally funded projects. 5.0 GEOGRAPHICAL PREFERENCES A. For any FTA-funded contracts, except when procuring A-E services, the Commission is prohibited from using statutorily or administratively imposed in- state or local geographical preferences in the evaluation of bids or proposals unless federal statutes expressly mandate or encourage geographic preference. 6.0 REVENUE CONTRACTS A. The Commission may enter into revenue contracts with a third party whereby the primary purpose is to either generate revenues in connection with a transit -related Procurement Policy Manual 47 September 2015 Revision: 2 194 activity or create business opportunities utilizing an FTA-funded asset. The FTA requires such third party revenue contracts to be awarded utilizing competitive selection procedures and principles. The extent of and type of competition required is within the discretionary judgment of the Commission. 7.0 STATUTORY AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS A. The Commission shall comply with applicable federal statutory and regulatory requirements (such as Davis -Bacon Act, DBE, Debarment and Suspension, Clean Air, Environmental and Conservation Requirements, Buy America and Cargo Preference) in carrying out federally -funded procurement actions under this Manual. Below is a contract clause matrix that is applicable to third -party contract provisions for federally funded contracts, excluding micropurchases and except for Davis -Bacon requirements which apply to construction contracts exceeding $2,000. The matrix should be reviewed at least annually for any regulatory changes. TYPE OF PROCUREMENT PROVISION Professional Services/A&E Operations/ Management Rolling Stock Purchase Construction Materials & Supplies No Federal Government Obligations to Third Parties (by Use of a Disclaimer) All All All All All False Statements or Claims Civil and Criminal Fraud All All All All All Access to Third Party Contract Records All All All All All Changes to Federal Requirements All All All All All Termination >$10,000 if 49 CFR Part 18 applies. >$10,000 if 49 CFR Part 18 applies. >$10,000 if 49 CFR Part 18 applies. >$10,000 if 49 CFR Part 18 applies. >$10,000 if 49 CFR Part 18 applies. Civil Rights (Title VI, ADA, EEO except Special DOL EEO clause for construction projects) All All All>$10,000 All All Special DOL EEO clause for construction projects >$10,000 Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs) All All All All All Incorporation of FTA Terms All All All All All Debarment and Suspension >$25,000 >$25,000 >$25,000 >$25,000 >$25,000 Buy America >$100,000 As of Feb. 2011, FTA has not adopted the FAR 2.101 $150,000 standard. >$100,000 As of Feb. 2011, FTA has not adopted the FAR 2.101 $150,000 standard. >$100,000 As of Feb. 2011, FTA has not adopted the FAR 2.101 $150,000 standard. Resolution of Disputes, Breaches, or Other Litigation >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 Procurement Policy Manual 48 September 2015 Revision: 2 195 TYPE OF PROCUREMENT PROVISION Professional Services/A&E Operations/ Management Rolling Stock Purchase Construction Materials & Supplies Lobbying >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 Clean Air >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 Clean Water >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 >$100,000 Cargo Preference Transport by ocean vessel. Transport by ocean vessel. Transport by ocean vessel. Fly America Foreign air transp./travel. Foreign air transp./travel. Foreign air transp./travel. Foreign air transp./travel. Foreign air transp./travel. Veterans Hiring Preference All Davis -Bacon Act >$2,000 (also ferries). Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act >$100,000 (transportation services excepted). >$100,000 >$100,000 (also ferries). Copeland Anti -Kickback Act Section 1 Section 2 All > $2,000 (also ferries). Bonding $100,000 Seismic Safety A&E for new buildings & additions. New buildings & additions. Transit Employee Protective Arrangements Transit operations. Charter Service Operations All School Bus Operations All Drug Use and Testing Transit operations. Alcohol Misuse and Testing Transit operations. Patent Rights R & D Rights in Data and Copyrights R & D Energy Conservation All All All All All Recycled Products EPA -selected items $10,000 or more annually. EPA -selected items $10,000 or more annually. EPA -selected items $10,000 or more annually. Conformance with ITS National Architecture ITS projects. ITS projects. ITS projects. ITS projects. ITS projects. ADA Access A&E All All All All Notification of Federal Participation for States Limited to States. Limited to States. Limited to States. Limited to States. Limited to States. Procurement Policy Manual 49 September 2015 Revision: 2 196 1 1 CHAPTER 9 - DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS PROPERTY 1.0 DEFINITIONS A. "Surplus personal property" shall mean personal property of the Commission which is no longer needed or fit for its intended purpose or has exceeded its useful life. B. "Surplus real property" shall mean real property of the Commission which is no longer needed for a specified project. 2.0 DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY 3.0 A. Upon recommendation by the Executive Director, designated Commission staff may dispose of surplus real property in accordance with the RCTC Right of Way Policies and Procedures Manual, Section 8.5, Disposal of Surplus Properties. DISPOSAL OF PERSONAL PROPERTY A. Upon recommendation by the Executive Director and in accordance with applicable state or federal funding requirements, designated Commission staff may dispose of all surplus and obsolete personal property by donation, bid, auction, negotiated sale or exchange. If the disposal of such items is conducted by bid, the sale shall be conducted in accordance with generally accepted best practices and applicable laws and regulations. The Commission staff shall attempt to obtain the best value for the property that can reasonably be obtained. Procurement Policy Manual 50 September 2015 Revision: 2 197 CHAPTER 10 - OTHER PROCUREMENT MATTERS 1.0 DISPUTES, CLAIMS, AND CHANGES —DEFINITIONS A. Change Orders — the commercial and technical resolution of a contract modification. The change order document can be unilateral or bilateral in execution. B. Potential Claim — written notice provided to the Commission by the contractor when the: 1. Parties are unable to reach bilateral agreement on a change and the contractor is provided a unilateral change order ("protest"); or, 2. Contractor perceives that it is entitled to additional compensation (time or money) for something it believes to constitute extra work performed or to be performed. C. Claim — differences that have developed during the contract, under protest or under notice of potential claim, which are not resolved at the time the contractor returns the proposed final pay estimate. D. Dispute — a disagreement between the parties as to the merits, amount or remedy arising out of an issue in controversy, including a disagreement regarding a Claim or asserted default. E. Amendment — a modification considered outside the original contract scope or terms and formalized with a written agreement signed by both parties. 2.0 DISPUTES, CLAIMS, AND CHANGES —GENERAL A. The Procurement Officer is responsible for documenting negotiation activities for the record, and should be present at all professional services and construction contract negotiations. B. The Procurement Officer or project manager, as required, prepares the appropriate documentation (e.g., change order forms) for review and approval by the Commission's Executive Director or Commission, prior to issuance to the consultant/contractor for signature. This document includes full definition of work scope, impact on DBE goals, definition of time and schedule impacts, and price. The change order language stipulates that the agreed -upon terms are all inclusive, and no other relief will be available regarding this work. }1. For FTA-funded contracts, any damages recovered must be credited to the project involved unless the FTA permits otherwise. 2. For FTA-funded contracts, change orders that amount to cardinal changes or tag-ons shall comply with Chapter 8, Section 3.0(A). 3.0 TERMINATION A. All Commission contracts exceeding $25,000 should contain provisions enabling the Commission to terminate such contracts for the convenience of the Commission, and all federally funded contracts must contain such provisions. Procurement Policy Manual 51 September 2015 Revision: 2 198 These provisions should specify the manner in which such termination will be effected and the basis for settlement. There should also be included in such contracts appropriate provisions specifying causes for which the contracts may be terminated for default. B. Terminations for Convenience of the Commission 1. Commission contracts will be terminated for convenience only when this is determined to be in the best interests of the Commission. In lieu of issuing a notice of termination for convenience, the Procurement Officer will effect a no -cost settlement agreement where possible and appropriate. 2. Formal written notice to the contractor is necessary to terminate a contract for convenience. Such notice will state that the contract is being terminated pursuant to the termination for convenience provision of the contract, the effective date, the extent of termination and instructions to the contractor to cease performance under the contract. 3. The Procurement Officer will negotiate a no -cost settlement with the contractor if possible. Otherwise, the Procurement Officer will negotiate an appropriate settlement agreement with the contractor pursuant to the provisions of the termination for convenience clause of the contract. C. Terminations For Default 1. If a contractor's right to proceed is terminated for default, the Commission may take over and complete the work or cause it to be completed, and the contractor and his sureties, if any, shall be liable to the Commission for any increased costs caused thereby. The contractor and his sureties should, in addition to increased costs in completing the work, be liable for liquidated damages, if liquidated damages are provided in the contract, or for actual damages, if liquidated damages are not so provided. 2. If the Procurement Officer determines that the contractor's failure to perform arises from causes which are excusable under the terms of the contract, the Procurement Officer shall not terminate the contractor's right to proceed, nor shall he/she charge the contractor with liquidated damages (or if no liquidated damages, then actual damages) because of any delays occasioned by such causes. 3. Where the surety does not complete performance of the contract, the Procurement Officer normally will complete the performance of work by awarding a new contract based on the same plans and specifications. Such award may be the result of competitive bidding or negotiation; whichever procedure is most appropriate under the circumstances. The Procurement Officer must use reasonable diligence to obtain the lowest price available for completion. 4. If, after due consideration, the Procurement Officer determines that termination is not in the best interest of the Commission although the contractor is in default, the Procurement Officer may permit the contractor to continue the work, and the contractor and his sureties shall be liable to Procurement Policy Manual 52 September 2015 Revision: 2 199 the Commission for liquidated damages, as specified in the contract, or if liquidated damages are not so specified, for any actual damages occasioned by the failure of the contractor to complete the work in accordance with the terms of the contract. 5. Any provision for a liquidated damages assessment must be at a specific rate per day for each day of overrun and must be specified in the contract. a. For FTA-funded contracts, any damages recovered must be credited to the project involved unless the FTA permits otherwise. 4.0 BONDS, OTHER SECURITIES AND INSURANCE A. The Commission should specify bonding, in compliance with applicable federal and state requirements for all public works contracts. 1. In general, all construction contracts over $25,000 require a payment bond in the amount of 100% of the contract value. 2. All FTA-funded construction contracts over $100,000 require a performance bond in the amount of 100% of the contract value and a bid guarantee in the amount of no less than 5% of the contract value. 3. Bids for construction of facilities where the work is anticipated to exceed $25,000 require bid security as set forth in PUC § 130232. B. The Procurement Officer may require any of the following types of security for any solicitation or contract subject to this Manual, other than a small purchase, regardless of the estimated amount of the contract: 1. Bid bonds; 2. Other bid or proposal security; 3. Construction performance and payment bonds; and 4. Performance or payment bonds or other security on non -construction contracts. C. Requirement for Bonds To Be Executed By An Admitted Surety Insurer 1. California Code of Civil Procedure § 995.311 calls for any bond required on a public works contract to be executed by an admitted surety insurer. 2. The Commission has a duty to verify that an admitted surety insurer executes the bond. The Procurement Officer should print out information from the website of the California Department of Insurance (http://www.insurance.ca.gov/docs/FS-CompanyProfiles.htm) confirming that the surety is an admitted surety insurer and attach it to the bond. D. For federally funded procurements, the Commission shall not require unnecessary experience or excessive bonding. Procurement Policy Manual 53 September 2015 Revision: 2 200 5.0 CONTRACT CLOSEOUT A. A completed contract is one which is both physically and administratively complete and in which all aspects of contractual performance have been accomplished, terminated, or otherwise disposed of by contract modification. A contract is physically complete only after all articles and services called for under the contract, including such related items as reports, spare parts, and exhibits, have been delivered to and accepted by the Commission, including those articles and services for which no specific compensation may have been stipulated. A contract is administratively complete when all payments have been made and administrative actions accomplished. B. The project manager, in cooperation with the Procurement Officer, is responsible for review of the contract file and obtaining all necessary documentation to ensure that: (1) all deliverables and/or services (including any reports) required under the contract have been received and accepted; (2) the terms and conditions of the contract have been complied with; (3) disposition of accountable property under the contract has been accomplished; all necessary actions including final payment and releases required to close the contract are completed and documented. C. Small purchase files should be considered closed when the Procurement Officer receives evidence of receipt of property and final payment. D. A contract file should not be closed in any of the following situations: 1. If the contract is the subject of a claim or dispute; 2. If the contract is in litigation or under appeal; 3. In the case of a termination, if all termination actions have not been completed; or 4. If state or federal approval is required and has not been received. Procurement Policy Manual 54 September 2015 Revision: 2 201 CHAPTER 11- PAYMENT 1.0 COMMISSION PAYMENT PROCESS A. The Commission will promptly process all contract payments with necessary controls to assure compliance with all contract terms and conditions in accordance with internal procedures recommended by the Chief Financial Officer and authorized by the Executive Director. B. The Procurement Officer should clearly specify in solicitations and contracts the form and content of an acceptable invoice, including a requirement that invoices be sequentially numbered, that they contain a date and contract number and the services for which they are invoicing, the period of performance being invoiced, and to whom invoices are to be sent. 2.0 PROGRESS PAYMENTS A. The Commission may provide for progress payments under contracts that require long time periods to complete contract performance or if the use of progress payments contributes to the effective and efficient administration of consultant/contractor work. Progress payments will be made on the basis of allowable costs incurred by the consultant/contractor, and the stage of completion of the contract. 1. Criteria. Contract clauses providing for progress payments should be used when the investment in work and progress is expected to be great enough to add substantial costs to the contract or strain the consultant/contractor's cash flow or ability to obtain financing. Under no circumstances should payments exceed the consultant/contractor's physical completion of the Work, nor should they amount to advance payments. Progress payments can be based on a periodic voucher for expenditures, a milestone, or the Commission's estimate of work accomplished as defined in the contract. 2. For federally funded procurements, the Commission must obtain adequate security (i.e., title to work in progress; letter of credit) for any progress payments made. 3. For FTA-funded procurements, advance payments are prohibited unless prior written concurrence is obtained from the FTA. B. Progress Payments on Public Works In accordance with PCC § 20104.50, the Commission must make progress payments within 30 days after receipt of an undisputed and properly submitted payment request from a contractor on a construction contract. If the Commission fails to make timely payment, the Commission may be required to pay interest to the contractor equivalent to the legal rate set forth in subdivision (s) of Section 685.010 of the Code of Civil Procedure. C. Progress Payments and Retentions on Architect, Engineer, and Land Surveyor Contracts Procurement Policy Manual 55 September 2015 Revision: 2 202 Pursuant to California Civil Code §3320, for any contract for public works or improvement, the Commission shall pay to the prime design professional any progress payment within 30 days of receipt of a written demand for payment in accordance with the contract, and the final retention payment, if applicable, within 45 days of receipt of a written demand for payment in accordance with the contract. If any amount is wrongfully withheld or is not timely paid, the prime design professional should be entitled to a penalty of PA percent for the improperly withheld amount, in lieu of any interest otherwise due, per month for every month that payment is not made. 3.0 PROMPT PAYMENT TO SUBCONTRACTORS —FEDERALLY FUNDED AGREEMENTS A. In accordance with 49 CFR Part 26, Commission contracts above the small purchase threshold must require that the prime contractor or subcontractor shall pay to any subcontractor, not later than 7 days of receipt of each progress payment from the Commission, unless otherwise agreed to in writing, the respective amounts paid to the contractor on account for the work performed by the subcontractors, to the extent of each subcontractor's interest therein. The Commission contract may provide that, in the event that there is a good faith dispute over all or any portion of the amount due on a progress payment from the prime contractor or subcontractor to a subcontractor, then the prime contractor or subcontractor may withhold no more than 150 percent of the disputed amount. B. The Commission must also require the prompt return of retainage payments from the prime contractor to the subcontractor within 7 days after the subcontractor's work is satisfactorily completed. 4.0 PAYMENT OF RETENTION ON PUBLIC WORKS CONTRACTS A. Pursuant to PCC § 7107, within 60 days after the date of completion of the work of improvement, the Commission must release any retention withheld except funds withheld to satisfy outstanding stop notices or otherwise properly withheld. In the event of a dispute between the Commission and the original contractor, the Commission may withhold from the final payment an amount not to exceed 150 percent of the disputed amount. 5.0 REQUEST FOR PAYMENT CERTIFICATION A. All contracts above the small purchase threshold may contain a clause, which requires the contractor to submit with each request for payment, a certification that the claim for payment is true, correct, and for services rendered and/or supplies delivered in accordance with the contract. B. The user department/project manager will disapprove and Accounts Payable will return unpaid any request for payment which does not contain the certification when required. Procurement Policy Manual 56 September 2015 Revision: 2 203 REVISION HISTORY: Revision No. Revisions Adopted 0 Adopted by the Commission 7/11/12 1 Adopted by the Commission 12/ 12/ 12 2 Adopted by the Commission 9/9/15 (pending) Procurement Policy Manual 57 September 2015 Revision: 2 204 ATTACHMENT 2 RESOLUTION NO. 15-017 RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION REGARDING THE REVISED PROCUREMENT POLICY MANUAL WHEREAS, the Commission previously adopted Resolution No. 12-031, "Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding the Revised Procurement Policy Manual"; and WHEREAS, the Commission received corrective action recommendations from the Federal Transit Administration as a result of a triennial audit completed in June 2015; WHEREAS, the Commission is required to comply with the Office of Management and Budget's issuance of the Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards (Uniform Grant Guidance); and WHEREAS, the Commission desires to update its procurement policies and procedures to continue to be a comprehensive, useful framework and incorporate best practices for the Commission's procurements. NOW, THEREFORE, the Riverside County Transportation Commission does hereby resolve as follows: Section 1. Section 2. The Procurement Policy Manual previously adopted on December 12, 2012, is hereby replaced in its entirety by the revised Procurement Policy Manual, set forth in Attachment 1, attached hereto and incorporated herein. The Riverside County Transportation Commission hereby approves and adopts the Procurement Policy Manual, as revised, to be effective immediately. 205 APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 9t" day of September, 2015. Daryl R. Busch, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: Jennifer Harmon Clerk of the Board 206 ATTACHMENT 3 Revised Procurement Policy Manual .ni lino cam, tows ccomisuon August 24, 2015 207 • Response to 2006 FTA Triennial review April 2007 f— • Comprehensive • Incorporated various laws and regulations c A i cmeirEs 101gusrRAi101e a 110(11BENT • Response to 2012 FTA Procurement System Review December 2012 September 20 • Response to 2015 FTA Triennial review • Federal Uniform Guidance • Best practices 208 • Standards of conduct • Contract term • Cooperative agreements • Purchase authorizations • Prohibition of arbitrary actions • Cost estimates and analysis • Brand name or equal specifications • Contract changes • Debrief period 1 Specific Procurement Procedures • Sealed bid (low bid) • Design -build • Competitively negotiated • Bonding requirements c A i NEES ESIISTIW1011 a 110(11BENT Laws and Regulations • Veterans employment • Minority, women's, and labor surplus businesses • "Should" changed to "shall" • Limited application of certain policies to federally funded procurements 209 c A i (011INISESIISIDT1011&110(11BENT FTA contractor I Legal counsel 4- Final Revisions Commission adoption September 9, 2015 Submit to FTA by September 9, 2015 210 AGENDA ITEM 81 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Shirley Medina, Planning and Programming Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Congestion Management Program Monitoring BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 10-65-114-04, Amendment No. 4 to Agreement No. 10-65-114-00, with VRPA Technologies for continued monitoring of the Congestion Management Program (CMP) system of highways and roads per federal requirements for an additional amount of $28,167, and a total amount not to exceed $286,960; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In 1990 the Commission was designated as the congestion management agency (CMA) for Riverside County. The Riverside County CMP was first adopted in 1991 per state legislation. A few years later, legislation was passed changing the state mandate to a voluntary program. However, federal congestion management process regulations were in place requiring metropolitan planning organizations to certify that the requirements for implementing the federal congestion management process are met within its boundary. As a result, all CMAs within the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) region are held to meeting the federal requirements, which is determined through SCAG's federal certification process. To ensure consistency with federal requirements, the Riverside County CMP was primarily designed to meet federal requirements and also incorporated state CMP requirements. Monitoring the designated CMP system to ensure the established minimum level of service (LOS) threshold is met is the main focus of the program. Given that cities and the county establish LOS thresholds at "C" or "D", the CMP minimum LOS threshold was set at "E". Therefore, if any segment falls below "E", a deficiency plan would need to be prepared that would include projects and/or mitigation strategies that would improve the segment to LOS "E" or better. Agenda Item 81 211 The CMP is updated every two to three years. The last update was scheduled to take place in 2014. However, no new requirements or legislation occurred that warranted the document to be updated. In addition, monitoring efforts did not reveal system deficiencies that were not already addressed by transportation improvement projects programmed in the Federal Transportation Improvement Program or Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee program. Staff is planning the next CMP update to occur after several planning activities have concluded, such as the Commission's Strategic Assessment, 2016 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy, and release of final guidance from the Office of Planning and Research detailing the implementation and applicability that SB 743 will have under the California Environmental Quality Act. These planning efforts and legislation will have a direct impact on Riverside County's CMP. A request for proposals for the next CMP update cycle is scheduled for release by fall 2016. In the meantime, the CMP system is required to be monitored on a continuous basis. Monitoring efforts include utilizing loop or pavement sensors currently installed along the state highway system at call boxes and Caltrans' Performance Measurement System (PeMS) sites. PeMS sites have the capability to retrieve speed, truck flow, vehicle miles traveled, vehicle hours traveled, and delay data. Speed data is used to determine LOS. If any deficiencies (LOS "E") are identified on the CMP system, an analysis of the cause of deficiency is also determined, such as recurring congestion, construction activities, or interregional traffic. Monitoring is performed on a quarterly basis. However, to reduce costs associated with monitoring, staff proposes to change the frequency of monitoring from a quarterly basis to biannually, in fall and spring, as these seasons typically reflect average traffic conditions. In November 2010, after a competitive procurement that included federal provisions, the Commission awarded an agreement to VRPA Technologies to update and monitor the CMP system for a total amount of $258,793 for a two-year term plus three one-year options covering FY 2010/11 — 2014/15. The agreement has been amended three times to exercise each one- year option with no change in cost. During the full term of this agreement, services were related to the 2011 CMP update and quarterly monitoring. As of June 30, 2015, all funds have been expended. To ensure monitoring activities continue until the commencement of the next CMP update cycle in Spring 2017, staff recommends amending the current agreement with VRPA Technologies to continue monitoring the CMP system in the fall 2015, spring 2016, and fall 2016 for an additional amount of $28,167, which includes a contingency of $2,559. The additional amount is considered fair and reasonable. With this amendment, the total amount not to exceed is $286,960. Since CMP monitoring activities are eligible for State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Planning, Programming, and Monitoring (PPM) funds, these funds will be used for CMP monitoring. No budget adjustment is necessary, as the STIP PPM funds and CMP monitoring costs are included in the FY 2015/16 budget. Agenda Item 81 212 Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes N/A Year: FY 2015/16 FY 2016/17+ Amount: $17,100 11,067 Source of Funds: State STIP PPM funds Budget Adjustment: No N/A GL/Project Accounting No.: 002132 65520 00000 106 65 65520 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \)414A/;4,34 Date: 08/13/2015 Attachments: Agreement No. 10-65-114-04 (Draft) Agenda Item 81 213 Agreement No. 10-65-114-04 AMENDMENT NO. 4 TO AGREEMENT WITH VRPA TECHNOLOGIES, INC FOR CONSULTING SERVICES FOR THE CONGESTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 1. PARTIES AND DATE This Amendment No. 4 to the Agreement for Consulting Services is made and entered into as of this day of , 2015, by and between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ("Commission") and VRPA TECHNOLOGIES, INC. ("Consultant"), a California corporation. 2. RECITALS 2.1 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an agreement dated December 16, 2010 for the purpose of providing consulting services for the congestion management program (the "Master Agreement"). 2.2 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an Amendment No. 1 to the Master Agreement, dated January 1, 2013, for the purpose of extending the term. 2.3 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an Amendment No. 2 to the Master Agreement, dated January 1, 2014, for the purpose of extending the term. 2.4 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an Amendment No. 3 to the Master Agreement, dated June 25, 2015, for the purpose of extending the term. 2.5 The parties now desire to amend the Master Agreement to provide additional compensation for the continued provision of the Congestion Management Program. 3. TERMS 3.1 The maximum compensation for Services performed pursuant to this Amendment shall be Twenty -Five Thousand Six Hundred Eight Dollars ($25,608). Work shall be performed at the rates set forth in the Master Agreement. 3.2 The total not -to -exceed amount of the Master Agreement, as amended by this Amendment No. 3, shall be increased from Two Hundred Fifty -Eight 214 Thousand Seven Hundred Ninety -Three Dollars ($258,793) to Two Hundred Eight -Six Thousand Nine Hundred Sixty Dollars ($286,960). 3.3 Except as amended by this Amendment, all provisions of the Master Agreement, as amended by Amendment No. 1, 2 and 3 including without limitation the indemnity and insurance provisions, shall remain in full force and effect and shall govern the actions of the parties under this Amendment. 17336.00000\1514236.2 [Signatures on following page] 2 215 SIGNATURE PAGE TO AGREEMENT NO. 10-65-114-04 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have executed this Amendment on the date first herein above written. RIVERSIDE COUNTY VRPA TECHNOLOGIES, INC TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: By: Daryl R. Busch, Chair Signature APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: Best Best & Krieger LLP Counsel to the Riverside County Transportation Commission 3 Name Title 216 AGENDA ITEM 8J RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Grace Alvarez, Planning and Programming Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2015/16 Annual Local Transportation Fund Planning Allocations to Western Riverside Council of Governments and Coachella Valley Association of Governments BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to approve an allocation of Local Transportation Fund (LTF) planning funds in the amount of $684,750 for Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) and $373,500 for the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) for efforts identified in each agency's FY 2015/16 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan (Work Plan) that support transportation planning programs and functions consistent with regional and subregional plans, programs and requirements. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The LTF established in state law by the Transportation Development Act (TDA) is funded through a one -quarter of one cent of the state's 7.5 percent sales tax (based on point of sale and is returned to source). The LTF funding is distributed by the State Board of Equalization to the cities and counties on a pro rata basis, pursuant to Section 99233.2 of the TDA, providing up to 3 percent of annual revenues to fund transportation planning and programming efforts. The Commission, as the Regional Transportation Planning Agency, is legally responsible for apportioning the LTF funds. Based on the projected FY 2015/16 revenues of $83 million, 3 percent of the projected revenue or $2.49 million is for planning and programming. By statute, the TDA also requires one half of these LTF funds be allocated for planning activities within the Western Riverside County and the Coachella Valley areas, as determined by the Commission. Distribution of the funding, as confirmed by the Commission in October 2014, is as follows: Agenda Item 81 217 Planning Agency Percentage Apportionment/Allocation RCTC 15% $186,750 WRCOG 55% $684,750 CVAG 30% $373,500 WRCOG and CVAG submitted their respective FY 2015/16 Work Plans in accordance with existing guidelines: The FY 2015/16 Work Plan submitted by WRCOG includes: 1) Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) Compass Blueprint planning projects; 2) Air Quality, Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Programs; 3) Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Program; and 4) Riverside County Transportation Commission Programs. The FY 2015/16 Work Plan submitted by CVAG includes: 1) Transportation Department Operations; 2) Project Management and Contract Administration; 3) CVLink Project Development; 4) Riverside County Transportation Commission Programs; 5) Planning, Programming and Monitoring Programs; 6) Miscellaneous Programs; 7) Congestion Management/Air Quality Programs; 8) TUMF Program; and 9) Governmental and Special Projects. Staff reviewed the Work Plans and found these Work Plans are consistent with the Commission's overall transportation programming and planning objectives and recommends approval. The Work Plans also benefit the respective geographic regions and are consistent with subregional and regional plans including SCAG's Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS). WRCOG and CVAG, in conjunction with SCAG, are responsible for subregional planning efforts that implement and are in conformance with the RTP/SCS. Agenda Item 81 218 Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2015/16 Amount: $1,058,250 Source of Funds: Local Transportation Funds Budget Adjustment: No GL/Project Accounting No.: 106 65 86205 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \I-Xe4kettivi Date: 08/06/2015 Attachments: 1) WRCOG FY 2015/16 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan 2) CVAG FY 2015/16 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan Agenda Item 81 219 ATTACHMENT 1 Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) Fiscal Year 2015/2016 Local Transportation Funds Program Objectives The Work Plan for FY 2015/2016 is divided into two program areas: 1. Planning Programs and Energy/Environment Programs California Air Resources Board Department of Energy (DOE) South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Southern California Associations of Governments (SCAG) California Association of Councils of Governments (CALCOG) Planning: This program includes the following activities: staff time to develop and complete (by December 31, 2015) two SCAG Compass Blueprint projects: WRCOG Land Use, Transportation, and Water Quality Planning Framework and WRCOG Sustainability Framework Public Health & Climate Action Plan Implementation. Both projects focus on providing voluntary strategies at the local level, to implement regional policies adopted as part of the 2012-2035 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Community Strategy. Continued participation with SCAG, CALCOG, and other regional planning agencies; and continued support for the WRCOG Planning Directors' TAC to review, analyze and make recommendations to the WRCOG Executive Committee on the sub regional growth forecast, the regional Housing Needs Assessment, the Regional Transportation Plan and legislation that will impact/assist the implementation of AB 32 and SB 375. Air Quality, Energy Efficiency and Sustainability: These programs include the following activities: continued staff participation in SCAQMD activities and rule -making, participation in the development of the 2016 AQMP; provide outreach and to the jurisdictions regarding air quality issues and funding opportunities; support WRCOG Clean Cities and programs that WRCOG has developed to reduce emissions through energy efficiency and water conservation; continued participation to assist jurisdiction in the purchase of alternative fuel vehicles and the development of the supporting infrastructure. V:\2015\09 September\B&I\12.A1.GA-Comm.WRCOG LTF FY 2015-16 Work Plan.doc 220 2. Regional Transportation Programs Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Riverside Transit Agency Caltrans SCAG CALCOG TUMF: This program includes staff time to prepare the 2015 Nexus Study and Program Update; to administer the TUMF Program which includes but is not limited to: program contract/agreement administration; public outreach/information; the Annual Report; signage program; TUMF Zone Transportation Improvement Program development and amendments; prepare the annual audit; preparation of annual adjustment for construction costs; maintain TUMF data base of fee collections and disbursements; work with developers on credit and reimbursement agreements; and amend all program documents as necessary. Riverside County Transportation Commission Programs: These programs include staff time and project management to assist in transportation planning and air quality programs to include: participation in TUMF Program tasks as needed to assist RCTC in the implementation of the Regional TUMF Program; participate in evaluation committees as requested; and other planning related tasks as determined in consultation with the RCTC Executive Director. V:\2015\09 September\B&I\12.A1.GA-Comm.WRCOG LTF FY 2015-16 Work Plan.doc 221 ATTACHMENT 2 mksi CVAG COACHELLA VALLEY ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS 73-710 Fred Waring Dr., Suite 200, Palm Desert, CA 92260 • (760) 346-1127 • www.cvag.org July 1, 2015 D)I�C�I�ON/I� �\ JUL 08 2015 Ms. Theresia Trevino Chief Financial Officer RIVERSIDE COUNTY Riverside County Transportation Commission Riverside County Regional Complex 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92502 Dear Theresia, Invoice: CV16019-15 Re: 2015/16 Local Transportation Funding (LTF1 The allocation to the Coachella Valley Association of Governments' (CVAG) Local Transportation Funding (LTF) for fiscal year 2015/16 is $373,500. Attached is an overview of CVAG's LTF Work Plan objectives utilizing this funding. Please consider this letter as an invoice for the funds. Please do not hesitate to call me if you have any questions. Thank you. Sincerely, COACHELLA VALLEY ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS RECEIVED JUL 03 2015 RCTC Finance Department Gary Leong, CPA Director of Administrative Services attachment c.c. Allyn Waggle Shirley Medina, RCTC Director of Planning & Programming CITY OF BLYTHE • CITY OF CATHEDRAL CITY • CITY OF COACHELLA • CITY OF DESERT HOT SPRINGS • CITY OF INDIAN WELLS CITY OF INDIO • CITY OF LA QUINTA • CITY OF PALM DESERT • C222F PALM SPRINGS • CITY OF RANCHO MIRAGE • COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE AGUA CALIENTE BAND OF CAHUILLA INDIANS • CABAZON BAND OF MISSION INDIANS TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT PROGRAM GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FISCAL YEAR 2015/16 The Work Plan for 2015/16 is separated into nine main program areas: 1) Transportation Department Operations • Transportation Program Administration • Implementation of Transportation Project Prioritization Study (TPPS) • Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Update • Other Transportation Planning • Operations Management and Administration This program area performs primarily administrative functions which consist of general transportation program administrative activities and various transportation planning duties in support of the Transportation Department. Completion of the 2015 update of the TPPS, RACE and Nexus Study and implementation of the Valley —wide Signal Synchronization program and primary consideration this fiscal year: (Funded from Measure A, TUMF and Active Transportation Program Funds) 2) Project Management and Contract Administration • Financial Cash Flow • Project Status Tracking • Preparation and Monitoring of Agreements Includes staff time to conduct project oversight (design, environmental, construction and close-out), preparation of reimbursement agreements for regional arterial projects, review and approval of project billings in accordance with project scope of work and participation in project development team meetings and associated staff reports. (Funded from Measure A, TUMF, LTF and Special Program Funds) 3) CV Link Project Development (Phased) • Project Development and Monitoring • Cash Flow Tracking • Grant Condition Monitoring Includes staff time to conduct project oversight of consultant services (preliminary environmental compliance and phased construction plans); review of project billings; participation in project development team meetings and preparation of associated reports. Developing the proposed "spurs" of the CVLink and the funding of their construction is an added consideration this fiscal year. (Funded from Riverside County Regional Park and Open Space District Grant, Caltrans Environmental Justice Grant, California Strategic Growth Council Grant, PP&M, LTF, Sentinel Project AQMD Grant and Measure A) 223 4) Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Programs • Congestion Management Program/System (CMP/CMS) • RCTC Technical Advisory Committee • SB 821 • Coachella Valley Rail Program Includes staff time to support the Riverside County Congestion Management Program; analysis of traffic patterns through the traffic count program; provide RCTC staff regional transportation project information for the State Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP); support the RCTC Technical Advisory Committee; Coachella Valley Passenger Rail Service Development Plan. (Funded from LTF, STA, Proposition IB [one-time funds] and TUMF) 5) Planning, Programming and Monitoring Program • Regional Transportation Improvement Program/State Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP/STIP) This area includes staff time in support of the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP), support in implementation and updating of the CVAG Transportation Project Prioritization Study (TPPS), coordination of updates to the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP), and monitoring and examining impacts of implementing SB 45. TPPS activities support the regional project construction program which includes staff time to develop an annual prioritized list of construction projects and required financial resources. (Funded from PP&M, LTF and Measure A) 6) Miscellaneous Programs • GIS Information Services • Maintain Transportation Model • Regional Arterial Traffic Count Program This area involves support to multiple programs with a focus on key project areas. These areas include staff time and project management to maintain. and provide input for GIS Information Services, the countywide transportation demand model, the regional arterial traffic count program, and transportation legislation review and analysis. GIS Information Services includes staff time to provide regional land use information to CVAG jurisdictions, developers, SCAG and Caltrans. The countywide transportation model involves support for the RIVTAM transportation model for forecasting projected transportation system needs to the year 2039. (Funded from Measure A, TUMF, and Special Program Funds) 224 7) Congestion Management /Air Quality Programs • CM/AQ Programs • Conformance with SIP requirements Involves Transportation Department staff support to CMAQ program areas. Also includes implementation of State Implementation Plan (SIP) conformance to CVAG regional projects. (Funded from CMAQ and Measure A) 8) Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Program • TUMF Program Administration • TUMF/GIS Interface • TUMF Audits Includes staff time in support of the TUMF program and TUMF/GIS Interface program. TUMF program activities include staff time to monitor the implementation of the TUMF program in member jurisdictions, to perform annual fiscal reviews of building permits and TUMF collections, to research, analyze and prepare reports for TUMF appeals, to enter TUMF collections in the TUMF data base, to meet with developers on request to review potential TUMF assessments, and to perform special TUMF analysis on request. The TUMF/GIS Interface program requires support for continuing the development of integrating the TUMF collection process with electronic transmission of new development information for land use coverages. (Funded from TUMF) 9) Governmental and Special Projects • Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) The SCAG program includes staff time to coordinate the CVAG sub -region SCAG Program needs, develop annual growth projections, provide input to the Federal Regional Transportation Plan, and assist SCAG with transportation modeling refinements. Additionally staff performs specific transportation project work for SCAG. (Funded from Special Program Funds) • Special Projects Some proposed projects may involve general fund money or special grants. Any project not already a part of the regular work programs, will be brought through the committee process for approval of the proposed work. (Funded from Special Grant funds) 225 AGENDA ITEM 8K RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Alex Menor, Capital Projects Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Agreement for California Highway Patrol Construction Zone Enhancement Enforcement Program Services During the Construction of the Interstate 215 Central Widening Project from Scott Road to Nuevo Road in the Cities of Menifee and Perris STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 13-31-035-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 13-31-035-00, with the California Highway Patrol (CHP) for Construction Zone Enhanced Enforcement Program (COZEEP) services during the construction of the Interstate 215 Central widening project for an additional amount of $1.1 million, resulting in a total amount not to exceed $2,180,000; 2) Approve an increase of $1.1 million in FY 2015/16 budget revenues and expenditures for construction support services related to the project; 3) Approve an increase of $5 million in FY 2015/16 budget revenues and expenditures for construction services related to the project; and 4) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its September 2012 meeting, the Commission awarded the construction agreement for the 1-215 Central widening project between Scott Road and Nuevo Road in the cities of Menifee and Perris to Skanska USA Civil West (Skanska). This project extends the third mixed flow lane from Scott Road to Nuevo Road resulting in three continuous mixed flow lanes in each direction from 1-15 to the 60/91/215 interchange. At its November 2012 meeting, the Commission approved the necessary funding and scoping agreements needed during construction. These construction support services include design support by URS Corporation, COZEEP services by the CHP, and Native American monitoring by Agenda Item 8K 226 the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians. The COZEEP services were approved under Agreement No. 13-31-035-00 in the amount of $380,000. COZEEP is used in conjunction with nighttime lane and full freeway closures and detours for speed enforcement and to increase visibility, motorist awareness, and safety for motorists and workers in the construction zone. At its October 2014 meeting, the Commission approved Amendment No. 1 to the agreement with the CHP for COZEEP services for an additional amount of $700,000 for a total amount not to exceed $1,080,000. The increase was due to additional CHP COZEEP services associated with two traffic incidents that occurred in July 2013 and July 2014 and affected bridge falsework resulting in repairs at Perris Boulevard, more nighttime lane closures than anticipated, and additional freeway closures added to accelerate the construction work between Scott Road and Ethanac Road for early opening of new lanes. Late last year, staff and Skanska made changes to the project staging to allow the new lanes in the south half of the project between Scott Road and Ethanac Road (about six miles) to be opened to traffic several months earlier than originally planned in mid -November 2014. At this time, the construction of the project is about 90 percent complete and substantial completion of the project is expected by December 2015. CHP COZEEP Services The remaining work on the project consists mainly of paving, striping, and other work that requires nighttime lane closures. Therefore it is estimated that additional COZEEP services will be required almost every night for the duration of the project. Furthermore, additional COZEEP units have been required at one time for certain types of work due to the number of motorists going through ramp closures. Accordingly, staff estimates the need to amend the agreement for an additional $1.1 million in COZEEP services. Staff coordinated with the CHP to develop this cost estimate and an amendment to the CHP COZEEP agreement. With this amendment, the total amount not to exceed is $2,180,000. Staff recommends approval of this amendment. Staff also recommends approval of budget amendments for an increase in FY 2015/16 budgeted revenues and expenditures of $1.1 million for construction support services related to COZEEP services and $5 million for construction for the project. There are remaining State Transportation Improvement Program and Proposition 1B Corridor Mobility Improvement Account funds available for these additional costs. These revenues and costs were included but not expended in the FY 2014/15 budget; therefore these costs need to be included in the FY 2015/16 budget. Agenda Item 8K 227 Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: No Year: FY 2015/16 Amount: $6,100,000 Source of Funds: CMIA, STIP Budget Adjustment: Yes 003023 415 41502 262 3141501 $3,600,000 (STIP revenues) 003023 415 41507 262 3141501 $2,500,000(CMIA revenues) GL/Project Accounting No.: 003023 81304 262 31 81301 $1,100,000 (Construction support) 003023 81301 262 3181301 $5,000,000 (Construction) Fiscal Procedures Approved: \IX14"4,:evi Date: 08/17/2015 Attachment: Agreement No. 13-31-035-02 with the CHP for COZEEP Services Agenda Item 8K 228 State of California ---Transportation Agency EDMUND G. BROWN Jr., Governor DEPARTMENT OF CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL Business Services Section Contract Services Unit P.O. Box 942898 Sacramento, CA 94298-0001 (916) 843-3610 (800) 735-2929 (TTlTDD) (800) 735-2922 (Voice) August 18, 2015 Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92502 Subject: Agreement Number 12R685000-2 Complete the following markedrtem(s) and return to the above address within ten (10) business days: STD. 213, Standard Agreement with attached exhibits. Sign the first page of the STD. 213, sign the additional single STD. 213, and return both copies. +� STD. 213A, Standard Agreement Amendment. Sign the first page of the STD. 213A, sign the additional single STD. 213A, and return both copies. STD. 210, Short Form Contract. Sign and return both copies. Letter of Agreement. Sign and return both copies. STD. 204, Payee Data Record. Complete and return. CCC, Contractor Certification Clauses. Complete and return. Obtain and forward the liability insurance certificate required by the terms of the Agreement. Resolution, motion, order, or ordinance from the local governing body authorizing this Agreement. STD. 807, Payment Bond. Complete and return one copy. CHP 28, Voluntary Statistical Data. Complete and return. Other: Contract status. The enclosed agreement is signed on behalf of the Department of California Highway Patrol. Process and when approved, return an original to this office. The enclosed approved agreement is for your records. You are now authorized to provide services. MADONNA YOUNG Contract Analyst Enclosures Safety, Service, and Security An Internationally Accredited Agency 229 STD213A_0613.xfl STATE OF CALIFORNIA STANDARD AGREEMENT AMENDMENT STD. 213 A (Rev 6t03) CHECK HERE IF ADDITIONAL PACES ARE ATTACHED Pages Agreement No. 13-31-035-02 ANALYST INITIALS: my AGREEMENT NUMBER 12R68S000 REGISTRATION NUMBER AMENDMENT NUMBER 2 1. This Agreement is entered into between the State Agency and Contractor named below: STATE AGENCY'S NAME Department of California Highway Patrol CONTRACTEE'S NAME Riverside County Transportation Commission 2. The term of this Agreement is February 1, 2013 through June 30, 2016 3. The maximum amount of this $2,179,950.72 Agreement after this amendment IS: Two Million One Hundred Seventy -Nine Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty Dollars and Seventy - Two Cents 4. The parties mutually agree to this amendment as follows. All actions noted below are by this reference made a part of the Agreement and incorporated herein: A. Extend the term of this agreement through June 30, 2016. B. Add funds in the amount of One Million One Hundred Thousand Dollars and Zero Cents ($1,100,000.00) effective immediately. Page 1, Item 3 (Maximum Amount), is revised to read: The maximum amount of this Agreement is Two Million, One Hundred Seventy -Nine Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty Dollars and Seventy -Two Cents ($2,179,950.72). All references to Page 1, Item 3 (Maximum Amount), in the body of this Agreement and in any Exhibits hereto shall be deemed to read Two Million, One Hundred Seventy -Nine Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty Dollars and Seventy - Two Cents ($2,179,950.72). All other terms and conditions shall remain the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, this Agreement has been executed by the parties hereto. CONTRACTEE CONTRACTEE'S NAME (If other than an individual, state whether a corporation, partnership, etc.) Riverside County Transportation Commission BY (Authorized Signature) .�i DATE SIGNED (Do not type) PRINTED NAME AND TITLE OF PERSON SIGNING Anne Mayer, Executive Director ADDRESS 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Annex Riverside, CA 92501 STATE OF CALIFORNIA AGENCY NAME Department of California Highway Patrol BY (Authorized Signature) DATE SIGNED (Do not type) PRINTED NAME AND TITLE OF PERSON SIGNING T. L. ANDERSON, Assistant Chief, Administrative Services Division ADDRESS P.O. Box 942898, Sacramento, CA 94298-0001 CALIFORNIA Department of General Services Use Only ❑ Exempt per: 230 STATE OF CALIFORNIA STANDARD AGREEMENT AMENDMENT STD, 213 A (Rev 6I63) CHECK HERE IF ADDITIONAL PAGES ARE ATTACHED Pages Agreement No. 13-31-035-02 ANALYST INITIALS: my AGREEMENT NUMBER 12R685000 REGISTRATION NUMBER AMENDMENT NUMBER 2 This Agreement is entered into between the State Agency and Contractor named below: STATE AGENCY'S NAME Department of California Highway Patrol CONTRACTEE'S NAME Riverside County Transportation Commission 2. The term of this Agreement is February 1, 2013 through June 30, 2016 3. The maximum amount of this $2,179,950.72 Agreement after this amendment is: Two Million One Hundred Seventy -Nine Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty Dollars and Seventy - Two Cents 4. The parties mutually agree to this amendment as follows. All actions noted below are by this reference made a part of the Agreement and incorporated herein: A. Extend the term Of this agreement through June 30, 2016. B. Add funds in the amount Of One Million One Hundred Thousand Dollars and Zero Cents ($1,100,000.00) effective immediately. Page 1, Item 3 (Maximum Amount), is revised to read: The maximum amount of this Agreement is Two Million, One Hundred Seventy -Nine Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty Dollars and Seventy -Two Cents ($2,179,950.72). All references to Page 1, Item 3 (Maximum Amount), in the body of this Agreement and in any Exhibits hereto shall be deemed to read Two Million, One Hundred Seventy -Nine Thousand Nine Hundred Fifty Dollars and Seventy - Two Cents ($2,179,950.72). All other terms and conditions shall remain the same. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, this Agreement has been executed by the parties hereto. CONTRACTEE CONTRACTEE'S NAME of other than an individual, state whether a corporation, partnership, atc.) Riverside County Transportation Commission BY (Authorized Signature) .�s DATE SIGNED (Do not type) PRINTED NAME AND TITLE OF PERSON SIGNING Anne Mayer, Executive Director ADDRESS 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Annex Riverside, CA 92501 STATE OF CALIFORNIA AGENCY NAME Department of California Highway Patrol BY (Authorized Signature) ,d DATE SIGNED (Do not type) PRINTED NAME AND TITLE OF PERSON SIGNING T. ,L. ANDERSON, Assistant Chief, Administrative Services Division ADDRESS P.O. Box 942898, Sacramento, CA 94298-0001 CALIFORNIA Department of General Services Use Only ❑ Exempt per: 231 AGENDA ITEM 8L RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Marlin Feenstra, Project Delivery Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Amendment to Agreements for On -Call Environmental Consulting Services STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the following amendments to provide on -call environmental consulting services for an additional three-year term, for a total term not to exceed five years; a) Agreement No. 13-31-132-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 13-31-132-00, with ICF International; b) Agreement No. 13-31-149-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 13-31-149-00, with LSA Associates, Inc.; c) Agreement No. 13-31-150-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 13-31-150-00, with HDR Engineering, Inc.; and d) Agreement No. 13-31-151-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 13-31-151-00, with VCS Environmental; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to execute task orders awarded under the terms of the agreements. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission has identified a need for comprehensive on -call consulting services related to various environmental and archaeological services including, but not limited to, coordination with resources agencies, review of National Environmental Policy Act and California Environmental Quality Act documents, permitting preparation, monitoring and documentation of environmental commitments, and support of the Western Riverside County Multispecies Habitat Conservation Plan projects. While the Commission typically has most of the environmental -related consulting services described above accomplished through separate contracts for the preliminary engineering/environmental phase of a specific project, there are occasions in which these services will be needed outside of the environmental phase. Examples of this include the need for permitting prior to construction, construction monitoring, or mitigation. Agenda Item 8L 232 DISCUSSION: When the request for qualifications (RFQ) for on -call environmental consulting services was released in April 2013, the Local Assistance Program Manual (LAPM) only allowed for a two- year maximum contract term. Within the past two years, the LAPM Chapter 10 has been revised and now allows for on -call contracts to be for a reasonable maximum length of contract, not to exceed five years, and a maximum total contract dollar amount (23 CFR 172). In September 2013 after a competitive procurement, the Commission approved four agreements with HDR Engineering, Inc.; ICF International; LSA Associates, Inc.; and VCS Environmental for on -call environmental consulting services for a total amount not to exceed $1.5 million for a two-year term. Since approval, 13 task orders have been issued totaling $428,711 leaving a balance of $1,071,289. Staff recommends extending the terms of these on -call agreements; however, no additional funds are needed based on the unexpended balance. Staff recommends the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, execute the amendments to the agreements with a new term ending in November 2018. Multiple award, on -call, task order type contracts do not guarantee work to any of the awardees. Services will be provided through the Commission's issuance of contract task orders to the consultants on an as -needed basis. Staff oversight of the contract will maximize the effectiveness of the consultants and minimize the costs to the Commission. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2015/16 Amount: $ 75,000 N/A FY 2016/17+ $996,289 Source of Funds: Measure A and/or state funds Budget Adjustment: No N/A 223999 81115 222 31 81101 GL/Project Accounting No.: 623999 81115 262 31 81101 653826 81115 265 33 81101 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \JI4IA1544� Date: 08/18/2015 Attachments: 1) ICF International Agreement No. 13-31-132-02 (Draft) 2) LSA Associates, Inc. Agreement No. 13-31-149-02 (Draft) 3) HDR Engineering, Inc. Agreement No. 13-31-150-02 (Draft) 4) VCS Environmental Agreement No. 13-31-151-02 (Draft) Agenda Item 8L 233 ATTACHMENT 1 Agreement No. 13-31-132-02 AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO PROFESSIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENT WITH FHWA AND/OR FTA FUNDING/ASSISTANCE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AGREEMENT WITH ICF JONES & STOKES, INC. FOR ON -CALL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING SERVICES 1 PARTIES AND DATE This Amendment No. 2 is made and entered into as of this day of , 2015, by and between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ("Commission") and ICF JONES & STOKES, INC. ("Consultant"), a Delaware Corporation. 2. RECITALS 2.1 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an agreement dated November 1, 2013 for the purpose of providing on -call environmental consulting services (the "Master Agreement"). 2.2 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an Amendment No. 1 to the Master Agreement, dated July 30, 2014, for the purpose of including sub-consultant(s) compensation and payment rates. 2.3 The parties now desire to amend the Master Agreement in order to extend the term of the Master Agreement. 3. TERMS 3.1 The term of the Master Agreement shall be extended for an additional term of three years, ending on October 31, 2018, unless earlier terminated as provided in the Master Agreement. 3.2 Except as amended by this Amendment, all provisions of the Master Agreement, as amended by Amendment No. 1 and 2, including without limitation the indemnity and insurance provisions, shall remain in full force and effect and shall govern the actions of the parties under this Amendment. [Signatures on following page] 234 SIGNATURE PAGE TO AGREEMENT NO. 13-31-132-02 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have executed this Amendment on the date first herein above written. RIVERSIDE COUNTY ICF JONES & STOKES, INC. TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: By: Daryl R. Busch, Chair Signature APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: Best Best & Krieger LLP Counsel to the Riverside County Transportation Commission 2 Name Title 235 ATTACHMENT 2 Agreement No. 13-31-149-02 AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO PROFESSIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENT WITH FHWA AND/OR FTA FUNDING/ASSISTANCE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AGREEMENT WITH LSA ASSOCIATES, .INC. FOR ON -CALL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING SERVICES 1 PARTIES AND DATE This Amendment No. 2 is made and entered into as of this day of , 2015, by and between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ("Commission") and LSA ASSOCIATES, INC. ("Consultant"), a California Corporation. 2. RECITALS 2.1 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an agreement dated December 9, 2013 for the purpose of providing on -call environmental consulting services (the "Master Agreement"). 2.2 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an Amendment No. 1 to the Master Agreement, dated May 10, 2014, for the purpose of including sub-consultant(s) compensation and payment rates. 2.3 The parties now desire to amend the Master Agreement in order to extend the term of the Master Agreement. 3. TERMS 3.1 The term of the Master Agreement shall be extended for an additional term of three years, ending on October 31, 2018, unless earlier terminated as provided in the Master Agreement. 3.2 Except as amended by this Amendment, all provisions of the Master Agreement, as amended by Amendment No. 1 and 2, including without limitation the indemnity and insurance provisions, shall remain in full force and effect and shall govern the actions of the parties under this Amendment. [Signatures on following page] 236 SIGNATURE PAGE TO AGREEMENT NO. 13-31-149-02 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have executed this Amendment on the date first herein above written. RIVERSIDE COUNTY LSA ASSOCIATES, INC TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: By: Daryl R. Busch, Chair Signature APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: Best Best & Krieger LLP Counsel to the Riverside County Transportation Commission 2 Name Title 237 ATTACHMENT 3 Agreement No. 13-31-151-02 AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO PROFESSIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENT WITH FHWA AND/OR FTA FUNDING/ASSISTANCE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AGREEMENT WITH VANDERMOST CONSULTING SERVICES, INC. FOR ON -CALL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING SERVICES 1 PARTIES AND DATE This Amendment No. 2 is made and entered into as of this day of , 2015, by and between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ("Commission") and VANDERMOST CONSULTING SERVICES, INC. ("Consultant"), a California Corporation. 2. RECITALS 2.1 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an agreement dated November 18, 2013 for the purpose of providing on -call environmental consulting services (the "Master Agreement"). 2.2 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an Amendment No. 1 to the Master Agreement, dated February 25, 2014, for the purpose of including sub-consultant(s) compensation and payment rates. 2.3 The parties now desire to amend the Master Agreement in order to extend the term of the Master Agreement. 3. TERMS 3.1 The term of the Master Agreement shall be extended for an additional term of three years, ending on October 31, 2018, unless earlier terminated as provided in the Master Agreement. 3.2 Except as amended by this Amendment, all provisions of the Master Agreement, as amended by Amendment No. 1 and 2, including without limitation the indemnity and insurance provisions, shall remain in full force and effect and shall govern the actions of the parties under this Amendment. [Signatures on following page] 238 SIGNATURE PAGE TO AGREEMENT NO. 13-31-150-02 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have executed this Amendment on the date first herein above written. RIVERSIDE COUNTY VANDERMOST CONSULTING TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION SERVICES, INC. By: By: Daryl R. Busch, Chair Signature APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: Best Best & Krieger LLP Counsel to the Riverside County Transportation Commission 2 Name Title 239 ATTACHMENT 4 Agreement No. 13-31-150-02 AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO PROFESSIONAL SERVICES AGREEMENT WITH FHWA AND/OR FTA FUNDING/ASSISTANCE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AGREEMENT WITH HDR ENGINEERING, INC. FOR ON -CALL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING SERVICES 1 PARTIES AND DATE This Amendment No. 2 is made and entered into as of this day of , 2015, by and between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ("Commission") and HDR ENGINEERING, INC. ("Consultant"), a Nebraska Corporation. 2. RECITALS 2.1 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an agreement dated November 18, 2013 for the purpose of providing on -call environmental consulting services (the "Master Agreement"). 2.2 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an Amendment No. 1 to the Master Agreement, dated February 26, 2014, for the purpose of including sub-consultant(s) compensation and payment rates. 2.3 The parties now desire to amend the Master Agreement in order to extend the term of the Master Agreement. 3. TERMS 3.1 The term of the Master Agreement shall be extended for an additional term of three years, ending on October 31, 2018, unless earlier terminated as provided in the Master Agreement. 3.2 Except as amended by this Amendment, all provisions of the Master Agreement, as amended by Amendment No. 1 and 2, including without limitation the indemnity and insurance provisions, shall remain in full force and effect and shall govern the actions of the parties under this Amendment. [Signatures on following page] 240 SIGNATURE PAGE TO AGREEMENT NO. 13-31-150-02 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have executed this Amendment on the date first herein above written. RIVERSIDE COUNTY HDR ENGINEERING, INC. TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: By: Daryl R. Busch, Chair Signature APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: Best Best & Krieger LLP Counsel to the Riverside County Transportation Commission 2 Name Title 241 AGENDA ITEM 8M RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Robert Yates, Multimodal Services Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Authorization to Execute the Funds Transfer Agreement and Approval of Amendment for Forecasting Services with HDR, Inc. for the Coachella Valley — San Gorgonio Pass Rail Corridor Service Development Plan BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Authorize the Executive Director to execute the Caltrans Division of Rail (Caltrans) Fund Transfer Agreement No. 16-25-017-00; 2) Approve Agreement No. 14-25-072-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 14-25-072-00, with HDR, Inc. (HDR) for rail forecasting services, for an additional amount of $69,450, and a total amount not to exceed $1,917,095, with bridge funding from Coachella Valley Rail fund reserves in advance of Commission receipt of Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) grant funds; and 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In May 2014, the Commission awarded Agreement No. 14-25-072-00 to HDR to perform preliminary analysis work on the Coachella Valley -San Gorgonio Pass Rail Corridor Service Development Plan. The HDR proposal and scope of work encompassed both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the project; however, the Commission was only able to award the Phase 1 work in an amount not to exceed $1,847,645 due to funding constraints. After HDR initiated work on Phase 1, staff became aware of a FRA grant funding opportunity and proceeded to work with HDR and Caltrans on an application to secure additional funds for the Phase 2 portion of the work. Caltrans and the Commission were notified by the FRA in April 2015 that the grant application was successful and that $2,982,050 in additional grant funds would be dedicated toward completion of the study. Agenda Item 8M 242 DISCUSSION: While the Commission and HDR will be responsible for the Phase 2 portion of the work, the Commission is not the lead agency. Caltrans, having standing as the appropriate state agency for intracounty rail service, will technically be the recipient of the FRA funds and will execute the FRA required grant agreement documents. These grant documents will be prepared by Commission staff and HDR. Upon FRA approval of the grant documents, Caltrans will then execute a fund transfer agreement with the Commission in order to reimburse the Commission for the work. Staff expects that FRA will execute its agreement with Caltrans in the November/December 2015 timeframe and for the fund transfer agreement with the Commission to be in place by January 2016. The fund transfer agreement to be executed between the Commission and Caltrans will be in the same amount of grant funds as those awarded to the project by the FRA. Caltrans will reimburse the Commission for the costs related to the work performed. Staff requests the Executive Director be given the authority to execute the fund transfer agreement to be developed pursuant to review by legal counsel. This will allow for a seamless transition between Phases 1 and 2 of the project study without undue delay. Staff will also continue to report back to the Commission on the status of all agreements as that information becomes available. Prior to the Commission receiving the fund transfer agreement from Caltrans, work on Phase 2 will be required of HDR related to preparation of the statement of work, budget, and schedule. Additionally integration of Phase 1 documents and deliverables into the Phase 2 portion of the study is required. Accordingly, staff recommends an amendment to the agreement for a limited scope of work related to Phase 2 for an additional amount of $69,450. Staff will return at a later date for another amendment related to the full scope of Phase 2 work. Staff proposes using Coachella Valley Rail Reserve funds to fund HDR's services. Since the FRA grant requires a local match in the amount of $1,102,950, staff intends that this amendment and related funding be considered as partially fulfilling the FRA local match requirement. Funding for this work is available in the Commission's FY 2015/16 rail department budget, and a budget adjustment is therefore not required. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2015/16 Amount: $69,450 Source of Funds: Coachella Valley Rail fund balance Budget Adjustment: No GL/Project Accounting No. 454199 65520 245 25 65520 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \l/fMAte:ev. Date: 08/18/2015 Attachment: HDR Agreement No. 14-25-072-01 (Draft) Agenda Item 8M 243 Agreement No. 14-25-072-01 AMENDMENT NO. 1 TO AGREEMENT WITH PROPOSITION 1 B ASSISTANCE WITH HDR ENGINEERING, INC. FOR FORECASTING SERVICES FOR THE COACHELLA VALLEY-SAN GORGONIO PASS RAIL CORRIDOR SERVICE DEVELOPMENT PLAN 1 PARTIES AND DATE This Amendment No. 1 to the Agreement for Forecasting Services is made and entered into as of this day of , 2015, by and between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ("Commission") and HDR ENGINEERING, INC., a ("Consultant"), a Nebraska corporation. 2. RECITALS 2.1 The Commission and the Consultant have entered into an agreement dated June 3, 2014 for the purpose of providing forecasting services for the Coachella Valley -San Gorgonio Pass Rail Corridor Service Development Plan (the "Master Agreement"). 2.2 The parties now desire to amend the Master Agreement in order to provide additional compensation to initiate Phase 2 activities. 3. TERMS 3.1 The Scope of Services for the Master Agreement shall be amended to include Services, as that term is defined in the Master Agreement, required to provide additional Phase 2 services, as more fully described in Exhibit "A" attached to this Amendment and incorporated herein by reference. 3.2 The maximum compensation for Services performed pursuant to this Amendment shall be Sixty -Nine Thousand Four Hundred Fifty Dollars ($69,450). Work shall be performed at the rates set forth in the Master Agreement. 3.3 The total not -to -exceed amount of the Master Agreement, as amended by this Amendment No. 1, shall be increased from One Million Six Hundred Ninety - Seven Thousand Six Hundred Forty -Five Dollars ($1,697,645) to One Million Seven Hundred Sixty -Seven Thousand Ninety -Five Dollars ($1,767,095). 244 3.4 Except as amended by this Amendment, all provisions of the Master Agreement, including without limitation the indemnity and insurance provisions, shall remain in full force and effect and shall govern the actions of the parties under this Amendment. 17336.00000\1514236.2 [Signatures on following page] 2 245 SIGNATURE PAGE TO AGREEMENT NO. 14-25-072-01 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have executed this Amendment on the date first herein above written. RIVERSIDE COUNTY HDR ENGINEERING, INC. TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: By: Daryl R. Busch, Chair Signature APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: Best Best & Krieger LLP Counsel to the Riverside County Transportation Commission 3 Name Title 246 AGENDA ITEM 8N RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Sheldon Peterson, Rail Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Annual Funding Memorandum of Understanding with Regional Rail Authority Southern California STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve the form of the Fiscal Year 2015/16 Annual Funding Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) No. 16-25-014-01 with Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) and authorize the Executive Director to approve and execute the final MOU, pursuant to legal counsel review; and 2) Authorize the Executive Director to approve and execute amendments to the MOU, pursuant to legal counsel review, for additional amounts up to the total amounts not to exceed $14,555,000 for operations and $9,483,000 for capital projects. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission's Commuter Rail Program works closely each year with staff of the SCRRA to provide the appropriate funding and resources necessary to implement rail service for Riverside County. At its June 10, 2015 meeting, the Commission approved the Riverside County FY 2015/16 SCRRA subsidies of $14,555,000 for operations and $9,483,000 in capital projects. There is the desire to develop a more formal agreement to better define the roles and responsibilities of each agency in this partnership. This is especially important as it relates to the utilization of Federal Transit Administration (FTA) grant funds for capital projects. SCRRA will now be treated as a subrecipient for the Commission's FTA grant funds, and that designation requires additional oversight and monitoring that are outlined in this new MOU. By completing this MOU and establishing SCRRA as a subrecipient, the Commission will be resolving a corrective action item related to the recent FTA Triennial Review completed in June 2015. The attached draft MOU clearly describes the responsibilities and expectations of each party as it relates to funding and performance. This MOU also includes additional operating responsibilities for the Perris Valley Line, which will be on Commission -owned right of way. Both SCRRA and the Commission envision this type of agreement as a positive step in clearly Agenda Item 8N 247 defining expectations, responsibilities, and financial obligations between the parties. Staff intends to enter into a new funding agreement each fiscal year. Future MOUs will come back to the Commission for approval. Staff recommends that the Commission approve the form of the MOU with SCRRA related to FY 2015/16 operating and capital subsidies and authorize the Executive Director to approve and execute the final MOU, pursuant to legal counsel review. The MOU reflects the Commission's share of FY 2015/16 operating and capital subsidies for SCRRA. Therefore, staff also recommends that the Commission authorize the Executive Director to approve and execute amendments to the MOU for additional amounts up to the amounts of $14,555,000 for operations and $9,483,000 for capital projects approved in the Commission's FY 2015/16 budget. Financial Information $ 14,555,000 Operating In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2015/16 Amount: $9,483,000 Capital Local Transportation Funds, Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality, Cap and Source of Funds: Trade Low Carbon Transit Operating Budget Adjustment: No Program, and Federal Transit Administration Section 5307 and 5309 254199 86101 103 25 86101 $14,555,000 GL/Project Accounting No.: 254199 86102 103 25 86102 $9,483,000 Fiscal Procedures Approved: \taz Date: 08/26/2015 Attachment: Draft SCRRA Agreement No. 16-25-014-01 Agenda Item 8N 248 WORKING DRAFT 8/31/15 MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING NO. 16-25-014-01 BETWEEN RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA REGIONAL RAIL AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2015-16 ANNUAL FUNDING MOU This memorandum of understanding (MOU) is effective as of this _ day of _ 2015, by and between the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (hereinafter referred to as "SCRRA"), One Gateway Plaza 12th Floor, Los Angeles, California 90012, and the Riverside County Transportation Commission, 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, Riverside, California 92501, a public agency (hereinafter referred to as "RCTC"), which are sometimes individually referred to as "PARTY", and collectively referred to as "PARTIES". I. RECITALS A. RCTC and SCRRA desire to enter into a MOU to define RCTC's financial commitments to the SCRRA fiscal year (FY) 2015-16 operating budget and rehabilitation/renovation and capital budget (collectively, the "BUDGET"). B. This MOU BUDGET is in addition to RCTC funding commitment Marketing Support Letter Agreement No. 16-25-014 for the Perris Valley Line (PVL) that provided SCRRA with $200,000.00 for Metrolink marketing expenses related to the launch of PVL service. C. RCTC and SCRRA desire to enter into a MOU to define the respective responsibilities of SCRRA as a subrecipient of RCTC federal funds for costs in connection with the BUDGET, and SCRRA's prior year rehabilitation/renovation and new capital costs. D. SCRRA provides commuter rail service operating to, within, or through Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura, San Diego and Orange Counties. E. RCTC funds SCRRA commuter rail services benefitting Riverside County on the Riverside Line, Inland Empire -Orange County Line, and 91/PVL consistent with the existing cost sharing formula established by the Joint Powers Agreement forming SCRRA ("JPA"), RCTC Agreement No. M-23-008, to which RCTC is a party. F. SCRRA's operating budget covers train operations, including operating crews, dispatching, equipment maintenance, fuel, non-scheduled rolling stock repairs, operating facilities maintenance, rolling stock lease payments, Page 1 of 18 249 security and guard services, public safety programs, passenger relations, ticket vending machine (TVM) maintenance and revenue collection, marketing and market research, media/external relations, utilities and leases, passenger transfers to other operators, Rail 2 Rail program, station maintenance, freight rail agreements and general administrative costs that support SCRRA operations (EXHIBIT A- SCRRA Budget). G. RCTC, at its June 10, 2015 meeting, approved RCTC's financial commitments to the SCRRA FY 2015-16 for operating costs as required by the JPA . H. SCRRA's capital budget includes the following rehabilitation/renovation and new capital projects: track, structure, and signal work; layover facility work at Downtown Riverside Metrolink Station; and RCTC's share of system -wide track, signal, information technology, communications, rubber tire vehicles, TVM, and mechanical improvements. I. RCTC, at its June 10, 2015 meeting, approved RCTC's financial commitments to the SCRRA FY 2015-16 rehabilitation/renovation and new capital projects with funds to be drawn down by RCTC from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and used to reimburse SCRRA. J. RCTC, in previous Commission meetings, has approved RCTC's financial commitment to prior SCRRA rehabilitation/renovation and new capital projects. Certain projects have not been completed and funds for those carryover projects, as presented in Exhibit A, will be drawn down by RCTC from FTA and used to reimburse SCRRA. K. This MOU does not address the late breaking budget items including, but not limited to: expanded F-125 Locomotive Purchases, Universal Fare Ticketing Alternatives, and potential Fare Policy Changes. L. RCTC agrees to provide fiber optic connections for communications and signals for the PVL. RCTC will allocate to SCRRA four (4) fiber optic buffer tubes containing 12 fibers in each tube for a total of 48 fibers in accordance with agreed -upon system design. Any change to the agreed -upon allocation shall be agreed to in writing by the PARTIES prior to use. Maintenance of the 48 fibers will be SCRRA's responsibility. M. SCRRA agrees to provide weed abatement, debris removal, track maintenance, graffiti removal, and other related maintenance ("Maintenance of Way Services") for all operational tracks along the San Jacinto Subdivision. Other related Maintenance of Way includes routine maintenance, inspection and repairs of track, structures, signal system, grade crossing warning system, and communication infrastructure. The levels of maintenance required on individual lines are dependent of the condition of the infrastructure, levels of commuter and freight train traffic, the number of road crossings, the number of curves and exposure to weather conditions. Page 2 of 18 250 N. SCRRA will also maintain the freight -only double track, sidings and spurs, between the Citrus Curve and Highgrove Junction provided that the costs for such maintenance are not an RCTC obligation, and shall instead be reimbursed by BNSF Railway (BNSF). SCRRA shall invoice BNSF for such costs. O. RCTC and SCRRA, with this MOU, memorialize the contribution of RCTC funds for 10 Rotem cars and 2 locomotives to support PVL service, as referenced in the SCRRA October 14, 2011 Board meeting minutes for agenda item 8. No additional equipment or new capital funds are required to commence PVL service. II. Scope of MOU This MOU specifies the terms and conditions, roles and responsibilities of the PARTIES as they pertain to the subjects and projects addressed herein. Both RCTC and SCRRA agree that each will cooperate and coordinate with the other in all activities covered by this MOU and any other supplemental MOUs that may be required to facilitate the purposes thereof. III. Responsibilities of RCTC RCTC agrees to the following responsibilities for the BUDGET: A. Allocate and pay to SCRRA the RCTC share of the BUDGET for operating costs in the not -to exceed amount of Thirteen Million Nine Hundred Ninety -Two Thousand Twenty -Three Dollars and Forty Cents ($13,992,023.40) for rail operations using federal, state, and local funds, which will be invoiced to RCTC on a quarterly basis in advance by SCRRA. Rail operations costs related to the new PVL service will be funded by federal Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality funds up to Four Million Dollars ($4,000,000), which will be passed through to SCRRA, as a subaward under FTA Grant No. CA-95-X339. a. RCTC will report to SCRRA the total federal pass -through amount for FY 2015-16 no later than August 31, 2016. B. Program Four Million Six Hundred Twenty -Six Thousand Six Hundred Forty - Nine Dollars and Fifty -Six Cents ($4,626,649.56) in FTA Section 5309 funds as a subaward under FTA Grant Nos. CA-05-0268 and CA-05-283 to be drawn down directly by RCTC to reimburse SCRRA as a subrecipient for rehabilitation and renovation projects on the River subdivision, as well as, RCTC's share of systemwide capital projects as listed in Exhibit A. RCTC shall Page 3 of 18 251 review each invoice and pay all authorized expenses in a timely manner following approval of the invoice, and receipt of funds from FTA. a. RCTC shall provide Nine Hundred Twenty -Five Thousand Three Hundred Twenty -Nine Dollars and Ninety -One Cents ($925,329.91) in toll credits as required match, which will not be billed to RCTC. C. Program Four Million Eight Hundred Twenty -Two Thousand Three Hundred Eighteen Dollars and Thirteen Cents ($4,822,318.13) in FTA Section 5337 funds as a subaward under FTA Grant No. CA-54-0033 to be drawn down directly by RCTC to reimburse SCRRA for RCTC-approved new capital projects as listed in Exhibit A. RCTC shall review each invoice and pay all authorized expenses in a timely manner following approval of the invoice, and receipt of funds from FTA. a. RCTC shall provide Nine Hundred Sixty -Four Thousand Four Hundred Sixty -Three Dollars and Sixty -Three Cents ($964,463.63) in toll credits as required match, which will not be billed to RCTC. D. Review each SCRRA invoice for operating costs, rehabilitation/renovation, and RCTC-approved new capital project costs to ensure eligibility for federal reimbursement and make timely drawdown requests to FTA for eligible expenses following approval of the invoice. E. Prepare and submit to the FTA, on a timely basis, all required periodic reports and milestone updates, so long as it timely receives all necessary information from SCRRA. F. Comply with all requirements of the FTA Master Agreement, found at http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/21-Master.pdf ("Master Agreement"). G. Monitor SCRRA's respective responsibilities as a subrecipient of RCTC's federal funds for operating, rehabilitation/renovation and new capital costs in connection with the BUDGET and with SCRRA's prior years' carryover budget, provided that SCRRA shall be responsible for any violation of FTA rules, regulations or policies, or misuse of federal funds by SCRRA. H. Per the regular operating formula, as set forth in the JPA, reimburse SCRRA for Maintenance of Way Services within twenty (20) feet from the center line along PVL, including any railroad structure or ballast cross-section that is located outside of this twenty (20) feet area (collectively, the "PVL SCRRA Maintenance Area"). These costs shall be included in the quarterly rail operations invoices submitted by SCRRA pursuant to Section III.A and are part of the BUDGET allocated not -to -exceed amount set forth therein as listed in Exhibit A. I. For the PVL, be responsible for Maintenance of Way Services that are outside the PVL SCRRA Maintenance Area. RCTC shall not be required to provide Page 4 of 18 252 flagmen for such Maintenance of Way Services, but shall properly ensure that contractors have safety training for employees. J. Reimburse SCRRA for actual Maintenance of Way Services expenses incurred between the Citrus Curve to Highgrove Junction, which costs shall be invoiced separately by SCRRA on at least a quarterly basis. K. Provide security guards for the layover facilities at South Perris and Riverside Downtown stations, which costs shall be reimbursed by SCRRA. SCRRA's payment obligation shall be based on a prorated share of the security supervisior costs incurred by RCTC, not -to -exceed $10.00 per hour. RCTC shall invoice SCRRA on a quarterly basis for the direct security and management costs associated with the security of the layover facilities. Agreement No. 12-25-043 is superceded by this provision. L. Require, under its contract(s) for security guard services, that the contractor(s) indemnify SCRRA to the same extent as indemnification is provided to RCTC, and include SCRRA as an additional insured under all applicable policies required by RCTC under the contract(s). M. Make available to SCRRA as part of this MOU station security camera feeds for such use and for safety and security needs. However, this MOU will not cover any additional connections requested by SCRRA. Future connections shall be agreed to in writing by the PARTIES, and funding for any costs associated therewith will need to be identified. N. Be responsible for Maintenance of Way Services along the PVL until the construction project is completed and service is transferred to SCRRA. Written confirmation will be sent by the RCTC Executive Director to the SCRRA Chief Executive Officer as to the official transfer date. IV. Obligations of SCRRA SCRRA agrees to the following responsibilities for the BUDGET: A. Establish fiscal controls and accounting procedures sufficient to assure proper accounting for all transactions, so that audits may be performed. SCRRA shall use accounting and fiscal procedures conforming to generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). B. Comply with the Office of Management and Budget Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards (Uniform Guidance), including but not limited to: a. Indirect Cost Rate. SCRRA's provisional federally recognized indirect cost rate negotiated between SCRRA and the FTA to be applied to FY 2015-16 shall be as follows, using total salaries as the base; Page 5 of 18 253 New Capital 127.23 % Rehabilitation and renovation 260.63 % Equipment 161.11 % Third party agreements 176.25 % i. Once the final rates are approved by FTA, within 30 days of approval of the final rates, SCRRA must reconcile its billings for any over or under -recovery of indirect costs previously billed to and reimbursed by RCTC using the provisional rates. Interest may not be claimed on any potential underpayments. b. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program. SCRRA shall implement a stand-alone DBE Program that includes goal setting, outreach, monitoring, and reporting, such as: i. When subcontracting opportunities are available, include race - conscious contract goals in solicitations. ii. Comply with 49 CFR, Part 26 requirements when soliciting, awarding, and performing FTA-funded projects. iii. Ensure required DBE Program clauses are included in solicitations and contracts. These include, but are not limited to the following FTA clauses: contract assurance (must be included verbatim in contracts), prompt payment, and prompt payment of withheld funds. iv. Include DBE commitment forms, Bidders List forms, and monthly DBE payment reporting requirements in solicitations. v. Report awards, commitments and payments to the FTA under the SCRRA Uniform Report as required on a semi-annual basis. SCRRA shall provide RCTC a copy of the Uniform Report. vi. Perform adequate Good Faith Efforts (GFE) and Commercially Useful Function Reviews (CUF) reviews on projects, as such terms are defined by the FTA. vii. Create and maintain records of compliance with the DBE obligations in this MOU, and provide compliance information to RCTC upon request. C. Comply with all applicable sections of FTA Circular 5010.1d pertaining to the management of federally funded assets, FTA Circular 4220.1F pertaining to any third party contracts funded with FTA funds, and any other applicable FTA Circulars. SCRRA will provide all necessary information to RCTC so that RCTC can coordinate with the FTA regarding the requirements in Circular 5010.1d. D. Assume the role of subrecipient of federal awards and provide RCTC with all the necessary information to remain in compliance as a subrecipient with the Uniform Guidance, FTA requirements, and RCTC Subrecipient Guidelines, all Page 6 of 18 254 of which are on file at the offices of the PARTIES, and are incorporated herein by reference. E. Comply with all applicable requirements of the FTA Master Agreement, the terms of which are incorporated herein by reference. F. Submit a separate invoice to RCTC (Attention: Accounts Payable) on a quarterly basis for RCTC's share of the costs associated with the individual components of the BUDGET. Each invoice shall include the following information: a. RCTC Agreement No. 16-25-014-01; b. Time period covered by the invoice; c. Total invoice amount; d. Total expended to date and balance remaining on contract; e. For rehabilitation/renovation and new capital projects, supporting documentation, such as executed contracts, contractor invoices, or other records to indicate payment has been made to contractor(s), or that payment is imminent in the amount of the invoice, and such additional supporting documentation and background information as RCTC may reasonably require (including progress reports, as further described below); f. All information needed for quarterly project reporting and milestone updates to allow RCTC enough time to prepare and submit to the FTA on a timely basis all required or requested FTA reports and updates. In no event shall such reports be received later than ten (10) days prior to the required date of the quarterly submission to the FTA, which is 30 days following the end of each quarter. G. For each invoice submitted to RCTC related to capital projects, provide a progress report, which shall include a description of services performed during invoice period and any significant issues encountered or anticipated; for rehabilitation/renovation and new capital projects, progress report should include breakdown of percent completed/remaining for projects included in invoice; H. Provide quarterly budget to actual reports to RCTC and the SCRRA Board of Directors reflecting actual ridership and revenues and expenses at a line item level compared to the adopted operating budget, based on financial information generated by SCRRA's Oracle financial system. Such financial information should be based on a monthly financial closing process that includes significant accruals and account reconciliations. a. SCRRA shall also provide reports to RCTC on a quarterly basis for any budgetary transfers to date. Page 7 of 18 255 I. Operate Metrolink commuter rail service on three lines serving Riverside County within budgeted service levels as outlined in Exhibit A. J. Submit invoices to RCTC in a timely manner to allow RCTC to draw down Section 5309 federal funds directly and provide quarterly expenditure reports to RCTC no later than the 20th of the month following the end of each quarter reflecting anticipated drawdown of federal funds and funds expended for RCTC-funded rehabilitation/renovation projects, including a progress report on each budgeted rehabilitation/renovation project that includes status of each project, schedule update, anticipated cash flow and drawdowns, and expenditures to budget. K. Provide a reconciliation report to RCTC by January 30, 2017, identifying a surplus or deficit in FY 2015-16 RCTC allocations to the SCRRA. L. Obtain express written permission by July 31, 2017 from RCTC prior to reallocating any unexpended FY 2015-16 RCTC funds. M. Provide quarterly reports to RCTC that include updates on Exhibit A, summarizing FY 2015-16 actual data versus budget, to assist in the measurement of performance metrics. N. Prepare and submit all required reports to federal and state agencies in a timely manner by the due dates established by those agencies in order to avoid any penalties that could impair funding to RCTC. O. To qualify for reimbursement from RCTC, submit (i) a final invoice for operations for FY 2015-16 on or prior to June 30, 2016, and (ii) final invoices for rehabilitation/renovation and new capital projects within three years of initial authorization of the relevant project. Invoices submitted beyond the stated timeframes will be reviewed and may be reimbursed, on a case by case basis, subject to the availability of funding, as determined by RCTC. P. Submit invoices to BNSF for dispatching and Maintenance of Way along the PVL. Q. Provide Maintenance of Way services within the PVL SCRRA Maintenance Area. R. Be responsible for all the fencing maintenance, weeding, trash, graffiti and maintenance within SCRRA's responsibility for track and structures. S. Submit a separate invoice to RCTC on a quarterly basis for Maintenance of Way expenses that exceed the BNSF reimbursement cap for the track maintenance between the Citrus Curve to Highgrove Junction. T. Reimburse RCTC on a quarterly basis for the direct security costs associated with the security of the layover facility located at the Riverside Downtown station and the South Perris Station along the PVL, for a total, not -to -exceed amount of $750,000. Page 8 of 18 256 U. Make available to RCTC as part of this MOU security camera feeds for such use and for safety and security needs. Future connections will need to be agreed to in writing by the PARTIES and funding for any costs associated with the project will need to be identified. V. Maintain the 48 fibers provided by RCTC for SCRRA's use. W. Be responsible for the delivery, installation and maintenance of eight (8) TVMs which will equally be divided among the four (4) new Metrolink stations: Riverside Hunter Park, Moreno Valley/March Field, Downtown Perris and South Perris. Removal of any TVM from the designated station will require written notification to and approval from RCTC prior to work commencing. X. Report on and credit to RCTC's quarterly member agency operating subsidy allocation any revenues received from BNSF for the Maintenance of Way Services along the PVL on a quarterly basis. Upon completion of PVL construction those revenues will be used to offset RCTC's member agency operating subsidy allocation and reported on quarterly invoices. Y. Report on and credit to RCTC's quarterly member agency operating subsidy allocation any revenues received from BNSF for the dispatching along the PVL. Z. Be responsible for the maintenance of the Riverside Downtown and South Perris layover facilities, unless different agreements are made in writing by both PARTIES. AA. Notify RCTC in writing within five (5) business days of the commencement of a federal or state agency review or audit, provide draft and final copies of the related reports within five (5) business days of receipt from such agency, and provide copies of any SCRRA responses to required corrective actions. SCRRA shall update RCTC on the status of required actions on a quarterly basis until such corrective actions have been completed to the satisfaction of the federal or state agency. BB.Complete all responsibilities of SCRRA which are subject to RCTC reimbursement, as set forth in this MOU, within the total not -to -exceed amounts as set forth in Article III, and Article V of this MOU. CC. Notify RCTC of a Project Implementation Program in writing with the scope of work, schedule and budget of any new rehabilitation/renovation and/or new capital project and obtain RCTC approval prior to commencing a new project with funds outlined in this MOU. Failure of SCRRA to abide by the conditions above may result in delay to payment schedule outlined in Responsibilities of RCTC. Page 9 of 18 257 V. Maximum Obligation Notwithstanding any provisions of this MOU to the contrary, RCTC and SCRRA agree that RCTC's maximum cumulative payment obligation hereunder shall be Thirteen Million Nine Hundred Ninety -Two Thousand Twenty -Three Dollars and Forty Cents ($13,992,023.40) for rail operations; Four Million Six Hundred Twenty - Six Thousand Six Hundred Forty -Nine Dollars and Fifty -Six Cents ($4,626,649.56) for rehabilitation and renovation projects; and Four Million Eight Hundred Twenty - Two Thousand Three Hundred Eighteen Dollars and Thirteen Cents ($4,822,318.13) for a total amount not to exceed Twenty -Three Million Four Hundred Forty Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety -One Dollars and Nine Cents ($23,440,991.09) which shall include all amounts incurred solely for the purposes of the BUDGET. Any amendments to the BUDGET that increase the amount set forth as due from RCTC will require RCTC board approval. VI. Complete MOU A. This MOU, including any attachments incorporated herein and made applicable by reference, constitutes the complete and exclusive statement of the term(s) and condition(s) of this MOU between SCRRA and RCTC concerning the BUDGET and it supersedes all prior representations, understandings, and communications. The invalidity in whole or in part of any term or condition of this MOU shall not affect the validity of other term(s) or conditions(s) of this MOU. The above -referenced Recitals are true and correct and are incorporated by reference herein. B. RCTC'S failure to insist on any instance(s) of SCRRA's performance of any term(s) or condition(s) of this MOU shall not be construed as a waiver or relinquishment of RCTC's right to such performance or to future performance of such term(s) or condition(s), and SCRRA's obligation in respect thereto shall continue in full force and effect. Changes to any portion of this MOU shall not be binding upon RCTC except when specifically confirmed in writing by an authorized representative of RCTC by way of a written amendment to this MOU and issued in accordance with the provisions of this MOU. C. SCRRA's failure to insist on any instance(s) of RCTC's performance of any term(s) or condition(s) of this MOU shall not be construed as a waiver or relinquishment of SCRRA's right to such performance or to future performance of such term(s) or condition(s), and RCTC's obligation in respect thereto shall continue in full force and effect. Changes to any portion of this MOU shall not be binding upon SCRRA except when specifically Page 10 of 18 258 confirmed in writing by an authorized representative of SCRRA by way of a written amendment to this MOU and issued in accordance with the provisions of this MOU. VII. Authorized Representatives The actions required to be taken by SCRRA and RCTC in the implementation of this MOU are delegated the respective authorized representative of each PARTY. The authorized representative for SCRRA is its Chief Executive Officer, or designee, and the authorized representative for RCTC is its Executive Director, or designee. VIII. Audit and Inspection In its role as a subrecipient, SCRRA shall: A. Maintain a complete set of accounting records in accordance with GAAP for RCTC subrecipient monitoring, FTA, and normal operations purposes. The original records shall be maintained within the SCRRA limits. B. Prepare and file, within nine (9) months after the close of the fiscal year, financial statements of SCRRA for such fiscal year, together with an audit report thereon prepared by and independent certified public accountant. SCRRA shall furnish such audited financial statements to RCTC within seven (7) days of issuance of the audit report. C. Upon reasonable notice, permit the authorized representatives of RCTC and FTA to inspect and audit all work, materials, payroll, books, accounts and other data and records of SCRRA for a period of not less than three (3) years after final payment, or until any on -going audit is completed whichever is longer. For purposes of audit, the date of completion of this MOU shall be the date of RCTC's payment of SCRRA's final billing (so noted on the invoice) under this MOU. a. Upon conclusion of RCTC's monitoring of SCRRA as a subrecipient under this MOU, RCTC shall prepare a notice to SCRRA of any findings or deficiencies and immediate actions to be taken by SCRRA to correct issues involving ineligible uses of federal funds. i. SCRRA shall develop a corrective action plan for any findings or deficiencies within 60 days from the issuance of the review findings to address deficiencies or noncompliance issues. D. With respect to audits in accordance with (C), include these same requirements in construction contracts with SCRRA's contractor. E. Comply with the terms and conditions for closeout of subawards. Page 11 of 18 259 RCTC shall have the right to reproduce any such books, records, and accounts. If the FTA determines that any FTA funds were not spent in accordance with applicable federal rules and regulations, SCRRA shall be responsible for reimbursement of all such improperly expended funds and shall make such reimbursement in the manner specified by FTA. If SCRRA fails to comply with the requirements of this MOU as it pertains to federal requirements as a subrecipient, RCTC may impose additional conditions or take one or more of the following actions, as appropriate: A. Temporarily withhold cash payments; B. Disallow all or part of cost of the activity that is not in compliance; C. Wholly or partly suspend or terminate the federal award; D. Recommend that the federal agency initiate suspension or debarment proceedings; or E. Take other remedies that may be legally available. XI. Indemnification and Insurance A. SCRRA shall indemnify, defend and hold harmless RCTC, its officers, directors, employees and agents from and against any and all claims (including attorney's fees and reasonable expenses for litigation or settlement) for any loss or damages, bodily injuries, including death, worker's compensation subrogation claims, damage to or loss of use of property alleged to be caused by the acts, omissions or willful misconduct by SCRRA, its officers, directors, employees, contractors, or agents in connection with or arising out of the performance of this MOU. B. RCTC shall indemnify, defend and hold harmless SCRRA, its officers, directors, employees and agents from and against any and all claims (including attorney's fees and reasonable expenses for litigation or settlement) for any loss or damages, bodily injuries, including death, worker's compensation subrogation claims, damage to or loss of use of property alleged to be caused by the acts, omissions or willful misconduct by RCTC, its officers, directors, employees or agents in connection with or arising out of the performance of this MOU. C. The indemnification and defense obligations of this MOU shall survive its expiration or termination. D. SCRRA maintains property and general liability insurance and/or self- insurance in the amounts and with coverage as set forth in the insurance Page 12 of 18 260 certificates attached hereto as Exhibit "B". SCRRA shall maintain, for the duration of this MOU, and/or shall require that SCRRA contractors maintain, levels of insurance coverage equivalent to existing coverage, as shown in the attached certificates, against claims for injuries to persons, or damages to property, which may arise from or in connection with SCRRA rail operations or construction by the SCRRA, its agents, representatives, employees or subcontractors on RCTC property. Further, the PARTIES agree that SCRRA is responsible for maintenance and repair of damage to, regardless of cause, all assets that facilitate SCRRA's operations, and shall provide insurance therefor. E. SCRRA shall include RCTC as an additional insured on all insurance policies required to be maintained hereunder. F. The PARTIES agree that, under that certain MOU No. 10-33-012-00 between RCTC and SCRRA, SCRRA is obligated to provide final inspection and testing of the constructed Perris Valley Line (PVL) Project prior to accepting the PVL Project for pre -revenue and revenue service ("End to End Testing"). The PARTIES agree that the insurance required herein shall be in place and shall cover the PVL Project no later than the date on which SCRRA commences the End to End Testing. SCRRA shall provide evidence of such insurance to RCTC prior to commencing such testing. X. Additional Provisions RCTC and SCRRA agree to the following mutual responsibilities: A. Term of MOU: This MOU shall terminate upon the completion of the disbursement of the operating and capital funds to SCRRA and the completion of all reports, updates or any other documentation or responsibility of the PARTIES related to the projects in the BUDGET. In all events, this MOU shall terminate within the time limits set forth in applicable FTA procedures and regulations, but in no event later than three (3) years from the date of the Agreement's execution date. This MOU may only be extended upon written mutual consent by both PARTIES. B. Termination: In the event either Party defaults in the performance of any of their obligations under this MOU or breaches any of the provisions of this MOU, the non -defaulting Party shall have the option to terminate this MOU upon thirty (30) days' prior written notice to the other PARTY. Page 13 of 18 261 C. Modifications: This MOU may be amended in writing at any time by the mutual consent of both PARTIES. No amendment shall have any force or effect unless executed in writing by both PARTIES. D. Laws and Regulations: RCTC and SCRRA shall comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, statues, ordinances and regulations of any governmental authority having jurisdiction over the BUDGET. E. Legal Authority: The persons signing below represent that they are authorized to execute this MOU on behalf of their respective PARTY, and that, by so executing this MOU, the PARTIES hereto are formally bound to the provisions of this MOU. F. Severability: If any term, provision, covenant or condition of this MOU is held to be invalid, void or otherwise unenforceable, to any extent, by any court of competent jurisdiction, the remainder of this MOU shall not be affected thereby, and each term, provision, covenant or condition of this MOU shall be valid and enforceable to the fullest extent permitted by law. G. Counterparts: This MOU may be executed and delivered in any number of counterparts, each of which, when executed and delivered shall be deemed an original and all of which together shall constitute the same MOU. Facsimile signatures will be permitted. H. Force Majeure: Either PARTY shall be excused from performing its obligations under this MOU during the time and to the extent that it is prevented from performing by an unforeseeable cause beyond its control, including but not limited to: any incidence of fire or flood; acts of God; commandeering of material, products, plants or facilities by the federal, state or local government; national fuel shortage; or a material act or omission by the other PARTY; when satisfactory evidence of such cause is presented to the other PARTY, and provided further that such nonperformance is unforeseeable, beyond the control and is not due to the fault or negligence of the PARTY not performing. I. Assignment: Neither this MOU, nor any of the PARTIES rights, obligations, duties, or authority hereunder may be assigned in whole or in part by either PARTY without the prior written consent of the other PARTY in its sole and absolute discretion. Any such attempt of assignment shall be deemed void and of no force and effect. Consent to one assignment shall not be deemed consent to any subsequent assignment, nor the waiver of any right to consent to such subsequent assignment. J. Obligations To Comply with Law: Nothing herein shall be deemed nor construed to authorize or require any PARTY to issue bonds, notes or other evidences of indebtedness under the terms, in amounts, or for purposes other than as authorized by local, state or federal law. Page 14 of 18 262 K. Governing Law: The laws of the State of California and applicable local and federal laws, regulations and guidelines shall govern this MOU. Venue shall be in Riverside County. L. Litigation fees: Should litigation arise out of this MOU for the performance thereof, the court shall award costs and expenses, including attorney's fees, to the prevailing PARTY. M. Notices: Any notices, requests, or demands made between the PARTIES pursuant to this MOU are to be directed as follows: To SCRRA: To RCTC: Southern California Regional Rail Authority Riverside County Transportation Commission One Gateway Plaza 12th Floor Los Angeles, CA 90012 Street Address: 4080 Lemon St 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502 Attention: Art Leahy Chief Executive Officer Tel: 213-452-0255 E-mai1:SCRRACE0@scrra.net Attention: Anne Mayer Executive Director Tel: 951-787-7141 E-mail: amayer@rctc.org N. Successors and Assigns: The provisions of this MOU shall bind and inure to the benefit of each of the PARTIES hereto, and all successors or assigns of the PARTIES hereto. This MOU shall be made effective upon execution by both PARTIES. Page 15 of 18 263 IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the PARTIES hereto have caused this MOU No. 16-25-003-00 to be executed on the date first above written. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION REGIONAL RAIL AUTHORITY COMMISSION Chief Executive Officer Executive Director Reviewed and Approved as to Form: SCRRA Legal Counsel RCTC General Legal Counsel Page 16 of 18 264 EXHIBIT A-SCRRA BUDGET RCTC's shares of SCRRA's FY 2015-2016 Budget, as approved by the SCRRA Board of Directors in July 2015, are shown below: Operating Budget: Expenses $ 21,647,194.56 Revenues 7,655,171.16 Net Subsidy $ 13,992,023.40 Rehabilitation/Renovation New Authority Budget: RCTC Share $ 4,169,755.56 Rotem Settlement 456,894.00 Total $ 4,626,649.56 New Capital Authority Budget: Ticket Vending Machines $ 4,822,318.13 Carryover Rehabilitation/Renovation & New Capital Budget: RCTC Share $ 5,134,000.00 Page 17 of 18 265 EXHIBIT B-INSURANCE CERTIFICATES Page 18 of 18 266 AGENDA ITEM 80 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 9, 2015 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Review of Coachella Valley Association of Governments Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Plan STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In 2011, the Governor signed Assembly Bill 61, authored by then -Assemblyman Kevin Jeffries. The new law authorized the county of Riverside or other local jurisdictions to establish NEV Plans. NEVs are defined by law as low -speed vehicles capable of a maximum speed of 25 miles per hour. The bill established a number of standards to be met as part of a plan, requires the entity that adopts a plan to submit a report to the Legislature, and to have the plan reviewed by the Commission. The approval of the legislation provides agencies with a planning option that complies with previous legislation such as Senate Bill 375 and Assembly Bill 32, which strengthen land use policies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions created by single occupancy vehicles. A number of communities in California have adopted NEV Plans to meet these requirements as a way of encouraging sustainable development. Over the course of a number of months, CVAG launched an effort to develop a NEV Plan for the Coachella Valley, and the draft NEV Plan is attached for Commission review. Commission staff reviewed the plan, which complies with the law and is the product of considerable research and public outreach. Additionally, staff reviewed the plan to ensure it is consistent with state and local requirements and does not conflict with countywide transportation priorities. In addition to the Commission review, the law requires CVAG to consult with local law enforcement agencies responsible for traffic enforcement within the plan area and a report will need to be filed with the Legislature. The final approval of the plan falls under the jurisdiction of CVAG. Attachment: Draft NEV Plan Dated March 2015 Agenda Item 80 267 Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Report prepared for Coachella Valley Association of Governments March 2015 CVAG CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Table of Contents 1 Introduction 1 Ll Context and Definitions 1 1.2 NEV Plan Development Process 2 1.3 NEV Network Development Process 3 2 Legislative Context 4 2.1 Introduction 4 2.2 Federal Register: 49 CFR 571.500,1998 4 2.3 California Assembly Bill no. 61, Chapter 170, 2011 4 2.4 California Streets and Highways Code 5 2.5 California Vehicle Code 5 2.6 City Municipal Codes 7 3 Existing Conditions 14 3.1 Document Review 14 3.2 NEV Demand and Access Analysis 16 3.3 Opportunities and Constraints 26 4 Route Selection 34 4.1 Route Selection Assumptions 34 4.2 Network Concept 37 5 Design Guidelines 48 5.1 Design Needs of NEV Facilities 48 5.2 NEV Facility Classification and Selection 52 5.3 Class I NEV Path Design 53 5.4 Class II NEV Lane Design 60 5.5 Class III NEV Route Design 68 5.6 Implementation Strategies 69 5.7 Facility Maintenance 70 5.8 Additional AB 61 Considerations 73 6 Recommended Education, Legislation, and Enforcement 76 6.1 Legislation 76 6.2 Education and Enforcement 76 6.3 Frequently Asked Questions 77 7 Evaluation and Monitoring 78 8 References 80 Appendix A: NEVSA Features 82 Summary of Total Possible Scores 82 NEVSA Inputs 82 Appendix B. Existing Transit, Bike, Golf Cart and NEV Facility Maps 84 Coachella Valley Association of Governments I i 269 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Appendix C. Roadway Speed Limit Maps 94 Appendix D - Existing Golf Cart Permit Requirements and Maps 104 Indio 104 Cathedral City 106 La Quinta 107 Palm Desert 108 Palm Springs 109 Rancho Mirage 110 Appendix E - Electric Vehicle Charging Station Locations 111 List of Tables Table 1: Summary of City Staff Issues and Plan Section Where Incorporated 2 Table 2: Vehicle Access Permitted by Legislation 6 Table 3: Summary of City Ordinances 13 Table 4: Barriers to Connectivity 24 Table 5: NEV Accessibility on Whitewater River Channel Bridges 29 Table 6: Legal and Recommended Facility Type by Speed Limit 35 Table 7: Stopping Sight Distance vs. Grade (Bicyclists) 49 Table 8: Recommended Maintenance Activities 70 List of Maps Map 1: Where People Live 18 Map 2: Where People Work 19 Map 3: Where People Play 20 Map 4: Where People Learn 21 Map 5: Where People Access Transit 22 Map 6: Composite NEV Demand Map 23 Map 7: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept 38 Map 8: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Palm Springs 39 Map 9: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Cathedral City 40 ii I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 270 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Map 10: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept -Rancho Mirage 41 Map 11: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Palm Desert 42 Map 12: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Indian Wells 43 Map 13: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - La Quinta 44 Map 14: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Indio 45 Map 15: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Coachella 46 List of Figures Figure 1: Golf car modified for on -road use 1 Figure 2: Four and Six -seat NEVs 1 Figure 3: Generalized NEV Plan Network Development Process 3 Figure 4: Spatial Needs of NEVs 48 Figure 5: Spatial Needs of Bicyclists 48 Figure 6: Typical NEV Parking 50 Figure 7: FHWA Recommended NEV/Electric Vehicle Regulatory Parking and Charging Signs 51 Figure 8: Preferred Cross Section for One-way Class I NEV Path where Passing is Permitted 53 Figure 9: Preferred Cross Section for One-way Class I NEV Path where Passing is Not Allowed 53 Figure 10: Constrained Cross Section for All User Class I Path 54 Figure 11: CV Link Type Crossride / Crosswalk Concept Markings 55 Figure 12: Transition the Class I NEV Path into Class II NEV Lane 56 Figure 13: Lateral Shift and Class I NEV Path Crossing 56 Figure 14: Transition the Class I NEV Path Into Conventional Class I Shared Use Path 57 Figure 15: NEV/BIKES USE PED SIGNAL Sign 58 Figure 16: Class I NEV Path Driveway Crossing 59 Figure 17: Preferred Cross Section for Class II I NEV Lane 60 Figure 18: Constrained Cross Section for Class II NEV Lane 60 Figure 19: Experimental Standard NEV Pavement Marking 61 Figure 20: Longitudinal Edge Striping Alternatives 61 Figure 21: Combination NEV/Bike Lane Sign and Supplemental Plaques 62 Coachella Valley Association of Governments I iii 271 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Figure 22: NEV Prohibition Sign 62 Figure 23: Dashed NEV Lane Next to Through/Right Lane 63 Figure 24: Through NEV Lane and Added Right Turn Only Lane 64 Figure 25: Combined NEV Lane/Turn Lane (Mixing Zone) 64 Figure 26: Through NEV Lane with Transition to Right -Turn -Only Lane (35 mph or lower) 65 Figure 27: Typical Right -turn Departure NEV/Bike Lane 66 Figure 28: Right -turn Departure NEV/bike Lane Roadway Section 67 Figure 29: Shared Right -turn Only Lane with Exception for NEVs and Nikes 67 Figure 30: Shared Right -turn Only Lane Roadway Section 67 Figure 31: Typical Class III Route on Residential Street 68 Figure 32: Class III NEV Route Sign 68 Figure 33: Proper Placement of Construction Signage Outside of NEV Lane 72 Figure 34: City of Indio Golf Cart Map 105 Figure 35: City of La Quinta Golf Cart Map 107 Figure 36: Palm Desert Bike and Golf Cart Route Map 108 iv I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 272 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan This page intentionally left blank 273 Coachella Valley Association of Governments I v 274 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 1 Introduction 1.1 Context and Definitions This Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan was developed in conjunction with planning and design of CV Link, a new transportation and recreation pathway that will generally follow the Whitewater River flood channel between Palm Springs and Coachella. CV Link is anticipated to become a backbone for the further development of pathways throughout the valley. In the CV Link Master Plan, NEVs are one of several types of Low Speed Vehicle (LSV, also known as Low Speed Electric Vehicle or LSEV) that are anticipated to use the new facility. This Plan will describe the specific duties required of NEV operators and the key design parameters that will make NEVs a practical option for mobility throughout the Coachella Valley. While the federal definition may be interpreted to exclude golf cars (carts), for the purposes of this plan three principal types of 3 or more wheel LSVs are considered: • Golf cars (carts) that are factory designed to travel up to 15 mph within golf course environments. Golf cars that are not modified for on -street use may be used on roadways or paths designated for such use by local jurisdictions • Golf carts that are modified after manufacture for use on public streets and can travel up to 25 mph (Figure 1). While increasingly common, DMV guidance (FFVR37) requires owners to register them as motor vehicles that meet regular passenger vehicle standards or risk a citation. • Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs) that are designed and manufactured to be used on streets with posted speed limits up to 35 mph and can travel up to 25 mph (Figure 2) Figure 1: Golf car modified for on -road use Figure 2: Four and Six -seat NEVs Coachella Valley Association of Governments 11 275 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan The following links provide more information on the differences in golf cars and NEVs. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration publication on the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for Low Speed Vehicles (LSVs) that are capable of at least 20 mph but not more than 25 mph): http://www.nhtsa.gov/cars/rules/rulings/lsv/lsv.html#1sv3 Alternative vehicles definitions and information from Newport Beach Police Department, with comprehensive list of California Vehicle Code references: http://www.nbpd.org/community/altveh.asp California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) fact sheet on LSVs and golf carts: http://apps.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/brochures/fast facts/ffvr37.pdf Golf Car Portal's clear definition of the differences between golf cars and NEVs: http://golfcarportal.com/education/defference between.php 1.2 NEV Plan Development Process A series of public meetings related to the Coachella Valley CV Link project also informed elements of the NEV Plan. The cities of Cathedral City, Indio, Palm Desert, and Rancho Mirage returned detailed stakeholder surveys that assessed their current efforts, existing conditions, and future interest in NEV facility implementation. Meetings were held with a number of agency staff: • April 30, 2014 — Indio with the Principal Engineer • May 6, 2014 - Cathedral City with the City Engineer • May 6, 2014 — Palm Desert with the Director of Community Development • May 12, 2014 — Rancho Mirage with the Planning Manager • May 13, 2014 — Palm Springs with the City Engineer • June 9, 2014 — La Quinta with the Director of Community Development • June 11, 2014 — Coachella with the Community Development Director • Meeting with the Agua Caliente Tribe Director of Planning and Natural Resources City staff input has been incorporated into this plan as shown in Table 1. Table 1: Summary of City Staff Issues and Plan Section Where Incorporated Key Themes Where Covered in This Plan Inconsistent policies and laws; prohibitions on use; confusion on definitions Section 0 City Municipal Codes Section 5 Recommended Education, Legislation, and Enforcement Roadway speed limits are too high for use of NEVs Appendix C Roadway Speed Limit Maps presents city -provided or published information that was used in the route planning. NEVs travel too fast to share designated golf cart paths Section 4 Design Guidelines recommends path widths likely to minimize user conflicts. Signage (e.g. Figure 22) may be used to identify where NEVs may operate at reduced speed or prohibited. Concern about reducing 12' wide car lanes to accommodate 7' wide NEV/bike lanes Section 4.4 Class II NEV Lane refers to the key resources for city engineers to reference for narrower lanes. 2 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 276 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan California Assembly Bill 61 stipulates that this transportation plan must be submitted to the director for approval following a review and recommendation by the California Traffic Control Devices Committee (CA-TCDC). This plan has been placed on the agenda for the March 5, 2015 committee meeting. 1.3 NEV Network Development Process This NEV Plan has been based on the GIS NEV Suitability Analysis (NEVSA) described in Chapter 2 where the inputs are demographics (population, jobs, and land uses). The outputs are shown in the maps in this plan, which should be seen as the ultimate vision. This analysis did not have the benefit of roadway information such as right of way width, curb -to -curb roadway width, and existing and proposed number of lanes at and between intersections. As a next step, a NEV Plan Implementation Program should be developed based on assessment of each roadway and intersection to determine how NEVs can be accommodated. The Implementation Program would follow a general process as outlined below. Yes Speed < 35 mph? Figure 3: Generalized NEV Plan Network Development Process NEVs may share lane Provide a dedicated lane or path Yes Lane Existing path 10'or wider? Existing bicycle lane >_ 7' leading to and departing from intersections? NEVs may share pat - Enough right-of-way to iden sidewalk" NEVs may share lane Enough room to widen bicycle lane to 7'? Yes No Yes No Long term 7 improvement Remove from NEV network concept, Restripe road and designate for NEVs Road widenin or road space reconfiguration possible? Long term improvement Yes TRemove from NEVI network concept J The proposed standards in this document represent the desirable widths and conditions for Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) travel. To achieve a critical mass of connected trip ends, it is recommended that the maximum possible number of streets and paths be made accessible to NEV and golf cart operators even if the desirable widths cannot be achieved initially. Once the number of users has grown, higher geometric standards can be implemented on a segment -by -segment basis to permit more comfortable routes for all users. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 13 277 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 2 Legislative Context 2.1 Introduction Recent California climate change and air quality legislation including Assembly Bill 32, Senate Bill 375, and Assembly Bill 1358 have strengthened transportation and land use policies aimed at reducing single occupancy vehicle trips through multimodal transportation options. Local policy and planning efforts must make progress toward reduction targets set forth by state climate change legislation and a growing number of communities have identified Neighborhood Electric Vehicles as an effective means of attaining those goals. A number of local cities and counties in California (Lincoln, Rocklin, Western Riverside County, Rancho Mission Viejo, Coronado, and Playa Vista), have developed NEV Plans with various goals such as reducing reliance on gasoline, reducing vehicle emissions, reducing roadway wear and tear, and creating more sustainable communities. 2.2 Federal Register: 49 CFR 571.500,1998 In 1998, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) created a new Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS-500) category for low speed vehicles (LSV) - including NEVs - in response to the growing popularity of low speed vehicles for short trips. The intent of 49 CFR Part 571 was to establish consistent treatment of LSVs at the Federal, state, and local levels with respect to on - street operations, speed, and safety standards. The new LSV class was defined to include "small, 4- wheeled vehicles with top speeds of 20-25 mph." This effectively removed conventional golf carts with a top speed of 15 mph from the classification and provided a more appropriate set of safety standards specific to LSVs (as compared to the umbrella "Passenger Car" class designation). Consistent rulemaking specific to LSVs would in turn enable manufacturers of these electric vehicles to bring new technologies to the market. 49 CFR 571.500 did not affect state and local decision making with regard to permitting on -street operation of LSVs, or requiring existing LSV owners to retrofit their vehicles to meet the safety standards established. In subsequent years, NHTSA would amend the definition of LSVs to allow for commercial vehicle utility and an increase in the maximum gross vehicle weight restriction from 2,500 lbs. to 3,000 lbs. 2.3 California Assembly Bill no. 61, Chapter 170, 2011 AB-61 authorizes the County of Riverside or any of its jurisdictions to develop an NEV Transportation plan for a designated plan area. The California Streets and Highway Code sections 1962-1962.8 were established to implement the bill. Section 1 of AB-61 establishes the scope of NEV Transportation plans, which includes route selection and provisions for "NEV Lanes", parking and turnouts, signage, striping and roadway markings, roadway crossings, connections to other travel modes, and electrical charging stations. The bill further requires the development of facility design criteria, traffic control devices, safety criteria, route restrictions, and plan evaluation measures. Sections 2 and 3 amend the California State Vehicle Code language with respect to vehicle class provisions, operation of LSVs on roadways with operating speeds in excess of 35 mph and the operation of LSVs at certain roadway crossings. Section 4 absolves the State of California 4 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 278 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan from responsibility for reimbursing jurisdictions for expenses incurred as a result of the state mandated local program. All NEV transportation plans must be submitted for review and approval by Caltrans. 2.4 California Streets and Highways Code The California Streets and Highways Code Division 2.5 City Streets, Chapter 6 Section 1950-1961 establishes a framework for any county or city to establish a Golf Cart Transportation Plan. Golf carts are defined as: "Golf Cart" means a motor vehicle having not less than three wheels in contact with the ground and unladen weight less than 1,300 pounds which is designed to be and is operated at not more than 25 miles per hour and is designated to carry golf equipment and not more than two persons, including the driver. In the context of code Section 1962.1 authorizing the County of Riverside or cities contained within to establish NEV Plans, the code defines NEVs as: (b) "Neighborhood electric vehicle" or "NEV' means a low -speed vehicle as defined by Section 385.5 of the Vehicle Code 2.5 California Vehicle Code 2.5.1 Definitions According to California State Vehicle Code Section 385.5, NEVs are defined as "low -speed vehicles" and: a) Having four wheels, b) Attaining a maximum speed of 20-25 mph on a paved level surface, and c) Having a maximum gross vehicle weight of 3,000 pounds. NEV drivers must be licensed as motor vehicle drivers and abide by the California State Vehicle Code when operating on street. 2.5.2 Lane Use The California Vehicle Code (CVC)1 permits NEVs on all roadways with posted speed limits of 35 mph and under. NEVs are also permitted on roadways up to 55 mph within on -street Class II NEV striped lanes. For roadways with posted speed limits above 55 mph, NEV travel can only be accommodated with a separated off-street path. Table 2 summarizes lane use allowed by the CVC. Please refer to Chapter 4 of this document for more information on how this legislation will impact route development. ihttp://www.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/vctop/d11/vc21260.htm Coachella Valley Association of Governments 15 279 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Table 2: Vehicle Access Permitted by Legislation Traffic Condition <_ 25 mph <_ 35 mph 40-50 mph >_ 55 mph Shared general traffic NEVs lanes Golf carts* Bicycles NEVs Bicycles Bicycles peritted Bicycles not advised but may be permitted Separate lane or shoulder NEVs Golf carts* Bicycles Separate path NEVs Golf carts* Bicycles NEVs Golf carts* Bicycles Bicycles NEVs Golf Carts * Generally limited to close proximity to golf courses and as authorized in a golf cart plan approved by the jurisdiction 2.5.3 Crossings NEV crossings at roadways with speed limits above 35 mph must be orthogonal (90 degree intersection angles). If such crossings are a major part of the NEV network and the crossing is not orthogonal, there may be opportunities to reconfigure the geometry of the intersection to meet this requirement. Caltrans must approve any uncontrolled crossing of a state highway. The code states: (1) The operator of a low -speed vehicle may cross a roadway with a speed limit in excess of 35 miles per hour if the crossing begins and ends on a roadway with a speed limit of 35 miles per hour or less and occurs at an intersection of approximately 90 degrees. However, the CVC also permits NEVs on roadways with a posted speed of 40, 45, or 50 mph where that roadway has a dedicated NEV / bike lane. Such use would be impractical if turning or crossing movements were not continuous. The CVC is interpreted to mean that at an intersection, as long as the NEV / bike lane is carried all the way through the approach up to the stop line, and again on the departure side of any leg that a NEV would be permitted to travel to, the movement would be permitted. If the movement is a left turn, then the NEV driver could perform: • A two -stage turn (with or without special provisions) although at higher volumes there could be an issue with queuing space for NEVs • A vehicular style left turn, just like a bicyclist is permitted to do, as long as they have a NEV/bike lane to turn into on the departure side. The NEV driver would not be in a designated NEV lane on the approach - like a vehicular bicyclist, they would be in the general traffic left turn lane. Even on a green indication, there should not be an issue with this because a NEV has similar acceleration and cornering capabilities as an automobile. 6 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 280 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 2.6 City Municipal Codes This section provides relevant golf cart and NEV vehicles and traffic regulations obtained from each jurisdiction's municipal code available from the www.qcode.us, www.municode.com or www.amlegal.com websites. 2.6.1 Desert Hot Springs No applicable municipal code. 2.6.2 Palm Springs Definitions Chapter 12.84 sets out the following definitions. a) "Golf cart" means a motor vehicle having not less than three wheels in contact with the ground, having an unladen weight less than one thousand three hundred pounds, which is designed to be and is operated at not more than fifteen miles per hour and designed to carry golf equipment and not more than two persons, including the driver. b) "Darkness" means any time from one-half hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise and any other time when visibility is not sufficient to render clearly discernible any person or -vehicle on the highway at a distance of one thousand feet. c) "Real estate development offering golf facilities" means an area of single-family or multiple -family residences, the owners or occupants of which are eligible for membership in, or the use of, one or more golf courses within the development by virtue of their ownership or occupancy of a residential dwelling unit in the development. (Ord.1405 § 1,1991) Operation a) Any person operating a golf cart on designated city streets shall abide by all applicable traffic laws of the city and state. b) No person shall operate a golf cart on a designated city street after darkness unless the golf cart conforms with the equipment requirements of the California Vehicle Code. c) No person shall operate a golf cart on a designated city street for any other purpose than transporting persons and golfing equipment to or from a golf course. (Ord. 1405 § 1,1991) Routes Chapter 12.84.030 designates thirteen streets are for operation of golf carts. No NEV routes have been established in the municipal code, but the City published a NEV network map in 2009 (although this is no longer readily found on the city website). The map is provided in Appendix D to this plan. Discussion The Palm Springs definition of a golf cart (1300 lb / 15 mph) excludes NEVs and prohibits non -golfing purposes of travel, severely limiting the transportation utility of such vehicles. The city code does define an electric personal assistive mobility device (EPAMD, popularized by the "Segway" scooter, but does not define electric bicycles or NEVs. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 17 281 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 2.6.3 Cathedral City Although city staff have advised that golf carts and NEVs are prohibited, no such prohibition is found in the municipal code. 2.6.4 Rancho Mirage Definitions Chapter 10.70 sets out the following definitions. Golf cart means a four -wheeled motor vehicle with an unladen weight of less than one thousand three hundred pounds, which is designed to be and is operated at not more than twenty miles per hour and is designed to carry golf equipment and not more than two persons, including the driver, and can be utilized on local golf courses for the purpose of playing golf. Golf cart facility means all travel ways, as designated by the city, that provide for golf cart travel. There shall be three categories of golf cart facility: 1. Class I golf cart paths provide an area separate from the roadway used by automobile traffic for shared one-way or two-way use by golf carts, bicycles and pedestrians. 2. Class II golf cart lanes provide a striped eight -foot lane for one-way golf cart and bicycle travel on a street or highway. 3. Class III golf cart routes provide for shared use with automobile and bicycle traffic. Class III facilities are established by placing golf cart route signs along roadways with speed limits of twenty-five miles per hour or less in order to link them to Class I or Class II facilities. Golf cart circulation plan means the adopted map depicting routes and crossing that will be constructed, posted and designated for use by permitted golf carts. (Ord. 713 4 3,1999) Operation All golf cart operators operating golf carts on any golf cart facility in the city must conform to the following operator requirements and safety criteria: 1. Golf cart operators must be licensed drivers in the State of California with valid California driver's license, or a driver's license issued by another state. 2. Golf cart operators must comply with the financial responsibility requirements established pursuant to Chapter 1 (commencing with Section 16000) of Division 7 of the California Vehicle Code. 3. Golf cart operators must maintain golf cart in a safe condition. 4. Golf carts are limited to daytime operation and are not permitted before one-half hour prior to sunrise or after one-half hour after sunset. 5. Golf cart operators must yield the right-of-way to automobiles, pedestrians and bicyclists. 6. Golf cart operators may only travel on designated golf cart facilities, and only in those golf carts that meet the minimum design criteria required by Section 10.70.030 and that are also properly permitted by the city. (Ord. 713 § 3,1999) Routes The city has developed a golf cart map, last updated March 2012, identifying class 1 paths and class 2 on -street lanes between Dinah Shore Drive and Highway 111. This is provided in Appendix D. 8 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 282 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Discussion The Rancho Mirage definition of a golf cart (1300 lb / 20 mph) excludes NEVs and in contrast to Palm Springs also prohibits night-time use of golf carts regardless of whether they are equipped for such use. The lack of a connection between the Eisenhower Medical Center at Country Club Drive and The River at Highway 111 along Bob Hope Drive is a significant barrier to CV Link access. 2.6.5 Palm Desert Definitions "Golf cart" means an electric powered motor vehicle having not less than four wheels in contact with the ground and an unladen weight of less than three thousand pounds which is designed to be and is operated at not more than twenty-five miles per hour and is designed to carry not more than six persons, including the driver. "Golf cart lanes" is synonymous with "golf cart routes" and means all publicly owned facilities that provide for golf cart travel including roadways designated by signs or permanent markings which are shared with pedestrians, bicyclists, and other motorists in the plan area. There shall be three categories of golf cart lanes: 1. Class I golf cart lanes provide a right-of-way completely separated from any highway, with cross traffic by other motorists minimized, and designated for the exclusive use of golf carts, or, where feasibly safe and when no parallel improvements for pedestrians and bicyclists are available, designated for the shared use of golf carts, bicyclists and pedestrians. 2. Class II golf cart lanes provide a restricted right-of-way on a highway designated by striping and signage for the exclusive or semiexclusive use of golf carts, with through travel by motor vehicles or pedestrians prohibited, but with vehicle parking and cross traffic by pedestrians and other motorists permitted. 3. Class III golf cart lanes are lanes on local streets with speed limits of forty-five miles per hour or less and are shared with pedestrians, bicyclists and other motorists. (Ord.1174 41, 2008; Ord. 895 § 2,1998; Ord. 703 41,1993) Routes The city's golf cart map was last updated in September 2010 and is provided in Appendix D. Discussion The Palm Desert definition of a golf cart (30001b / 25 mph) effectively includes NEVs. The exclusion of lanes on roadways with a posted speed of 50 mph is in variance with the California Vehicle Code which permits operation of NEVs within a designated lane on such roadways. 2.6.6 Indian Wells No applicable municipal code. 283 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 19 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 2.6.7 La Quinta Definitions Chapter 12.69 sets out the following definitions. "Golf cart" means a four -wheeled electric motor vehicle with an unladen weight of less than one thousand three hundred pounds, which is designed to be, and is operated at not more than twenty-five miles per hour, and is designed to carry golf equipment and no more than two persons, including the driver. "Golf cart paths" or "golf cart routes" means all city -owned travel ways that allow golf cart travel, including roadways. There shall be three categories of golf cart paths: 1. Class I golf cart paths provide an area separate from the roadway used by automobile traffic for shared one-way or two-way golf carts, bicycles, pedestrians, and equestrians. 2. Class II golf cart paths provide a striped eight -foot lane for one-way golf cart and bicycle travel on a street or highway. 3. Class III golf cart paths provide for shared use with automobile and bicycle traffic. Class III paths are established by placing golf cart route signs along roadways with speed limits of twenty-five miles per hour or less in order to link them to Class I or Class II paths. "Golf cart route" means the map depicting routes and crossings that will be constructed, posted and designated for use by permitted golf carts. (Ord. 474 § 1, 2009) Operation All golf cart operators operating golf carts on any golf cart path in the city must conform to the following operator requirements and safety criteria: A. Golf cart operators must be licensed drivers in the state of California with valid California driver's license, or have a valid driver's license issued by a jurisdiction in accordance with Vehicles Code Sections 12502 through 12505. B. Golf cart operators must comply with the financial responsibility requirements (insurance) established pursuant to Chapter 1(commencing with Section 16000) of Division 7 of the California Vehicle Code. C. No golf cart shall be operated on golf cart paths or golf cart routes within the city without a current golf cart permit decal visibly displayed on the right rear fender of the golf cart. D. The golf cart permit shall be valid for two years from the date of issuance. E. Golf cart operators must maintain the golf cart in a safe condition and be properly loaded to conform with CVC Section 24002. F. Golf cart operators may only travel in those golf carts that meet the minimum design criteria required by Section 12.69.030. G. Golf carts are limited to daytime operation and are permitted on public streets only during the time period between one hour prior to sunrise and one hour after sunset. H. A maximum of two persons may ride in the golf cart and may only ride in the main passenger compartment equipped with safety belts. Both driver and passenger must wear safety belts at all times while the golf cart is being operated on Class I, II, or III golf cart paths. 10 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 284 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan I. Golf cart operators must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians, bicyclists, and equestrians. J. Golf cart operators may only travel on designated golf cart routes or along streets with speed limits of twenty-five miles per hour or less. K. Golf cart operators may not travel on or along streets with speed limits in excess of twenty-five miles per hour except on designated golf cart routes, and shall only cross at controlled intersections as designated on the golf cart route map. L. Golf carts modified by removing any of the above safety equipment or a modification that in any way creates an unsafe cart will result in the immediate revocation of the golf cart permit and will be subject to any violations that apply under the California Vehicle Code. Should a golf cart be impounded pursuant to a violation under the State Vehicle Code, the registered owner shall be subject to any regulations imposed by the impounding authority pursuant to Section 22850.5 of the California Vehicle Code. M. No person shall operate or move a golf cart upon a sidewalk except those persons who in the course of their employment by a state, federal, or local government, or school district maintenance crew. (Ord. 474 41, 2009) Routes Undated map; includes specification of 8' lanes; included in a detailed brochure. Discussion The La Quinta definition of a golf cart (13001b / 25 mph) effectively includes on some NEVs, because the maximum number of occupants is only 2. La Quinta has substantially more regulations beyond those provided in the California Vehicle Code. 2.6.8 Indio Definitions GOLF CART. A motor vehicle having not less than three wheels in contact with the ground that is designed to be and is operated at not more than 25 miles per hour and carries golf equipment, food/beverages for golfers, and one or more people, including a driver, and can be utilized on a golf course for play, service to golfers or maintenance. GOLF CART CIRCULATION PLAN. The plan presented by city staff concurrent with this chapter's approval or such plan as may supersede same by determination of the Planning Commission. The golf cart circulation plan shall be a public record maintained by the City Clerk. GOLF CART FACILITY. All travel ways, as designated by and located in the city within public right-of- way, that provide for golf cart travel. There shall be three categories of golf cart facilities: 1) Class I golf cart paths provide an area separate from the roadway used by automobile traffic for shared one-way or two-way use by golf carts, bicycles and pedestrians. 2) Class II golf cart lanes provide a striped lane for one-way golf cart and bicycle travel on a street or highway. 3) Class III golf cart routes provide for shared use with automobile and bicycle traffic. Class III facilities are established by placing golf cart route signs along roadways with speed limits of 25 miles per hour or less in order to link them to Class I or Class II facilities. GOLF CART OPERATOR. Any person that operates a golf cart within public right-of-way per this chapter. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 111 285 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan GOLF CLUB. A public or private golf course owned by an institutional golf cart operator and located in its entirety on private or city -owned property with the sole exception of city street crossings identified in § 72.06. INSTITUTIONAL GOLF CART. A golf cart owned by an institutional golf cart operator and operated exclusively within a golf club. INSTITUTIONAL GOLF CART OPERATOR. Any entity, e.g., a company, corporation, homeowners' association, management association, etc., that owns and allows usage of golf carts at a golf club by persons who are playing golf, and are: 1) Members of the entity in question, or 2) Residents or guests of residents of a community related to the entity in question, or 3) Otherwise affiliated with, paying fees to, or in receipt of consent from the entity in question to do so. (Ord. 1583, passed 12-1540) Operation A. A golf cart operator must be possess a valid California driver's license, a driver's license issued by another state, or other proof of legal authority to operate a motor vehicle in California; B. A golf cart operator must have insurance that complies with the financial responsibility requirements established pursuant to Cal. Vehicle Code Chapter 1, Division 7, 4§ 16000 et seq.; C. Each golf cart must be maintained in a safe condition; D. In the case of an institutional golf cart, the party responsible to fulfill this duty to maintain the golf cart in question is the institutional golf cart operator, not an individual golf cart operator; E. Operation of a golf cart that does not meet the design criteria specified in § 72.03 is prohibited between one-half hour after sunset and one-half hour before sunrise at designated crossings; F. Golf cart operators must yield the right-of-way to automobiles, pedestrians and bicyclists; G. Golf cart operators may only travel on a designated golf cart facility, a golf club crossing conforming to § 72.06, or a public street with a speed limit of 25 miles per hour or less; and H. Except as otherwise provided in this chapter, each golf cart operated in the city shall comply with the design criteria required by § 72.03 and be properly permitted as required by § 72.05. (Ord.1583, passed 12-15-10) Penalty see § 72.99 Routes Eight streets are identified for golf cart operation in the March 2011 map, provided in Appendix D. Discussion Indio's definitions are less prescriptive than other jurisdictions, and could effectively include NEVs. The speed limit restriction to 25 mph roadways varies from the California Vehicle Code, which permits operation in mixed traffic lanes up to and including 35 mph posted speeds. The route map does not identify many local streets that could serve as Class III mixed traffic routes, and a explicit approval for such neighborhood street operation could clarify the bylaw. 2.6.9 Coachella No applicable municipal code. As an aside related to the CV Link Master Plan, the code provides for bicycle licensing by the Chief of Police, applicable to resident operation of bicycles on city streets. 12 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 286 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 2.6.10 Summary A summary of City Ordinances Relevant to Golf Carts and NEVs is provided in Table 3, showing that there are no two cities with the same definition of a golf cart. By permitting golf cart operation up to 25 mph on designated city streets, three cities effectively permit NEVs. No city explicitly defines or prohibits an NEV. Table 3: Summary of City Ordinances Jurisdiction Weight (lb) Speed (mph) Maximum Occupants Prohibitions Routes Desert Hot Springs N/A mo Palm Springs 1300 15 2 Non -golf use Separate golf cart and NEV maps Cathedral City N/A Rancho Mirage 1300 20 2 Night use Golf cart map Palm Desert 3000 25 6 Golf cart map Indian Wells N/A La Quinta 1300 25 Golf cart brochure Indio not defined 25 not defined Golf cart map Coachalla N/A 2.6.11 Executive Order B-16-2012 and ZEV Action Plan, 2013 In March 2012, California State Governor Edmund (Jerry) Brown issued Executive Order B-16-2012 requiring all state agencies and entities to make efforts toward the rapid deployment of Zero -Emissions Vehicles (ZEV) in the state of California. This order also required that state agencies — including the California Air Resources Board, California Energy Commission and Public Utilities Commission — partner with the Plug-in Electric Vehicle Collaborative and California Fuel Cell Partnership to develop zero -emissions benchmarks for the state to achieve by 2015, 2020, and 2025. ZEVs as defined here include the broad range of electric vehicles including NEVs, but also other plug-in Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV), Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles (PHEV) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The 2013 ZEV Action Plan was drafted in response, and outlines strategies and actions necessary to meet the benchmarks set forth in EO B-16-2012. The Action Plan places emphasis on the market conditions and charging/fueling infrastructure necessary for large-scale deployment of ZEVs, and the public -private partnership opportunities that will enable these developments. The plan consists of four general goals: 1) Complete needed infrastructure and planning 2) Expand consumer awareness and demand 3) Transform fleets, and 4) Grow jobs and investment in the private sector Coachella Valley Association of Governments 113 287 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 3 Existing Conditions As the Coachella Valley region continues to expand, attracting new residents and jobs, the mobility and accessibility needs of its residents will also increase. Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs) can contribute to a more livable and sustainable region. The purpose of this chapter is to establish a base understanding of the current state of NEV development and the plans for future NEV infrastructure development in the Coachella Valley region. This chapter begins with summaries of existing local plans and relevant reports for NEV system design and policy in the Coachella Valley. Residential density, employment density and other key local destinations are used to complete an NEV Suitability Analysis (NEVSA). The chapter concludes with a summary of identified opportunities and constraints to NEV network development. Additional NEVSA documentation is provided in Appendix A and existing network maps are provided in Appendix B and C. 3.1 Document Review Several local NEV plans and reports have been published in recent years. These plans and reports provide a number of effective approaches towards NEV system development directly applicable to the Coachella Valley region. 3.1.1 Draft CVAG PEV Readiness Plan The recently published draft CVAG Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV) Readiness Plan provides the foundation for a regional NEV transportation network in the Coachella Valley. The purpose of the plan was to prepare for the system -wide deployment and adoption of PEVs throughout the region over the next decade. The plan is the result of close coordination between local communities, local, regional, state, and federal agencies, members of the California PEV Coordinating Council, electric vehicle industry representatives, and numerous stakeholder groups. The plan estimates up to 13,000 PEVs will be on Coachella Valley roads by 2025. These projections were based on current vehicle registration data (there are currently about 148 PHEVs, 76 BEVs and 440 NEVs in the Coachella Valley). The plan notes that the NEV fleet has not grown over the last decade, which may be attributable to the current road network limitations. These projections were also used to generate demand estimates for non-residential charging stations. Several indicators of adoption were identified through surveys and market data. These indicators were then used to develop a weighted scoring methodology for charging station siting throughout the region. This was further refined to identify workplace and opportunity charging locations. The PEV Readiness Plan considers the broad range of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) and Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs). As a result of this general scope, the PEV Readiness Plan focuses primarily on vehicle technology and Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) infrastructure and the corresponding market and policy/regulatory drivers necessary for deployment. That is, it does not specifically address the infrastructure required for NEV adoption - NEV Class I, II, and III facilities. 14 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 288 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 3.1.2 WRCOG NEV Plan The Western Riverside Council of Governments Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Plan (WRCOG NEV Plan) was drafted to develop the "backbone" network of NEV facilities between the cities of Corona, Norco, Riverside, and Moreno Valley in 2010. It was designed as a model plan for each of the individual cities to consult in developing their own local NEV Plans. Most of the backbone network is based on existing and planned routes with Class II bike facilities, as these can be relatively easy and cost-effective to convert for NEV use. The WRCOG NEV Plan provides a model design guide section with guidance on NEV facility types, signage and pavement markings, wayfinding, charging stations, parking, and facility maintenance. This guidance informed the CVAG NEV Transportation Plan. 3.1.3 City of Lincoln NEV Transportation Plan The City of Lincoln was the first city in California to adopt a NEV Transportation Plan. The Lincoln plan was primarily created to accommodate high usage of NEVs in the Sun City Lincoln Hills development and expand the NEV network to meet increasing demand in the greater Lincoln area. Much of that demand is generated from the large and growing retirement community in Lincoln. This provides a similar context for cities across the Coachella Valley. The plan was intended to prescribe relatively "minor modifications" to existing facilities including signing and striping improvements, parking, charging stations, and crossings. The Environmental Justice element of the plan estimates that the cost of owning and operating an NEV is 20% of the cost of owning a passenger automobile, suggesting that NEVs provide an affordable transportation options for low-income drivers. The plan provides a special drivers permit to improve the safety and independence of aging or disabled drivers that can no longer hold a driver's license. 3.1.4 Local Support and Opposition to NEVs NEVs provide mobility options for a wide range of trip purposes, including commute trips, school, shopping, errands and recreation. The replacement of short passenger vehicle trips with NEV trips will reduce fuel consumption and emissions. With lower new vehicle purchase prices and reduced long-term maintenance costs, NEVs can be attractive to a wide range of household incomes, and have the potential to increase independence and mobility options of older residents who are no longer able to operate a motor vehicle. As the infrastructure and market develop, the barriers to NEV ownership and operation are further reduced. As documented in the draft CVAG PEV Readiness Report, the opportunities for NEV development in the Coachella Valley are abundant. Many valley residents are already accustomed to travel by golf cart, and PEVs have been on the road in the region for over a decade. Current PEV and golf cart use has contributed to a general understanding of the need for improved facilities, and safer, more convenient connections to local and regional destinations. Several of the cities in the region have in recent years begun to invest more heavily in NEV infrastructure. For example, the City of Palm Springs has an electric vehicle fleet and has installed electric vehicle charging stations throughout the city. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 115 289 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan The majority of local and regional policy makers are supportive of NEV development efforts including CVAG, Riverside County Supervisors, and the mayors of most of the cities in Coachella Valley. In recent years, local and regional support for NEV development has centered on CV Link While not necessarily specific to NEV vehicles or the infrastructure, this media attention has simultaneously elevated the profile of the project and reaffirmed the region's goals toward NEV development. Despite the many opportunities and benefits of NEV development, support has not been unanimous. Outreach conducted for CV Link has indicated concern about the safety of mixing NEVs, bicyclists and pedestrians on existing and constrained new pathways. This NEV Plan and the CV Link Master Plan will help guide the development of facilities that minimize path user conflicts. However, the cities will also need to consider widening of existing paths and/or traffic control devices where widening is not feasible. 3.2 NEV Demand and Access Analysis The purpose of this NEV Suitability Analysis (NEVSA) is to identify areas of high current and potential activity as well as patterns of land use and demographics that will generate NEV travel within the study area. This analysis will help guide route selection and infrastructure decisions. The analysis provides the following benefits: • Quantify factors that impact NEV activity, objectively identifying areas where NEV users might want to be, while focusing on destinations like schools, and parks • Provides the basis for a geographically based alternative alignment analysis • Quantifying the economic benefits that are derived from construction of various alignment alternatives • Guide community leaders and the public on alternative alignment analyses 3.2.1 Development of NEVSA The analytical methods in NEVSA provide an objective, data -driven process of identifying clusters of high potential NEV activity and areas with poor existing network connectivity. Background, Overview of NEVSA, and Use Considerations This NEVSA has its basis in a technique devised by prominent landscape architect, Ian McHarg. His influential book Design with Nature (1969) highlighted the importance of considering the natural environment when introducing new development and infrastructure. McHarg was an early pioneer of GIS analysis and established innovative techniques for route planning using photographic map overlays. McHarg asserted that in order to find the most suitable route, one must determine the least social cost; meaning factors that would impact social values would have to be considered. Once identified, each factor was mapped on individual transparent sheets using three different color shades to represent the level of social cost. The sheets were overlaid into a single stack revealing the most suitable route location. McHarg's photographic map overlay analysis paved the way for the foundation of modern day GIS models. 16 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 290 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Models serve as an effective means to understand how factors in a complex system interact by providing a simplified version of the system for study. However, by definition, models are representations of reality and are constrained by the quality of available data and the complexity of the system under consideration. NEVSA provides a general understanding of expected activity in the environment by combining categories representative of where people live, work, play, and go to school into a composite sketch of regional demand. Area specific land use and transportation factors, such as transit service, local retail and service destinations, and schools are considered, as well as demographic factors. This analysis will form the basis of the route selection process, because it predicts where there will be a high demand for trip making. Subsequent to completing this demand model, the likely routes, based on average NEV trip length and roadway suitability, can be prioritized. NEVSA Demand Analysis Development NEVSA's Demand Analysis relies on spatial consistency in order to generate logical distance and density patterns. All scores are aggregated to a central location at the census block level, the census block corner, referred to as "NEVSA Point". Census blocks closely represent the street network and therefore Census block corners closely represent street corners where NEV traffic is prevalent. This method is based on the "Low -Stress Bicycling and Network Connectivity" report2. The report discusses the benefits of using a smaller geographic setting for pedestrian and bicycle demand analyses rather than using more traditional traffic model features such as census block groups, census tracts or traffic analysis zones (TAZs). Due to the current lower range of NEV movement relative to automobiles, this smaller geographic unit of analysis is also suitable. 3.2.2 Utilization of NEVSA — Demand Analysis Demand Analysis Scoring Method Generally speaking, the scoring method for the demand analysis is a function of density and proximity of trip generators. Areas with a large number of destinations close to each other score highly Similarly, areas that are expected to generate more NEV trips score highly. Appendix A provides further detail on destination types and feature scores and weights. Results of Demand Analysis The following thematic maps illustrate where people live, work, play, learn and access transit. For the purposes of this analysis, shopping centers are considered locations where people play. Z Maaza, Mekuria, P. Furth, and H. Nixon. Low Stress Bicycling and Network Connectivity. Mineta Transportation Institute. May, 2012. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 117 291 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan DESERT HOT SPRINGS Cam_ i s 0 1.25 2.5 5 7.5 10 Miles Map 1: Where People Live • Where People Live mmR High Low City Limits Where people live includes 2010 census block level population density information. These locations represent potential trip origin locations. More trips can be made in areas with higher population density if conditions are right.Areas with the densest populations are found in the southeast portion of the region, in Indio and Coachella. This category is a function of the number of NEVSA points within a half - mile of each other. As for all maps, the areas shaded more deeply represent higher demand areas relative to lighter colors. See Appendix Afor scoring details. 18 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 292 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Map 2: Where People Work DESERT HOT SPRINGS IhDIAN WELLS Where People Work gm High Low City Limits • • ^L. e Io•- . alR � �iP IN DO 0111 • I` CHELLA COA:MELLA 0 1.25 2.5 5 7.5 10 Miles Where people work mainly represents trip ends for people working within the Coachella Valley region regardless of residency. Its basis is 2010 total employment by census block. Areas of dense employment are found in Palm Springs, Palm Desert along Highway 111, Thousand Palms Indio and Coachella. Depending on the type of job, this category can represent both trip attractors (i.e., retail stores or cafes) and trip generators (i.e., office parks and office buildings) in terms of base employment population. It is therefore also used in the where people play category by overlaying with specific job types, such as retail. This category accounts for the number of employees per NEVSA Point within a half - mile. See Appendix Afor scoring details. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 119 293 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Map 3: Where People Play Where People Play En High Low City Limits 0 1.25 2.5 5 7.5 10 Miles Where people playis a combination of varied land use types and destinations. Overlays such as golf courses, retail destinations, parks and services and hospitals all contribute to this category. While hospitals and services are not exactly where one would expect to "play," these civic amenities are still destinations of importance reflected in this category due to the temporary nature of the visit. As shown above, the greatest concentration of play destinations in the valley is found along Highway 111, in downtown Palm Springs and the northern portion of Indio. This category accounts for the number of destinations per NEVSA Point as well as the relative importance of each destination. See Appendix Afor scoring details. 20 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 294 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan DESERT HOT SPRINGS 1 L ar, PALM SPRINGS • fe. w 410 I� ^g► Map 4: Where People Learn CATHEDRAL CITY • li I,0 0 1.25 2.5 5 7.5 10 Miles PALM DESERT • ■ INDIAN WELLS LA QUI NTA Where People Learn High Low City Limits COACHELLA Where people learn is important due to the number of children that could receive rides to school and the role schools play as civic destinations for all types of activities. Darker shading indicates areas where learning destinations are closer together and parents or other family members would have an easier time accessing multiple schools. Schools with the greatest proximity are found in population centers within the valley. See Appendix Afor scoring details. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 121 295 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Map 5: Where People Access Transit Where People Access Transit mi High Low City Limits COWBELL % 0 1.25 2.5 5 7.5 10 Miles Where people access transit is assessed using transit stop locations. This category accounts for the transit stops within a half -mile of each other. Areas with the greatest density of transit stations are typically in commercial areas, where roadways are served by multiple transit lines. This category is included in the model, because it is specified in the legislation prescribing the considerations for NEV plans in California. See Appendix Afor scoring details. 22 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 296 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Map 6: Composite NEV Demand Map DESERT HOT SPRINGS 0 1.25 2.5 5 7.5 10 Miles Composite Score High riw Low City Limits After independently processing the features, the composite model is created and grouped into five demand classes using natural breaks in the data values. Estimated demand is highest along Highway 111, between Palm Springs and Indian Wells, along Indio Boulevard in Indio, and at the confluence of retail land uses, `play destinations,' residences and places of work. Moderate demand is seen between high demand areas, representing movement between destinations in these areas. Areas with moderate demand are often characterized by a single dominant land use (e.g., employment centers). The route selection process draws from this demand analysis to recommend the high priority NEV routes that can connect the areas in high demand using the appropriate street types. See Appendix Afor a description of the extent to which each feature influences the composite demand model. By comparing the total possible score (per NEVSA Point) with the actual scores one can see both how social and cultural features affect demand and how increasing distance between origins and destinations reduces demand. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 123 297 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Areas with Poor Existing Network Connectivity Areas with poor connectivity have barriers and gaps such as roadways with posted speed limits greater than 35 mph. In these cases, NEVs must either travel in an exclusive NEV/bike lane, travel along a designated grade -separated path or travel greater distances to arrive at their intended destination via lower speed, lower -stress local streets. A list of these high speed roadways are listed in Table 4 below, and are further illustrated in Appendix B and C. This table may include roads that currently have some segments marked for bike or golf cart lanes. Table 4: Barriers to Connectivity Road peed Limit Road Speed Limit Palm Springs Highway 111 50 Alejo Road 45 Gene Autry Trail 50 Mesquite Avenue 45 Indian Canyon Drive 45 Palm Canyon Drive 40-45 San Rafael Drive 45 Tachevah Drive 40 Racquet Club Road 45 Amado Road 40 Farrell Drive 45 Baristo Road 40 Vista Chino 45 Escoba Drive 40 Sunrise Way 45 Ramon Road 40 Crossley Road 45 Sunny Dunes Road 40 Cathedral City I-10 70 Ramon Road 45 Date Palm Drive 45-55 Perez Road 45 Highway 111 50 Dinah Shore Drive 40 Gerald Ford Drive 50 Rancho Mirage Bob Hope Drive 40 Morningside Drive 50 Highway 111 50 Da Vall Drive 45 Frank Sinatra Drive 50 Country Club Drive 45 Dinah Shore Drive 50 Parkview Drive 45 Monterey Avenue 50 Indian Wells Highway 111 45-55 Fred Waring Drive 45-50 Washington Street 50 Cook Street 45-50 Miles Avenue 50 Eldorado Drive 40 La Quinta Avenue 53 55 Avenue 42 45-50 24 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 298 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Road Speed Limit Road T Speed Limit Avenue 54 55 Dune Palms Road 40-50 Highway 111 50-55 Washington Street 40-50 Jefferson Street 45-55 Adams Avenue 45 Miles Avenue 50 Avenue 52 45 Fred Waring Drive 50 Madison Street 45 Avenue 50 50 Eisenhower Drive 40 Palm Desert I-10 70 Portola Avenue 40-50 Highway 74 55 Highway 111 45 Frank Sinatra Drive 55 Fred Waring Drive 45 Gerald Ford Drive 55 Parkview Drive 45 Oasis Club Drive 55 Hovely Lane 45 Magnesia Falls Drive 50 Country Club Drive 45 Monterey Avenue 50 Haystack Road 45 Eldorado Drive 50 Cook Street 50 Washington Street 50 Mesa View 40 Indio I-10 70 Avenue 52 45 Avenue 50 55 Avenue 44 45 Jefferson Street 40-55 Monroe Street 40-45 Indio Boulevard 50 Dr Carreon Boulevard 40 Fred Waring Drive 50 49th Avenue 40 Hjorth Street 50 Burr Street 40 Avenue 48 40-50 Clinton Street 40 Madison Street 45-50 Arabia Street 40 Jackson Street 40-50 Oasis Street 40 Miles Avenue 45 46th Avenue 40 Cabazon Avenue 45 Market Street 40 Golf Center Parkway 45 45th Avenue 40 Dillon Road 45 Calhoun Street 40 Highway 111 45 Van Buren Street 40 Coachella I-10 70 Fillmore Street 40-50 Highway 86 S 65 Avenue 53 45 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 125 299 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Road Speed Limit Road Speed Limit Highway 111 40-55 Jackson Street 45 Van Buren Street 50 Dillon Road 45 Harrison Street 50 Tyler Street 40-45 Avenue 54 50 Polk 40 Avenue 52 50 Avenue 49 40 Avenue 48 40-50 Avenue 50 40 Desert Hot Springs I-10 70 Palm Drive 40-50 Highway 62 65 Dillon Road 45 Indian Avenue 55 Mission Lakes Boulevard 40 Fairview Road 55 Hacienda Avenue 40 Pierson Boulevard 50-55 Camino Aventura 40 Little Morongo Road 40-55 Other network gaps occur at many of the Whitewater River Channel bridge crossings. These locations are considered to be constrained since they have limited space for new NEV specific facilities (and where outward expansion is cost prohibitive). In some cases existing golf cart or bike lanes exist and narrowing existing travel lanes can be a cost-effective way of accommodating shared Class II NEV lanes or an NEV path. As mentioned above, roadway speeds and right-of-way widths will determine whether Class II NEV lanes are possible on these bridges. These opportunities and constraints are explored in further detail in Table 2 of this chapter. 3.3 Opportunities and Constraints This section identifies general opportunities and challenges for the development and implementation of a comprehensive NEV network in the Coachella Valley. Some of the opportunities and constraints identified here may apply more to some jurisdictions than others, but Riverside County and CVAG have a key role in coordinating NEV development efforts and ensuring that plans and development strategies are consistent throughout the region. 3.3.1 Connectivity and Circulation Coachella Valley street networks are generally characterized by grids of multi -lane arterials on one mile spacing with curvilinear suburban residential streets within. The suburban style road networks create disconnected street patterns, which present major challenges for through transportation, because they limit route options and increase travel distances for all roadway users. Fewer route choices, due to lower street and intersection densities, means that there are decreased opportunities for individuals to use low -stress streets to reach their destination. In general, the routes that do connect to key destinations (e.g. commercial centers, schools, and parks) are on more heavily travelled, high speed arterial streets. On streets with a posted speed limit greater than 35 mph and no 26 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 300 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan separate NEV accessible lane, NEV users are legally prohibited from completing their journey. Where a NEV accessible lane is present, many would-be users may not feel safe or comfortable alongside much faster vehicles A second symptom of a disconnected street network is that street connections are often indirect. Traveling to an adjacent neighborhood, a local park, or a commercial area may be a short distance "as the crow flies", but taking the existing street network will lead to longer travel times due to out -of -direction travel. Since NEVs are generally slower than passenger automobiles, travel by NEV is at a competitive disadvantage to travel by automobile. This can be addressed through the design of roadways and intersections. For example, plans for CV Link will improve the level of service for NEV users by providing an alternative to the street network. Access to various roadway types permitted by legislation is summarized in Table 2 earlier in this document. Street connectivity varies throughout each city in the Coachella Valley as a result of a unique mix of land uses including golf courses, limited access gated communities, drainage channels, major roads and highways, larger block sizes, and areas with lower residential densities. These constraints are illustrated in further detail in city profile maps in Appendix B and C. There are also some areas within Desert Hot Springs, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Rancho Mirage, Cathedral City and Palm Springs where the residential street network includes lower speed streets, smaller blocks sizes, and an orthogonal grid. Roadways in these mostly residential areas have tremendous potential to serve as low -speed, low -stress NEV routes that connect to other NEV facilities and destinations. In the long term, NEV connections to transit may provide residents with a "first and last mile" trip solution. SunLine Transit Agency provides bus service for the entire Coachella Valley region. Having a single regional transit provider offers the advantage of simplifying coordination between neighboring jurisdictions, allowing for a more seamless and convenient transit user experience. NEV Park and Ride facilities at local bus stations can offer residents a multimodal connection point for longer trips. 3.3.2 Integration with Existing Bike Network Similar to Caltrans bicycle facility classifications, three classes of NEV facilities are proposed. These are described in detail in Chapter 5, and briefly described below. • Class I NEV paths are off-street facilities where standard passenger cars are prohibited. • Class II NEV lanes are travel lanes for the shared use of bicycles, NEVs and golf carts, adjacent to the right or left -most motor vehicle lane. • Class III NEV Routes are shared lanes on low speed streets. Planned Class II facilities listed in local bike plans and in the Coachella Valley Non -motorized Transportation Plan should be assessed for future shared NEV/bike lane use. With minor roadway striping modifications, many NEV focused facilities can be shared with bicycles. Maps of existing bike networks in each city are provided in Appendix B. In other cases, existing streets can be considered for future NEV route and NEV lane designations. Maps of street speed limits for each city are provided in Appendix C. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 127 301 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 3.3.3 Integration with Existing Golf Cart Network The cities of Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, La Quinta and Indio all have existing golf cart transportation plans and policies. Existing public pathways designated for golf cart use may present opportunities for conversion to shared-NEV paths. However, many of these paths are constrained by geometries (widths and curve radii) more suited to the typical top speed of a golf cart (under 15 mph). Because NEVs are capable of travelling up to 25 mph, the route planning may suggest upgrades to existing golf cart facilities, or the use of other routes. NEV operators may also simply decrease their speed when using constrained paths. The existing width of the path, presence of shoulders (and potential for expansion of the path) will dictate whether the path can be used as one-way or two-way, whether there is sufficient space for passing and turnouts, and shared -use with bikes and pedestrians. The opportunities and constraints listed for Class II shared NEV/bike lanes apply to shared NEV/golf cart lanes. NEV users are likely to prioritize routes that offer the most direct connection between points, so consideration should be given to minimization of out -of -way travel and potential congestion points. These opportunities will need to be assessed in further detail during the implementation of the network. Existing golf cart networks are typically designed around golf courses as the primary destination. Because golf cart paths are designed for golf course access and circulation, they may not offer direct transportation connections to other destinations. When integrating these pathways into the larger NEV network, providing safe and convenient connections to a variety of destinations should be the top priority. 3.3.4 Wayfinding Wayfinding signage provides NEV drivers with valuable travel information, including direction, travel distance, and estimated travel time. Signs help people reach destinations via optimal routes, with minimal uncertainty. The lack of consistent NEV wayfinding throughout the Coachella Valley limits the number of people who know how to access local destinations (e.g. parks, schools, and commercial centers) using existing low -stress routes, on -street lanes, and paths. Basic Wayfinding Signage The cities of Lincoln and Rocklin have already initiated a California Traffic Control Device Committee Request to Experiment process for the design of NEV wayfinding signage.. A simple potential wayfinding sign based on their design is presented as Figure 33 on page 68 of this document. Custom Wayfinding Signage Designing more personalized wayfinding could effectively provide CVAG and/or the individual cities within it the opportunity to use wayfinding as a branding tool. Establishing a unique style of wayfinding signage that will clearly differentiate each city's Class I, II and III NEV facilities from other kinds of facilities could improve the visibility of the network as a whole. Unique branding will also help users navigate transitions between facilities. For example, if an on -street Class III NEV route transitions to an existing NEV/shared-use path, the path may already have a sign identifying it as such. However, a second sign of a differing color and/or shape will allow users to quickly identify it as being part of the Class III network. It is recommended that CVAG work with cities that adopt this plan during the implementation phase to design a custom wayfinding signage program. 28 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 302 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 3.3.5 High -Speed Road Crossings Even with marked crossings, some roads feel too uncomfortable for operators to cross in an NEV. As noted in section 2 of this document (page 6), California Vehicle Code Section 21260 specifies that NEVs shall not cross roadways with speed limits greater than 35 mph, unless the crossing "begins and ends on a roadway with a speed limit of 35mph or less and occurs at an intersection of approximately 90 degrees." NEVs are also not permitted to cross state highways at uncontrolled locations unless the crossing has been approved and authorized by Caltrans. Undercrossings and overcrossings are one such improvement, but they are also often cost prohibitive. The CV Link Master Plan includes many of these types of crossings. Securing funds for their development can be a long-term challenge, especially for jurisdictions with multiple major road and highway crossings and poor on -street connectivity. 3.3.6 Whitewater River Channel Crossings One of major impediments to NEV travel in the Coachella Valley is the lack of accessible Whitewater River Channel crossings. The CV Link Master Plan focuses on the path crossings of the arterials, while this NEV Plan identifies gaps for access to the path and across the channel between other origins and destinations. As new bridges are built, wide (7'+) shared bike/golf cart lanes or paths are typically included on both sides. Therefore, where a bridge is currently deficient but programmed for replacement, it is assumed that NEV access will be provided. Class II NEV lanes are recommended for bridges on roadways with speeds 35 mph and under. However, many of these bridges are on roadways with posted speed limits greater than 35 mph. In these circumstances, Class II Lanes may be considered on roadways with posted speed limits up to 55 mph. A NEV Class I grade -separated path is the only option on bridges with speed limits over 55 mph. Sufficient space and the potential for road diets, lane narrowing, conversion of existing golf/bike lanes, and other lower -cost path alternatives should be explored at each location. Table 2 below details the existing roadway provision of bike/golf cart lanes, posted speed limits and opportunities for future Class II NEV/Bike/Golf cart lanes and Class I NEV Paths. Table 5: NEV Accessibility on Whitewater River Channel Bridges Bridge ' ossibl , Class II Lane* PossibleBridge Class I Path?* NO Replacement Planned YES Posted peed Limit 40 xistin . Provision Date Palm Drive None NO Country Club Drive Class II Bike lane YES NO NO 45 Indio Boulevard None NO NO NO 50 Monroe Street None NO NO NO 40 Jackson Street None NO NO NO 40 Bob Hope Drive 4' Sidewalk NO YES NO 40 3 Existing facility widths are approximate measures obtained via Google Earth. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 129 303 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Bridge Existing Provision Possible Class II Lane* Possible Class I Path?* !Bridge Replacement Planned Posted Speed Limit Monterey Avenue None NO YES NO 50 Fred Waring Drive W None NO YES NO 50 Miles Avenue W 5' Bike lanes YES YES NO 50 Washington Street None NO YES NO 50 Jefferson Street 7' Bike lanes YES YES NO 55 Miles Avenue E 5' Bike lanes YES YES NO 45 Vista Chino 6' Shoulder (Westbound), Wide sidewalk (Eastbound) YES YES YES 35 Ramon Road None NO NO YES 40 Cathedral Canyon Drive 4'-5' Shoulder (both directions) NO NO YES 40 Cook Street 12' Golf Path (Southbound) Bike Lane (Northbound) YES YES YES 50 Dune Palms Road 18' Shoulder (Northbound) YES YES YES 45 Ave 44 8' Shoulder (both directions) YES YES YES 45 Dillon Road 4' Shoulder NO NO YES 45 Ave 50 None YES YES YES 40 Ave 52 7' Shoulder (both directions) YES YES YES 50 Ave 66 7' Shoulder (both directions) YES YES ? 55 Adams Street ? ? ? YES 45 Airport Blvd (Ave 56) None YES YES ? 35 Ave 62 7' Shoulder (both directions) YES YES ? 25 Dinah Shore Drive Wide Sidewalk YES YES NO 40 El Dorado Drive 8' Shoulders YES YES ? 40 Frank Sinatra Drive None NO NO YES 50 Gene Autry Trail 8' Shoulders (both directions) YES YES ? 35 Golf Center Parkway 8' Bike lane YES YES NO 35 30 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 304 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Bridge Existing Provision Possible Class II Lane* Possible ,�Bridge Class I Replacement Path?* Planned Posted Speed Limit Indian Canyon Drive Wide Shoulder YES YES ? 55 Lincoln Avenue None NO YES ? 25 Portola Avenue 7' Bike Lane, 7' Golf Path YES YES NO 50 Railroad Bridge None NO NO ? N/A SR-111(Grapefruit Road) None NO NO ? 55 State Highway 86 8' Shoulders (both directions) NO (due to speed) YES ? 65 US Highway 111 None NO (due to speed) YES YES 65 * Considers travel lane narrowing/re-striping 305 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 131 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 3.3.7 NEV Parking Section 5.1 of this document provides guidelines on NEV parking. Local parking ordinances can be structured to support NEV development by prescribing a minimum number of NEV parking spaces in zoning and building codes, variable/free on -street NEV parking rates, and free or reduced rate electric vehicle charging station parking. Agencies may also consider development incentives for on -site electric vehicle parking and charging stations. At the very least, local parking ordinances should allow NEV parking spaces to count toward parking minimums. Design standards for NEV parking should be consistent throughout a planning area. After adopting consistent design guidelines, cities could develop a design toolkit to assist developers and property owners in designing off-street NEV parking spaces. Coordination between County planning staff and local jurisdictions for the planning and implementation of parking facilities will help to avoid inconsistencies in design. The PEV Readiness plan contains some general design guidelines that could be adopted by all local jurisdictions and made available through design toolkits. CVAG or Riverside County could further assist local jurisdictions by providing design toolkit workshops or trainings that would ensure consistency, enhance participation, and lend transparency to local planning efforts. 3.3.8 Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Section 5.1 of this document provides guidelines on NEV charging facilities. To support widespread NEV adoption, providing frequent and appropriately located EV charging facilities will ensure that NEV operators can get from point A to point B without running out of energy and getting stranded. Insufficient or poorly located charging stations can lead to "range anxiety" and is a major inhibitor of NEV adoption for longer trips. Charging stations at workplaces and other opportunity locations such as grocery stores and shopping centers help to alleviate the uncertainty associated with NEV energy requirements, and the reliability of NEVs for longer trips. CV Link access points provide an opportunity for users to park and recharge while using the facility for recreation. The cost of installing charging stations is much less expensive when the location is "pre -wired" for EV charging stations. Local building and zoning codes can be amended to require such pre -wired parking spaces for new development. Alternatively jurisdictions can offer other incentives such as FAR bonuses, reduced development fees, fast -tracked permitting, etc. to have developer's pre -wire projects for future NEV charging stations. The CVAG PEV Readiness Plan provides information about EV Charging Station design and installation. 3.3.9 Market -based Opportunities According to the CVAG PEV Readiness Plan, supporting NEV economies including NEV retail sales, maintenance and repair, battery recycling, and NEV sharing programs, are likely to develop as NEV sales increase. As such, the plan suggests that "targeted strategies to attract these particular enterprises" are not necessary. The plan also suggests the College of the Desert's specialized Advanced Transportation Technologies degree program could play a key role in developing the skilled workforce of technicians needed as NEV use expands. 32 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 306 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan The plan focuses on engineering and design supply chain strategies to promote widespread NEV adoption. These include NEV vehicle and component manufacturing, and engineering and design of vehicles and charging infrastructure. According to a study by Zhou et.a14, PEV manufacturing economies tend to present lower barriers to entry, as a result of their horizontal supply chain structures and simple componentry. This presents the Coachella Valley region with an opportunity to re-establish its large- scale manufacturing base that has experienced significant declines during the recession. The PEV Readiness plan provides a summary of economic development strategies for NEV business attraction, retention, expansion, and incubation. 4 Zhou, Lei, J.W. Watts, M. Sase, and A. Miyata. Charging Ahead: Battery Electric Vehicles and Transformation of an Industry. Deloitte Review. Issue 7.2010. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 133 307 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 4 Route Selection The purpose of this chapter is to outline the proposed method for developing a safe and comfortable regional NEV Network Concept. The first part of this chapter explains the assumed facility hierarchy and considerations relating to CV Link, street crossings, golf courses, existing golf cart routes, existing NEV routes, and sidewalk paths. The latter part of this chapter provides a narrative and visual summary of the recommended Network Concept, including alternative facility improvements that may be considered given physical constraints or budget. 4.1 Route Selection Assumptions The following assumptions form the basis for the preliminary assignment of priority NEV routes throughout the Coachella Valley. According to the Streets and Highways Code (section.1962.3), the plan must address how the route will accommodate NEVs without an adverse impact upon traffic safety. Towards this end, the routing method seeks to minimize conflict opportunities between NEVs and conventional vehicles, and suggests methods to reduce the probability and severity of collisions. 4.1.1 Facility Hierarchy Route selection prioritizes placing NEV routes on the "most comfortable" roadways, a relative measure that takes into account roadway posted speed limits, separation of modes, standardized designs, and the opportunity to communicate clear NEV user expectations. The potential facility types that will make up the network are listed below: • Class I NEV Path (such as CV Link) • Class II NEV lane (shared with bikes and golf carts) • Class III NEV Route (shared with bikes, golf carts and motor vehicles) An example of a Class I NEV Path is the CV Link The CV Link represents an enormous opportunity to provide quick, convenient and safe connections for residents. It will enhance the experience for residents using NEVs, bikes, and pedestrians within and between cities by providing a major non -motorized corridor eventually running from Desert Hot Springs and Palm Springs all the way to the Salton Sea. This backbone path network will allow NEVs to traverse longer distances without driving on major arterials or highways, and connect them to local destinations via local streets with Class III NEV routes and Class II NEV lanes. Class II NEV Lanes are on -street striped lanes exclusive to NEVs, bicycles and golf carts. The exclusive NEV lane is intended for roadways with a posted speed limit of 55 mph and under, but generally recommended on roadways with lower speeds since the striped lane does not feature any physical separation from higher speed traffic. This facility offers some flexibility to make connections along or across high speed roadways where barriers or network gaps exist such as bridge crossings and where space or cost does not permit a Class I Path. In the proposed Network Concept, Class III NEV Routes are the recommended facility on selected roadways 25 mph and under, because NEVs sharing the roadway with conventional vehicles are traveling approximately the same speed, reducing the severity of any collisions that may occur. These streets are Coachella Valley Association of Governments 134 308 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan ideal candidates for additional treatments such as traffic calming and wayfinding. The Class III signed route designation provides a navigational function optimized for direct travel, directing users to safe transitions at high speed crossings, lending predictability to the system, and clarifying roadway user expectations. Detailed descriptions of NEV facility types are available in Chapter 4, and are consistent with Assembly Bill 61 and the California Streets and Highway Code Division 2.5, Chapter 7.1 Section 1962. In infrastructure terms, they are similar to the Caltrans Class I, II, and III bikeway infrastructure categories. The appropriate type of NEV facility depends on the posted speed of the roadway, vehicle volumes, roadway geometry and lane widths. As noted in section 2 on page 5, the CVC permits NEVs on all roadways 35 mph and under. Table 2 presents a broad categorization of NEV facilities by speed limit. Table 6 further describes the legal and recommended facility types. Table 6: Legal and Recommended Facility Type by Speed Limit Facility Type Category 'Posted Speed L s25 mph 30-35 mp _ 40-55 mph 'a60 mph Minimum Required Facility Type on Non- None None Class II NEV Lanes Class I NEV Path Designated Routes Legal Facility Type for Designated Routes Class III NEV Routes Class III NEV Route Class II NEV Lanes Class I NEV Path Recommended Facility Type for Class III NEV Route Class II NEV Lanes Class I NEV Path Class I NEV Path Designated Routes The recommended facility type may differ from the legally required facility type for the purpose of enhanced comfort and user safety. The Class II NEV lane facility is legally acceptable for roadways with a posted speed limit of 55 mph and under, but generally recommended on roadways with lower speeds since the striped lane does not feature any physical separation from higher speed traffic. This facility offers some flexibility to make connections along or across high-speed roadways where barriers or network gaps exist such as bridge crossings and where space or cost does not permit a Class I NEV path. 4.1.2 CV Link Routes The plan's routing method assumes that CV Link will attract all NEV trips with origins or destinations within a 1.2 mile travel shed. This figure is based on a method proposed by the South Bay Cities Council of Governments and the mature suburban context of each of the cities, where the average trip length is estimated at 1.13 miles. Route selection is based on roadway network distances rather than direct, "as the crow flies" distances, and takes into account potential access issues from different directions. 4.1.3 CV Link Street Crossings All street crossings are assumed to provide access to CV Link, although not all streets that the CV Link crosses will have dedicated NEV facilities along them. The route selection method considers all access points equal, for the purpose of transportation. Further consideration will be given to points that may not be accessible from every direction due to roadway or intersection configuration and NEV facility type. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 135 309 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Opportunities for access points at these locations will require future evaluation of designs for grade - separated CV Link crossings and other nearby route opportunities. 4.1.4 Golf Courses All golf courses within 1.2 miles of CV Link will be considered major destinations and will be connected to CV Link via designated NEV routes. Similar to CV Link, route selection is also based on roadway network distances rather than direct "as the crow flies" distances. Route evaluation will also consider limited access from different directions. 4.1.5 Existing Golf Cart and NEV Routes Based on their existing design characteristics, existing golf cart "routes" should be reclassified as either Class I NEV/Golf Cart Paths, Class II NEV/Golf Cart Lanes, or Class III NEV/Golf Cart Routes per Streets and Highway Code 1962.3(g). After this is established, a determination can be made whether to maintain, relocate or upgrade the facility. Existing golf cart routes and NEV routes will be considered for inclusion in the NEV network if there is an opportunity to connect local and/or regional origins and destinations. Where existing golf cart or NEV routes are within V mile of the proposed NEV route and where only a short (up to V mile) detour is required to access the same point, the preference is to include the existing golf cart or NEV route in the network. In addition, consideration should be placed on improving existing golf cart facilities on roadways greater than 35 miles per hour. For example, where an opportunity exists to widen an existing off-street golf cart path along a 45 mph roadway, a higher priority should be given to this option than relocating the route to lower speed streets. These improvements should be completed with user safety and comfort in mind, as this is critical to increasing NEV usage across the region. 4.1.6 Sidewalks In some communities, the existing golf cart network may route a golf cart "path" on what would otherwise be considered a sidewalk. Here, sidewalks are defined as: • Paths less than 10' wide • Paths greater than or equal to 10' but not designated for shared use (e.g. commercial district sidewalks) Due to the low level of service and NEV incompatibility with pedestrian activity, sidewalks are not considered valid NEV facilities. As mentioned above, it may be possible to upgrade a sidewalk to a path, but not at the expense of separated pedestrian facilities. 36 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 310 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 4.2 Network Concept The Network Concept presented in this section illustrates the primary backbone network for NEV travel throughout the region. Roadway characteristics such as speed, bridges, and block structure create gaps in network connectivity, and limit the options for low -stress NEV route alternatives. The Network Concept considers these factors in addition to the above route selection assumptions to connect regional origins and destinations in a complete NEV network. In Figure 4, Class I paths do not include CV Link or any existing trails such as the Tahquitz Creek Trail; Class II lanes do not include bicycle lanes without golf cart or NEV symbols, and Class III routes do not include all the local streets which are accessible but not signposted. Figure 4: Existing and Proposed Network by Class The Network Concept takes advantage of CV Link as the most attractive and desirable NEV path in the valley. As CV Link would be utilized for most trips, it is important to have a dense network of connected facilities on all roads that intersect with CV Link. By designating facilities on these roadways, travel by NEV is simplified and users are not required to spend significant effort remembering where designated routes exist. The recommended network routing and facility types take advantage of the directness of arterial streets. However these tend to be higher volume and speed streets, so both Class I and Class II facilities should be considered in the actual designing of the routes. As such, the city route maps on the following pages illustrate the recommended facility type, as well as an alternative facility type for consideration after factoring speed limits, location -specific constraints, and budget. Jurisdictions may choose to adopt a phased approach to the recommended improvements based on the ease of implementation, cost, traffic safety impact and community support. This concept will involve the reallocation of road space on some major arterial streets. Class II NEV lanes are optional on streets with speed limits higher than 25 mph, but would provide a more comfortable experience for all vehicle drivers, and therefore lane narrowing is recommended, where possible, to Coachella Valley Association of Governments 137 311 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan accommodate this facility type on streets with 30 or 35 mile per hour speed limits. Similarly, for streets and bridges with speed limits higher than 35 mph, motor vehicle lane narrowing or, in some cases, sidewalk widening treatments will be needed to accommodate NEV users on a separated Class I NEV path or Class II NEV lanes. On streets with speed limits higher than 25 mph, consideration should be given to the facility type that provides greater separation to reduce the probability and severity of collisions between NEVs and highway capable motor vehicles. Finally, separated off-street facilities are required on roadways with speed limits greater than 55 mph. Minor route adjustments should be considered when it is possible to reroute the network away from locations with specific safety challenges such as high-speed crossings, or where the recommended facility type is infeasible. However, this should be accomplished with out of direction travel limited to V mile or less. Map 7: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept rtS- :6, 1ULAIWaIi of -' :1174 .agfAM.1111K SIB ,r [t i CVAG NEV Network Concept 0 2.5 5 7.5 10 t 3✓ , tr4v Recommended NEV Network Facilities Class III NEV Route Class II NEV Lane • Class I NEV Path Proposed CV Link Trail di Activity Clusters Primary Network Service Area Golf Courses Coachella Valley Region ter'' c Miles 38 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 312 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Map 8: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Palm Springs a — ,r z SATF FLAME. ...� x' • `v 4+� }•••••• TAHQUITZC NYON B+IEIISTO • RAMOF4 l 0 Legend Recommended Class III NEV Route Recommended Class II NEV Lane Recommended Class I NEV Path Alternate Class III NEV Route Alternate Class II NEV Lane -- Proposed CV Link Future CV Link Connectors Streets Golf Courses Palm Springs City Limits -MFSQUrrE .' SUNNY DUNES' •••=••....---11 � I r— ViSfA CHINO 1-51-� r 30TH MCCRLiUM HMAI cA YOFF - EscalA SUNNY PUN MESQUITE 1.5 2 Miles Palm Springs NEV Network Concept E 313 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 139 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Map 9: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Cathedral City SAN RAFAEL /AESCUELA VISTA CHINO a; ... C. _ _.ac■�.A..MApC��F9�1 �j ' , ,_ 4......v & 1 k MCCALLUM ; TAHQUITZ `ANYON 7.a i SUNNY DUN RAMN wu. .a�RAMOV r BAISTp •:, uiTE Jz . ,-. • 'u bpi NAH SHORE Legend ��, W im f, ►� & 35TH 3 Recommended Class III NEV Route Recommended Class II NEV Lane Recommended Class I NEV Path Alternate Class III NEV Route Alternate Class II NEV Lane --- Proposed CV Link -- Future CV Link Connectors Streets Golf Courses I Cathedral City Limits I� r 0 03 1 ///1 5, 2 Cathedral City NEV Network Concept RAMON 40 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 314 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Map 10: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept -Rancho Mirage 0 Legend Recommended Class III NEV Route Recommended Class II NEV Lane Recommended Class I NEV Path Alternate Class III NEV Route Alternate Class li NEV Lane -- Proposed CV Link --- Future CV Link Connectors Streets Golf Courses Rancho Mirage City Limits •r :- SUNNY CBIkg-my ewe swruww.►`. ❑ V/AIRING 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 Miles i Rancho Mirage NEV Network Concept HOARY -105HUAr IRON .. mA SrA[IL " y 5,06.A . �? 315 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 141 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan DIN A! I SHOH F Map 11: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Palm Desert FRANK SINATRA COUNTRY CLUB ..1.1044eEILMEMP* PARKVIEWl� __ i—� EL PASE _•'� ^.f l.'IosFium-REE S , i S GRAPEVINE Legend Recommended Class Ill NEV Route Recommended Class Il NEV Lane Recommended Class I NEV Path Alternate Class III NEV Route Alternate Class II NEV Lane Proposed CV Link Future CV Link Connectors Streets Golf Courses Palm Desert City Limits K - 'COUNTRY CLUB, . Hwy' 11 i FAIIWAY NEW YORK y _ ERLIFORNIR � %� 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 Miles a Palm Desert NEV Network Concept 3 42 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 316 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Map 12: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Indian Wells Legend Recommended Class Ili NEV Route Recommended Class II NEV Lane Recommended Class I NEV Path Alternate Class ill NEV Route Alternate Class II NEV Lane Proposed CV Link Future CV Link Connectors Streets Golf Courses Indian Wells City Limits 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 CliMiles Indian Wells NEV Network Concept i IE- 317 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 143 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Map 13: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - La Quinta = 1r7q,� I F16VLEY ..... -1 r�_4 to ._z NEW YORK Legend Recommended Class III NEV Route Recommended Class II NEV Lane Recommended Class I NEV Path Alternate Class III NEV Route Alternate Class II NEV Lane Proposed CV Link Future CV Link Connectors Streets Golf Courses La Quinta City Limits z- •s - OARRT � 3 'FREO WARING , < a. l • MILES a ~�•••,„.� r� W CALLE TAMP.IC0 MILES AVENUE 5 La Quinta NEV Network Concept AVENUE 52 f; L I H 1 1 LLLr,11 AVENUE 53 AIRPORT 62N6 44 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 318 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan r DARBY L Map 14: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Indio L Indio NEV Network Concept 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 Miles N .42ND AVENUE 413 AVENUE 50 Legend Recommended Class III NEV Route Recommended Class II NEV Lane Recommended Class I NEV Path Alternate Class III NEV Route Alternate Class 11 NEV Lane --- Proposed CV Link --- Future CV Link Connectors Streets Golf Courses Indio City Limits AVENUE 40 �. SRN IACINTO AVENUE 5 z A 51,— AVENUE 40 AVENUE 49 AVENUE 53 AVENUE 54 AVENUE44 a x AVENUE 48 AVENUE AVENUE 52 ........... VALLEY 319 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 145 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 1,1 DR CAR Map 15: CVAG NEV Recommended Network Concept - Coachella Coachella NEV Network Concept 1 1j • AVENUE44 AVENUE 49 -AVENUE so AVENUE52 AVENUE 53 AIRPORT AVENUE 48 VALLEY INDUSTRIAL Legend Recommended Class ill NEV Route Recommended Class 11 NEV Lane Recommended Class I NEV Path Alternate Class ili NEV Route Alternate Class 11 NEV Lane Proposed CV Link Future CV Link Connectors Streets Golf Courses Coachella City Limits —1111111111111r- 4 0.5 1 1.S 2 Miles a 58TH 46 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 320 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan This page intentionally left blank 321 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 147 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5 Design Guidelines This chapter is intended to assist the Coachella Valley Association of Governments and member jurisdictions in the selection and design of on -street NEV facilities. These guidelines are consistent with California state code and have been developed based on existing guidance in NEV plans for Lincoln CA, Rocklin CA, and the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG). The following guidance is not exhaustive and is not intended to substitute for professional design and engineering judgment under local conditions. 5.1 Design Needs of NEV Facilities 5.1.1 Spatial Needs of Users NEVs and bicyclists are the expected users of NEV facilities, and design dimensions should be built with these user types in mind Similar to conventional motor vehicles, NEVs and bicyclists exist in a variety of sizes and configurations. These variations occur in the types of vehicle and behavioral characteristics (such as the skill level of the driver). The design of an NEV facility should consider reasonably expected user types on the facility and design for the appropriate dimensions. Physical Dimensions The figures below illustrate the operating space and physical dimensions of NEVs and bicyclists, the typical users of NEV paths and lanes. Because NEVs and bicyclists require clear space to operate within a facility, the minimum operating width is greater than the physical dimensions of the user. Dimensions below are based on GEM vehicles, a popular NEV manufacturer. All GEM NEVs are the same width regardless of model. The GEM catalog refers to 55" (4'7") width however this is from fender edge to fender edge. A GEM with dual mirrors was measured at the Palm Springs Energy Summit and found to be 60" (5'). Figure 5: Spatial Needs of NEVs 5 Height:5' 10" Physical Width:4'6" Operating Width:7' Figure 6: Spatial Needs of Bicyclists Operating Height:8' Eye Leve1:5' Handlebar Height:3' Physical Width:2'6" Operating Width:4' H Preferred Operating Width:5' 322 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 148 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.1.2 Travel Speeds Based on the legislated maximum NEV speed (25 mph) and the Highway Design Manual (HDM) table 1003.1, the path design speed conventionally would be 30 mph. In an effort to maintain the desired maximum speed of the pathway, a design speed of 25 mph should be utilized. In comparison, the adult cyclist typically travels between 8 and 15 mph'. AASHTO guidelines specify that 18mph is a sufficient design speed for most relatively flat shared bicycle paths'. American roads are often over -engineered, or designed to accommodate higher speeds that are not only faster than the posted speed limit, but faster than is appropriate for the area. Aligning the design speed (the speed that vehicles can navigate the facility without losing control) with the desired driving speed, results in a speed that makes sense for the context. 5.1.3 Other Geometric Design Details It is assumed that NEVs can stop at least as quickly as bicyclists under the same conditions, and the operating requirements of bicyclists are the limiting factor in shared NEV/Bicycle facility design. As such, horizontal curves and stopping sight distances should be calculated according to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities, 4th Edition. It is presumed that these measures will meet the needs of NEVs, although research has not been conducted to support this assumption. Through future testing and evaluation these guidelines may change to reflect NEV specific operating conditions. Stopping Sight Distance Stopping sight distance is the distance required by the NEV driver to be able to see in order to have room to stop in advance of an obstacle on the path. Trees, vegetative buffers, and other landscaping elements should be maintained so as not to obstruct visibility, especially at intersection and driveway approaches. The NEV braking distance is 10 feet at 25 miles per hour. Based on a maximum speed of 30 mph, AASHTO lists stopping sight distances for bikes ascending a hill as 300' (0%) and 200' (.15%), and descending a hill, as 250' (0%) and 1,600' (.15%). Table 7: Stopping Sight Distance vs. Grade (Bicyclists) Ascending 0% Grade 300 Feet 15% Grade 200 Feet Descending 250 Feet 1600 Feet Horizontal Curves NEVs come in various shapes and sizes. A typical 4-seat NEV has an inside turn -radius of 12' and exterior turn radius of up to 18'. Based on the maximum design speed of 25 mph, the smallest horizontal curve along an NEV facility segment should be 115'. Turns tighter than this should be signed and/or striped well in advance of the turn, and sign location should be based on breaking distance. 5 FHWA. Characteristics of Emerging Road and Trail Users and Their Safety. 2004. ' AASHTO. Guide for the Development of Bicycle Facilities. 2012. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 149 323 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.1.4 NEV Parking Some jurisdictions (e.g. Indio) prohibit golf carts from parking in a "motor vehicle" space, notwithstanding that the California Department of Motor Vehicles will register a golf cart as a motor vehicle. To the general public, a golf car and an NEV are indistinguishable and any such parking prohibitions will be confusing and may limit adoption of LSEVs. Given that golf cars and NEVs can serve the same purposes as a regular car and there would therefore have no impact on parking supply and demand, parking should be permitted in any space. The following guidelines are intended to provide greater parking capacity because golf cars and NEVs are smaller and therefore more of them can fit in a given land area compared to regular motor vehicles. A typical NEV parking space is 15' x 7' utilizing a 6" white striping pattern, compared to 18' x 8'6" for standard vehicles. NEVs occupy less physical space than standard passenger vehicles, so a relatively higher number of NEV spaces can be accommodated in a given parking area. This means that NEVs may also be able to utilize existing spaces more efficiently, in a wider assortment of configurations, both on - street and in private lots and garages. Parking should be located adjacent to charging stations if available. Figure 7: Typical NEV Parking NEV PARKING ONLY I. l Length:..5'..13' in) I Width: ' NEV Charging Station 50 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 324 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.1.5 Charging Stations NEV parking location s should be configured with or placed within functional reach of electric vehicle charging stations. To date, no symbol has been developed that can effectively convey regulations associated with electric vehicle charging or parking facilities. Symbols that have not been adopted in the CAMUTCD for use in a specific application cannot be used in untested applications without approved official experimentation that includes the requisite human factors evaluation for comprehension and legibility. FHWA guidance provides typical examples of modified parking restriction signage to identify, reserve and regulate parking and charging locations. Some of them have been explicitly adopted for use in California. These signs are: • No parking - FHWA R7-111, R7-112, and R7-113 are augmented in the CAMUTCD by R113, R113A • Supplementary text - FHWA R7-113aP and R7-113bP signs (approved in informational letter dated 6/17/13) have been approved by the CA-TCDC for inclusion in the next CAMUTCD • Blue background EV sign D9-11b (FHWA) or G66-21B (CA) may be used as per FHWA approval 1A-13-1 issued 4/11/11 Figure 8: Recommended NEV/Electric Vehicle Regulatory Parking and Charging Signs o 1 PARKING EXCEPT ELECTRIC VEHICLES 110. R7-111 (FHWA) R113 (CA) HR ELECTRICPARKING VEHICLES R7-112 (FHWA) EXCEPT FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING J R113A (CA) °PARKING EXCEPT WHILE CHARGING 110. R7-113 (FHWA) 1 VEHICLE MUST BE PLUGGED IN 'J R7-113aP (FHWA) VACATE STALL (WHEN CHARGING COMPLETED i � J R7-113bP (FHWA) D9-11 b (FHWA) / G66-21 B (CA) 325 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 151 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.2 NEV Facility Classification and Selection 5.2.1 Facility Classification There are three Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) facility classes. Class I NEV Paths Class I Paths are physically separated pathways exclusive to NEV and bicycle travel. Due to the speed differential, Class I NEV paths are not intended for shared -use with pedestrians although in constrained conditions this may be unavoidable. Class I paths should be located immediately adjacent, or as close to the street as space permits to provide direct connections to local destinations and minimize out -of -direction travel. Class 11 NEV Lanes Class II Lanes designate an exclusive space for NEVs and bicyclists through the use of pavement markings and signage. The lane is typically located on the right side of the street, between the adjacent travel lane and curb, and is used in the same direction as motor vehicle traffic. An additional buffer treatment can be implemented between the NEV/bike lane and travel lane where space provides. Class RI NEV Routes Class III Routes are low -volume, low -speed streets with shared operating conditions comfortable for use by NEVs and bicyclists. Treatments such as signage, pavement markings, traffic calming and/or traffic reduction are utilized to achieve specific speed or volume targets. 52 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 326 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.3 Class I NEV Path Design Class I routes provide for a physically separate path for the use of NEVs and bicyclists, golf carts, pathway maintenance vehicles, emergency service, and potentially water district maintenance. Typically, Class I NEV paths will be one-way, on the right hand side of the street traveling the same direction as the adjacent general-purpose traffic lanes. 5.3.1 Cross Sections The preferred pathway width for a one-way Class I NEV path is 12 feet with 1-foot shoulders on each side. This provides adequate room for a NEV and bicyclist to pass side -by -side in comfort, and may permit two NEVs to pass in the event of a breakdown. Providing for passing within the Class I path is important if a physical barrier or landscaping prohibits convenient egress from the path. Figure 9: Preferred Cross Section for One-way Class I NEV Path where Passing is Permitted General Purpose Travel Lanes Path Separation I I It Shoulder:1' Class I NEV Path: 2' I Shoulder:1' Pedestrian Path If passing is not required, or if the configuration permits users to easily and safely leave the path, the pathway width for a one-way Class I path should be 6 feet, with 1-foot shoulders on each side. In tightly constrained segments, a 5-foot pathway with 1-foot shoulders may be necessary. Constrained segments should be indicated with warning signs or markings. Figure 10: Preferred Cross Section for One-way Class I NEV Path where Passing is Not Allowed �. F''' ' M t.. k_ r General Purpose Travel Lanes Path 1 Class I NEV Separation I Path:6' Shoulder:1' Shoulder:1' Pedestrian Path 327 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 153 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan In highly constrained conditions, it may not be possible to provide separate path treads for pedestrians and NEVs/bicyclists. In these conditions, a class I shared use path used by a wide spectrum of users may be considered. This is only appropriate where there is limited right of way or if necessary to provide connections to the CV Link In this configuration NEV and bicyclists are only permitted to travel in one direction, matching that of adjacent traffic. Pedestrians and other non -motorized users may travel in both directions. Because NEV and bicycle users should operate following the same direction as adjacent traffic, Class I paths along roadways should generally be provided on both sides of the street to offer mobility in both directions. The recommended pathway width for an all user class I shared use path path is 12 feet, with 1-foot shoulders on each side. In tightly constrained segments, a 10-foot pathway may be necessary. Constrained segments should be indicated with warning signs or markings. Efforts should be made to maintain a reduced NEV operating speed in areas shared with pedestrians. Figure 11: Constrained Cross Section for All User Class I Path General Purpose Travel Lanes 5.3.2 Markings and Signs Path Separation I Class I NEV/ Shared Use Path:12' Shoulder:1' I I Shoulder:1' Sign Size The California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (CAMUTCD) lists sizes for shared use path regulatory signs in Part 9, Traffic Control for Bicycle Facilities. Proposed sign sizes should be based on the larger dimensions found in the Roadway column of table 9B-1(CA). California Bicycle Facility Sign and Plaque Minimum Sizes. Class 1 NEV Path Crosswalk Markings Consider implementing a unique crosswalk marking style to support path crossings on the NEV network. Enhanced crosswalk designs may serve to raise awareness of the NEV path crossing to all users. Standard 54 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 328 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan marked crosswalks may be enhanced with decorative painting and designs, assuming such designs do not compromise the effectiveness of the crosswalk. Per FHWA guidance, enhanced crosswalks designs should: • Use subdued -colored aesthetic treatments between the legally marked transverse crosswalklines. • Be devoid of retroreflective properties to clarify that they are not a traffic control device. • Not diminish the effectiveness (contrast) of the legally required white transverse pavement markings (however, a crosswalk is not needed to provide a legal crossing at intersections) • Acceptable colors for these materials would be red, rust, brown, burgundy, clay, tan or similar earth tone equivalents. The colors yellow, blue and green are discouraged to prevent confusion as a traffic control device. • If brighter colors are desired, a buffer space or black coloring may be used to create the necessary contrast. This is not preferred by the FHWA, but may be acceptable. The current CV Link crosswalk design concept is shown in Figure 12. This is a conceptual illustration only. The concept could be augmented with white lines parallel to the crosswalk. The FHWA representative to the California Traffic Control Devices Committee (CATCDC) has advised that the ruling is guidance and jurisdictions can exercise engineering judgment. The conceptual CV Link crosswalk may need to be further refined in discussion with local jurisdictions, including materials testing for enhanced durability in the desert environment. Figure 12: CV Link Type Crossride / Crosswalk Concept Markings 7 Interpretation Letter 3(09)-24(I) — Application of Colored Pavement - August 2013. http://mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov/resources/interpretations/3 09 24.htm Coachella Valley Association of Governments 155 329 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.3.3 Intersection Crossing Strategies The following general strategies apply when Class I NEV Paths approach signalized intersections. Convert to Class 11 NEV Lane One strategy in advance of the crossing is to transition the Class 1 NEV into a Class II NEV Lane. Motor vehicles must make right turns from the right most travel lane, which requires NEVs and motor vehicles to negotiate right of way upstream of the intersection. See Section 4.4 for additional guidance on how to integrate Class II lanes with right turn lanes. Figure 13:Transition the Class I NEV Path into Class II NEV Lane Separated Class 1 Crossing When a greater degree of separation is desired, the separate Class I NEV Path should be maintained. To ensure adequate visibility, consider laterally shifting the path toward the roadway and/or establish a clear zone in advance of the intersection. Consider signalization schemes that allow NEVs to cross with the pedestrian signal. Figure 14: Lateral Shift and Class I NEV Path Crossing L Lateral Shift and Clear Setback Convert to Shared Use Path In highly constrained conditions the Class I NEV path may be converted into a conventional Class I shared use path. 56 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 330 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Because this design potentially combines NEVs, bicyclists and pedestrians in the same space it is important to encourage NEV speeds closer to that of pedestrians. Markings, warnings signs and tactile markings may be used to indicate a speed transition zone. Figure 15: Transition the Class I NEV Path Into Conventional Class I Shared Use Path Advance Stop Bar (-If 41 41 o Clear Setback --CC ii Coachella Valley Association of Governments 157 331 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Street Crossing Signal Phasing When operating on Class I NEV Paths, users will rely on either the standard traffic signal indication or the pedestrian signal head to provide traffic control at signalized intersections. When NEV and bicyclists are expected to use the pedestrian signal head, a modified R9-5 NEVs/BIKES USE PED SIGNAL sign should be provided. This sign has been approved by the CATCDC for inclusion in the next CAMUTCD. Figure 16: NEV/BIKES USE PED SIGNAL Sign 4 \l NEV-BIKE USE PED `SIGNAL Modified R9-5 Protected Signal Phasing In areas where conflicts between NEVs and turning motor vehicles is a high risk, providing an exclusive pedestrian phase for use by NEVs, bicyclists and pedestrians will provide full protection of NEV Crossings. Right turn on red should be prohibited at these locations. Leading Pedestrians/NEV Interval Phasing Where a protected signal phase for pedestrians/NEVs is impractical, it may be possible to provide a short -duration head -start protected phase to allowing path users to enter the intersection before adjacent conflicting motor vehicles. Right turn on red should be prohibited at these locations. 58 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 332 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Signal Detection and Actuation NEVs can be detected at signalized intersections using the same technologies that are often used to detect bicycles. Similar to bicycle detection and actuation, NEV detection and actuation, can employ video imaging detection, magnetometers, microwave radar, and embedded inductive loop detectors at signalized intersections and further upstream. Embedded inductive loop detectors and video imaging detection systems are the most commonly used detection technologies for passenger vehicles and bicycles. More research is needed to determine the most effective loop detector configuration for NEVs given their larger width and wheelbase. However, if the sensitivity of the loop detector is adjusted for bicycles (more sensitive), and pavement markings or signage are used to indicate appropriate NEV position, then NEVs can effectively use existing bike detectors. Installing new loop detectors would serve both NEV operators and bicyclists. Driveways Motor vehicles are required to yield to NEVs, bicyclists and pedestrians at driveways. It is important for driveway designs to communicate the priority of these users, and to encourage appropriate turning speed by motor vehicles. Figure 17: Class I NEV Path Driveway Crossing Provide clear zone in advance of driveway. Maintain grade of Class I NEV Path and adjacent sidewalk. Steep driveway apron to slow driver turning speeds. 1 Landscaping, fences or other elements to define driveway aisle. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 159 333 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.4 Class ii nity Lane uesign Class II NEV/Bike lanes provide for a separate striped lane adjacent to roadways with speed limits of 55 miles per hour or less. The lane may be shared with bicyclists, or may be configured as an additional lane adjacent to a bicycle lane. Adjacent general traffic lanes may need to be narrowed to between 10-11' to accommodate wider Class II NEV/Bike lanes. Less than 12' wide lanes are proven to improve safety for all road users and are appropriate for multi -modal urban arterials as noted in the California Highway Design Manual and other documents supported by Caltrans promoting multi -modal design'. 5.4.1 Cross Sections Class II lanes should have a minimum width of 7 feet. Where possible, a 3-foot or wider buffer should allow for passing and provide additional comfort and separation from traffic and/or parking lanes. See Figure 16 for buffer striping options. Special attention should be given to the continuity of NEV lanes through intersections, between vehicle travel and turn lanes and transitions to other NEV facility types. In constrained locations, Class II NEV Lanes may be 7' wide and delineated with a single 8" white stripe. Figure 18: Preferred Cross Section for Class II I NEV Lane General Purpose Travel Lanes I Class II NEViane: ' Longitudinal Marked Buffer Pedestrian Path Figure 19: Constrained Cross Section for Class II NEV Lane General Purpose Travel Lanes TClass II NEVikane: 8"Edgeikine Pedestrian Path 8 http://www.dot.ca.gov/Documents/2014-4-2-Flexibility-in-Design.pdf 60 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 334 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.4.2 Markings and Signs Preferential Lane Markings The California Traffic Control Devices Committee (CATCDC) has approved the inclusion of the letters "NEV" for use in the bike lanes markings in the next CAMUTCD and this marking may be implemented now. Subject to approved experimentation process, it is recommended that a graphic symbol pavement marking design be developed so that the markings are more legible to locals and tourists who may not fully understand the difference between an NEV and a motor vehicle or golf cart. Additionally, a graphic symbol serves international needs and does not require comprehension of written English. Figure 20: Experimental Standard NEV Pavement Marking Normal whiteA.ine or Buffer 48 inches 64 inches 48inches 64 inches 48inches 72 inches 72inches Lines and Buffers Class II NEV Lanes require lane striping to identify the boundary between the NEV Lane and the adjacent travel lane. Class II lanes are typically marked with a normal 6" white line, although in locations with insufficient room for a standard buffer, a line of up to 12" may be used9. Preferential lane striping is described in section 3D.02 of the CAMUTCD and the buffers shown have been adopted by the CATCDC. Figure 21: Longitudinal Edge Striping Alternatives (modified CAMUTCD Figure 9C-104) Buffer Between NEV- BIKE Lane and Parking Lane: j1FLAdialaffigail -31111.-11111 Buffer Between NEV - BIKE Lane and Travel Lane: 9 For example, the City of Davis, CA has recently installed 12" striping on 5th Street where there was insufficient room for a full buffer Coachella Valley Association of Governments 161 335 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Signs The combination NEV/Bike Lane sign should be placed on NEV Lanes designed for use by both NEVs and bicyclists. The sign should be placed at the far side of collector street intersections and at a minimum of one-half mile intervals on all continuous NEV lane segments. Figure 22: Combination NEV/Bike Lane Sign and Supplemental Plaques [NEU BIKE LANE 1 ` BEGIN , R81 A (CA) l 1 END R81 B (CA) In locations where a NEV Lane is terminated or transitioned into or from a Class I or Class III facility, the R81A "BEGIN' or R81B "END" plaques may be used to the Combination NEV/Bike Lane sign. NEV prohibition This regulatory plate may be placed at entrances to public streets that will not accommodate NEV travel. This sign may be placed on the right-hand side of the roadway approximately 25 feet past the intersection so it is visible to operators before they enter that portion of the public right-of-way. Figure 23: NEV Prohibition Signs ALN -- NEV PROHIBITED .111 10," 1� NEV PROHIBITED BEYOND THIS POINT The CTCDC has explained that NEV is an acronym for Neighborhood Electric Vehicle or Neighborhood Electric Vehicles, and accordingly will be adopted with "NEV PROHIBITED" rather than "NEVS PROHIBITED". This sign may be used in conjunction with an existing "BEYOND THIS POINT" supplementary sign or in one sign. 62 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 336 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.4.3 Intersection Design Elements Right Turns and NEV Lanes Experience in the City of Lincoln indicates that there are no significant issues with NEV use of conventional roadway left turn lanes. From the Lincoln Evaluation Reportm: NEVs tend to move over to the left turn lane, much like bicycles are able to do. The general feelings of safety for turning and maneuvering an NEV are subjective. Driving skills, experience, and familiarity with the driver's surroundings area all key factors. However, as a general rule of thumb, if a bicycle has sufficient speed, site distance, and capability to move from a bike lane to a left turn lane, then an NEV would certainly have similar capability, since NEVs are generally faster and more visible than a standard bicycle." Because such operation requires shared roadway conditions for short segment, exercise caution when expecting this type of operation on roadways with a posted speed limit above 35 mph. Managing Right Turns and NEV Lanes Managing conflict between NEVs and right turning vehicles is one of the most important aspects of Class II NEV Lane design at intersections. At locations adjacent to a shared through/right turn lane, the NEV lane should be dashed in advance of the intersection to allow right turning vehicles to turn from the rightmost lane of the street. Motorists are required to yield to NEVs and bicyclist prior to positioning for the right turn. However according to the CVC they can enter a bike lane 150' prior to an intersection when safe to do so. Figure 24: Dashed NEV Lane Next to Through/Right Lane 50-200 ft dotted line at signalized intersections In areas of high right turn volumes, a dedicated right -turn -only lane should be provided. The right turn only lane should be added to the right of the NEV lane and the merge area should be marked with dashed lines. The NEV lane alignment should be straight through the merge area (so the right -turn lane is io City of Lincoln and City of Rocklin. Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Transportation Plan Evaluation. 2011. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 163 337 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan designer as an "add" lane) with as little deflection to the NEV lane as necessary. Motorists are required to yield to NEVs and bicyclist at the entrance to the right -turn -only lane. Figure 25: Through NEV Lane and Added Right Turn Only Lane BEGIN RIGHT TURN LANE Ait YIELD TOO NEVS/BIKES R4-4 RIGHT LANE MUST TURN RIGHT When there isn't adequate space for a dedicated right -turn -only lane, a Combined NEV/Turn Lane (Figure 22) may be provided to encourage users to negotiate priority in advance of the intersection. This treatment is based off a similar configuration used for bike lanes11. Signs should be used to permit through movements by NEVs and bicyclists in these locations. Figure 26: Combined NEV Lane/Turn Lane (Mixing Zone) BEGIN RIGHT T.R-N LANE YIELD TO N�EVS/BIKES Modified R4-4 Short Right Turn Lane i RIGHT LANE MUST TURN RIGHT EXCEPT NEVS/BIKES R3-7R "Except NEV" plaque 11 NACTO. Urban Bikeway Design Guide: Combined Bike Lane/Turn Lane. 2012. 64 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 338 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan In situations where a through travel lane becomes a right -turn -only lane, NEV operators and bicyclists are required to move laterally to maintain a through position to the left of the right -turn -only lane. This situation is highly undesirable, as motor vehicles are traveling at a high rate of speed and user priority is ambiguous. Because this configuration creates a short -length of shared -roadway condition, exercise caution when applying this treatment on roadways with a posted speed limit above 35 mph. Figure 27: Through NEV Lane with Transition to Right -Turn -Only Lane (35 mph or lower) Signals Detection and Actuation At signalized intersections the Class II NEV Lane users must be able to reliably and easily actuate the signal controller if the signal is not operating on fixed timing mode. Most commonly this is done through loop detectors or other technology. Loop Detectors NEV/Bicycle-activated loop detectors are installed within the roadway to allow the presence of an NEV lane user to trigger a change in the traffic signal. Loops that are sensitive enough to detect bicycles should be supplemented with pavement markings to instruct users how to activate the signals. Video Detection Cameras Video detection systems use digital image processing to detect a change in the image at a location. These systems can be calibrated to detect NEVs and bicyclists. Video camera system costs range from $20,000 to $25,000 per intersection. Remote Traffic Microwave Sensor Detection (RTMS) RTMS is a system which uses frequency modulated continuous wave radio signals to detect objects in the roadway. This method marks the detected object with a time code to determine its distance from the sensor. The RTMS system is unaffected by temperature and lighting, which can affect standard video detection. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 165 339 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Right Turn Access Lanes In many areas of the Coachella Valley where arterial roads intersect other arterial roads, consecutive right -turn lanes can present a significant challenge for NEV operators and bicyclists. To make a right turn, an NEV operator would use the right -turn lane as though they were in a motor vehicle. However, once they've executed the turn, they no longer have a dedicated NEV facility, and are instead forced to share another right -turn lane with vehicles turning into driveways or parking lot entrances. This is especially problematic for NEV operators because they must negotiate a shared space with faster travelling vehicles entering the right -turn lane, while trying to merge over into the through travel lane (again with faster moving vehicles continuing straight). Two options are presented below. Figure 22 depicts a typical right -turn departure NEV/bike lane transition. This lane striping provides separation after the turn and forces vehicles to turn across the NEV/bike lane to access driveways. The dashed vehicle merging area can utilize a green colored surface treatment to further highlight the potential conflict area. Where roadway widths allow, buffered bike lanes (on one or two sides) offer additional space, and increased comfort for NEV operators and bicyclists along higher speed roadways. Physical separation can also be achieved with a concrete channelization island near the intersection. Figure 28: Typical Right -turn Departure NEV/Bike Lane 66 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 340 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Figure 29: Right -turn Departure NEV/bike Lane Roadway Section j, SIDE- 1 DRIVEWAY NEV/ WALK ACCESS BIKE "MEDIAN 6'-8' 10' 7' 1 1 ' 10' 7' When the roadway is not wide enough to accommodate a 7-foot NEV/bike lane, a secondary option is to provide a shared or "mixing" lane, where motor vehicles must turn right for driveway access, and NEVs and bikes are permitted to proceed through (Figure 24). Shared lane markings ("Sharrows") may be used and "Right -Turn Only — Except NEVs/Bikes" signage should be used in this context. Figure 30: Shared Right -turn Only Lane with Exception for NEVs and Nikes Figure 31: Shared Right -turn Only Lane Roadway Section SIDE- SHARED RIGHT - WALK TURN LANE 6'-8' 12' 14' 12' JMEDIAN 7' 341 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 167 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.5 Class III NEV Route Design Class III Routes are shared, on -street facilities without exclusive NEV striping or separation from motor vehicles, bikes or other modes, typically designated on residential streets with posted speed limits of 25 mph or less12 . Designers should create streets with low design speeds to create "self explaining" or "self enforcing" operating conditions. Narrow cross sections and traffic calming elements such as speed tables, chicanes and neighborhood roundabouts should be used to encourage appropriate driver operating speed without the need for enforcement or education. 5.5.1 Cross Sections When Class III Routes coincide with designated bicycle boulevards, Class III Routes may also feature a bicycle shared lane marking to indicate the facility type to other roadway users. Commonly, the centerline is not marked, to permit and encourage full use of the roadway for comfortable passing. Figure 32: Typical Class III Route on Residential Street Pedestrian Path a. s•-•'^�. No Marked Centerline 1111111 Parking Class IIIINEV Route: Parking Pedestrian Path Width Varies 5.5.2 Markings and Signs No identifying pavement markings are required for Class III NEV Routes. NEV ROUTE signs should be used to raise awareness to other users of the presence of NEVs. The word BIKE has been included because it is assumed that any route preferred for NEVs would also be a preferred for bicyclists. Figure 33: Class III NEV Route Sign 30" NEV- BIKE ROUTE 15" iz State regulations permit shared roadway NEV use on streets with speed limits of 35 mph or lower. 68 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 342 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.6 Implementation Strategies 5.6.1 Travel Lane Reconfigurations The removal of a single, wide travel lane may provide sufficient space for NEV lanes on both sides of a street. Streets with excess vehicle capacity provide opportunities for NEV lane retrofit projects. Depending on a street's existing configuration, traffic operations, user needs and safety concerns, various lane reduction configurations may apply. For instance, a four -lane street (with two travel lanes in each direction) could be modified to provide one travel lane in each direction, a center turn lane, and bike lanes. Prior to implementing this measure, a traffic analysis should identify potential impacts. 5.6.2 Travel Lane Narrowing Lane narrowing utilizes roadway space that exceeds minimum standards to provide the needed space for NEV lanes. Many roadways have existing travel lanes that are wider than those prescribed in local and national roadway design standards, or which are not marked. Most standards allow for the use of 9-12 foot travel lanes to create space for NEV lanes. Special consideration should be given to the amount of heavy vehicle traffic, desired speed of the roadway and horizontal curvature before the decision is made to narrow travel lanes. Narrow travel lanes have proven effective in reducing motorists speeds on roadways as they are more appropriately designed for the predominate passenger vehicle users of the roadway rather than the largest roadway users like semi trucks and buses ability to drive the design speed. Two way left turn lane or Center turn lanes can also be narrowed to 9'-11' in many situations to repurpose pavement space for NEV lanes. AASHTO supports reduced width lanes in A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets: "On interrupted -flow operation conditions at low speeds (45 mph or less), narrow lane widths are normally adequate and have some advantages." 5.6.3 Parking Lane Removal Like travel lane removal, the removal of one or both parking lanes may provide necessary space to establish NEV lanes. Typical parking lane widths of 8 feet are directly compatible with one -direction NEV lanes and such conversions may be very cost effective. Parking lane removal may be controversial and a public process is typically needed. 5.6.4 Shoulder Widening NEV lanes can be accommodated on streets with excess right-of-way through shoulder widening. Although roadway widening incurs higher expenses compared with re -striping projects, NEV lanes can be added to streets currently lacking curbs, gutters and sidewalks without the high costs of major infrastructure reconstruction. Due to the cost of street reconstruction, shoulder widening is most appropriate on roads lacking curbs, gutters and sidewalks. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 169 343 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.6.5 Speed Limit Adjustments In some cases, a roadway may be operating at a speed too fast for Class III shared roadway use (> 35 mph), but would otherwise be compatible with NEV operation. In these situations, it may be possible to adjust the design speed of the road through striping, geometry adjustments, and traffic calming to reduce the posted speed limit to 35 mph or less as appropriate for NEV use. 5.7 Facility Maintenance 5.7.1 Considerations Regular NEV facility maintenance includes sweeping, maintaining a smooth roadway, ensuring that the gutter -to -pavement transition remains relatively flush, and installing bicycle- and NEV-friendly drainage grates. Pavement overlays are a good opportunity to improve NEV facilities. The following recommendations provide a menu of options to consider enhancing a maintenance regimen. Table 8: Recommended Maintenance Activities Maintenance Activity Inspections Frequency Seasonal - at beginning and end of Summer Pavement sweeping/blowing As needed, with higher frequency in the early Spring and Fall Pavement sealing 5 -15 years Pothole repair 1 week- 1 month after report. Marked with high visibility paint until repairs can be completed. Culvert and drainage grate inspection Before Winter and after major storms Pavement markings replacement As needed Signage replacement As needed Shoulder plant trimming (weeds, trees, brambles) Twice a year; middle of growing season and early Fall Tree and shrub plantings, trimming 1 - 3 years Major damage response (washouts, fallen trees, flooding) As soon as possible 70 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 344 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.7.2 Street Sweeping NEV users often avoid shoulders and lanes filled with gravel, broken glass, sand accumulation and other debris; they will ride in the roadway to avoid these hazards, potentially causing conflicts with motorists. Debris from the roadway should not be swept onto sidewalks (pedestrians need a clean walking surface), nor should debris be swept from the sidewalk onto the roadway. A regularly scheduled inspection and maintenance program helps ensure that roadway debris is regularly picked up or swept. Street sweeping maintenance practices should include: • Establish a seasonal sweeping schedule that prioritizes roadways with NEV facilities • Sand removal should occur after each wind storm event • Sweep NEV facilities whenever there is an accumulation of debris on the facility. • Develop a "debris in roadway" hotline to report • In curbed sections, sweepers should pick up debris; on open shoulders, debris can be swept onto gravel shoulders • Pave gravel driveway approaches to minimize loose gravel on paved roadway shoulders • Perform additional sweeping in areas where debris accumulates 5.7.3 Gutter to Pavement Transitions On streets with concrete curbs and gutters,1 to 2 feet of the curbside area is typically devoted to the gutter pan, where water collects and drains into catch basins. On many streets, the NEV lane is situated near the transition between the gutter pan and the pavement edge. This transition can be susceptible to erosion, creating potholes and a rough surface for travel. The pavement on many streets is not flush with the gutter, creating a vertical transition between these segments. This area can buckle over time, creating a hazardous condition for bicyclists. Gutter maintenance strategies include: • Ensure that gutter -to -pavement transitions have no more than a V " vertical transition. • Examine pavement transitions during every roadway project for new construction, maintenance activities, and construction project activities that occur in streets. • Inspect the pavement 2 to 4 months after trenching construction activities are completed to ensure that excessive settlement has not occurred. • Provide at least 5 feet of smooth pavement outside of the gutter seam. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 171 345 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.7.4 Access through Construction Areas Wherever NEVs are allowed, measures should be taken to provide for the continuity of a user's trip through a work zone area. NEV drivers should not be led into conflicts with work site vehicles, equipment, moving vehicles, open trenches, or temporary construction signage. Efforts should be made to re-create an NEV lane (if one exists) to the left of the construction zone. If this is impossible, then consider the closure of a standard -width travel lane to accommodate separated NEV travel. Contractors performing work should be made aware of the needs of NEV users and be properly trained in how to safely route NEVs through or around work zones. Construction Signage • Place in a location that does not obstruct the path of NEV drivers, bicyclists or pedestrians. • Detour and closure signs related to NEV travel may be included on all bikeways where construction activities occur. Signage should also be provided on all other roadways. Travel on and around Steel Grates Plates used to cover trenches tend to not be flush with pavement and have a 1"-2" vertical transition on the edges. This can puncture a hole in a bicycle tire and can be be jarring to NEV drivers. Although it is common to use steel plates during non -construction hours, these plates can be dangerously slippery, particularly when wet. Good practices include: • Require temporary asphalt (cold mix) around plates to create a smooth transition. • Use steel plates only as a temporary measure during construction, not for extended periods. • Use warning signs where steel plates are in use. • Require both temporary and final repaving to provide a smooth surface without abrupt edges. Figure 34: Proper Placement of Construction Signage Outside of NEV Lane Construction signs placed outsidekf NEV lanekr sidewalk. ROAD WORK AHEAD 72 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 346 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.8 Additional AB 61 Considerations 5.8.1 Safety and Maintenance Requirements NEVs eligible to use NEV lanes shall meet the safety requirements for low -speed vehicles as set forth in Section 571.500 of Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations, included below. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 173 347 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 5.8.2 Operator Requirements Operators shall be required to possess a valid California driver's license and to comply with the financial responsibility requirements established pursuant to Chapter 1(commencing with Section 16000) of Division 7 of the Vehicle Code. 5.8.3 Restrictions on Use Operation of NEVs is restricted to those NEV routes identified in the transportation plan, and limited to those NEVs that meet the safety equipment requirements specified in the plan. 5.8.4 Violations Any person operating a NEV in the plan area in violation of these rules and regulations is guilty of an infraction punishable by a fine not exceeding one hundred dollars ($100). 5.8.5 Evaluation and Monitoring Any city that adopts a NEV transportation plan shall submit a report to the Legislature on or before January 1, 2016, in consultation with the Department of Transportation, the Department of the California Highway Patrol, and any applicable local law enforcement agency. The report shall include all of the following: 1. A description of the NEV transportation plan and its elements that have been authorized up to that time. 2. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the NEV transportation plan, including its impact on traffic flows and safety. 3. A recommendation as to whether AB 61 should be terminated, continued in effect, or expanded statewide. More detail on evaluation and monitoring is provided in section 0 of this plan. 74 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 348 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan This page intentionally left blank 349 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 175 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 6 Recommended Education, Legislation, and Enforcement 6.1 Legislation The disparate patchwork of current bylaws and policies are presented in Appendix D. In order to provide greater consistency across jurisdictional boundaries, support the objectives of CV Link, and promote wider adoption of lower cost and environmentally friendly transportation options, a model set of municipal city codes and policies should be developed to include: • Coachella Valley wide standard definitions of the types of golf cars, NEVs, LSVs and LSEVs based on the California Vehicle Code • All golf carts and NEVs shall be permitted to park in any parking space • NEVs and golf carts that have a state issued registration for on -street use shall be exempt from city permits • The acceptance of permits issued by other jurisdictions in the State of California and/or a California Department of Motor Vehicle (DMV) issued license plate for operation on identified routes • Publication of a map indicating which streets with posted speed limits above 35 mph have NEV facilities, and which designated golf cart paths are available for: o Unrestricted NEV speed (up to the legal 25 mph limit) as conditions permit o Restricted NEV speed up to 15 mph due to geometric or other considerations o Prohibited for NEVs but still permissible for golf carts (not recommended, as this may lead to confusion and enforceability issues) 6.2 Education and Enforcement As NEVs are a nascent technology, many residents and officials conflate them with golf cars (carts). Following on from the recommendation for a Coachella Valley wide set of definitions, there will be a need to educate the public on what each type of vehicle is and where they may be used. • CVAG and the member cities should conduct outreach and public service announcements to clarify the various vehicle types • All Coachella Valley DMV offices should feature hardcopies of the DMV's fact sheet available online here: http://apps.dmv.ca.gov/pubs/brochures/fast facts/ffvr37.pdf • Member cities should distribute to all residents the adopted uniform municipal code sections applying to NEVs and golf carts via regular mail as well as throughout all city departments including the police • Riverside County Sheriffs Department should distribute the DMV's fact sheet and applicable municipal city codes to all officers As previously noted, to support the development of golf cart and NEV plans, streets and paths must be designated for use or prohibited access. • Inter -jurisdictional development and publication of maps with routes for the operation of NEVs. This is needed for planning and design of streets, education, wayfinding, and enforcement purposes 76 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 350 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 6.3 Frequently Asked Questions Q. What does the State of California require me to do to drive an NEV / LSV, and do I have to follow the same laws as a car driver? A. An NEV / LSV driver must have registration, insurance, and driver's license. Although the legislation has established a separate class for LSVs, almost all laws applicable to motor vehicle drivers also apply to LSV drivers. A driver may not operate a vehicle under the influence of alcohol (CVC 23152) Q. Can I modify my golf cart to achieve 25 mph like a NEV? A. While it is not difficult to do this and many businesses are currently doing it, the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) states: A golf cart cannot be converted for registration as an NFU/LSV. If you modify your golf cart to go faster than 15mph or seat more than two persons, the vehicle is considered a regular motor vehicle and must comply with Federal Motor Vehicle Standards for passenger vehicles. Failure to comply with all necessary regulations may result in a citation. You may register the golf cart with the DMV as a golf cart, and you may obtain any currently required city permits for operation on public pathways or streets with speed limits generally limited to 25 mph, but you will not be able to legally operate a modified golf cart on a street with a speed limit of 30 or 35 mph. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 177 351 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 7 Evaluation and Monitoring To meet the reporting requirements of Assembly Bill No. 61, CVAG must submit to the legislature by January 1, 2016 an NEV Plan Evaluation and Monitoring Report to the legislature, in consultation with the Department of Transportation, the Department of the California Highway Patrol, and local law enforcement agencies. According to AB 61, the report shall describe the plan adopted, evaluate its effectiveness and impact on traffic flows and safety, and make a recommendation to the Legislature on whether to extend the sunset date or expand the authorization for NEV transportation plans statewide. Required elements include: • A description of NEV transportation plan and its elements that have been authorized up to that time. • An evaluation of the effectiveness of the NEV transportation plans, including their impact on traffic flows and safety. • A recommendation as to whether AB61 sunset date should be extended and if the authorization for NEV transportation plans should be expanded statewide. In 2011 the City of Lincoln and Rocklin prepared an NEV Plan Evaluation for the California Legislature to meet the requirements of AB 2963. The Lincoln evaluation requirements are equivalent to those in AB 61, and as such offers a model for CVAG to follow in preparation and execution of their own Evaluation and Monitoring Report. It is recommended that the CVAG report evaluate the same categories included in the Lincoln/Rocklin report plus additional measures not previously evaluated. The recommended evaluation categories for CVAG are: Traffic Engineering Speed Study Histograms of operating speed frequency for both motor vehicles and NEVs on Class II and Class III facilities. Incident and Traffic Violation Databases Inquiry and analysis of NEV-involved traffic collision or violations from local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol. Surveys Surveys of travelers of all modes, to understand the perception of NEV use safety and NEV facility design. Survey results can be evaluated separately by mode to understand differences in perception between motorist, NEV operators and bicyclists. A copy of the full survey used by the City of Lincoln is available in Appendix C of the City of Lincoln NEV Transportation Plan Evaluation report. Energy and Air Quality Impacts A detailed travel survey can form the bases of an analysis of air quality and energy benefits of current and future NEV use. 78 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 352 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Evaluation of Signs, Striping and Pavement Markings To understand comprehension and compliance with NEV specific traffic control devices, methods such as surveys or an analysis of operation should evaluate the effectiveness of non-standard signs and markings. This evaluation may be necessary as part of an experimentation process with the MUTCD. Education Campaign Experience in other cities indicates that there may be some confusion about compatibility between NEV and golf cart facilities. It is important to educate users about the limitations and capability differences between the two vehicle types. A NEV Brochure/Route Map would help educate the public about where NEVs can be legally and comfortably operated, and help explain the difference of NEVs and golf carts. The brochure can include safety tips for NEV operators and answer frequently asked questions about using the network. Coachella Valley Association of Governments 179 353 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 8 References Planning, design and implementation standards in this document are derived from the following sources: • AASHTO, Roadside Design Guide, 2002. • U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT), Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD), 2009. • Caltrans, California Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, 2012. • USDOT, FHWA, Conflicts on Multiple -Use Trails: Synthesis of the Literature and State of the Practice,1994. • Caltrans, Highway Design Manual, 2014 • Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), Design and Safety of Pedestrian Facilities,1997. • National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), Urban Bikeway Design Guide, 2nd Ed, 2012. • Assembly Bill No. 61. Chapter 170.2011-2012. Section 571.500 of Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations • Coachella Valley Area Governments (CVAG), Whitewater River/Parkway 1e11 NEV/Bike/Pedestrian Corridor Preliminary Study Report, 2012 • CVAG, Coachella Valley Non -motorized Transportation Plan Update, 2010 • Coachella Valley Water District (CVWD), Development Design Manual, 2010 • Riverside County, General Plan Draft Circulation Element, Trails and Bikeway System, 2013 • City of Lincoln, NEV Transportation Plan, 2006 • City of Lincoln, CTCDC Approved Experimental Standards, 2005 The sources listed above provide details on many aspects of path design, but a) may contain recommendations that conflict with each other; b) are not, in most cases, officially recognized "requirements"; and c) do not cover all conditions on most paths. All design guidelines must be supplemented in the application to specific situations by the professional judgments of the path designers and engineers. 80 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 354 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan This page intentionally left blank 355 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 181 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Appendix A: NEVSA Features Summary of Total Possible Scores ➢ Where People Live - 20% ➢ Where People Work - 200/0 ➢ Where People Play - 30% ➢ Where People Learn - 20% ➢ Where People Access Transit -10% NEVSA Inputs Mere Poop Doe Where People Work Where People Play Where People Learn. Where Maple ACCOS x�ansl� '..oyernmen' fsulldlrogs �Ibrsirle.s Cdlifr. kr ron Retail Destin ne flullgivus inskr[u Maim TFall Ihe,d5 AI113Orts CV Link Ac{esE PoirYG Damen'tary Schook Junior High. khooli Frlgh khools Coll-ges and unwe+slt.1-s DerYl-Cgrsrpllic pr. NFV5A r m.Tnd Analysis 82 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 356 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan This page intentionally left blank 357 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 183 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Appendix B. Existing Transit, Bike, Golf Cart and NEV Facility Maps The following maps are based upon the: • Published golf cart maps for each jurisdiction (where available) • Non -Motorized Transportation Plan (NMTP) • City staff feedback 84 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 358 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Legend Class I NEV Route Class I Bike Path Class ,i Bike Lane Class ill Bike Route ▪ Stitt Irke step sunLine Route — Proposed CV Link Streets Golf Courses TIArellE r3 1- 3 VIR --1 I , 5di== Nv 9 Palm Springs City Lim Its --,-I g-L .. _ £ 1 { a MS �R �_ u= O ▪ ii-Ex, x s .:E • . K C' 4' r orJC�iGA$- Icy J rAFA':LiIT2C�`.r.,0, d 1 r.i. 0 '49 l� • it ''y 'I .7_ihf LllS% .v ! IA TAG r.+,r_e�a.0 ZMMlmll ., W I , N ''r. 8EUJ5 VISTA Ho ��▪ TinIK;.4 I 2 Miles Palm Springs Transit, Bike & NEV Facilities _ �r� f 359 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 185 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan • m• .1 n�( Illh'. -=���r3tliii�I1P • 1 �M,.1lle 9P„��r riTzza� A .� . uggriti .-; --� Si �M= M 1 N *s ws , ti '\ _am Fan aromr.411.-111=1 -r..j 4 1Vim*PtIK ilM! i rr ��,� W - Ili IJ ■rmilmi rrwr eovt iItgliiiWgnimeilli . Legend Class I Bike Path Class II Bike Lane Class III Bike Route SunLine Stop SunLine Route Proposed CV Link Streets Golf Courses Cathedral City Limits 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 Miles EDOMJLLf 4dFC ■, �■ - (p OCOTI LO U ORTEGALI OLANCHA 2 COBLE P Cathedra[ City Transit and Bike Facilities 86 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 360 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Legend Class I Golf Cart Path Class I Bike Path Class II Bike Lane Class III Bike Route SunLine Stop SunLine Route Proposed CV Link Streets Golf Courses Rancho Mirage City Limits c 111111111i 1 v 111/111111 1 "pg11ni11! . 1111111'`� 031- rrhy i?l n 4-40.marg 0 0 0.5 2 Rancho Mirage Transit, Bike & Golf Cart Facilities t—1 361 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 187 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Palm Desert Transit, Bike & Golf Cart Facilities ri A! Legend Class I/II Golf Cart Path/Lane Class I Bike Path • — Class II Bike Lane Class III Bike Route SunLine Stop SunLine Route Proposed CV Link Streets Golf Courses Palm Desert City Limits F' 1+1 ¢4++w ii''r •. 88 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 362 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 11 AA•51•31414., r?0.4 1 . Cru Ssv� FRED V•'AR N_ ..�G,Es4 _ . HY,111 MY 111v Indian Wells Transit and Bike Facilities Coachella Valley Association of Governments 189 363 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan 'r CN__E-ao6Fira RM.% I ;4..FNQL52 •• f{ d • u U 5� 377. I � c ari Ghl0• 2 Miles La Quinta Transit, Bike & Golf Cart Facilities AGUE 74 vu 90 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 364 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan FRANCES U Z 40TH -I Indio Transit, Bike & Goff Cart Facilities LIN� 6TH GREEN Miles A176E ' R ,a b OCOOTILL0 7 Mq,q / SfROCCO KEr ft VALENDA NCIS U m SIERRA z E BLISS Y �4E ORD REOUA C co v O . w X� z o 77z u L., Li ARLA v w SOLANa cr 1 �v.p$'� 0 coC��N�'l'zkr o q' 0. AVENUE 51 FOLD J 'MITCH Legend Class I Golf Cart Path Class II Golf Cart Lane Class I Bike Path = Class II Bike Lane Class III Bike Route SunLine Stop SunLine Route -- Proposed CV Link Streets Golf Courses Indio City Limits 42N8' 11 • 'TM 45 ,, 45TH �� �/ • a D U m 1 DATE , DR CARREON + I' ALBION ¢ z i DOE CARIBE w , UP ' Z Av:Flli b:` _ r■ T4.I a Vii - f►�',w 00�Ne4 513T Wala.•.s � yII?w BA' D ,be��i�. � UoirII4"re:�w � ,Q� 61' — lai ME � i3I IL' "'�'' .Q�iiik 41,n ,T�' '` • 1M E Ply O AVENUE 47 AIES r 365 Coachella Valley Association of Governments 191 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan Coachella Transit and Bike Fadlities Legend Class I Bike Path - Class II Bike Lane Clash ui Bike Rnu le 5urrL•1ne Stop SunLine Route Proposed CV Linlc Streets Golf -Courses Coachella CIly Limit# 92 I Coachella Valley Association of Governments 366 CVAG Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Plan _7 ZISCE= '5/4 £ T SA4E@PUSH Legend class i Dike Path Class II Bike Lane Class IIM Bike Route Sun Line Slop = 5urlLine Route -- Proposed {V Link Streets 1.111 Golf Courses Desert 1-tor 4[rings City Limits 5. •• o-3 .. n—_r k�$ Ihlnrot¢H K _ -. ` �� _ I `.. { 17 • fiT.T41 • `'��� 'T 0 •Ce. G 71+0.— - I' 5 "