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HomeMy Public PortalAbout12 December 14, 2016 CommissionComments are welcomed by the Commission. If you wish to provide comments to the Commission, please complete and submit a Speaker Card to the Clerk of the Board. MEETING AGENDA TIME/DATE: 9:30 a.m. / Wednesday, December 14, 2016 LOCATION: BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside  COMMISSIONERS  Chair – Scott Matas Vice Chair – John F. Tavaglione Second Vice Chair – Dana Reed Kevin Jeffries, County of Riverside John F. Tavaglione, County of Riverside Chuck Washington, County of Riverside John J. Benoit, County of Riverside Marion Ashley, County of Riverside Deborah Franklin / Art Welch, City of Banning Lloyd White / Mike Lara, City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck / Tim Wade, City of Blythe Ella Zanowic / Joyce McIntire, City of Calimesa Dawn Haggerty / Jordan Ehrenkranz, City of Canyon Lake Greg Pettis / Shelley Kaplan, City of Cathedral City Steven Hernandez / To Be Appointed, City of Coachella Karen Spiegel / Randy Fox, City of Corona Scott Matas / Russell Betts, City of Desert Hot Springs Adam Rush / Clint Lorimore, City of Eastvale Linda Krupa / Paul Raver, City of Hemet Dana Reed / Douglas Hanson, City of Indian Wells Michael Wilson / Glenn Miller, City of Indio Frank Johnston / Brian Berkson, City of Jurupa Valley Robert Radi / To Be Appointed, City of La Quinta Bob Magee / Natasha Johnson, City of Lake Elsinore To Be Appointed / John Denver, City of Menifee Yxstian Gutierrez / Jesse Molina, City of Moreno Valley Rick Gibbs / Jonathan Ingram, City of Murrieta Berwin Hanna / Ted Hoffman, City of Norco Jan Harnik / Susan Marie Weber, City of Palm Desert Ginny Foat / Geoffrey Kors, City of Palm Springs To Be Appointed / Rita Rogers, City of Perris Ted Weill / Charles Townsend, City of Rancho Mirage Rusty Bailey / Andy Melendrez, City of Riverside Andrew Kotyuk / Crystal Ruiz, City of San Jacinto Michael S. Naggar / Michael McCracken, City of Temecula Ben Benoit / Timothy Walker, City of Wildomar John Bulinski, Director, Governor’s Appointee Caltrans District 8 COMM-COMM-00063 Tara Byerly From: Tara Byerly Sent: Thursday, December 08, 2016 11:15 AM To: Tara Byerly Cc: Jennifer Harmon; Anne Mayer; STANDIFO Subject: RCTC: December Commission Agenda - 12.14.2016 Importance: High Good morning Commissioners: The December Agenda for the Commission meeting scheduled for Wednesday, December 14, 2016 @ 9:30 a.m. is available. Please copy the link: http://www.rctc.org/uploads/media items/december-14-2016.original.pdf Conflict of Conflict of Interest Form.pdf Interest Memo.p... Also, attached for your review and information is the conflict of interest memo and form. Please let me know if you have any questions. Thank you, Respectfully, Riverside County Transportation Commission Tara Byerly Deputy Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission PO Box 12008, Riverside, CA 92502-2208 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 787-7141 I rctc.org 1 Tara Byerly From: Tara Byerly Sent: Thursday, December 08, 2016 11:50 AM To: Tara Byerly Subject: RCTC: December Commission Agenda - 12.14.2016 Importance: High Good morning Commission Alternates: The December Agenda for the Commission meeting scheduled for Wednesday, December 14, 2016 @ 9:30 a.m. is available. Please copy the link: http://www.rctc.org/uploads/media items/december-14-2016.original.pdf Respectfully, Riverside County Transportation Commission Tara Byerly Deputy Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission PO Box 12008, Riverside, CA 92502-2208 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 787-7141 I rctc.org i Riverside County Transportation Commission TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board DATE: December 7, 2016 SUBJECT: Possible Conflicts of Interest — Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda of December 14, 2016 The December 14, 2016 agenda of the Riverside County Transportation Commission includes items that may raise possible conflicts of interest. A Commissioner may not participate in any discussion or action concerning a contract or amendment if a campaign contribution of more than $250 is received in the past 12 months or 3 months following the conclusion from any entity or individual listed. Agenda Item No. 6H — RCTC 91 Express Lanes Changeable Message Signs Maintenance Agreement and Software Purchase Consultant(s): Daktronics, Inc. Sarah Licht, Transportation Services Manager 201 Daktronics Drive Brookings, SD 57006 Agenda Item No. 61— Agreement for Landscape Maintenance Services Consultant(s): Tropical Plaza Nursery, Inc. Leslie Fields, President 9642 Santiago Blvd. Villa Park, CA 92861 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION www.rctc.org AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, December 14, 2016 BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, CA In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting at the Commission office, 4080 Lemon Street, Third Floor, Riverside, CA, and on the Commission’s website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Government Code Section 54954.2, and the Federal Transit Administration Title VI, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141 if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, including accessibility and translation services. Assistance is provided free of charge. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to the meeting time will assist staff in assuring reasonable arrangements can be made to provide assistance at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER / ROLL CALL 2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 3. PUBLIC COMMENTS – Each individual speaker is limited to speak three (3) continuous minutes or less. The Commission may, either at the direction of the Chair or by majority vote of the Commission, waive this three minute time limitation. Depending on the number of items on the Agenda and the number of speakers, the Chair may, at his/her discretion, reduce the time of each speaker to two (2) continuous minutes. In addition, the maximum time for public comment for any individual item or topic is thirty (30) minutes. Also, the Commission may terminate public comments if such comments become repetitious. Speakers may not yield their time to others without the consent of the Chair. Any written documents to be distributed or presented to the Commission shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board. This policy applies to Public Comments and comments on Agenda Items. Under the Brown Act, the Commission should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda that are not listed on the agenda. Commission members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. 4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – NOVEMBER 9, 2016 Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda December 14, 2016 Page 2 5. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS – The Commission may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Commission subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Commission. If there are less than 2/3 of the Commission members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 6. CONSENT CALENDAR – All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 6A. PROPOSED 2017 COMMISSION/COMMITTEE MEETING SCHEDULE Page 1 Overview This item is for the Commission to adopt its 2017 Commission/Committee Meeting Schedule. 6B. RESOLUTION TO AMEND THE APPENDIX OF THE CONFLICT OF INTEREST CODE Page 5 Overview This item is for the Commission to adopt Resolution No. 16-016, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Amending the Appendix of the Conflict of Interest Code Pursuant to the Political Reform Act of 1974”. 6C. QUARTERLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Page 17 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the period ended September 30, 2016. 6D. QUARTERLY SALES TAX ANALYSIS Page 25 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 2, 2016 (2Q 2016). Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda December 14, 2016 Page 3 6E. QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT Page 34 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended September 30, 2016. 6F. AMENDMENT TO 91 EXPRESS LANES RCTC-OCTA FACILITY AGREEMENT Page 95 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 16-31-025-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 16-31-025-00, with the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) for joint operating costs of the toll operations center in the amount of $2,536,500, plus a contingency amount of $126,825, for a total amount not to exceed $2,663,325; 2) Authorize Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director or designee to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required. 6G. DEPARTMENT OF CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL AGREEMENT FOR RCTC 91 EXPRESS LANES TOLL ENFORCEMENT Page 105 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 17-31-044-00 to the Department of California Highway Patrol (CHP) for toll enforcement on the RCTC 91 Express Lanes for a three-year term in the amount of $1,443,310, plus a contingency amount of $56,690, for a total amount not to exceed $1.5 million; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve contingency work as may be required for the agreement. Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda December 14, 2016 Page 4 6H. RCTC 91 EXPRESS LANES CHANGEABLE MESSAGE SIGNS MAINTENANCE AGREEMENT AND SOFTWARE PURCHASE Page 114 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 17-31-045-00 to Daktronics, Inc. (Daktronics) for the maintenance and repair of the changeable message signs (CMS) for the 91 Express Lanes for a four-year term, in the amount of $115,690, plus a contingency amount of $11,569, for a total amount not to exceed $127,259; 2) Award Agreement No. 17-31-046-00 to Daktronics for CMS software for the RCTC 91 Express Lanes, in the amount of $16,200, plus a contingency amount of $1,620, for a total amount not to exceed $17,820; 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 4) Authorize the Executive Director or designee to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for the agreements. 6I. AGREEMENT FOR LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SERVICES Page 126 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 17-24-023-00 to Tropical Plaza Nursery, Inc. (Tropical) for the provision of landscape maintenance services for a three-year term, and two, two-year options to extend the agreement, in an amount of $3,267,100, plus a contingency amount of $326,710, for a total amount not to exceed $3,593,810; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement, including option years, on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director or designee to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for these services. 7. PRESENTATION: 40TH ANNIVERSARY SPOTLIGHT – COMMITMENT TO TRANSIT 8. 2016 COORDINATED PUBLIC TRANSIT – HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION PLAN Page 151 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve the 2016 Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan (2016 Coordinated Plan). Riverside County Transportation Commission Agenda December 14, 2016 Page 5 9. ELECTION OF RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION OFFICERS AND APPOINTMENT OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS Page 155 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) The Commission to conduct an election of officers for 2017 – Chair, Vice Chair, and Second Vice Chair; and 2) The cities of Corona, Moreno Valley, Murrieta, Riverside, and Temecula to appoint two representatives to the Executive Committee; 3) The cities of Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Eastvale, Hemet, Jurupa Valley, Lake Elsinore, Menifee, Norco, Perris, San Jacinto, and Wildomar to appoint one representative to the Executive Committee; and 4) The cities of Blythe, Cathedral City, Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, Indian Wells, Indio, La Quinta, Palm Desert, Palm Springs, and Rancho Mirage to appoint one representative to the Executive Committee. 10. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA 11. COMMISSIONERS / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and the Executive Director to report on attended meetings/conferences and any other items related to Commission activities. 12. ADJOURNMENT The next meeting of the Commission is scheduled to be held on Wednesday, January 11, 2017, Board Room, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. AGENDA ITEM 4 MINUTES  RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION    MINUTES  Wednesday, November 9, 2016    1. CALL TO ORDER / ROLL CALL    The Riverside County Transportation Commission was called to order by  Chair Scott Matas at 9:30 a.m. in the Board Room at the County of Riverside  Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, California, 92501.    2. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE    Commissioner Dana Reed led the Commission in a flag salute.    Commissioners/Alternates Present Commissioners Absent    Marion Ashley Shelley Kaplan Ginny Foat  Rusty Bailey Andrew Kotyuk Yxstian Gutierrez  Ben Benoit Linda Krupa Steven Hernandez  John J. Benoit Bob Magee Michael Naggar  John Bulinski Scott Matas Adam Rush  Daryl Busch Robert Radi   Joseph DeConinck Dana Reed   John Denver Karen Spiegel   Deborah Franklin John F. Tavaglione   Rick Gibbs Chuck Washington   Dawn Haggerty Ted Weill   Berwin Hanna Lloyd White   Jan Harnik Michael Wilson   Kevin Jeffries Ella Zanowic   Frank Johnston         3. PUBLIC COMMENTS    Anne Mayer, Executive Director, presented Senior External Affairs Analyst Marla Dye with  a 5‐year service award, and Planning and Programing Director Shirley Medina with a   25‐year service award.    4. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – OCTOBER 12, 2016    M/S/C (Radi/Krupa) to approve the October 12, 2016 minutes as submitted.    Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes  November 9, 2016  Page 2  5. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS    There were no additions or revisions to the agenda.    6. CONSENT CALENDAR    M/S/C (Krupa/Radi) to approve the following Consent Calendar items.    No:  Commissioner Kevin Jeffries, Agenda Item 6G  Recuse:  Commissioners Marion Ashley and John Tavaglione, Agenda  Item 6I    6A. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT    Receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the first quarter ended  September 30, 2016.    6B. AMENDMENT TO THE 91 EXPRESS LANES OPERATOR AGREEMENT    1) Approve Agreement No. 13‐31‐105‐01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement   No. 13‐31‐105‐01, the operator agreement (ORCOA) between the Orange  County Transportation Authority (OCTA), the Commission, and Cofiroute  USA, LLC (Cofiroute), for a net reduction in operations and maintenance  services for the 91 Express Lanes in an amount of $2,900,947, and a total  amount not to exceed $31,196,999; and  2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review,  to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission.    6C. TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM MITIGATION FEE REGIONAL ARTERIAL PROGRAM  – PROJECT DELIVERY UPDATE    Receive and file a status report on the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee  (TUMF) Regional Arterial program.       Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes  November 9, 2016  Page 3  6D. AGREEMENT FOR FINAL DESIGN AND RIGHT OF WAY ACQUISITION FOR THE  CONSTRUCTION OF THE INTERSTATE 215/PLACENTIA AVENUE INTERCHANGE  IMPROVEMENT PROJECT    1) Award Agreement No. 16‐31‐066‐00 to T.Y. Lin International (T.Y. Lin) to  perform final engineering services and prepare plans, specifications, and  cost estimate (PS&E) for the construction of the Interstate 215/Placentia  Avenue interchange improvements project (Project) in the amount of  $3,412,700, plus a contingency amount of $341,300 for potential changes  in scope, for a total amount not to exceed $3,754,000;  2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review,  to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission;  3) Authorize the Executive Director or designee to approve contingency work  as may be required for the Project;  4) Approve Agreement No. 17‐31‐039‐00 with Caltrans for the final design  and right of way (ROW) acquisition of the Project;  5) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to  execute the agreement and future non‐funding related amendments to  this agreement;  6) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to  execute utility agreements required for the Project in an amount not to  exceed $1.2 million; and  7) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to  acquire required parcels and mitigation property for the Mid County  Parkway (MCP) project in accordance with the Commission’s ROW policies  and procedures and subject to available funding.    6E. MOBILE SOURCE AIR POLLUTION REDUCTION REVIEW COMMITTEE  TRANSPORTATION CONTROL MEASURE PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM    1) Approve Agreement No. 17‐25‐016‐00 with the South Coast Air Quality  Management District (SCAQMD) for a grant from the Mobile Source Air  Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC) Transportation Control  Measure Partnership Program in the amount of $1,909,241;  2) Approve Agreement No. 17‐25‐038‐00 with the city of Riverside for the  Rustin Avenue Sidewalk Improvement and Bike Lane project in the amount  not to exceed $600,000;  3) Approve an amendment in the amount of $1,909,241 to the FY 2016/17  Commuter Rail Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP);  4) Approve an increase in revenues and expenditures of $1,909,241 in the   FY 2016/17 budget related to the MSRC grant; and  5) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review,  to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission.  Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes  November 9, 2016  Page 4  6F. MOBILE SOURCE AIR POLLUTION REDUCTION REVIEW COMMITTEE MAJOR  EVENT CENTER TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM GRANT    1) Approve Agreement No. 17‐25‐040‐00 with the South Coast Air Quality  Management District (SCAQMD) for the receipt of a Mobile Source Air  Pollution Reduction Review Committee (MSRC) Major Event Center  Transportation Programs grant in the amount of $1.2 million;  2) Approve Agreement No. 17‐25‐037‐00 with the Los Angeles – San Diego –   San Luis Obispo (LOSSAN) Rail Corridor Agency for project coordination  and transportation services with Amtrak in an amount not to exceed   $1 million;  3) Approve Agreement No. 17‐25‐036‐00 with Goldenvoice/Valley Music  Travel (Goldenvoice) for project coordination and shuttle bus  transportation in an amount not to exceed $200,000;  4) Approve an amendment of $1.2 million to the FY 2016/17 Commuter Rail  Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) for the total grant;  5) Approve an increase to the FY 2016/17 budget of $600,000 for MSRC grant  revenues and corresponding rail and shuttle service expenditures; and  6) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review,  to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission.    6G. OCTA 2016 ANGELS EXPRESS AGREEMENT    1) Approve Agreement No. 17‐25‐014‐00 with the Orange County  Transportation Authority (OCTA) for the cost sharing of the 2016 Angels  Express Service for an initial one‐year term in an amount not to exceed  $33,176, with additional option years for the 2017 season and beyond  upon mutual written agreement by both agencies in an amount not to  exceed an annual 5 percent increase; and  2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review,  to execute the agreement, including option years, on behalf of the  Commission.    6H. TRANSIT TRANSFER AND LICENSE AGREEMENTS    1) Approve Agreement No. 17‐25‐015‐00 with Omnitrans for reimbursement  of transit transfers effective January 1, 2017, for an indefinite term  cancelable by either party with a 30‐day notice in an amount  approximating $15,000 annually;     Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes  November 9, 2016  Page 5  2) Approve Agreement No. 17‐25‐033‐00 with Megabus Northeast LLC  (Megabus) for use of the Commission’s Riverside‐Downtown Station for a  three‐year term, with two two‐year options to extend the agreement, in  an estimated revenue amount of $117,245 for the full term of all the  options; and  3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review,  to execute the agreements, including option years, on behalf of the  Commission.    6I. AGREEMENTS FOR STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE ADVOCACY SERVICES    1) Award the following agreements to provide state and federal legislative  advocacy services for a four‐year term, and two two‐year options to  extend the agreements, for up to an eight‐year period of performance, as  follows:  a) Agreement No. 17‐14‐009‐00 with Smith, Watts & Hartmann, in an  amount not to exceed $524,000;  b) Agreement No. 17‐14‐010‐00 with Ruffalo and Associates, LLC, in  an amount not to exceed $720,000;  c) Agreement No. 17‐14‐011‐00 with Cliff Madison Government  Relations, in an amount not to exceed $530,000; and  2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review,  to execute the agreements, including option years, on behalf of the  Commission.    7. INTERSTATE 15 EXPRESS LANES PROJECT PLAN OF FINANCE    Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer, presented the Interstate 15 Express Lanes  preliminary plan of finance, highlighting the following areas:     A map depicting the I‐15 Express Lanes project and the access points;   A graphic of the current I‐15 cross section and the future two tolled express lanes  in each direction;   Environmental process completed with Commission adoption in July 2016;   Minimal right of way impacts;   Project financing objectives and overview;   Finance plan – Measure A, TIFIA, toll revenue bonds, and other/federal grant  funds;   Financing schedule; and   Next steps.       Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes  November 9, 2016  Page 6  Commissioner Rusty Bailey expressed support for this project and requested additional  information regarding the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) funds and the  Active Transportation Program (ATP).    Anne Mayer provided a detailed explanation of how CMAQ funds can and have been  spent, as well as ATP eligible projects and the lack of state and federal funding.  She  expressed from a long term perspective, there are too many projects competing for the  same pots of money.    Commissioner Bailey expressed appreciation for Ms. Mayer’s comments and staff’s  efforts to bring this project forward.    M/S/C (Radi/J. Benoit) to:    1) Provide input and direct staff regarding the preliminary funding plan for  the Interstate 15 Express Lanes project (Project); and  2) Approve an additional $50 million in federal Congestion Mitigation and  Air Quality (CMAQ) and/or Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG)  funds for a total amount of $110 million in CMAQ and/or STBG funds for  design‐build costs related to the Project and direct staff to program the  funding in the 2017 Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP).    8. PRESENTATION:  40TH ANNIVERSARY SPOTLIGHT – VOTER APPROVED SALES TAX  MEASURES    John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director, presented the transportation sales tax  throughout California, highlighting the following areas:     Voter approved sales taxes and transportation;   The Self‐Help Era;  o Law requires detailed plans;  o Initially, only majority vote needed to pass;   Supermajority requirement:  o Proposition 13 specified a two‐thirds vote for special taxes;  o Proposition 62 in 1986 strengthened the two‐thirds language;   Riverside County and Measure A – Voters have approved sales taxes in Riverside  twice; and it has generated $2.7 billion since 1989;   2016: A new wave of sales tax elections, implications, and outcomes; and   Future issues and concerns.       Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes  November 9, 2016  Page 7  Anne Mayer stated by looking at the number of measures on the ballot, local elected  officials are being forced to focus on local revenue streams that can be controlled at the  local and regional level.  Ms. Mayer noted the failure in Ventura County directly impacts  the Commission as Ventura County is one of the five member agencies of Metrolink and  have expressed repeatedly it cannot sustain its investments into the Metrolink system  and maybe faced with withdrawing from the joint powers authority.  Additionally, with  the passage of Los Angeles County’s measure, it will put pressure on the surrounding  counties since there are not enough revenue sources to build or implement the  complimentary transit systems.    9. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR FOR DISCUSSION    There were no items pulled from the Consent Calendar.    10. COMMISSIONERS/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S REPORT    10A. Chair Scott Matas briefed the Commission on Mobility 21.    10B. Commissioner Michael Wilson announced the CV Link project in Coachella Valley  was recommended for a $24.4 million ATP Grant award.    10C. Anne Mayer announced the California Transportation Commission (CTC) is  scheduled to meet in the Riverside at the County Administrative Center Board  Room on December 7.  There will also be a reception for the CTC following the  meeting.    10D. Anne Mayer announced the special trains for the Festival of Lights at the Mission  Inn in Riverside.  Flyers will be distributed to the Commissioners.    At this time, Commissioners John Bulinkski, Kevin Jeffries, and Frank Johnston left the meeting.    11. CLOSED SESSION     11A. CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS    Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8    Property:            291 Corporate Terrace Circle, Corona 92882 – APN 115‐680‐012 Negotiating Party:   Rexco Corporate Terrace, LLC; and                Tim Hawke, President, Strata Realty  Property:            301 Corporate Terrace Circle, Corona 92882 – APN 115‐680‐011 Negotiating Party:   Corporate Terrace Properties, LLC and                Tim Hawke, President, Strata Realty    Agency Negotiator:  Anne Mayer or Michael Blomquist    Under Negotiation:  Price and terms of payment  Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes  November 9, 2016  Page 8  There were no announcements from the Closed Session items.    12. ADJOURNMENT    There being no further business for consideration by the Riverside County Transportation  Commission, Chair Matas adjourned the meeting at 10:35 a.m.  The next Commission  meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, December 14, 2016, Board  Room, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside.    Respectfully submitted,    Jennifer Harmon  Clerk of the Board  AGENDA ITEM 6A Agenda Item 6A RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: December 14, 2016 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Proposed 2017 Commission/Committee Meeting Schedule STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to adopt its 2017 Commission/Committee Meeting Schedule. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission is scheduled to meet on the second Wednesday of each month at 9:30 a.m. The Executive Committee is scheduled at 9:00 a.m. on the same day. For 2017, the annual Commission Workshop will be held on Thursday, January 26 and Friday, January 27 at the Hyatt Palm Springs. Due to the timing of the annual workshop, the January Budget and Implementation and Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committees will not be scheduled. The Commission’s policy committees – Budget and Implementation and Western Riverside County Programs and Projects – meet on the fourth Monday of each month at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., respectively. For 2017, these Committees will not meet in December due to a holiday. Additionally, the Eastern Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee meets on the first Monday of each month at 10:30 a.m., except when the first Monday falls on a holiday or in the same week as a Commission meeting. There are times when a committee meeting may be cancelled due to lack of substantive agenda items. When this occurs, the Commissioners will be notified and items are forwarded directly to the Commission for final action. Attachment: Proposed 2017 Commission/Committee Meetings Schedule 1    2017 RCTC Meeting Schedule – V1  RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION 2017 MEETING SCHEDULE Meeting Date (Wednesday) Commission Location Executive Committee Location January 11 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A January 26‐27 Meeting / Workshop 1:30 p.m. (Thursday) 8:30 a.m. (Friday) Hyatt Palm Springs N/A N/A February 8 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A March 8 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A April 12 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A May 10 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A June 14 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A July 12 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A August 9 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A September 13 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A October 11 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A November 8 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A December 13 9:30 a.m. Board Room 9:00 a.m. RCTC Conf. Rm A The Commission and the Executive Committee meetings are held on the second Wednesday of each month.      2017 RCTC Meeting Schedule – V1  Meeting Date (Monday) Budget and Implementation Committee Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Location February 27 9:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Board Room March 27 9:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Board Room April 24 9:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Board Room May 22 9:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Board Room June 26 9:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Board Room July 24 9:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Board Room August 28 9:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Board Room September 25 9:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Board Room October 23 9:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Board Room November 27 9:30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Board Room The meetings of the Budget and Implementation Committee and the Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee are held on the fourth Monday of each month, except on holidays.  Meeting Date (Monday) Eastern Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Location April 3 10:30 a.m. CVAG Office 73‐710 Fred Waring Drive Suite 119 Palm Desert, CA 92260 May 1 10:30 a.m. June 5 10:30 a.m. October 2 10:30 a.m. December 4 10:30 a.m. The meetings of the Eastern Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee are held on the first Monday of the month, except when the first Monday falls on a holiday or in the same week as a Commission meeting.       2017 RCTC Meeting Schedule – V1  Meeting Date (Monday) Technical Advisory Committee Location January 23 10:00 a.m. Riverside ‐ RCTC Conf. Rm A March 20 10:00 a.m. Beaumont ‐ City Hall May 15 10:00 a.m. Riverside ‐ RCTC Conf. Rm A July 17 10:00 a.m. Beaumont ‐ City Hall September 18 10:00 a.m. Riverside ‐ RCTC Conf. Rm A November 20 10:00 a.m. Beaumont – City Hall The meetings of the Technical Advisory Committee are held on the third Monday of every other month, except for holidays.If the meeting falls on a holiday, the meeting is moved to the second Monday. Riverside – Commission Office, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, Riverside, CA Beaumont ‐ City Hall, Conference Room 2, 550 East Sixth Street, Beaumont, CA      2017 RCTC Meeting Schedule – V1  Meeting Date (Monday) Technical Advisory Committee Location January 23 10:00 a.m. Riverside ‐ RCTC Conf. Rm A March 20 10:00 a.m. Beaumont ‐ City Hall May 15 10:00 a.m. Riverside ‐ RCTC Conf. Rm A July 17 10:00 a.m. Beaumont ‐ City Hall September 18 10:00 a.m. Riverside ‐ RCTC Conf. Rm A November 20 10:00 a.m. Beaumont – City Hall The meetings of the Technical Advisory Committee are held on the third Monday of every other month, except for holidays.If the meeting falls on a holiday, the meeting is moved to the second Monday. Riverside – Commission Office, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, Riverside, CA Beaumont ‐ City Hall, Conference Room 2, 550 East Sixth Street, Beaumont, CA  4 AGENDA ITEM 6B Agenda Item 6B RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: December 14, 2016 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Resolution to Amend the Appendix of the Conflict of Interest Code STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to adopt Resolution No. 16-016, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Amending the Appendix of the Conflict of Interest Code Pursuant to the Political Reform Act of 1974”. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: As required, the Riverside County Transportation Commission performs a biennial review of its Conflict of Interest Code (Code). For this year, there is a need to amend the appendix to include new positions which must be designated, update referenced to Regulations, and add clarifying language as provided by the Fair Political Practice Commission. The amended appendix shows the list of positions who manage public investments, and positions to be governed under the Code and their respective disclosure categories. A notice of intention to amend the appendix of the Code was publicly posted and provided to the affected designated employees. After the Commission adopts the amended appendix, it will be submitted to the Riverside County’s Board of Supervisors for approval as it is the code-reviewing body for the Commission. In order to meet the requirements of the Code pursuant to the Political Reform Act of 1974, staff recommends that the Commission adopt Resolution No. 16-016 to make the appropriate changes to the Code. Attachments: 1) Resolution No. 16-016 2) Amended Appendix 3) Notice of Intention 5 LAW OFFICES OF BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP -1-BBK –November 2016 17336.00019\29368152.2 CONFLICT OF INTEREST CODE FOR THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION (Amended December 14, 2016) The Political Reform Act (Gov. Code § 81000, et seq.) requires state and local government agencies to adopt and promulgate conflict of interest codes. The Fair Political Practices Commission has adopted a regulation (2 Cal. Code of Regs. § 18730) which contains the terms of a standard conflict of interest code, which can be incorporated by reference in an agency’s code. After public notice and hearing it may be amended by the Fair Political Practices Commission to conform to amendments in the Political Reform Act. Therefore, the terms of 2 California Code of Regulations section 18730 and any amendments to it duly adopted by the Fair Political Practices Commission are hereby incorporated by reference. This regulation and the attached Appendix designating officials and positions and establishing disclosure categories, shall constitute the conflict of interest code of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the “Commission”). All officials and designated employees required to submit a statement of economic interests shall file their statements with the Clerk of the Board as the Commission’s Filing Officer. The Clerk of the Board shall make and retain a copy of all statements filed by Members of the Board of the Commission and the Executive Director, and forward the originals of such statements to the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of the County of Riverside. The Commission’s Clerk of the Board shall retain the originals of the statements filed by all other officials and designated positions and make all statements available for public inspection and reproduction during regular business hours. (Gov. Code § 81008.) ATTACHMENT 1 6 A.-1-BBK – November 2016 17336.00019\29368152.2 LAW OFFICES OF BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP APPENDIX CONFLICT OF INTEREST CODE OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION (Amended December 14, 2016) PART “A” OFFICIALS WHO MANAGE PUBLIC INVESTMENTS Commission Officials who manage public investments, as defined by 2 Cal. Code of Regs. § 18700.3(b), are NOT subject to the Commission’s Code, but must file disclosure statements under Government Code Section 87200 et seq. [Regs. § 18730(b)(3)] These positions are listed here for informational purposes only. It has been determined that the positions listed below are officials who manage public investments1: Members of the Board of the Commission and their Alternates Executive Director Deputy Executive Director Chief Financial Officer Financial Consultants 1 Individuals holding one of the above-listed positions may contact the Fair Political Practices Commission for assistance or written advice regarding their filing obligations if they believe that their position has been categorized incorrectly. The Fair Political Practices Commission makes the final determination whether a position is covered by § 87200. 7 A.-2-BBK – November 2016 17336.00019\29368152.2 LAW OFFICES OF BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP DESIGNATED POSITIONS GOVERNED BY THE CONFLICT OF INTEREST CODE DESIGNATED POSITIONS’ TITLE OR FUNCTION DISCLOSURE CATEGORIES ASSIGNED Accounting and Human Resources Manager 5 Capital Projects Manager 1, 2 Community Relations Manager 5 Commuter Assistance Manager 5 Clerk of the Board 4 Deputy Director of Finance 1 External Affairs Director 5 Facilities Administrator 1, 2 Finance Manager/Controller 5 General Counsel 1, 2 Goods Movement Manager 5 Government Relations Manager 1 Human Resources Administrator 4 Motorist Assistance Manager 5 Multimodal Services Director 2, 3, 5 Office and Board Services Manager 2, 4 Planning and Programming Director 2, 3, 5 Procurement and Assets Administrator 1, 2 Procurement and Assets Manager 1, 2 8 A.-3-BBK – November 2016 17336.00019\29368152.2 LAW OFFICES OF BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP Programming and Planning Manager 2, 5, 6 Project Delivery Director 1, 2 Project Development Director 1, 2 Public Affairs Manager 5 Rail Manager 1, 2 Right of Way Manager 1, 2 Senior Administrative Assistant, Administration 5 Staff Analyst – Multimodal Services (ALL)2, 3, 5 Staff Analyst – Programming (ALL)5 Staff Analyst – Rail (ALL)1, 2 Staff Analyst – Right of Way (ALL)1, 2 Toll Operations Manager 2, 3, 5 Toll Program Director 2, 3, 5 Toll Project Manager 2, 3, 5 Toll Technology Manager 3, 5 Transit Manager 2, 3, 5 Consultant and New Positions2 2 Individuals serving as a consultant as defined in FPPC Reg 18700.3(a) or in a new position created since this Code was last approved that makes or participates in making decisions must file under the broadest disclosure category in this Code subject to the following limitation: The Executive Director may determine that, due to the range of duties or contractual obligations, it is more appropriate to assign a limited disclosure requirement. described in this Section. A clear explanation of the duties and a statement of the extent of the disclosure requirements must be in a written document. (Gov. Code Sec. 82019; FPPC Regulations 18219 and 18734). The Executive Director’s determination is a public record and shall be retained for public inspection in the same manner and location as this Conflict of Interest Code (Gov. Code Sec. 81008). DESIGNATED POSITIONS’ TITLE OR FUNCTION DISCLOSURE CATEGORIES ASSIGNED 9 B.-1-BBK – November 2016 17336.00019\29368152.2 LAW OFFICES OF BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP PART “B” DISCLOSURE CATEGORIES The disclosure categories listed below identify the types of investments, business entities, sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, or real property which the Designated Position must disclose for each disclosure category to which he or she is assigned.3 “Investment” means financial interest in any business entity (including a consulting business or other independent contracting business) and are reportable if they are either located in or doing business in the jurisdiction, are planning to do business in the jurisdiction, or have done business during the previous two years in the jurisdiction of the Commission. Category 1: All investments and business positions and sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, that are located in, do business in, or own real property within the jurisdiction of the Commission. Category 2: All interests in real property which is located in whole or in part within, or not more than two (2) miles outside, the jurisdiction of the Commission. Category 3: All investments and business positions and sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, that are engaged in land development, construction or the acquisition or sale of real property within the jurisdiction of the Commission. Category 4: All investments and business positions and sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, that provide services, supplies, materials, machinery, vehicles or equipment of a type purchased or leased by the Commission. Category 5: All investments and business positions and sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, that provide services, supplies, materials, machinery, vehicles or equipment of a type purchased or leased by the Designated Position’s department, unit or division. Category 6: All investments and business positions and sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, subject to the regulatory, permit, or licensing authority of the Designated Position’s department, unit or division. 3 This Conflict of Interest Code does not require the reporting of gifts from outside this agency’s jurisdiction if the source does not have some connection with or bearing upon the functions or duties of the position. (Reg. 18730.1) 10 LAW OFFICES OF BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP -1-BBK –December2014 November 2016 17336.00019\29368152.1 LEGISLATIVE VERSION CONFLICT OF INTEREST CODE FOR THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION (Amended December 10, 201414, 2016) The Political Reform Act (Gov. Code § 81000, et seq.) requires state and local government agencies to adopt and promulgate conflict of interest codes. The Fair Political Practices Commission has adopted a regulation (2 Cal. Code of Regs. § 18730) which contains the terms of a standard conflict of interest code, which can be incorporated by reference in an agency’s code. After public notice and hearing it may be amended by the Fair Political Practices Commission to conform to amendments in the Political Reform Act. Therefore, the terms of 2 California Code of Regulations section 18730 and any amendments to it duly adopted by the Fair Political Practices Commission are hereby incorporated by reference. This regulation and the attached Appendix designating officials and positions and establishing disclosure categories, shall constitute the conflict of interest code of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the “Commission”). All officials and designated employees required to submit a statement of economic interests shall file their statements with the Clerk of the Board as the Commission’s Filing Officer. The Clerk of the Board shall make and retain a copy of all statements filed by Members of the Board of the Commission and the Executive Director, and forward the originals of such statements to the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of the County of Riverside. The Commission’s Clerk of the Board shall retain the originals of the statements filed by all other officials and designated positions and make all statements available for public inspection and reproduction during regular business hours. (Gov. Code § 81008.) ATTACHMENT 2 11 A.-1-BBK – December 2014November 2016 17336.00019\29368152.1 LAW OFFICES OF BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP APPENDIX CONFLICT OF INTEREST CODE OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION (Amended December 10, 201414, 2016) PART “A” OFFICIALS WHO MANAGE PUBLIC INVESTMENTS Commission Officials who manage public investments, as defined by 2 Cal. Code of Regs. § 1870118700.3(b), are NOT subject to the Commission’s Code, but must file disclosure statements under Government Code Section 87200 et seq. [Regs. § 18730(b)(3)] These positions are listed here for informational purposes only. It has been determined that the positions listed below are officials who manage public investments1: Members of the Board of the Commission and their Alternates Executive Director Deputy Executive Director Chief Financial Officer Financial Consultants 1 Individuals holding one of the above-listed positions may contact the Fair Political Practices Commission for assistance or written advice regarding their filing obligations if they believe that their position has been categorized incorrectly. The Fair Political Practices Commission makes the final determination whether a position is covered by § 87200. 12 A.-2-BBK – December 2014November 2016 17336.00019\29368152.1 LAW OFFICES OF BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP DESIGNATED POSITIONS GOVERNED BY THE CONFLICT OF INTEREST CODE DESIGNATED EMPLOYEES’POSITIONS’ TITLE OR FUNCTION DISCLOSURE CATEGORIES ASSIGNED Accounting and Human Resources Manager 5 Capital Projects Manager 1, 2 Community Relations Manager 5 Commuter Assistance Manager 5 Clerk of the Board 4 Deputy Director of Finance 1 External Affairs Director 5 Facilities Administrator 1, 2 Finance Manager/Controller 5 General Counsel 1, 2 Goods Movement Manager 5 Government Relations Manager 1 Human Resources Administrator 4 Motorist Assistance Manager 5 Multimodal Services Director 2, 3, 5 Office and Board Services Manager 2, 4 Planning and Programming Director 2, 3, 5 Procurement and Assets Administrator 1, 2 Procurement and Assets Manager 1, 2 13 A.-3-BBK – December 2014November 2016 17336.00019\29368152.1 LAW OFFICES OF BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP Programming and Planning Manager 2, 5, 6 Project Delivery Director 1, 2 Project Development Director 1, 2 Public Affairs Manager 5 Rail Manager 1, 2 Right of Way Manager 1, 2 Senior Administrative Assistant, Administration 5 Staff Analyst – Multimodal Services (ALL)2, 3, 5 Staff Analyst – Programming (ALL)5 Staff Analyst – Rail (ALL)1, 2 Staff Analyst – Right of Way (ALL)1, 2 Toll Operations Manager 2, 3, 5 Toll Program Director 2, 3, 5 Toll Project Manager 2, 3, 5 Toll Technology Manager 3, 5 Transit Manager 2, 3, 5 Consultant and New Positions2 2 Individuals serving as a consultant as defined in FPPC Reg 18701 18700.3(a) or in a new position created since this Code was last approved that makes or participates in making decisions must file under the broadest disclosure category in this Code subject to the following limitation: The Executive Director may determine that, due to the range of duties or contractual obligations, it is more appropriate to assign a limited disclosure requirement. described in this Section. A clear explanation of the duties and a statement of the extent of the disclosure requirements must be in a written document. (Gov. Code Sec. 82019; FPPC Regulations 18219 and 18734). The Executive Director’s determination is a public record and shall be retained for public inspection in the same manner and location as this Conflict of Interest Code (Gov. Code Sec. 81008). DESIGNATED EMPLOYEES’POSITIONS’ TITLE OR FUNCTION DISCLOSURE CATEGORIES ASSIGNED 14 B.-1-BBK – December 2014November 2016 17336.00019\29368152.1 LAW OFFICES OF BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP Part “B” DISCLOSURE CATEGORIES The disclosure categories listed below identify the types of investments, business entities, sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, or real property which the Designated Position must disclose for each disclosure category to which he or she is assigned.3 Such economic interests “Investment” means financial interest in any business entity (including a consulting business or other independent contracting business) and are reportable if they are either located in or doing business in the jurisdiction, are planning to do business in the jurisdiction, or have done business during the previous two years in the jurisdiction of the Commission. Category 1: All investments and business positions and sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, that are located in, do business in, or own real property within the jurisdiction of the Commission. Category 2: All interests in real property which is located in whole or in part within, or not more than two (2) miles outside, the jurisdiction of the Commission. Category 3: All investments and business positions and sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, that are engaged in land development, construction or the acquisition or sale of real property within the jurisdiction of the Commission. Category 4: All investments and business positions and sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, that provide services, supplies, materials, machinery, vehicles or equipment of a type purchased or leased by the Commission. Category 5: All investments and business positions and sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, that provide services, supplies, materials, machinery, vehicles or equipment of a type purchased or leased by the Designated Position’s department, unit or division. Category 6: All investments and business positions and sources of income, including gifts, loans and travel payments, subject to the regulatory, permit, or licensing authority of the Designated Position’s department, unit or division. 3 This Conflict of Interest Code does not require the reporting of gifts from outside this agency’s jurisdiction if the source does not have some connection with or bearing upon the functions or duties of the position. (Reg. 18730.1) 15 NOTICE OF INTENTION TO AMEND THE CONFLICT OF INTEREST CODE OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the “Commission”) intends to amend its Conflict of Interest Code (the “Code”) pursuant to Government Code Section 87306. The Appendix of the Code designates those positions, members, officers, and consultants who make or participate in the making of decisions and are subject to the disclosure requirements of the Commission’s Code. The Commission’s proposed amendments include new positions that must be designated, amended positions and titles, deletion of abolished positions, and clarifying language as provided by the FPPC. The proposed amended Code will be considered by the Board of Commissioners on December 14, 2016, at 9:30 a.m. at Riverside County Board Room, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, California. Any interested person may be present and comment at the public meeting or may submit written comments concerning the proposed amendment. Any comments or inquiries should be directed to the attention of Jennifer Harmon, Clerk of the Board, Riverside County Transportation Commission, 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor, Riverside, CA 92501; (951) 787-7141. Written comments must be submitted no later than December 14, 2016, at 9:30 a.m. The proposed amended Code may be reviewed at, and copies obtained from, the office of the Clerk of the Board. ATTACHMENT 3 16 AGENDA ITEM 6C Agenda Item 6C RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: December 14, 2016 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Financial Statements STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Financial Statements for the period ended September 30, 2016. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: During the first three months of the fiscal year, staff monitored the revenues and expenditures of the Commission. The first quarter of the fiscal year is primarily directed toward completing fiscal year-end closing activities. Staff expects most of the categories to present a more realistic outlook beginning in the second quarter. The operating statement shows the sales tax revenues for the first quarter at 3 percent of the budget. This is a result of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 33, Accounting and Financial Reporting for Nonexchange Transactions. GASB Statement No. 33 requires sales tax revenues to be accrued for the period in which it is collected at the point of sale. The State Board of Equalization (SBOE) collects the Measure A funds and remits these funds to the Commission after the reporting period for the businesses. This creates a two-month lag in the receipt of revenues by the Commission. Accordingly, these financial statements reflect the revenues related to collections for July 2016. On a cash basis, the Measure A and Local Transportation Fund (LTF) sales tax revenues are 4.75 and 1.07 percent higher, respectively, then the same period last fiscal year. State Transit Assistance fund receipts for the first quarter have not yet been submitted by the SBOE; therefore, STA revenues are negative due to the reversal of FY 2015/16 accrued revenues at the beginning of FY 2016/17. Staff will continue to monitor the trends in the sales tax receipts and report to the Commission any necessary adjustments. Federal, state, and local revenues are on a reimbursement basis. The Commission will receive these revenues as eligible project costs are incurred and invoiced to the respective agencies. The negative revenue amounts for federal, state, and local reimbursements reflect the reversal of FY 2015/16 accrued revenues at the beginning of FY 2016/17 in excess of amounts billed during the first quarter. Reimbursement invoices for expenditures for the first quarter will be prepared and submitted in the second quarter. 17 Agenda Item 6C During the FY 2016/17 budget process, the Commission took a conservative approach to estimate the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) revenues of $18.5 million passed through from the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG). The Commission received TUMF receipts through July 2016. The budgeted balance of $20,000 relates to TUMF zone reimbursements from WRCOG for the State Route 74/Interstate 215 Interchange project (74/215 Interchange project). Toll revenues budgeted at $3.8 million represent a half year of projected toll transactions for the RCTC 91 Express Lanes based on the Riverside County 91 Express Lanes Extension Investment Grade Traffic and Revenue Report and 2013 financing assumptions. The commencement of toll operations is scheduled for early 2017. Other revenues include $2.3 million of non-toll source of revenues not attributable directly to toll transactions and derived from the Commission’s share of 91 Express Lanes’ transaction-based fees and account-based fees, net of uncollectable tolls. The budgeted balance of $173,000 relates to property management revenues generated from various Commission-owned properties. The Commission took a conservative approach in estimating investment income for FY 2016/17, as a result of flat interest yields on investment balances. Investment income is higher in the first quarter primarily as a result of the investment of sales tax and toll revenue bond proceeds. The expenditure/expenses and other financing sources/uses categories are in line overall with the expectations of the budget with the following exceptions. • Professional services are higher in the first quarter due to the termination payment of $10.3 million to Deutsche Bank (DB). Due to Moody’s Investor Service lowering DB’s long-term rating to Baa2, the downgrade resulted in the occurrence of a termination event under the swap agreement. At its September 2016 meeting, the Commission approved the termination of the forward interest rate swap with DB in the outstanding notional amount of $63.9 million and a termination cost of $10.3 million, resulting in the refunding of the 2009 Series A Sales Tax Revenue Variable Rate Demand Bonds (2009 A Bonds); • Program operations are under budget due to unused budget authority for the 91 Project activities, motorist and commuter assistance program operations, and highway and rail program management; • Capital project expenditures are generally affected by lags in invoices submitted by contractors and consultants, as well as other issues encountered during certain phases of the projects. The negative expenditure amounts for construction and right of way/land reflect the reversal of FY 2015/16 accrued expenditures at the beginning of FY 2016/17, in excess of amounts paid during the first quarter. The status of significant capital projects with budget exceeding $5 million is discussed in the attachment; • Special studies unused budget authority relates to feasibility studies; 18 Agenda Item 6C • Local streets and roads are related to the timing of Measure A sales tax revenues as previously explained. These financial statements reflect expenditures made to the local jurisdictions related to collections through July 2016; • Regional arterial expenditures primarily represent expenditures for the highways and regional arterial program administered by the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG). CVAG requests reimbursements from the Commission based on available funds and sufficient budget authority; • Debt service principal payments are made annually on June 1, while interest payments are made semiannually on December 1 and June 1, except for the 2009 Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (variable rate) as those interest payments are monthly; • Cost of issuance and payment to escrow agent relate to the 2016 Series A Sales Tax Revenue Refunding Bonds (2016 Refunding Bonds) resulting from the termination of DB interest rate swap and refunding of the2009 A Bonds. The financial closing of the issuance of the 2016 Refunding Bonds and payment of the cost of issuance and payment to escrow agent were made in October 2016, and will be reflected in the second quarter financial statements; • Capital outlay expenditures are under budget due to unused budget authority for station security improvements, toll operations equipment, and Commission network, hardware, and software improvements; • The Commission entered into a loan agreement with the U.S. Department of Transportation for a $421,054,409 Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan to pay eligible 91 Project costs. The loan is a toll revenue bond (TIFIA Bond) that is subordinate to the 2013 Toll Bonds. Proceeds of the TIFIA Bond may be drawn upon after certain conditions have been met. During the first quarter, the Commission drew down $35.4 million in TIFIA loan proceeds. During construction of the 91 Project and for a period of up to five years following substantial completion, interest is compounded and added to the initial TIFIA loan. TIFIA debt service payments are expected to commence on December 1, 2021, which is approximately five years after substantial completion of the 91 Project, through June 1, 2051; and • At its September 2016 meeting, the Commission approved the issuance of the 2016 Refunding Bonds to refund all of the outstanding 2009 A Bonds, retire all of the outstanding commercial paper notes which have been applied to finance a termination payment in connection with an interest rate swap agreement with DB, and pay cost of issuance. The 2016 Refunding Bonds were sold in October 2016, and the debt proceeds will be reflected in the second quarter financial statements. Approximately $40 million of commercial paper notes issuance was included in the FY 2016/17 budget and is expected to occur in subsequent quarters. Attachments: 1) Quarterly Project Status – September 2016 2) Quarterly Financial Statements – September 2016 19 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY PROJECT STATUS 1ST QUARTER FOR THREE MONTHS ENDED 9/30/2016 FY 2016/17 BUDGET 1ST QUARTER EXPENDITURES Project Description Project Status 91 Project (Design-Build) $ 196,476,400 $27,405,011 The Design-Build contract is 89 percent as of September 30, 2016. The Commission has acquired and delivered all 197 Caltrans Parcel Numbers to the Design-Builder. Construction has begun on all 32 bridges (21 bridges are complete) and 87 walls (of 93, 58 walls are complete), while 87 utility relocations (of 90) are complete. The under run of the FY 2016/17 budget at the first quarter is due to under runs in right of way, including anticipated goodwill and negotiated settlement costs later in the fiscal year ($21.2 million), the Design-Build contract ($33.4 million), the project and construction management (PCM) contract ($2.2 million), and the Caltrans Cooperative Agreement ($2.3 million). The project will connect with Orange County Transportation Authority’s tolled express lanes at the Orange County/Riverside County line and continue approximately eight miles to the Interstate (I)-15/State Route (SR)-91 interchange. The project involves widening pavement on the outside of the existing highway to reposition general purpose lanes and repurposing the existing High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes to accommodate two-tolled express lanes in the median in each direction. The SR-91 CIP also involves constructing one new general purpose lane in each direction from SR-71 to I-15, ultimately providing two-tolled express lanes and five general purpose lanes in each direction. SR-91 CIP development activities began in September 2007, construction work related to roadway and structures began in July 2014, and the toll lanes are expected to open in early 2017. The total acquisition and construction cost of the SR-91 CIP is estimated at $1.4 billion, including capitalized interest, debt service reserves, contingency, and cost of issuance. I-15 Express Lanes Project 32,832,300 2,278,655 Staff completed the project report and environmental document phase of work in May 2016. Staff is currently conducting two procurements for toll system and operations and design-build civil work. Procurement shortlists for both toll services and design-build were announced in FY 2015/16. The under run of the FY 2016/17 budget at the first quarter is due to under runs in the PCM contract ($1.4 million) and special legal services for completion of the Toll Systems Provider and Design-Build procurements ($1.2 million). The project will generally add two tolled express lanes in each direction from SR-60 to Cajalco Road in Corona. Project development activities began in April 2008, and lanes are expected to open to traffic in 2020. The 2016 CAPEX forecast estimates the total project cost at $486 million, which includes $46 million of contingency. ATTACHMENT 1 20 FY 2016/17 BUDGET 1ST QUARTER EXPENDITURES Project Description Project Status I-215 Corridor Improvements/Scott Road to Nuevo Road 5,863,728 264,051 Aesthetic work along the freeway has been completed and the project is substantially complete with only minor punch-list items remaining. Project accounting and change order close-out activities are ongoing. The project will add one mixed flow lane in each direction. Preliminary engineering began in 2007 and was completed in 2011. Final design began in 2011 and was completed in December 2012; construction began in 2013 and was completed in 2016. The estimated project cost is $120 million. Mid County Parkway 10,764,300 274,505 Staff completed the work on the Environmental Impact Report (EIR)/Environmental Impact Study (EIS). Major milestones have been met and the project’s Record of Decision was published in the Federal register in August 2015. In April 2015 the Commission approved the EIR. Staff is conducting the procurement for final design of the I-215 Placentia interchange. Staff has been working with the Federal Highway Administration on approval of the New Connection Report and approval of the Habitat Mitigation and Monitoring Plan with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Commission acquired some of the mitigation land needed for the project. Staff continues to work on identifying the remaining mitigation land needed. A recirculated project report and environmental document is under development for a new corridor from I-215 to SR-79. The environmental phase was completed in FY 2014/15. Construction of this new facility will be completed over many years as funding becomes available; the project cost is estimated at $1.3 to $1.6 billion. Pachappa Underpass Project 11,933,500 25,075 Design work is proceeding. An option to retain the shoofly and adjoining retaining walls is under consideration by Caltrans and Union Pacific Rail Road with interface coordination required with the BNSF Railway Company and city of Riverside. The project will remove the Pachappa shoofly activities and construct the retaining wall, drainage, and track work for the permanent Pachappa underpass; the project cost is estimated at $12 million. 21 FY 2016/17 BUDGET 1ST QUARTER EXPENDITURES Perris Valley Line and other rail projects 8,043,900 (9,251,829) The FTA awarded Small Starts Grant Agreement funds. ROW acquisition activities for the station and layover facility at south Perris have been completed. Following the settlement of a lawsuit challenging elements of the California Environmental Quality Act document in July 2013, the construction contract was given full notice to proceed in October 2013 following FTA approval of the Small Starts Grant Agreement. Active construction commenced in January 2014. Metrolink operations commenced in June 2016. Substantial completion was reached in September 2016. Final completion is expected in November 2016, while closeout activities will extend into 2017. The project extended commuter rail services to the city of Perris. The project commenced in December 2007 when the Commission received approval from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to move into project development. The estimated project cost is $248.3 million. Other rail projects included adding a fourth main track between the Riverside Downtown station to the connector to the San Jacinto Branch Line at Highgrove. This list discusses the significant capital projects (i.e., total budgeted costs in excess of $5 million) and related status. Capital project expenditures are generally affected by lags in invoices submitted by contractors and consultants, as well as issues encountered during certain phases of the projects. The capital projects budgets tend to be based on aggressive project schedules. 22 Revenues Sales tax 268,821,600$ 8,287,156$ (260,534,444)$ 3% Federal reimbursements 32,456,953 (4,625,524) (37,082,477)-14% State reimbursements 9,080,000 (697,367) (9,777,367)-8% Local reimbursements 10,496,100 (129,145) (10,625,245)-1% Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee 18,520,000 1,134,460 (17,385,540)6% Toll revenues 3,798,000 - (3,798,000)N/A Other revenues 2,518,000 99,133 (2,418,867)4% Investment income 1,849,000 608,934 (1,240,066)33% Total revenues 347,539,653 4,677,647 (342,862,006)1% Expenditures Salaries and benefits 9,505,100 2,254,464 7,250,636 24% Professional and support Professional services 22,488,900 11,581,485 10,907,415 51% Support costs 10,117,600 1,636,189 8,481,411 16% Total Professional and support costs 32,606,500 13,217,674 19,388,826 41% Projects and operations Program operations - general 20,555,700 1,287,656 19,268,044 6% Engineering 18,007,900 96,219 17,911,681 1% Construction 89,054,038 (4,353,296) 93,407,334 -5% Design Build 146,955,600 34,556,178 112,399,422 24% Right of way/land 85,058,313 (9,646,207) 94,704,520 -11% Operating and capital disbursements 145,539,447 35,457,656 110,081,791 24% Special studies 2,965,000 - 2,965,000 N/A Local streets and roads 51,358,000 3,242,438 48,115,562 6% Regional arterials 30,516,600 1,603,183 28,913,417 5% Total projects and operations 590,010,598 62,243,827 527,766,771 11% Debt service Principal 8,100,000 - 8,100,000 N/A Interest 56,615,800 1,293,701 55,322,099 2% Cost of issuance 245,000 - 245,000 N/A Payment to escrow agent 63,900,000 - 63,900,000 N/A Total debt service 128,860,800 1,293,701 127,567,099 1% Capital outlay 2,181,000 67,681 2,113,319 3% Total Expenditures 763,163,998 79,077,347 684,086,651 10% Excess revenues over (under) expenditures (415,624,345) (74,399,700) 702,243,332 18% Other financing sources/(uses) Operating transfer in 241,687,700 17,191,397 (224,496,303) 7% Operating transfer out (241,687,700) (17,191,397) 224,496,303 7% TIFIA loan proceeds 100,269,200 35,411,868 (64,857,332) 35% Debt proceeds 103,225,000 - (103,225,000) N/A Total financing sources/(uses)203,494,200 35,411,868 168,082,332 17% Net change in fund balances (212,130,145) (38,987,832) 870,325,664 18% Fund balance July 1, 2016 741,082,700 740,421,402 (661,298) 100% Fund balance September 30, 2016 528,952,555$ 701,433,570$ 869,664,366$ 133% QUARTERLY BUDGET TO ACTUAL RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANPORTATION COMMISSION 1ST QUARTER FOR THREE MONTHS ENDED 9/30/2016 FY 2016/17 BUDGET 1ST QUARTER ACTUAL PERCENT UTILIZATION REMAINING BALANCE ATTACHMENT 2 23 ENTERPRISE FUND TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT AGENCY FUND TOLL OPERATIONS Revenues Sales tax 325,000$ -$ 8,315,181$ 2,379,081$ 63,237$ 5,573,000$ (8,368,343)$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ 8,287,156$ Federal reimbursements - - (4,625,524) - - - - - - - - - - - - (4,625,524) State reimbursements (2,643) (31,435) (663,289) - - - - - - - - - - - - (697,367) Local reimbursements (74,528) (67,257) 12,640 - - - - - - - - - - - - (129,145) Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee - - - - - - - 1,134,460 - - - - - - - 1,134,460 Other revenues 5,914 - 93,219 - - - - - - - - - - - - 99,133 Investment income - - 10,081 1,662 - - 3,323 3,323 - - - 397,836 141,512 44,705 6,492 608,934 Total revenues 253,743 (98,692) 3,142,308 2,380,743 63,237 5,573,000 (8,365,020) 1,137,783 - - - 397,836 141,512 44,705 6,492 4,677,647 Expenditures Salaries and benefits 1,403,445 28,257 740,454 - - - - 63,682 10,347 8,279 - - - - - 2,254,464 Professional and support Professional services (180,921) 19,976 1,469,839 1,371 - - 2,743 16,700 (40,223) - - 10,292,000 - - - 11,581,485 Support costs 1,476,771 43,312 116,023 - - - - - 83 - - - - - - 1,636,189 Total Professional and support costs 1,295,850 63,288 1,585,862 1,371 - - 2,743 16,700 (40,140) - - 10,292,000 - - - 13,217,674 Projects and operations Program operations - general 397,277 393,963 476,241 - - - - 17,280 - 2,895 - - - - - 1,287,656 Engineering - - 65,248 - - - - 30,971 - - - - - - - 96,219 Construction (74,625) - (4,923,193) - - - - 644,522 - - - - - - - (4,353,296) Design Build - - 34,556,178 - - - - - - - - - - - - 34,556,178 Right of way/land - - (9,962,758) - - - - 316,551 - - - - - - - (9,646,207) Operating and capital disbursements 9,002,974 - 1,221,412 1,458,924 - 23,753,111 21,235 - - - - - - - - 35,457,656 Local streets and roads - - 2,346,523 832,678 63,237 - - - - - - - - - - 3,242,438 Regional arterials - - - 1,603,183 - - - - - - - - - - - 1,603,183 Total projects and operations 9,325,626 393,963 23,779,651 3,894,785 63,237 23,753,111 21,235 1,009,324 - 2,895 - - - - - 62,243,827 Debt service Interest - - - - - - - - - - - 25,143 - - 1,268,558 1,293,701 Total debt service - - - - - - - - - - - 25,143 - - 1,268,558 1,293,701 Capital outlay 35,647 - 32,034 - - - - - - - - - - - - 67,681 Total Expenditures 12,060,568 485,508 26,138,001 3,896,156 63,237 23,753,111 23,978 1,089,706 (29,793) 11,174 - 10,317,143 - - 1,268,558 79,077,347 Excess revenues over (under) expenditures (11,806,825) (584,200) (22,995,693) (1,515,413) - (18,180,111) (8,388,998) 48,077 29,793 (11,174) - (9,919,307) 141,512 44,705 (1,262,066) (74,399,700) Other financing sources/(uses) Operating transfer in 9,213,095 714,700 4,682,252 - - - - - - - - - - - 2,581,350 17,191,397 Operating transfer out - (714,700) (2,635,342) - - (9,213,095) - - - - - (4,602,846) - (25,414) - (17,191,397) TIFIA loan proceeds - - 35,411,868 - - - - - - - - - - - - 35,411,868 Total financing sources/(uses)9,213,095 - 37,458,778 - - (9,213,095) - - - - - (4,602,846) - (25,414) 2,581,350 35,411,868 Net change in fund balances (2,593,730) (584,200) 14,463,085 (1,515,413) - (27,393,206) (8,388,998) 48,077 29,793 (11,174) - (14,522,153) 141,512 19,291 1,319,284 (38,987,832) Fund balance July 1, 2016 10,792,190 8,722,808 201,722,613 42,644,404 556 116,816,853 71,569,302 70,616,683 3,509,978 410,879 - 42,033,114 72,278,136 20,987,831 78,316,055 740,421,402 Fund balance September 30, 2016 8,198,460$ 8,138,608$ 216,185,698$ 41,128,991$ 556$ 89,423,647$ 63,180,304$ 70,664,760$ 3,539,771$ 399,705$ -$ 27,510,961$ 72,419,648$ 21,007,122$ 79,635,339$ 701,433,570$ CAPITAL PROJECTS FUNDS GENERAL FUND FSP/ SAFE WESTERN COUNTY PALO VERDE VALLEY COACHELLA VALLEY LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND MEASURE A SALES TAX SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION QUARTERLY BUDGET TO ACTUAL BY FUND 1ST QUARTER FOR THREE MONTHS ENDED 9/30/2016 SALES TAX BONDS DEBT SERVICE COMBINED TOTALCOMMERCIAL PAPER STATE TRANSIT ASSISTANCE TRANSPORTATION UNIFORM MITIGATION FEE (TUMF) TOLL REVENUE BONDS COACHELLA VALLEY RAIL 24 AGENDA ITEM 6D Agenda Item 6D RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: December 14, 2016 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Sales Tax Analysis STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the sales tax analysis for Quarter 2, 2016 (2Q 2016). BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its December 2007 meeting, the Commission awarded an agreement with MuniServices, LLC (MuniServices) for quarterly sales tax reporting services plus additional fees contingent on additional sales tax revenue generated from the transactions and use tax (sales tax) audit services. As part of the recurring contracts process, the Commission approved a five-year extension through June 30, 2018. The services performed under this agreement pertain to only the Measure A sales tax revenues. Since the commencement of these services, MuniServices submitted an audit, which reported findings generated and submitted to the State Board of Equalization (SBOE) for review and determination of errors in sales tax reporting related to 568 businesses. Through 1Q 2016, the SBOE approved corrections for 403 of these accounts for a total sales tax recovery of $6,712,416. Updated amounts for 2Q 2016 will be provided once received from MuniServices. If the SBOE concurs with the error(s) for the remaining claims, the Commission will receive additional revenues; however, the magnitude of the value of the remaining findings was not available. It is important to note that while the recoveries of additional revenues will be tangible, it will not be sufficient to alter the overall trend of sales tax revenues. Additionally, MuniServices provided the Commission with the quarterly sales tax summary report for 2Q 2016. Most of the 2Q 2016 Measure A sales tax revenues were received in the third quarter of calendar year 2016, during July through September 2016, due to a lag in the sales tax calendar. The summary section of 2Q 2016 report is attached and includes an overview of California’s economic outlook, local results, historical cash collections analysis by quarter, top 25 sales/use tax contributors, historical sales tax amounts, annual sales tax by business category, five-year economic trend for significant business category (business to business), and final results. 25 Agenda Item 6D Taxable transactions for the top 25 tax contributors in Riverside County generated 20.8 percent of taxable sales for the benchmark year ended 2Q 2016, slightly higher than the 20.4 percent for the benchmark year ended 2Q 2015. The top 100 tax contributors generated 33.1 percent of taxable sales for the benchmark year ended 2Q 2016, compared to 33 percent for the benchmark year ended 2Q 2015. In the Economic Category Analysis below, four of the six categories (general retail, food products, business to business, and miscellaneous) experienced new highs in the 2Q 2016 benchmark year compared to the prior eight benchmark years. Transportation was slightly below the 2Q 2015 benchmark year due to continued lower fuel prices and construction is higher than the 2Q 2015 benchmark year, but slightly lower than the high in the 2Q 2008 benchmark year. An analysis of sales tax performers by quarter through 2Q 2016 is attached, and illustrates fairly consistent cycles for sales tax performance for most of the economic categories since the economic recession in 2009. For 7 of the top 10 segments (auto sales-new, restaurants, department stores, miscellaneous retail, building materials-wholesale, apparel stores, and building materials-retail) during the past eight benchmark year quarters, sales tax receipts reached a new high point. The 7 segments represent 56.9 percent of total sales tax receipts. Light industry, one of the top 10 segments representing 4.9 percent of the total sales tax receipts for benchmark year 2Q 2016, was lower than the 1Q 2016 benchmark year due to completion of renewable energy developments in Riverside County. Food markets remained relatively unchanged representing 5.2 percent of the total sales tax receipts, and service stations reached a new low point in 2Q 2016. These top 10 segments represent 74.7 percent of the total sales tax receipts. For the other 19 segments representing 25.3 percent of the total sales tax receipts, 13 segments representing 19.7 percent of the total sales tax receipts reached new high points in the benchmark year 2Q 2016. In the Economic Segment Analysis below, auto sales-new, restaurants, and department stores represent the three largest segments for Riverside County, or 33.2 percent of total sales tax receipts. This is the fifteenth consecutive quarter since 3Q 2008, that department stores and auto sales-new have been in the top three economic segments. Growth seen in previous quarters % of Total / % Change RCTC State Wide Riverside County San Bernardino County Inland Empire South Coast S.F. Bay Area Sacramento Valley Central Valley North Coast Central Coast General Retail 28.7 / 2.8 28.3 / 2.6 28.7 / 3.9 25.1 / 8.0 26.8 / 5.9 29.2 / 2.2 26.7 / 1.1 27.9 / 4.2 30.8 / 3.3 28.5 / 4.5 31.5 / 0.9 Food Products 17.6 / 5.7 20.6 / 5.0 19.7 / 5.1 14.7 / 6.0 17.1 / 5.5 21.8 / 5.1 22.0 / 5.2 16.9 / 3.6 16.6 / 3.9 18.4 / 3.0 30.8 / 2.0 Transportation 25.4 / 0.0 23.7 / -0.2 26.7 / -0.1 27.3 / 2.2 27.0 / 1.1 23.3 / -0.5 20.5 / -1.3 28.0 / 2.9 26.2 / -0.7 30.0 / 0.1 21.0 / -0.7 Construction 10.8 / 4.3 9.7 / 7.5 13.0 / 1.2 11.8 / 48.1 12.4 / 20.2 8.4 / 5.8 9.5 / 4.1 11.4 / 7.1 12.2 / 5.4 13.5 / 7.7 9.5 / 5.1 Business to Business 15.3 / 0.1 16.5 / -0.1 10.8 / 3.4 19.6 / -0.6 15.4 / 0.7 16.1 / -2.1 20.1 / 4.0 14.2 / 5.1 12.7 / -8.0 8.6 / -3.7 6.2 / 5.8 Miscellaneous 2.2 / 7.8 1.3 / 8.6 1.1 / 12.1 1.5 / 34.1 1.3 / 24.5 1.2 / 10.4 1.3 / 1.6 1.7 / 3.1 1.5 / 5.3 1.0 / 7.8 1.0 / -12.0 Total 100.0 / 2.4 100.0 / 2.5 100.0 / 2.7 100.0 / 8.0 100.0 / 5.4 100.0 / 1.8 100.0 / 2.3 100.0 / 4.2 100.0 / 1.0 100.0 / 2.6 100.0 / 1.4 General Retail: Apparel Stores, Department Stores, Furniture/Appliances, Drug Stores, Recreation Products, Florist/Nursery, and Misc. Retail Food Products: Restaurants, Food Markets, Liquor Stores, and Food Processing Equipment Construction: Building Materials Retail and Building Materials Wholesale Transportation: Auto Parts/Repair, Auto Sales - New, Auto Sales - Used, Service Stations, and Misc. Vehicle Sales Business to Business: Office Equip., Electronic Equip., Business Services, Energy Sales, Chemical Products, Heavy Industry, Light Industry, and Leasing Miscellaneous: Health & Government, Miscellaneous Other, and Closed Account Adjustments ECONOMIC CATEGORY ANALYSIS 26 Agenda Item 6D for the service stations segment has been declining continuously from the high in the last five years due to lower fuel prices, and this segment reached a new low point in 2Q 2016. Restaurants replaced service stations in the top three economic segments beginning in 4Q 2014 and resulted from continued steady growth in restaurant prices with no decline in restaurant use. During the review of the 2Q 2016 detailed report with MuniServices, information regarding sales tax comparison by city and change in economic segments (two highest gains and two highest losses) from 2Q 2016 to 2Q 2015 was provided. Staff continues to monitor monthly sales tax receipts and other available economic data to determine the need for any adjustment to the revenue projections. Staff will utilize the forecast scenarios included with the complete report and receipt trends in assessing such projections. Attachments: 1) Sales Tax Digest Summary 2Q 2016 2) Sales Tax Performance Analysis by Quarter 3) Quarterly Sales Tax Change Comparison by City for 2Q 2016 to 2Q 2015 RCTC State Wide Riverside County San Bernardino County Inland Empire South Coast S.F. Bay Area Sacramento Valley Central Valley North Coast Central Coast Largest Segment Auto Sales - New Restaurants Restaurants Department Stores Restaurants Service Stations Restaurants Restaurants Department Stores Auto Sales - New Restaurants % of Total / % Change 11.7 / 6.2 14.6 / 6.1 12.6 / 6.1 10.2 / 4.6 11.1 / 6.3 26.0 / -1.6 15.7 / 6.0 16.0 / 6.2 13.6 / 1.9 11.7 / 13.8 22.3 / 1.5 2nd Largest Segment Restaurants Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Restaurants Auto Sales - New Restaurants Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Auto Sales - New Department Stores Misc. Retail % of Total / % Change 11.2 / 6.1 11.1 / 5.7 12.4 / 6.7 9.8 / 6.4 10.9 / 7.9 13.3 / 6.0 10.7 / 4.9 11.3 / 4.9 10.8 / 6.6 11.0 / 1.3 10.8 / 8.2 3rd Largest Segment Department Stores Department Stores Department Stores Auto Sales - New Department Stores Food Markets Department Stores Department Stores Restaurants Restaurants Auto Sales - New % of Total / % Change 10.3 / 2.6 9.5 / 0.5 10.6 / 0.0 9.6 / 9.3 10.4 / 2.3 8.6 / 1.7 7.8 / -1.8 9.2 / 0.4 10.8 / 6.2 10.6 / 4.3 8.7 / 12.0 ECONOMIC SEGMENT ANALYSIS 27 Riverside County Transportation Commission Sales Tax Digest Summary Collections through September 2016 Sales through June 2016 (2016Q2)  www.MuniServices.com (800) 800‐8181 Page 1 CALIFORNIA’S ECONOMIC OUTLOOK  California sales tax receipts increased by 1.2% over the same quarter from the previous year, with  Northern California reporting a 3.8% increase compared to ‐0.8% for Southern California. Receipts for  the RCTC changed by 1.4% over the same periods.    According YCharts data, U.S. retail sales increased 1.6% from $1.184T in 2016Q1 to $1.202T in  2016Q2. Previously 2016Q1 had decreased 0.3% from $1.187T in 2015Q4. (YCharts)    Retail sales should grow by 4% during the upcoming holiday season, up from a 2.5% increase last  year.  A similar increase is anticipated for the 2017 holiday season. Online sales have grown 14.1%  compared to last year. (Kiplinger)   Gas prices in California fluctuated weekly throughout 2016Q2; however, monthly price figures show  a steady upsurge lasting from March through June. Since then, a continual decrease in pricing has  occurred. (U.S. EIA)   During June both the U.S. and California's unemployment rate increased by 0.2% to 4.9% and 5.4%  respectively, California's was the first increase since September 2010. Labor force grew for both as  well, increasing by 1% in California while its employment increased by just 0.04%. (CA DoF, CA EDD)    LOCAL RESULTS  Net Cash Receipts Analysis  Local Collections $42,968,731  Share of County Pool 0.0% 0  Share of State Pool 0.0% 0  SBE Net Collections 42,968,731  Less: Amount Due County 0.0% .00  Less: Cost of Administration (501,550)  Net 2Q2016 Receipts 42,467,181  Net 2Q2015 Receipts 41,879,899  Actual Percentage Change 1.4%     Business Activity Performance Analysis  Local Collections $42,968,731  Less: Payments for Prior Periods (2,148,487)  Preliminary 2Q2016 Collections 40,820,245  Projected 2Q2016 Late Payments 1,413,535  Projected 2Q2016 Final Results 42,233,780   Actual 2Q2015 Results 41,460,403  Projected Percentage Change 1.9%    ATTACHMENT 1 28 Riverside County Transportation Commission www.MuniServices.com (800) 800‐8181 Page 2 HISTORICAL CASH COLLECTIONS ANALYSIS BY QUARTER                                      TOP 25 SALES/USE TAX CONTRIBUTORS  The following list identifies RCTC’s Top 25 Sales/Use Tax contributors. The list is in alphabetical order  and represents sales from July 2015 to June 2016. The Top 25 Sales/Use Tax contributors generate  20.8% of RCTC’s total sales and use tax revenue.  7‐ELEVEN FOOD STORES HOME DEPOT  ALBERTSON'S FOOD CENTERS JOHNSON MACHINERY COMPANY  AMAZON.COM KOHL'S DEPARTMENT STORES  AUTOZONE LOWE'S HOME CENTERS  BEST BUY STORES MACY'S DEPARTMENT STORE  CARMAX THE AUTO SUPERSTORE SAM'S CLUB  CIRCLE K FOOD STORES STATER BROS MARKETS  CONSOLIDATED ELECTRICAL DSTRS. TARGET STORES  COSTCO WHOLESALE VERIZON WIRELESS  CVS PHARMACY WAL MART STORES  DD’S DISCOUNTS WALGREEN'S DRUG STORES  DEPT OF MOTOR VEHICLES WHIRLPOOL CORPORATION  FOOD 4 LESS   29 Riverside County Transportation Commission www.MuniServices.com (800) 800‐8181 Page 3 HISTORICAL SALES TAX AMOUNTS  The following chart shows the sales tax level from sales through June 2016, the highs, and the lows for  each segment over the last two years.  $0 $5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000 (in thousands of $)2Q2016 High Low   ANNUAL SALES TAX BY BUSINESS CATEGORY                                        30 Riverside County Transportation Commission www.MuniServices.com (800) 800‐8181 Page 4 FIVE‐YEAR ECONOMIC TREND: Business To Business                    FINAL RESULTS: January‐March 2016 Sales  Local Net Cash Collections $40,977,671 Less: Pool Amounts ($‐528,660) Less: Prior Quarter Payments ($2,012,309) Add: Late Payments $1,632,763 Local Net Economic Collections after Adjustments $41,126,785 Percent Change from January‐March 2015 Sales UP BY 2.8%   MUNISERVICES’ ON‐GOING AUDIT RESULTS  This Quarter $282,843 Total to Date $6,661,741   31 RCTC 1/2%: Sales Tax Performance Analysis by Quarter TOTALEconomicTOTAL2016Q2 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$42,233,417 1.9% $773,314 2.4% $3,930,494GENERAL RETAIL2016Q2 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$11,663,153 3.2% $367,032 2.8% $1,304,63627.6%FOOD PRODUCTS2016Q2 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$7,606,368 3.4% $249,358 5.7% $1,587,694% of Total: 18.0%TRANSPORTATION2016Q2 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$10,873,228-2.9% -$320,406 0.0% -$10,759% of Total: 25.7%CONSTRUCTION2016Q2 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$4,614,043 1.6% $71,377 4.3% $751,383% of Total: 10.9%BUSINESS TO BUSINESS2016Q2 QoQ %∆QoQ $∆YoY %∆YoY $∆$6,540,292 6.0% $368,050 0.1% $36,538% of Total: 15.5%Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2TOTALCATEGORYQoQ = 16Q2 / 15Q2YoY = YE 16Q2 / YE 15Q2% of 2016Q2 Total:$0$2,000,000$4,000,000$6,000,000$8,000,000$10,000,000$12,000,000$14,000,000$16,000,000$0$5,000,000$10,000,000$15,000,000$20,000,000$25,000,000$30,000,000$35,000,000$40,000,000$45,000,000$50,000,0002011Q22011Q32011Q42012Q12012Q22012Q32012Q42013Q12013Q22013Q32013Q42014Q12014Q22014Q32014Q42015Q12015Q22015Q32015Q42016Q12016Q2ATTACHMENT 232 INLAND EMPIRE: Quarterly Comparison of 2016Q2 and 2015Q2 ( April thru June Sales )General RetailFood ProductsTransportationConstructionB2BMisc.Apr ‐ Jun2016(2016Q2)Apr ‐ Jun2015(2015Q2)% Chg GainGainDeclineDeclineRIVERSIDE COUNTYBANNING0.0% 2.3%‐11.7%‐10.9% 5.9% 46.4%447,434475,490‐5.9%Misc. Vehicle Sales RestaurantsService Stations Auto Sales ‐ NewBEAUMONT3.0% 8.7%‐6.4%‐9.0% 40.9%‐36.1%1,029,272991,4353.8%Light IndustryRestaurantsService Stations Bldg.Matls‐WhsleBLYTHE‐4.2%‐0.7%‐15.0%‐4.8%‐6.0%‐43.7%372,307406,839‐8.5%Light IndustryBldg.Matls‐Retail Auto Sales ‐ New Energy SalesCORONA 2.0% 4.9%‐5.0% 4.2% 10.7%‐36.9%8,704,7448,481,6692.6%Bldg.Matls‐Whsle Electronic Equipment Service Stations Auto Parts/RepairLAKE ELSINORE1.6% 1.5% 1.9% 6.1% 4.5% 8.1%2,057,4762,009,8782.4%Auto Sales ‐ New RestaurantsService Stations Food MarketsHEMET4.8% 2.3%‐3.3% 1.2%‐5.5% 3.6%2,533,0202,543,104‐0.4%Department Stores RestaurantsService Stations Light IndustryINDIO2.9%‐3.0% 2.4%‐6.8% 5.7%‐45.2%2,476,2502,484,378‐0.3%Auto Sales ‐ New Department Stores Bldg.Matls‐Retail Service StationsPERRIS27.5% 5.8%‐20.5%‐5.4%‐6.0% 11.2%2,092,8442,167,778‐3.5%Department Stores RestaurantsService Stations Auto Sales ‐ NewSAN JACINTO3.1%‐5.6% 3.9% 24.3%‐31.7%‐34.3%609,340621,497‐2.0%Service Stations Florist/Nursery Food Markets Health & GovernmentRIVERSIDE1.1% 5.5%‐0.8%‐1.0% 14.8%‐8.8%13,932,07913,589,0732.5%Heavy IndustryRestaurantsService Stations Misc. Vehicle SalesCOACHELLA11.4% 0.0%‐0.5%‐19.4%‐18.0% 21.6%778,384788,967‐1.3%Apparel Stores Bldg.Matls‐Whsle Bldg.Matls‐Retail Heavy IndustryPALM SPRINGS‐0.1% 3.4%‐11.5% 1.8%‐7.8%‐6.4%2,583,3682,634,443‐1.9%Restaurants Food Markets Service Stations Energy SalesDESERT HOT SPRINGS9.7% 6.6%‐16.0% 19.7% 24.2%‐6.8%321,560330,110‐2.6%RestaurantsDrug StoresService Stations Liquor StoresNORCO5.0% 3.1%‐5.5% 25.0%‐6.5%‐45.9%1,380,4131,392,692‐0.9%Bldg.Matls‐Whsle Furniture/Appliance Service Stations LeasingINDIAN WELLS4.2% 9.2%‐100.0%‐79.7% 16.7% 7.4%227,516209,6278.5%RestaurantsFood Markets Apparel Stores Miscellaneous RetailRANCHO MIRAGE37.2%‐1.0% 1.3%‐1.4% 25.3% 39.3%1,155,1211,048,79410.1%Miscellaneous Retail Department Stores Food Markets Service StationsPALM DESERT‐0.9% 0.1% 11.6% 4.8% 12.1% 30.0%3,867,2993,813,4831.4%Auto Sales ‐ NewBldg.Matls‐Whsle Service Stations Department StoresCATHEDRAL CITY‐3.9% 2.9%‐8.7%‐8.7% 6.8% 6.4%1,956,9852,067,174‐5.3%RestaurantsLeasingAuto Sales ‐ New Service StationsLA QUINTA2.2% 8.2%‐14.7% 1.6%‐9.0%‐10.0%1,806,4221,798,8450.4%RestaurantsFurniture/Appliance Auto Sales ‐ New Service StationsMORENO VALLEY‐0.7% 5.3%‐8.8% 14.8%‐12.0%‐0.9%3,972,9434,017,184‐1.1%RestaurantsBldg.Matls‐Whsle Service Stations Miscellaneous RetailTEMECULA18.0% 3.5% 3.2% 5.3% 12.7% 4.3%8,196,5187,480,1869.6%Miscellaneous Retail Auto Sales ‐ New Service Stations Department StoresCANYON LAKE8.6% 7.2% 17.6% 13.4% 199.4% 68.0%54,16645,90718.0%Heavy IndustryService Stations Miscellaneous Retail Bldg.Matls‐WhsleCALIMESA 6.5%‐2.6%‐15.5%‐20.6%‐30.6% 76.6%154,954169,923‐8.8%Department Stores Misc. Vehicle Sales Service Stations Light IndustryMURRIETA7.4% 2.9%‐4.1% 1.7%‐3.5% 17.1%3,334,2063,274,7001.8%Department Stores RestaurantsService Stations Energy SalesWILDOMAR17.0% 10.5%‐13.7% 23.2% 18.9% 60.7%373,971367,0431.9%Misc. Vehicle Sales RestaurantsService Stations Business ServicesMENIFEE4.0% 2.6% 6.8% 18.1%‐9.3% 16.4%1,573,4491,497,6225.1%Auto Parts/Repair Bldg.Matls‐Whsle Service Stations Recreation ProductsEASTVALE3.2% 9.6%‐18.0% 9.3% 11.0%‐25.5%1,717,8891,622,3545.9%Business Services Bldg.Matls‐Whsle Electronic Equipment Service StationsJURUPA VALLEY26.8% 2.1%‐13.5%‐3.7%‐5.5% 14.7%2,173,9042,185,777‐0.5%Furniture/Appliance Office Equipment Service Stations LeasingRIVERSIDE COUNTY‐2.0%‐0.7%‐12.6%‐8.3% 13.8% 19.1%6,125,0976,331,408‐3.3%Heavy IndustryBusiness Services Service Stations Bldg.Matls‐WhsleATTACHMENT 3Non‐ConfidentialMuniServices33 AGENDA ITEM 6E Agenda Item 6E RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: December 14, 2016 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Megan Kavand, Accountant Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Investment Report STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended September 30, 2016. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: For many years and as a result of a low interest rate environment, the Commission’s quarterly investment reports reflected investments primarily concentrated in the Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund (RCPIF). Other investments included the state Local Agency Investment Fund and mutual funds. In connection with the issuance of sales tax revenue bonds and toll revenue bonds and the execution of Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) loan for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (91 Project), the Commission anticipated the need to engage an investment manager for the bond proceeds and other required funds. Additionally, the Commission desired to engage an investment manager to provide investment advisory and management services related to the Commission’s operating funds. Accordingly, at its May 2013 meeting, the Commission awarded two investment management services agreements to Logan Circle Partners, L.P. (Logan) for 91 Project funds and to Payden & Rygel Investment Management (Payden & Rygel) for Commission operating funds. Logan invested the 91 Project debt proceeds during the first quarter of FY 2013/14 in the Short-Term Actively Managed Program (STAMP). Payden & Rygel was authorized to make specific investments for the Commission’s operating funds beginning with the third quarter of FY 2014/15. Since June 2015, the Commission funded its annual 91 Project equity contributions approximating $67.8 million; the funds were invested by Logan in a separate STAMP account. The quarterly investment report for the first quarter of FY 2016/17 as required by state law and Commission policy reflects the increased investment activities resulting from the 91 Project and available operating cash. The quarterly investment report includes the following information: 34 Agenda Item 6E • Investment Portfolio Report; • STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category; • STAMP Portfolio by Account; • STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account; • STAMP Portfolio Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Equity Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type and market sector; • Logan Circle Partners, L.P. Short Duration Third Quarter 2016 Review; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Third Quarter 2016 Review; and • County of Riverside Investment Report for the Quarter Ended September 30, 2016. The Commission’s investments were in full compliance with the Commission’s investment policy adopted on April 13, 2016, and investments securities permitted under the indenture for the Commission’s sales tax revenue bonds and the master indenture for the Commission’s toll revenue bonds. Additionally, the Commission has adequate cash flows for the next six months. Attachments: 1) Investment Portfolio Report 2) STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category 3) STAMP Portfolio by Account 4) STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account 5) STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments 6) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund Summary of Investments 7) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of Investments 8) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of Investments 9) STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments 10) STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments 11) STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Equity Fund Summary of Investments 12) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category 35 Agenda Item 6E 13) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report 14) Logan Circle Partners, L.P. Short Duration Quarterly Review 15) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Quarterly Review 16) County of Riverside Investment Report 36 Riverside County Transportation CommissionInvestment Portfolio ReportPeriod Ended: September 30, 2016FAIR VALUERATINGMOODYS/FITCH/S&PCOUPON RATEPAR VALUEPURCHASE DATEMATURITY DATEYIELD TO MATURITYPURCHASE COSTMARKET VALUEUNREALIZED GAIN (LOSS)OPERATING FUNDSCity National Bank Deposits30,419,575 A3/BBB+N/AN/ACounty Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund355,811,624 Aaa-bf/AAA/V1N/A0.72%Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF)3,654,166 Not RatedN/AN/A Subtotal Operating Funds389,885,366 FUNDS HELD IN TRUSTCounty Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund: Local Transportation Fund89,274,928 Aaa-bf/AAA/V1N/A0.72% Subtotal Funds Held in Trust89,274,928 COMMISSION MANAGED PORTFOLIOUS Bank Payden & Rygel Operating50,677,025 First American Government Obligation Fund8,340,500 Aaa-mf/-/AAAmN/AN/A Subtotal Commission Managed Portfolio59,017,525 STAMP PORTFOLIO for 91 CIP Toll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund21,006,182 Toll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund57 Series A & Series B Reserve Fund19,513,333 Toll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund11,657,868 Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund36,629,545 Sales Tax Revenue Equity Fund68,466,592 Subtotal STAMP Portfolio157,273,577 TOTAL All Cash and Investments695,451,396$ See attached report for detailsSee attached report for detailsSee attached report for detailsSee attached report for detailsSee attached report for detailsSee attached report for detailsSee attached report for details2.81%3.02%6.94%9.84%8.49%12.84%56.06% $‐ $50,000,000 $100,000,000 $150,000,000 $200,000,000 $250,000,000 $300,000,000 $350,000,000 $400,000,000 $450,000,000STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP ReserveSTAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Project FundSTAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP CapitalizedInterestSTAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP EquityCommission Managed PortfolioTrust FundsOperating FundsNature of Investments1.20% Mutual Funds68.37% County Pool/Cash0.53% LAIF27.59% Fixed Income2.21% Money Market Funds0.10% CashATTACHMENT 137 Source AccountAccountIdentifierSecurity Type CategoryIssuerFinal Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original CostNext Call Date Base Market ValueBase Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon YieldSummarized Credit Rating256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13135G0D75 Agency Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/22/2020 05/06/2015 600,000.00 593,490.00 ---609,180.00 13,968.48 1.500 1.080AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23133EECD0 AgencyFederal Farm Credit Banks Consolidated Systemwide Bonds06/20/2017 06/15/2015500,000.00 500,308.15 ---500,370.00 260.16 0.562 0.459AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137EADR7 AgencyFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation05/01/2020 05/15/2015475,000.00 471,527.75 ---480,153.75 7,691.63 1.375 1.066AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137EACA5 AgencyFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation03/27/2019 07/05/2013770,000.00 843,053.75 ---823,037.60 20,222.08 3.750 0.946AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137EADB2 AgencyFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation01/13/2022---750,000.00 737,385.50 ---789,780.00 45,801.36 2.375 1.332AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3130A3CE2 AgencyFHLBanks Office of Finance10/14/2016 09/30/2016275,000.00 275,027.50 ---275,027.50 1.96 0.625 0.367AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3130A7P82 AgencyFHLBanks Office of Finance10/05/2016 07/25/2016700,000.00 700,134.40 ---700,014.00 6.43 0.490 0.345AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136G3JZ9 AgencyFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 04/26/2019 05/31/2016200,000.00 200,960.00 42,669.00 200,174.00 3.79 2.000 0.788AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3137EADS5 AgencyFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation10/14/2016 08/30/2016320,000.00 320,188.80 ---320,054.40 (1.38) 0.875 0.436AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392HWL3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2018 07/12/201314,959.52 15,791.65 ---15,292.52 109.63 5.000 -0.517AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AJMF8 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation10/25/2021 08/05/201530,000.00 31,038.28 ---31,839.00 999.96 2.968 1.613AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392F6C6 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 12/25/2017 07/09/201387,987.18 93,335.15 ---89,503.20 202.64 5.000 -0.206AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377JZ89 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities10/20/2039 07/05/2013108,446.70 111,763.64 ---112,727.09 1,645.04 3.500 1.866AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31393EXC8 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/25/2018 07/24/2013147,157.07 155,572.62 ---150,541.68 425.57 4.500 0.155AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest31393EXC8 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/25/2018 07/24/201316,350.79 17,285.85 ---16,726.85 47.29 4.5000.155AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AH6Q6 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation08/25/2018 06/24/2016470,539.54 482,229.51 ---479,291.58 (1,406.37) 2.412 1.230AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131392JJ83 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 03/25/2018 07/08/201311,262.39 11,881.83 ---11,488.99 58.92 5.000 -0.007AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138376GB33 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities10/16/2044 01/23/2015322,865.12 331,409.83 ---327,485.32 (3,055.25) 3.500 2.211AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A2AZ4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation05/25/2020 07/01/2015330,674.99 340,646.91 ---335,046.52 (1,017.31) 2.757 1.420AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AUPE3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation06/25/2022 07/03/2013235,000.00 220,358.40 ---244,310.70 19,219.74 2.396 1.632AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392BVM5 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2017 07/11/20132,217.46 2,340.81 ---2,223.54 (4.22) 5.500 0.248AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238378BR35 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association11/16/2042 07/10/2015335,606.67 328,055.52 ---328,679.75 499.81 1.333 1.858AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378CRT6 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities10/20/2040 05/22/201493,606.50 90,388.78 ---93,716.02 2,948.98 2.000 1.939AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A7L26 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 12/25/2017---357,697.17 359,327.98 ---358,713.03 (363.79) 1.513 1.781AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137A7E22 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation04/15/2028 07/08/2013120,434.46 124,687.30 ---122,673.34 624.39 3.500 1.102AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231397SRT3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 10/25/2039 08/09/2016251,864.18 261,309.09 ---258,664.51 (2,532.54) 4.000 1.767AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138376T5Z1 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities01/16/2039 01/26/2015134,607.82 140,631.52 ---139,796.95 (115.33) 3.000 1.794AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377RSZ9 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities06/16/2039 01/21/201543,196.63 45,780.18 ---44,833.79 (603.09) 4.500 2.035AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A8G38 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/25/2017---170,404.29 170,931.45 ---170,383.84 (140.48) 1.246 1.647AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A85H7 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation12/15/2039 07/13/2015124,356.52 129,641.67 ---129,664.06 523.79 3.500 1.487AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A1LC5 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation08/15/2020 08/31/201570,717.35 71,844.41 ---71,453.52 (71.63) 2.000 0.983AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest3136A4M89 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 01/25/2019 07/05/2013155,781.24 156,773.13 ---157,191.06 1,106.20 1.934 1.479AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378BX20 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association06/16/2051 03/17/201563,299.96 61,891.99 ---61,590.86 (262.07) 1.240 1.845AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B7E3 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association05/16/2046---289,523.83 279,540.13 ---280,502.27 705.04 1.744 2.054AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AQT24 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation01/25/2019---339,419.85 346,570.13 ---345,169.62 (288.52) 2.130 1.291AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23133XY2H7 Agency CMO FHLBanks Office of Finance04/20/2017 07/13/2015235,653.80 242,060.64 ---238,245.99 216.79 2.900 0.916AA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377RVK8 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities04/20/2039---154,968.71 159,339.31 ---160,831.18 2,581.51 3.000 1.593AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AEV77 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation05/25/2018---364.82 364.82 ---372.46 - 0.000 2.640NA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137ASNH3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation09/25/2021 07/03/2013301,952.62 295,076.12 ---302,052.26 4,258.68 1.459 1.407AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A72D3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 04/25/2022 07/03/2013395,000.00 375,250.00 ---411,293.75 29,560.46 2.482 1.682AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest3137ASNH3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation09/25/2021 08/15/2013301,952.62 294,026.36 ---302,052.26 4,966.29 1.459 1.407AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392FPP6 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 11/25/2017 07/15/201352,332.06 55,422.92 ---53,170.42 111.70 5.000-0.209AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3136A8G38 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/25/2017 07/08/2013 1,687,552.23 1,662,634.47 ---1,687,349.72 6,246.98 1.246 1.647AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest3136A8G38 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/25/2017 07/08/2013511,212.89 503,664.51 ---511,151.54 1,892.41 1.246 1.647AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231394GH22 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation07/15/2018 07/20/201569,012.01 71,535.27 ---70,481.28 410.84 4.500 1.165AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AQVV7 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation10/25/2018 06/06/2016149,356.59 149,963.35 ---149,813.62 (45.13) 1.560 1.164AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137ANLP8 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation11/25/2016---8,036.69 8,102.44 ---8,029.78 (8.46) 1.655 1.308AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B7F0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association12/16/2042---450,000.00 427,324.22 ---438,538.50 10,325.16 2.273 2.084AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AQT24 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation01/25/2019 10/21/2013169,709.93 170,903.20 ---172,584.81 2,486.17 2.130 1.291AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138376WA62 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities10/20/2039 01/21/2015101,402.83 106,461.71 ---107,172.65 366.69 4.000 1.747AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378TAF7 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities07/20/2041 07/05/2013200,851.53 200,881.81 ---206,903.19 6,174.89 2.500 1.604AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest31393V2T7 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation06/15/2018 07/08/201382,933.25 87,714.87 ---84,793.44 440.77 4.500 -0.202AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31393V2T7 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation06/15/2018 07/08/2013273,053.27 288,796.50 ---279,177.86 1,451.22 4.500 -0.202AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AH6B9 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation10/25/2020---177,872.64 181,511.06 ---180,165.42 (364.32) 2.257 1.267AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A2HB2 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 03/25/2040 08/17/2016544,335.28 555,902.41 ---558,096.08 2,280.11 2.250 1.443AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377DPX8 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities11/20/203612/31/20131,081.89 1,134.17 ---1,081.68 (0.22) 2.500 0.485AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131395EZP5 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation08/15/2019 07/09/201354,435.89 57,591.47 ---55,823.46 156.32 4.500 0.820AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131394DVM9 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/25/2034 06/19/2014116,467.08 123,145.73 ---120,925.43 225.28 5.000 1.824AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KXW4 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities02/16/2037 12/11/2014190,227.43 189,306.02 ---188,616.21 (748.17) 1.705 1.859AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236225FGM5 Agency MBS Ginnie Mae II08/20/2041 08/06/201595,155.15 98,485.59 ---98,240.08 (103.02) 1.875 1.201AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23138ELY64 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 02/01/2023 07/07/2016218,565.10 240,353.31 ---238,878.54 (1,273.36) 6.000 1.142AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131413XVG5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/01/2019 08/04/2014200,000.00 218,500.00 ---206,626.00 (2,099.41) 4.506 3.147AAASTAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended September 30, 2016Page 2 of 33ATTACHMENT 238 Source AccountAccountIdentifierSecurity Type CategoryIssuerFinal Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original CostNext Call Date Base Market ValueBase Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon YieldSummarized Credit RatingSTAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended September 30, 2016256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138379KDN5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/16/2055 08/05/2015 187,374.45 182,587.62 --- 187,781.06 4,879.76 2.101 1.896 AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A4M48 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 01/25/2022 07/05/2013 317,013.88 317,905.48 --- 322,016.36 4,686.13 2.098 1.601 AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238378NNA7 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities 05/16/2038 06/26/2015 517,768.12 521,307.55 --- 520,724.57 (355.55) 2.250 1.849 AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131381PEB0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 11/01/2020 09/26/2014 261,405.92 275,252.26 --- 280,540.83 11,283.13 3.370 1.402 AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KRS0 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities 07/16/2043 05/08/2015 450,000.00 434,460.94 --- 455,026.50 19,923.86 2.389 2.174 AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136AEYG6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/25/2018 07/02/2015 208,425.09 211,030.41 --- 210,027.88 169.87 1.825 1.589 AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KWU9 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities 11/16/2041 --- 82,246.90 80,315.51 --- 79,948.10 (447.31) 1.400 1.701 AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236225FLU1 Agency MBS Ginnie Mae II 02/20/2042 08/06/2015 202,502.87 209,400.62 --- 209,778.79 676.56 2.000 1.065 AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378XP62 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities 05/16/2055 05/14/2015 398,476.35 403,395.04 --- 409,701.43 6,564.68 2.500 1.931 AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23138EKUP8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 03/01/2025 09/21/2015 162,675.81 171,432.34 --- 168,083.15 (2,191.09) 5.000 2.123 AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137B1U75 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2023 08/29/2016 380,000.00 394,917.97 --- 394,728.80 23.76 2.522 1.783 AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131404WTT3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 05/01/2019 12/31/2013 47,128.93 52,536.62 --- 48,462.21 (1,200.86) 4.500 1.661 AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131417YKF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 01/01/2030 07/10/2013 117,078.44 123,517.75 --- 128,512.32 5,254.07 4.500 1.644AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131385XBG1 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 03/01/2018 09/13/20134,450.70 4,739.99 ---4,502.42 (10.63) 6.000 1.509AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131416YXJ2 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/01/2026 07/03/201349,603.35 51,936.26 ---52,483.32 1,183.56 3.500 1.328AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest31402RBG3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/01/2019---24,496.74 26,276.38 ---25,179.71 (130.68) 6.000 1.726AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402RBG3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 09/01/2019---83,775.33 89,852.76 ---86,110.98 (444.18) 6.000 1.726AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23138L1TX7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 11/01/2017 06/18/2015304,671.17 306,051.72 ---304,616.33 (525.91) 1.660 1.646AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest31385JLF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 08/01/2017 09/18/201337,452.00 39,980.01 ---37,887.19 (128.00) 6.000 1.509AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KSL4 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities12/16/2046---425,000.00 415,829.11 ---434,235.25 18,216.00 2.785 2.363AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13138EJPZ5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 07/01/2022 08/29/2016338,959.10 360,024.87 ---361,174.48 1,269.90 2.973 0.830AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231374CNE2 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 05/01/2019 07/22/2016293,534.18 301,033.07 ---301,626.92 852.33 5.000 0.666AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236225EUY6 Agency MBS Ginnie Mae II09/20/2039 09/17/201593,876.35 96,545.97 ---96,733.95 304.04 1.875 1.395AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131418AFW3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/01/2022 07/10/2013162,727.89 168,067.39 ---171,005.85 4,857.26 3.000 0.340AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13138L33G8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/01/2020 11/12/2015100,000.00 99,875.00 ---101,879.00 2,027.75 2.010 1.461AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131381Q6B7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/01/2021 07/15/2016191,008.94 211,840.86 ---212,281.61 1,367.19 4.295 1.662AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31410GSQ7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 12/01/2017 07/05/201337,179.97 39,921.99 ---37,695.66 (234.81) 6.000 2.122AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B6A2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association11/16/2052 01/22/2015133,767.04 129,550.24 ---131,792.64 2,253.18 1.826 2.050AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31294LPZ0 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation12/01/2016 07/05/20134,673.20 4,940.45 ---4,683.71 (5.29) 6.000 2.286AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A7MJ8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 04/25/2018---465.71 465.71 ---467.18 - 0.000 1.510NA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A7MN9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 05/25/2022 08/29/2016300,000.00 308,578.13 ---307,869.00 (582.59) 2.349 1.669AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36200AFG9 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association11/15/2017 07/09/201311,360.53 12,106.06 ---11,505.15 (75.91) 5.500 2.066AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128MBTH0 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation03/01/2019 07/26/201352,059.41 55,182.98 ---53,478.03 60.51 5.000 1.284AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36290WH47 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association09/15/2018 07/18/2013456,150.63 484,660.05 ---464,552.92 (4,209.80) 4.500 1.935AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128H4NR6 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation05/01/2018 07/16/201335,689.56 37,808.63 ---36,662.10 180.22 5.000 0.514AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402QT68 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 10/01/2019 07/11/2013107,829.70 116,489.77 ---111,916.45 (516.22) 6.000 1.568AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128PGLY7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation05/01/2017 07/17/201344,966.64 47,383.60 ---46,191.98 814.88 5.000 -5.166AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128GNR59 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation10/01/2016 07/05/20132,502.08 2,650.65 ---2,500.38 (1.70) 6.000 2.032AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13128MMAK9 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation09/01/2019 07/08/201388,667.45 94,264.58 ---91,722.04 28.45 5.000 1.860AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31401MWC1 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/01/2018 07/12/2013347,418.30 370,434.76 ---356,159.34 971.07 4.500 0.741AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128PHVS7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation11/01/2019 07/16/201325,005.91 26,349.98 ---25,687.32 200.13 5.000 -0.022AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3132FEAK7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation12/01/2017 07/03/201350,766.42 53,796.54 ---52,149.81 379.17 5.000 -0.722AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136AEYG6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae 06/25/2018 11/20/2013133,706.66 134,761.70 ---134,734.87 701.94 1.825 1.589AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A7JU5 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation11/25/2017 06/03/2016430,000.00 442,345.70 ---439,167.60 (4.76) 3.882 1.503AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255315FAB6 Asset Backed MMAF EQUIPMENT FINANCE LLC12/17/2018 05/03/2016275,000.00 274,996.84 ---275,500.50 502.57 1.390 1.137AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 247787UAD5 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 201506/17/2019---600,000.00 600,819.73 ---601,506.00 915.90 1.320 1.009AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571FK5 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust08/16/2021 12/10/2015150,000.00 148,359.38 ---151,317.00 2,611.75 1.580 1.272AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258768WAD1 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Receivables Trust 2013-111/15/2019 06/16/2015282,206.41 283,066.26 ---282,302.36 (174.86) 1.130 1.062AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 202582JGG9 Asset Backed American Express Credit Account Master Trust05/17/2021 02/26/2016300,000.00 300,468.75 ---300,939.00 487.21 0.944 0.800AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236159LBW5 Asset Backed GE Dealer Floorplan Master Not04/22/2019 05/03/2016300,000.00 300,656.25 ---300,744.00 366.05 1.282 0.856AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265478QAD0 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2016-A03/15/2019 05/17/2016155,000.00 154,992.99 ---155,331.70 337.51 1.490 1.361AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258769AAD8 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Lease Trust 2015-B07/16/2018---600,000.00 600,906.74 ---601,242.00 549.85 1.340 1.091AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 290290KAD7 Asset Backed USAA Auto Owner Trust 2014-105/15/2019 06/12/2015445,000.00 443,991.80 ---445,035.60 419.95 0.940 0.930AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 243814KAC5 Asset Backed Honda Auto Receivables 2015-1 Owner Trust10/15/2018 06/02/2016571,806.44 571,895.79 ---572,012.29 139.93 1.050 0.994AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571HB3 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust05/17/2021 06/07/2016500,000.00 500,878.91 ---502,145.00 1,307.04 0.934 0.779AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571GJ7 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust01/15/2019---500,000.00 500,726.56 ---500,300.00 43.09 1.150 0.950AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258772PAC2 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Receivables Trust 2015-106/15/2018 08/04/2015182,264.88 182,286.24 ---182,310.45 (50.12) 0.794 0.731AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571GQ1 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust11/15/2019 10/28/2015120,000.00 120,510.94 ---120,450.00 166.90 1.380 1.047AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236159LCR5 Asset Backed GE Dealer Floorplan Master Not01/20/2020 06/07/2016110,000.00 109,759.38 ---109,940.60 120.62 1.032 1.079AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2477877AD6 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2014-B11/15/2018---369,436.72 369,410.74 ---369,591.88 176.25 1.070 0.999AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 260689LAC9 Asset Backed MMAF EQUIPMENT FINANCE LLC12/11/2017 08/05/201538,861.85 38,880.07 ---38,863.79 (2.59) 1.030 0.992AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265474VAL5 Asset Backed Nissan Master Owner Trust Receivables06/15/2021 07/12/2016225,000.00 224,967.96 ---224,253.00 (708.75) 1.540 1.673AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255315GAC2 Asset Backed MMAF EQUIPMENT FINANCE LLC10/16/2019---282,000.00 281,080.94 ---282,239.70 735.04 1.390 1.311AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571BQ6 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust04/15/2019 04/27/2016300,000.00 299,730.47 ---300,150.00 381.53 0.574 0.451AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 202582JGS3 Asset Backed American Express Credit Account Master Trust01/15/2020 07/13/2015500,000.00 500,859.38 ---501,005.00 686.00 1.260 0.977AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 262888WAA4 CMONATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION GUARANTEED NOTES TRUST12/08/2020---496,148.90 498,115.02 ---497,007.24 (966.91) 1.079 0.975AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 262888YAA0 CMONCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2011-R101/08/2020 07/14/2015190,627.79 191,551.15 ---190,997.61 (303.77) 0.969 0.975AAAPage 3 of 3339 Source AccountAccountIdentifierSecurity Type CategoryIssuerFinal Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original CostNext Call Date Base Market ValueBase Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon YieldSummarized Credit RatingSTAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended September 30, 2016256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 22254EAMN0 CP Credit Suisse (USA), Inc. 12/22/2016 08/24/2016 1,100,000.00 1,096,327.53 --- 1,097,844.00 374.61 0.000 0.863 AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23454G0K56 CP Ford Motor Credit Company LLC 10/05/2016 08/30/2016 600,000.00 599,574.17 --- 599,982.00 30.67 0.000 0.270 AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien88513AKQ4 CP Thomson Reuters Corporation 10/24/2016 08/25/2016 1,000,000.00 998,443.06 --- 999,690.00 296.94 0.000 0.486 AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien83700EKQ0 CP South Carolina Electric & Gas Company 10/24/2016 09/26/2016 1,000,000.00 999,377.78 --- 999,690.00 201.11 0.000 0.486 AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest0255E2KC3 CP American Electric Power Company, Inc. 10/12/2016 08/22/2016 275,000.00 274,656.25 --- 274,964.25 39.88 0.000 0.426 AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien0255E2KC3 CP American Electric Power Company, Inc. 10/12/2016 08/22/2016 1,100,000.00 1,098,625.00 --- 1,099,857.00 159.50 0.000 0.426 AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien44890MK43 CP Hyundai Capital America 10/04/2016 08/25/2016 825,000.00 824,365.43 --- 824,991.75 40.56 0.000 0.120 AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien65475LKJ0 CP Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation 10/18/2016 08/22/2016 1,100,000.00 1,098,780.84 --- 1,099,758.00 121.61 0.000 0.466 AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien43357LKB7 CP Hitachi Capital America Corp. 10/11/2016 09/07/2016 1,100,000.00 1,099,096.16 --- 1,099,868.00 179.67 0.000 0.432 AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien3454G0KK3 CP Ford Motor Credit Company LLC 10/19/2016 08/22/2016 1,100,000.00 1,098,475.88 --- 1,099,736.00 209.00 0.000 0.481 AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien58507AKH5 CP Medtronic Global Holdings S.C.A. 10/17/2016 08/23/2016 1,100,000.00 1,098,773.19 --- 1,099,769.00 125.89 0.000 0.473 AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest43357LKR2 CP Hitachi Capital America Corp. 10/25/2016 09/30/2016 100,000.00 99,940.97 --- 99,967.00 23.67 0.000 0.496 AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 037833AJ9 Corporate Apple Inc. 05/03/2018 06/17/2015 3,000,000.00 2,960,430.00 --- 2,995,830.00 17,989.57 1.000 1.088 AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 200138CAA6 CorporateAIG GLOBAL FDG SR SECD MEDIUMTERM NTS BOOK ENTRY 144A 12/15/2017 --- 700,000.00 702,068.00 --- 702,870.00 1,436.96 1.650 1.306A256350022LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest38144LAB6 CorporateThe Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.09/01/2017 07/03/2013300,000.00 322,515.00 ---312,945.00 7,618.25 6.250 1.505A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2553794AA6 CorporateMUFG Americas Holdings Corporation02/09/2018---350,000.00 348,334.50 43,109.00 350,528.50 1,466.99 1.625 1.505A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2865622CB8 CorporateSumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation01/18/2019 01/13/2016250,000.00 250,000.00 ---251,262.50 1,262.50 1.628 1.577A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2166754AK7 CorporateCHEVRON PHILLIPS CHEM CO LLC / CHEVRON PHILLIPS CHEM CO LP05/01/2018---400,000.00 399,676.00 ---399,612.00 (224.87) 1.700 1.762A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294988J5E3 CorporateWells Fargo Bank, National Association05/24/2019 08/03/2016255,000.00 255,731.85 ---256,331.10 641.27 1.425 1.267AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 222546QAM9 CorporateCredit Suisse AG05/26/2017---555,000.00 554,149.80 ---555,144.30 574.36 1.315 1.348A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest05565QCC0 CorporateBP Capital Markets P.L.C.11/06/2017 07/03/2013300,000.00 292,194.00 ---300,027.00 2,071.34 1.375 1.366A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 226442CAD6 CorporateDuke Energy Carolinas, LLC04/15/2018 06/11/2015116,000.00 127,422.52 ---123,081.80 812.30 5.100 1.095AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 274368CAD6 CorporateProtective Life Global Funding09/13/2019 09/07/2016295,000.00 295,000.00 ---294,548.65 (451.35) 1.555 1.608AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest166764AE0 CorporateChevron Corporation06/24/2018 06/17/2015300,000.00 301,848.00 43,244.00 302,643.00 1,591.69 1.718 1.177AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289352HAP4 CorporateTransCanada PipeLines Limited01/12/2018 02/03/2016150,000.00 146,716.50 ---149,469.00 1,654.89 1.457 1.925A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2828807CM7 CorporateSimon Property Group, L.P.02/01/2018---540,000.00 540,516.00 43,040.00 541,668.60 1,182.72 1.500 1.213A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest891145TN4 CorporateThe Toronto-Dominion Bank03/13/2017 05/21/2015700,000.00 707,168.00 ---701,435.00 (375.12) 1.500 1.044AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 084664BE0 CorporateBerkshire Hathaway Finance Corporation05/15/2018 06/17/2015800,000.00 890,632.00 ---853,728.00 2,532.58 5.400 1.213AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 205531FAP8 CorporateBB&T Corporation06/15/2018---380,000.00 381,823.60 43,235.00 382,329.40 805.41 1.710 1.350A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest48121CYK6 CorporateJPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association10/01/2017 07/03/2013300,000.00 341,424.00 ---312,876.00 2,672.63 6.000 1.666A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2446438RR6 CorporateThe Huntington National Bank11/06/2018---550,000.00 553,005.00 43,379.00 556,869.50 4,198.45 2.200 1.568A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 290261XHJ4 CorporateUBS AG03/26/2018---500,000.00 500,562.50 ---501,410.00 817.06 1.557 1.367A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 274153WCE7 CorporatePricoa Global Funding I08/18/2017---500,000.00 499,977.00 ---499,935.00 (267.68) 1.350 1.364AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest89236TAY1 CorporateToyota Motor Credit Corporation10/24/2018 06/17/2015500,000.00 505,870.00 ---507,315.00 3,648.35 2.000 1.280AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89236TAY1 CorporateToyota Motor Credit Corporation10/24/2018 06/17/2015 2,000,000.00 2,023,480.00 ---2,029,260.00 14,593.41 2.000 1.280AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 259562VAT4 CorporateBerkshire Hathaway Energy Company04/01/2018---500,000.00 539,316.00 ---532,655.00 (125.77) 5.750 1.345A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206416CAA6 CorporateBank of Nova Scotia, The09/11/2019 06/29/2016425,000.00 434,974.75 ---432,913.50 (1,339.26) 2.125 1.477AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2928668AF9 CorporateVolkswagen Group of America Finance, LLC11/20/2017 06/11/2015300,000.00 300,525.00 ---299,340.00 (908.49) 1.600 1.795A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206050TLY6 CorporateBank of America, National Association03/26/2018 06/10/2015300,000.00 298,968.00 ---301,245.00 1,801.43 1.650 1.367A256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien91324PCJ9 CorporateUnitedHealth Group Incorporated01/17/2017 08/03/2015290,000.00 290,222.43 ---290,275.50 230.17 1.129 1.018A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 269353RET1 CorporatePNC Realty Investors, Inc.11/05/2018---600,000.00 606,243.00 43,379.00 605,112.00 (650.89) 1.800 1.370A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 202665WBB6 CorporateAmerican Honda Finance Corporation02/22/2019---420,000.00 424,065.30 ---425,069.40 1,458.58 1.636 1.186A205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89114QAE8 CorporateThe Toronto-Dominion Bank10/19/2016 07/08/2013750,000.00 776,452.50 ---750,442.50 37.81 2.375 1.243AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2037833BR0 CorporateApple Inc.02/22/2019---450,000.00 454,432.50 ---456,993.00 3,079.86 1.637 1.039AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 217401QAC5 CorporateCitizens Bank, National Association12/03/2018---550,000.00 553,356.00 43,407.00 556,352.50 3,374.22 2.300 1.735A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest02580ECC5 CorporateAmerican Express Bank, FSB09/13/2017 07/08/2013250,000.00 287,890.00 ---260,750.00 1,816.43 6.000 1.439A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 291159HHD5 CorporateU.S. Bancorp05/15/2017---550,000.00 554,566.00 42,840.00 551,600.50 (184.95) 1.650 1.109A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246623EKD0 CorporateJPMorgan Chase & Co.03/01/2018---730,000.00 729,894.80 43,132.00 732,219.20 2,083.55 1.700 1.469A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2891145W59 CorporateThe Toronto-Dominion Bank09/25/2019 08/16/2016450,000.00 461,686.50 ---459,333.00 (1,925.56) 2.250 1.537AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206367XF30 CorporateBank of Montreal06/15/2021 08/17/2016500,000.00 500,975.00 ---498,655.00 (2,300.14) 1.750 1.810AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 213607RAB6 CorporateCanadian Imperial Bank of Commerce09/06/2019 08/29/2016430,000.00 429,922.60 ---430,004.30 79.95 1.600 1.600AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289837LAA3 CorporateThe Trustees of Princeton University03/01/2019---255,000.00 281,113.75 ---276,621.45 2,243.29 4.950 1.374AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 240428HPQ9 CorporateHSBC USA Inc.03/05/2018---395,000.00 394,330.60 ---395,809.75 1,183.86 1.700 1.554A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 274256LAT6 CorporatePrincipal Life Global Funding II12/01/2017 08/22/2016360,000.00 361,533.60 ---361,530.00 118.96 1.342 1.019A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 261747YDT9 CorporateMorgan Stanley03/22/2017 06/08/2016300,000.00 308,265.00 ---304,941.00 (137.37) 4.750 1.280A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238141GRC0 CorporateThe Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.01/22/2018---580,000.00 586,667.20 ---586,409.00 1,336.30 2.375 1.520A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206050TKX9 CorporateBank of America, National Association06/15/2017---505,000.00 501,876.55 ---504,767.70 1,502.32 1.150 1.245A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289114QBF4 CorporateThe Toronto-Dominion Bank01/22/2019---525,000.00 528,126.80 ---528,811.50 1,062.92 1.542 1.385AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 205531FAQ6 CorporateBB&T Corporation02/01/2019 08/23/2016200,000.00 204,374.00 43,467.00 203,810.00 (385.01) 2.250 1.389A205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 30231GAL6 CorporateExxon Mobil Corporation03/06/2018 06/10/2015580,000.00 579,344.60 ---581,757.40 2,102.84 1.305 1.091AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest30231GAL6 CorporateExxon Mobil Corporation03/06/2018 06/10/2015420,000.00 419,525.40 ---421,272.60 1,522.74 1.305 1.091AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255279HAH3 CorporateManufacturers and Traders Trust Company07/25/2017---550,000.00 549,163.10 ---550,121.00 515.89 1.015 1.144A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 263307EAB3 CorporateNational Bank of Canada10/19/2016 09/12/2016 2,000,000.00 2,002,590.00 ---2,000,980.00 (391.18) 2.200 1.259AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 209062XAB9 CorporateBiogen Inc.03/01/2018 03/03/201655,000.00 60,217.85 ---59,205.85 452.48 6.875 1.413A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest94974BGF1 CorporateWells Fargo & Company01/30/2020 06/03/2015600,000.00 594,924.00 ---604,368.00 8,055.27 2.150 1.923A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294988J5B9 CorporateWells Fargo Bank, National Association01/22/2018---500,000.00 501,314.25 ---502,320.00 1,261.85 1.442 1.252AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 249327M2H6 CorporateKeyBank National Association06/01/2018---650,000.00 650,060.00 ---653,178.50 2,891.04 1.700 1.402A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2202795HU7 CorporateCommonwealth Edison Company03/15/2018 08/05/2016255,000.00 273,819.00 ---271,707.60 (460.33) 5.800 1.252A256350005LC-Project Fund-Toll 294974BGR5 CorporateWells Fargo & Company12/07/2020 07/12/2016440,000.00 453,314.40 ---448,632.80 (4,063.97) 2.550 2.058A205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89153VAC3 CorporateTotal Capital International06/28/2017 07/08/2013160,000.00 157,765.60 ---160,456.00 885.89 1.550 1.164AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest46625HJL5 CorporateJPMorgan Chase & Co.05/15/2018 06/03/2015500,000.00 497,550.00 ---501,045.00 2,413.11 1.625 1.494APage 4 of 3340 Source AccountAccountIdentifierSecurity Type CategoryIssuerFinal Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original CostNext Call Date Base Market ValueBase Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon YieldSummarized Credit RatingSTAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended September 30, 2016205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 90327QCW7 CorporateUSAA Capital Corporation12/13/2016 07/11/2013 4,000,000.00 4,145,440.00 ---4,010,600.00 1,890.01 2.250 0.941AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest63307EAB3 CorporateNational Bank of Canada10/19/2016 05/21/2015900,000.00 918,414.00 ---900,441.00 (210.64) 2.200 1.259AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238147MAA3 CorporateThe Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.07/19/2018 12/02/2015100,000.00 102,578.00 ---102,369.00 582.82 2.900 1.561A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246849LSL6 CorporateJackson National Life Global Funding10/15/2018---650,000.00 655,151.00 ---656,090.50 1,425.49 1.875 1.408AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2209111ET6 CorporateConsolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc.04/01/2018 06/22/2015220,000.00 245,828.00 ---234,883.00 744.05 5.850 1.290A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231677QAV1 CorporateFifth Third Bank02/28/2018 06/08/2016400,000.00 400,544.00 43,128.00 400,672.00 225.64 1.450 1.322A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2063679ZT4 CorporateBank of Montreal01/30/2017 06/12/2015300,000.00 304,620.00 ---300,921.00 (22.47) 1.950 1.023AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 20258M0DZ9 CorporateAmerican Express Credit Corporation11/05/2018---450,000.00 453,007.50 43,378.00 453,676.50 1,058.92 1.875 1.462A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2233851CF9 CorporateDaimler Finance North America LLC07/05/2019 06/30/2016370,000.00 369,448.70 ---367,942.80 (1,548.52) 1.500 1.707A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255279HAA8 CorporateManufacturers and Traders Trust Company03/07/2018 06/06/2016400,000.00 400,012.00 43,136.00 399,924.00 (88.18) 1.450 1.463A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 259217GAY5 CorporateMetropolitan Life Global Funding I01/10/2018---550,000.00 550,406.00 ---551,512.50 1,079.33 1.500 1.282AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 280851QDA9 CorporateThe Charles Schwab Corporation09/01/2017 10/27/201565,000.00 71,075.55 ---68,108.95 57.41 6.375 1.130A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest78011DAC8 CorporateRoyal Bank of Canada09/19/2017 05/21/2015700,000.00 700,763.00 ---699,699.00 (623.83) 1.200 1.245AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 822582AC6 CorporateShell International Finance B.V.03/22/2017 07/08/2013400,000.00 449,936.00 ---408,148.00 1,554.14 5.200 0.917AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2780082AA1 CorporateRoyal Bank of Canada02/05/2020 06/24/2016990,000.00 1,002,941.55 ---1,000,434.60 (1,617.14) 1.875 1.550AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246625HJF8 CorporateJPMorgan Chase & Co.01/25/2018 08/03/2016265,000.00 266,831.15 ---266,317.05 (329.27) 1.615 1.389A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238141EC49 CorporateThe Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.12/15/2017 08/03/2016275,000.00 275,558.25 ---275,841.50 344.27 1.650 1.417A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2842434CN0 CorporateSouthern California Gas Company06/15/2018 06/15/2015250,000.00 249,992.50 ---251,620.00 1,624.39 1.550 1.165AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 248121CYK6 CorporateJPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association10/01/2017 03/09/2016250,000.00 265,022.50 ---260,730.00 964.87 6.000 1.666A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 26174467V5 CorporateMorgan Stanley04/25/2018---311,000.00 314,084.33 ---314,595.16 1,076.10 1.995 1.407A256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond CCYUSD CurrencyUNITED STATES OF AMERICA09/30/2016---- (0.01) ---(0.01) - 0.000 0.000AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 262944BBC7 Non-US Gov N.V. Bank Nederlandse Gemeenten07/14/2017---575,000.00 574,335.00 ---575,063.25 433.70 0.743 0.920AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2748148RV7 Non-US Gov Gouvernement de la Province de Quebec09/04/2018---375,000.00 374,252.10 ---375,333.75 906.71 1.065 1.051AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2500769FZ2 Non-US Gov KfW12/15/2016---540,000.00 539,671.10 ---539,994.60 114.30 0.625 0.629AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2298785GK6 Non-US Gov Banque Europeenne D'investissement (BEI)04/18/2017---575,000.00 575,503.50 ---575,074.75 (217.61) 0.875 0.851AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2302154BL2 Non-US Gov The Export-Import Bank of Korea01/14/2017---400,000.00 400,576.00 ---400,480.00 229.87 1.423 1.218AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 245818WAN6 Non-US Gov Inter-American Development Bank12/12/2016 05/12/2016250,000.00 250,025.00 ---250,045.00 38.22 0.835 0.746AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016---- 136,860.36 ---136,029.82 - 0.000 0.000NA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016---- 13,674.29 ---13,674.29 - 0.000 0.000NA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016---- 314,738.42 ---314,741.99 - 0.000 0.000NA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016---- 12,392,547.06 ---12,392,547.06 - 0.000 0.000NA256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016 08/02/2016- 57.12 ---57.12 - 0.000 0.000NA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 29AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016---- 2,409,828.30 ---2,409,828.30 - 0.000 0.000NA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 184126YS3 MuniClayton County Water Authority05/01/2017 07/11/2013770,000.00 755,939.80 ---772,941.40 5,169.86 1.300 0.646AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 64966H4E7 MuniNew York, City of10/01/2017 07/12/2013 1,170,000.00 1,238,222.70 ---1,196,687.70 10,018.97 3.140 0.851AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2955116AZ1 MuniWest Palm Beach, City of10/01/2017 06/09/2016230,000.00 229,857.40 ---230,046.00 161.99 1.100 1.080AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265819WAC7 MuniNorth Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency07/01/2018---190,000.00 190,625.40 ---191,843.00 1,407.89 2.003 1.440A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2544587B98 MuniMunicipal Improvement Corporation of Los Angeles 11/01/2018 11/04/2015160,000.00 160,000.00 ---163,092.80 3,092.80 2.344 1.400A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2180848HP1 MuniClark, County of07/01/2017 07/06/2015120,000.00 126,764.40 ---123,098.40 512.60 4.300 0.850AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 220772JL59 MuniConnecticut, State of08/01/2020 03/03/2016130,000.00 132,577.90 ---134,539.60 2,278.28 2.500 1.558AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 213063BFU1 MuniCalifornia, State Of03/01/2019---140,000.00 158,412.45 ---156,798.60 1,516.20 6.200 1.156AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2937308AZ7 MuniWBRP 3.2 WASHINGTON BIOMED RES03/01/2018 09/25/201595,000.00 95,000.00 ---95,362.90 362.90 1.485 1.213AA256350022LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest235219JS2 MuniDallas, City of02/15/2017 07/10/2013650,000.00 650,000.00 ---652,268.50 2,268.50 1.589 0.655AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 235219JS2 MuniDallas, City of02/15/2017 07/10/2013 2,135,000.00 2,135,000.00 ---2,142,451.15 7,451.15 1.589 0.655AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 249130TRY4 MuniKentucky Housing Corporation01/01/2017 06/17/2015275,000.00 274,634.25 ---275,066.00 126.25 0.937 0.840AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 291476PPG7 MuniUniversity of Oklahoma07/01/2020 11/17/201580,000.00 79,544.00 ---82,188.00 2,562.94 2.349 1.595A256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828WU0 TIPSTreasury, United States Department of07/15/2024 02/05/2016608,124.00 591,883.10 ---617,002.61 23,906.61 0.125 -0.062AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828K33 TIPSTreasury, United States Department of04/15/2020--- 2,158,107.00 2,174,799.95 ---2,200,211.67 26,986.07 0.125 -0.421AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828B58 US GovTreasury, United States Department of01/31/2021--- 1,640,000.00 1,677,556.65 ---1,709,060.40 37,774.95 2.125 1.127AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828TG5 US GovTreasury, United States Department of07/31/2017--- 1,600,000.00 1,592,193.36 ---1,598,496.00 3,081.48 0.500 0.613AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828M23 US GovTreasury, United States Department of10/31/2017 12/28/2015800,000.00 798,262.41 ---800,768.00 1,792.13 0.418 0.335AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UB4 US GovTreasury, United States Department of11/30/2019 06/17/2015 2,500,000.00 2,433,398.44 ---2,504,975.00 52,799.83 1.000 0.936AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828UF5 US GovTreasury, United States Department of12/31/2019--- 1,000,000.00 985,496.10 ---1,005,630.00 16,884.74 1.125 0.949AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828KD1 US GovTreasury, United States Department of02/15/2019--- 1,935,000.00 2,027,131.64 ---2,022,674.85 17,394.64 2.750 0.819AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828VV9 US GovTreasury, United States Department of08/31/2020---235,000.00 241,525.78 ---244,501.05 3,933.94 2.125 1.068AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest912828RX0 US GovTreasury, United States Department of12/31/2016 09/13/2013950,000.00 945,212.89 ---951,387.00 1,752.01 0.875 0.290AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UA6 US GovTreasury, United States Department of11/30/2017--- 3,465,000.00 3,454,861.14 ---3,462,297.30 4,153.74 0.625 0.692AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828B58 US GovTreasury, United States Department of01/31/2021--- 1,125,000.00 1,160,760.74 ---1,172,373.75 14,486.22 2.125 1.127AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828J84 US GovTreasury, United States Department of03/31/2020 06/03/2015 3,700,000.00 3,650,945.31 ---3,748,433.00 84,405.57 1.375 0.994AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest912828J84 US GovTreasury, United States Department of03/31/2020---600,000.00 591,146.48 ---607,854.00 14,390.07 1.375 0.994AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828VB3 US GovTreasury, United States Department of05/15/2023 07/05/2013 1,600,000.00 1,487,125.00 ---1,635,936.00 114,853.48 1.750 1.394AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UF5 US GovTreasury, United States Department of12/31/2019--- 3,775,000.00 3,776,018.56 ---3,796,253.25 20,380.01 1.125 0.949AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UR9 US GovTreasury, United States Department of02/28/2018--- 2,750,000.00 2,747,428.71 ---2,750,852.50 3,197.62 0.750 0.728AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest912828UA6 US GovTreasury, United States Department of11/30/2017 07/05/2013 1,200,000.00 1,166,062.50 ---1,199,064.00 8,233.37 0.625 0.692AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UA6 US GovTreasury, United States Department of11/30/2017 07/05/2013 1,750,000.00 1,700,507.81 ---1,748,635.00 12,007.00 0.625 0.692AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828XB1 US GovTreasury, United States Department of05/15/2025 05/24/2016 1,200,000.00 1,228,546.88 ---1,254,564.00 27,045.75 2.125 1.559AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest912828K41 US GovTreasury, United States Department of04/30/2017 07/30/2015200,000.00 200,001.77 ---200,038.00 37.42 0.324 0.294AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828RU6 US GovTreasury, United States Department of11/30/2016 07/05/2013 3,350,000.00 3,346,990.23 ---3,353,618.00 3,764.92 0.875 0.226AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828RC6 US GovTreasury, United States Department of08/15/2021--- 1,775,000.00 1,804,427.73 ---1,853,632.50 52,208.27 2.125 1.187AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 US GovTreasury, United States Department of06/30/2018--- 3,475,000.00 3,511,639.86 ---3,511,383.25 9,720.81 1.375 0.771AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UZ1 US GovTreasury, United States Department of04/30/2018 06/03/2015 3,400,000.00 3,360,421.88 ---3,394,424.00 16,113.78 0.625 0.729AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest912828UZ1 US GovTreasury, United States Department of04/30/2018 07/14/2015700,000.00 693,656.25 ---698,852.00 2,463.12 0.625 0.729AAAPage 5 of 3341 Source AccountAccountIdentifierSecurity Type CategoryIssuerFinal Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original CostNext Call Date Base Market ValueBase Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon YieldSummarized Credit RatingSTAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended September 30, 2016140,521,909.27 156,733,921.54157,273,577.95 979,608.56Page 6 of 3342 Source Account Account IdentifierSecurity Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade DateCurrent Face Value Original CostNext Call Date Base Market ValueBase Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon YieldSummarized Credit Rating205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest3130A3CE2 AgencyFHLBanks Office of Finance10/14/2016 09/30/2016 275,000.00 275,027.50 ---275,027.50 1.96 0.625 0.367AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest3130A7P82 AgencyFHLBanks Office of Finance10/05/2016 07/25/2016 700,000.00 700,134.40 ---700,014.00 6.43 0.490 0.345AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest3137EADS5 AgencyFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation10/14/2016 08/30/2016 320,000.00 320,188.80 ---320,054.40 (1.38) 0.875 0.436AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31392HWL3 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae02/25/2018 07/12/2013 14,959.52 15,791.65 ---15,292.52 109.63 5.000 -0.517AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31392F6C6 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae12/25/2017 07/09/2013 87,987.18 93,335.15 ---89,503.20 202.64 5.000 -0.206AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31393EXC8 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae09/25/2018 07/24/2013 147,157.07 155,572.62 ---150,541.68 425.57 4.500 0.155AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31392BVM5 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae02/25/2017 07/11/20132,217.46 2,340.81 ---2,223.54 (4.22) 5.500 0.248AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31392FPP6 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae11/25/2017 07/15/2013 52,332.06 55,422.92 ---53,170.42 111.70 5.000 -0.209AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest3136A8G38 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae08/25/2017 07/08/2013 1,687,552.23 1,662,634.47 ---1,687,349.72 6,246.98 1.246 1.647AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31393V2T7 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation06/15/2018 07/08/2013 273,053.27 288,796.50 ---279,177.86 1,451.22 4.500 -0.202AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31402RBG3 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae09/01/2019--- 83,775.33 89,852.76 ---86,110.98 (444.18) 6.000 1.726AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31410GSQ7 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae12/01/2017 07/05/2013 37,179.97 39,921.99 ---37,695.66 (234.81) 6.000 2.122AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31294LPZ0 Agency MBSFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation12/01/2016 07/05/20134,673.20 4,940.45 ---4,683.71 (5.29) 6.000 2.286AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest36200AFG9 Agency MBSGovernment National Mortgage Association11/15/2017 07/09/2013 11,360.53 12,106.06 ---11,505.15 (75.91) 5.500 2.066AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest3128MBTH0 Agency MBSFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation03/01/2019 07/26/2013 52,059.41 55,182.98 ---53,478.03 60.51 5.000 1.284AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest36290WH47 Agency MBSGovernment National Mortgage Association09/15/2018 07/18/2013 456,150.63 484,660.05 ---464,552.92 (4,209.80) 4.500 1.935AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest3128H4NR6 Agency MBSFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation05/01/2018 07/16/2013 35,689.56 37,808.63 ---36,662.10 180.22 5.000 0.514AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31402QT68 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae10/01/2019 07/11/2013 107,829.70 116,489.77 ---111,916.45 (516.22) 6.000 1.568AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest3128PGLY7 Agency MBSFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation05/01/2017 07/17/2013 44,966.64 47,383.60 ---46,191.98 814.88 5.000 -5.166AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest3128GNR59 Agency MBSFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation10/01/2016 07/05/20132,502.08 2,650.65 ---2,500.38 (1.70) 6.000 2.032AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest31401MWC1 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae06/01/2018 07/12/2013 347,418.30 370,434.76 ---356,159.34 971.07 4.500 0.741AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest3128PHVS7 Agency MBSFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation11/01/2019 07/16/2013 25,005.91 26,349.98 ---25,687.32 200.13 5.000 -0.022AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest3132FEAK7 Agency MBSFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation12/01/2017 07/03/2013 50,766.42 53,796.54 ---52,149.81 379.17 5.000 -0.722AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest037833AJ9 CorporateApple Inc.05/03/2018 06/17/2015 3,000,000.00 2,960,430.00 ---2,995,830.00 17,989.57 1.000 1.088AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest084664BE0 CorporateBerkshire Hathaway Finance Corporation05/15/2018 06/17/2015 800,000.00 890,632.00 ---853,728.00 2,532.58 5.400 1.213AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest89236TAY1 CorporateToyota Motor Credit Corporation10/24/2018 06/17/2015 2,000,000.00 2,023,480.00 ---2,029,260.00 14,593.41 2.000 1.280AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest89114QAE8 CorporateThe Toronto-Dominion Bank10/19/2016 07/08/2013 750,000.00 776,452.50 ---750,442.50 37.81 2.375 1.243AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest30231GAL6 CorporateExxon Mobil Corporation03/06/2018 06/10/2015 580,000.00 579,344.60 ---581,757.40 2,102.84 1.305 1.091AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest89153VAC3 CorporateTotal Capital International06/28/2017 07/08/2013 160,000.00 157,765.60 ---160,456.00 885.89 1.550 1.164AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest90327QCW7 CorporateUSAA Capital Corporation12/13/2016 07/11/2013 4,000,000.00 4,145,440.00 ---4,010,600.00 1,890.01 2.250 0.941AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest822582AC6 CorporateShell International Finance B.V.03/22/2017 07/08/2013 400,000.00 449,936.00 ---408,148.00 1,554.14 5.200 0.917AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest9AMMF05B2 MM FundU.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016---- 314,738.42 ---314,741.99 - 0.000 0.000NA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest184126YS3 MuniClayton County Water Authority05/01/2017 07/11/2013 770,000.00 755,939.80 ---772,941.40 5,169.86 1.300 0.646AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest64966H4E7 MuniNew York, City of10/01/2017 07/12/2013 1,170,000.00 1,238,222.70 ---1,196,687.70 10,018.97 3.140 0.851AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest235219JS2 MuniDallas, City of02/15/2017 07/10/2013 2,135,000.00 2,135,000.00 ---2,142,451.15 7,451.15 1.589 0.655AA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest912828M23 US GovTreasury, United States Department of10/31/2017 12/28/2015 800,000.00 798,262.41 ---800,768.00 1,792.13 0.418 0.335AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest912828UB4 US GovTreasury, United States Department of11/30/2019 06/17/2015 2,500,000.00 2,433,398.44 ---2,504,975.00 52,799.83 1.000 0.936AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest912828J84 US GovTreasury, United States Department of03/31/2020 06/03/2015 3,700,000.00 3,650,945.31 ---3,748,433.00 84,405.57 1.375 0.994AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest912828UA6 US GovTreasury, United States Department of11/30/2017 07/05/2013 1,750,000.00 1,700,507.81 ---1,748,635.00 12,007.00 0.625 0.692AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest912828RU6 US GovTreasury, United States Department of11/30/2016 07/05/2013 3,350,000.00 3,346,990.23 ---3,353,618.00 3,764.92 0.875 0.226AAA205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest912828UZ1 US GovTreasury, United States Department of04/30/2018 06/03/2015 3,400,000.00 3,360,421.88 ---3,394,424.00 16,113.78 0.625 0.729AAA36,629,545.82 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien91324PCJ9 CorporateUnitedHealth Group Incorporated01/17/2017 08/03/2015 290,000.00 290,222.43 ---290,275.50 230.17 1.129 1.018A256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien88513AKQ4 CPThomson Reuters Corporation10/24/2016 08/25/2016 1,000,000.00 998,443.06 ---999,690.00 296.94 0.000 0.486AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien83700EKQ0 CPSouth Carolina Electric & Gas Company10/24/2016 09/26/2016 1,000,000.00 999,377.78 ---999,690.00 201.11 0.000 0.486AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien0255E2KC3 CPAmerican Electric Power Company, Inc.10/12/2016 08/22/2016 1,100,000.00 1,098,625.00 ---1,099,857.00 159.50 0.000 0.426AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien44890MK43 CPHyundai Capital America10/04/2016 08/25/2016 825,000.00 824,365.43 ---824,991.75 40.56 0.000 0.120AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien65475LKJ0 CPNissan Motor Acceptance Corporation10/18/2016 08/22/2016 1,100,000.00 1,098,780.84 ---1,099,758.00 121.61 0.000 0.466AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien43357LKB7 CPHitachi Capital America Corp.10/11/2016 09/07/2016 1,100,000.00 1,099,096.16 ---1,099,868.00 179.67 0.000 0.432AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien3454G0KK3 CPFord Motor Credit Company LLC10/19/2016 08/22/2016 1,100,000.00 1,098,475.88 ---1,099,736.00 209.00 0.000 0.481AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien58507AKH5 CPMedtronic Global Holdings S.C.A.10/17/2016 08/23/2016 1,100,000.00 1,098,773.19 ---1,099,769.00 125.89 0.000 0.473AA256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien9AMMF05B2 MM FundU.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016---- 12,392,547.06 --- 12,392,547.06 - 0.000 0.000NA21,006,182.31 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond CCYUSD CurrencyUNITED STATES OF AMERICA09/30/2016---- (0.01) ---(0.01) - 0.000 0.000AAA256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond 9AMMF05B2 MM FundU.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016 08/02/2016- 57.12 ---57.12 - 0.000 0.000NA57.11 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23133EECD0 AgencyFederal Farm Credit Banks Consolidated Systemwide Bonds06/20/2017 06/15/2015 500,000.00 500,308.15 ---500,370.00 260.16 0.562 0.459AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AH6Q6 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation08/25/2018 06/24/2016 470,539.54 482,229.51 ---479,291.58 (1,406.37) 2.412 1.230AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A2AZ4 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation05/25/2020 07/01/2015 330,674.99 340,646.91 ---335,046.52 (1,017.31) 2.757 1.420AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238378BR35 Agency CMOGovernment National Mortgage Association11/16/2042 07/10/2015 335,606.67 328,055.52 ---328,679.75 499.81 1.333 1.858AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A7L26 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae12/25/2017--- 357,697.17 359,327.98 ---358,713.03 (363.79) 1.513 1.781AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231397SRT3 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae10/25/2039 08/09/2016 251,864.18 261,309.09 ---258,664.51 (2,532.54) 4.000 1.767AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A8G38 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae08/25/2017--- 170,404.29 170,931.45 ---170,383.84 (140.48) 1.246 1.647AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A85H7 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation12/15/2039 07/13/2015 124,356.52 129,641.67 ---129,664.06 523.79 3.500 1.487AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A1LC5 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation08/15/2020 08/31/2015 70,717.35 71,844.41 ---71,453.52 (71.63) 2.000 0.983AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AQT24 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation01/25/2019--- 339,419.85 346,570.13 ---345,169.62 (288.52) 2.130 1.291AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23133XY2H7 Agency CMOFHLBanks Office of Finance04/20/2017 07/13/2015 235,653.80 242,060.64 ---238,245.99 216.79 2.900 0.916AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231394GH22 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation07/15/2018 07/20/2015 69,012.01 71,535.27 ---70,481.28 410.84 4.500 1.165AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AQVV7 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation10/25/2018 06/06/2016 149,356.59 149,963.35 ---149,813.62 (45.13) 1.560 1.164AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137ANLP8 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation11/25/2016---8,036.69 8,102.44 ---8,029.78 (8.46) 1.655 1.308AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AH6B9 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation10/25/2020--- 177,872.64 181,511.06 ---180,165.42 (364.32) 2.257 1.267AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A2HB2 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae03/25/2040 08/17/2016 544,335.28 555,902.41 ---558,096.08 2,280.11 2.250 1.443AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236225FGM5 Agency MBSGinnie Mae II08/20/2041 08/06/2015 95,155.15 98,485.59 ---98,240.08 (103.02) 1.875 1.201AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23138ELY64 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae02/01/2023 07/07/2016 218,565.10 240,353.31 ---238,878.54 (1,273.36) 6.000 1.142AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238378NNA7 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities05/16/2038 06/26/2015 517,768.12 521,307.55 ---520,724.57 (355.55) 2.250 1.849AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136AEYG6 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae06/25/2018 07/02/2015 208,425.09 211,030.41 ---210,027.88 169.87 1.825 1.589AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236225FLU1 Agency MBSGinnie Mae II02/20/2042 08/06/2015 202,502.87 209,400.62 ---209,778.79 676.56 2.000 1.065AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23138EKUP8 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae03/01/2025 09/21/2015 162,675.81 171,432.34 ---168,083.15 (2,191.09) 5.000 2.123AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23138L1TX7 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae11/01/2017 06/18/2015 304,671.17 306,051.72 ---304,616.33 (525.91) 1.660 1.646AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231374CNE2 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae05/01/2019 07/22/2016 293,534.18 301,033.07 ---301,626.92 852.33 5.000 0.666AAASTAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended September 30, 2016Page 7 of 33ATTACHMENT 343 Source Account Account IdentifierSecurity Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade DateCurrent Face Value Original CostNext Call Date Base Market ValueBase Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon YieldSummarized Credit RatingSTAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended September 30, 2016256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236225EUY6 Agency MBSGinnie Mae II09/20/2039 09/17/2015 93,876.35 96,545.97 ---96,733.95 304.04 1.875 1.395AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A7JU5 Agency MBSFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation11/25/2017 06/03/2016 430,000.00 442,345.70 ---439,167.60 (4.76) 3.882 1.503AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255315FAB6 Asset BackedMMAF EQUIPMENT FINANCE LLC12/17/2018 05/03/2016 275,000.00 274,996.84 ---275,500.50 502.57 1.390 1.137AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 247787UAD5 Asset BackedJohn Deere Owner Trust 201506/17/2019--- 600,000.00 600,819.73 ---601,506.00 915.90 1.320 1.009AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571FK5 Asset BackedChase Issuance Trust08/16/2021 12/10/2015 150,000.00 148,359.38 ---151,317.00 2,611.75 1.580 1.272AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258768WAD1 Asset BackedMercedes-Benz Auto Receivables Trust 2013-111/15/2019 06/16/2015 282,206.41 283,066.26 ---282,302.36 (174.86) 1.130 1.062AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 202582JGG9 Asset BackedAmerican Express Credit Account Master Trust05/17/2021 02/26/2016 300,000.00 300,468.75 ---300,939.00 487.21 0.944 0.800AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236159LBW5 Asset BackedGE Dealer Floorplan Master Not04/22/2019 05/03/2016 300,000.00 300,656.25 ---300,744.00 366.05 1.282 0.856AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265478QAD0 Asset BackedNissan Auto Lease Trust 2016-A03/15/2019 05/17/2016 155,000.00 154,992.99 ---155,331.70 337.51 1.490 1.361AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258769AAD8 Asset BackedMercedes-Benz Auto Lease Trust 2015-B07/16/2018--- 600,000.00 600,906.74 ---601,242.00 549.85 1.340 1.091AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 290290KAD7 Asset BackedUSAA Auto Owner Trust 2014-105/15/2019 06/12/2015 445,000.00 443,991.80 ---445,035.60 419.95 0.940 0.930AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 243814KAC5 Asset BackedHonda Auto Receivables 2015-1 Owner Trust10/15/2018 06/02/2016 571,806.44 571,895.79 ---572,012.29 139.93 1.050 0.994AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571HB3 Asset BackedChase Issuance Trust05/17/2021 06/07/2016 500,000.00 500,878.91 ---502,145.00 1,307.04 0.934 0.779AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571GJ7 Asset BackedChase Issuance Trust01/15/2019--- 500,000.00 500,726.56 ---500,300.00 43.09 1.150 0.950AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258772PAC2 Asset BackedMercedes-Benz Auto Receivables Trust 2015-106/15/2018 08/04/2015 182,264.88 182,286.24 ---182,310.45 (50.12) 0.794 0.731AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571GQ1 Asset BackedChase Issuance Trust11/15/2019 10/28/2015 120,000.00 120,510.94 ---120,450.00 166.90 1.380 1.047AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236159LCR5 Asset BackedGE Dealer Floorplan Master Not01/20/2020 06/07/2016 110,000.00 109,759.38 ---109,940.60 120.62 1.032 1.079AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2477877AD6 Asset BackedJohn Deere Owner Trust 2014-B11/15/2018--- 369,436.72 369,410.74 ---369,591.88 176.25 1.070 0.999AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 260689LAC9 Asset BackedMMAF EQUIPMENT FINANCE LLC12/11/2017 08/05/2015 38,861.85 38,880.07 ---38,863.79 (2.59) 1.030 0.992AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265474VAL5 Asset BackedNissan Master Owner Trust Receivables06/15/2021 07/12/2016 225,000.00 224,967.96 ---224,253.00 (708.75) 1.540 1.673AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255315GAC2 Asset BackedMMAF EQUIPMENT FINANCE LLC10/16/2019--- 282,000.00 281,080.94 ---282,239.70 735.04 1.390 1.311AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571BQ6 Asset BackedChase Issuance Trust04/15/2019 04/27/2016 300,000.00 299,730.47 ---300,150.00 381.53 0.574 0.451AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 202582JGS3 Asset BackedAmerican Express Credit Account Master Trust01/15/2020 07/13/2015 500,000.00 500,859.38 ---501,005.00 686.00 1.260 0.977AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 262888WAA4 CMONATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION GUARANTEED NOTES TRUST12/08/2020--- 496,148.90 498,115.02 ---497,007.24 (966.91) 1.079 0.975AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 262888YAA0 CMONCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2011-R101/08/2020 07/14/2015 190,627.79 191,551.15 ---190,997.61 (303.77) 0.969 0.975AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 200138CAA6 CorporateAIG GLOBAL FDG SR SECD MEDIUMTERM NTS BOOK ENTRY 144A12/15/2017--- 700,000.00 702,068.00 ---702,870.00 1,436.96 1.650 1.306A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2553794AA6 CorporateMUFG Americas Holdings Corporation02/09/2018--- 350,000.00 348,334.50 43,109.00 350,528.50 1,466.99 1.625 1.505A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2865622CB8 CorporateSumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation01/18/2019 01/13/2016 250,000.00 250,000.00 ---251,262.50 1,262.50 1.628 1.577A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2166754AK7 CorporateCHEVRON PHILLIPS CHEM CO LLC / CHEVRON PHILLIPS CHEM CO LP05/01/2018--- 400,000.00 399,676.00 ---399,612.00 (224.87) 1.700 1.762A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294988J5E3 CorporateWells Fargo Bank, National Association05/24/2019 08/03/2016 255,000.00 255,731.85 ---256,331.10 641.27 1.425 1.267AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 222546QAM9 CorporateCredit Suisse AG05/26/2017--- 555,000.00 554,149.80 ---555,144.30 574.36 1.315 1.348A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 226442CAD6 CorporateDuke Energy Carolinas, LLC04/15/2018 06/11/2015 116,000.00 127,422.52 ---123,081.80 812.30 5.100 1.095AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 274368CAD6 CorporateProtective Life Global Funding09/13/2019 09/07/2016 295,000.00 295,000.00 ---294,548.65 (451.35) 1.555 1.608AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289352HAP4 CorporateTransCanada PipeLines Limited01/12/2018 02/03/2016 150,000.00 146,716.50 ---149,469.00 1,654.89 1.457 1.925A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2828807CM7 CorporateSimon Property Group, L.P.02/01/2018--- 540,000.00 540,516.00 43,040.00 541,668.60 1,182.72 1.500 1.213A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 205531FAP8 CorporateBB&T Corporation06/15/2018--- 380,000.00 381,823.60 43,235.00 382,329.40 805.41 1.710 1.350A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2446438RR6 CorporateThe Huntington National Bank11/06/2018--- 550,000.00 553,005.00 43,379.00 556,869.50 4,198.45 2.200 1.568A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 290261XHJ4 CorporateUBS AG03/26/2018--- 500,000.00 500,562.50 ---501,410.00 817.06 1.557 1.367A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 274153WCE7 CorporatePricoa Global Funding I08/18/2017--- 500,000.00 499,977.00 ---499,935.00 (267.68) 1.350 1.364AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 259562VAT4 CorporateBerkshire Hathaway Energy Company04/01/2018--- 500,000.00 539,316.00 ---532,655.00 (125.77) 5.750 1.345A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206416CAA6 CorporateBank of Nova Scotia, The09/11/2019 06/29/2016 425,000.00 434,974.75 ---432,913.50 (1,339.26) 2.125 1.477AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2928668AF9 CorporateVolkswagen Group of America Finance, LLC11/20/2017 06/11/2015 300,000.00 300,525.00 ---299,340.00 (908.49) 1.600 1.795A256350005LC-Project Fund-Toll 206050TLY6 CorporateBank of America, National Association03/26/2018 06/10/2015 300,000.00 298,968.00 ---301,245.00 1,801.43 1.650 1.367A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 269353RET1 CorporatePNC Realty Investors, Inc.11/05/2018--- 600,000.00 606,243.00 43,379.00 605,112.00 (650.89) 1.800 1.370A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 202665WBB6 CorporateAmerican Honda Finance Corporation02/22/2019--- 420,000.00 424,065.30 ---425,069.40 1,458.58 1.636 1.186A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2037833BR0 CorporateApple Inc.02/22/2019--- 450,000.00 454,432.50 ---456,993.00 3,079.86 1.637 1.039AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 217401QAC5 CorporateCitizens Bank, National Association12/03/2018--- 550,000.00 553,356.00 43,407.00 556,352.50 3,374.22 2.300 1.735A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 291159HHD5 CorporateU.S. Bancorp05/15/2017--- 550,000.00 554,566.00 42,840.00 551,600.50 (184.95) 1.650 1.109A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246623EKD0 CorporateJPMorgan Chase & Co.03/01/2018--- 730,000.00 729,894.80 43,132.00 732,219.20 2,083.55 1.700 1.469A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2891145W59 CorporateThe Toronto-Dominion Bank09/25/2019 08/16/2016 450,000.00 461,686.50 ---459,333.00 (1,925.56) 2.250 1.537AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206367XF30 CorporateBank of Montreal06/15/2021 08/17/2016 500,000.00 500,975.00 ---498,655.00 (2,300.14) 1.750 1.810AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 213607RAB6 CorporateCanadian Imperial Bank of Commerce09/06/2019 08/29/2016 430,000.00 429,922.60 ---430,004.30 79.95 1.600 1.600AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289837LAA3 CorporateThe Trustees of Princeton University03/01/2019--- 255,000.00 281,113.75 ---276,621.45 2,243.29 4.950 1.374AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 240428HPQ9 CorporateHSBC USA Inc.03/05/2018--- 395,000.00 394,330.60 ---395,809.75 1,183.86 1.700 1.554A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 274256LAT6 CorporatePrincipal Life Global Funding II12/01/2017 08/22/2016 360,000.00 361,533.60 ---361,530.00 118.96 1.342 1.019A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 261747YDT9 CorporateMorgan Stanley03/22/2017 06/08/2016 300,000.00 308,265.00 ---304,941.00 (137.37) 4.750 1.280A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238141GRC0 CorporateThe Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.01/22/2018--- 580,000.00 586,667.20 ---586,409.00 1,336.30 2.375 1.520A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206050TKX9 CorporateBank of America, National Association06/15/2017--- 505,000.00 501,876.55 ---504,767.70 1,502.32 1.150 1.245A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289114QBF4 CorporateThe Toronto-Dominion Bank01/22/2019--- 525,000.00 528,126.80 ---528,811.50 1,062.92 1.542 1.385AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 205531FAQ6 CorporateBB&T Corporation02/01/2019 08/23/2016 200,000.00 204,374.00 43,467.00 203,810.00 (385.01) 2.250 1.389A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255279HAH3 CorporateManufacturers and Traders Trust Company07/25/2017--- 550,000.00 549,163.10 ---550,121.00 515.89 1.015 1.144A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 263307EAB3 CorporateNational Bank of Canada10/19/2016 09/12/2016 2,000,000.00 2,002,590.00 ---2,000,980.00 (391.18) 2.200 1.259AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 209062XAB9 CorporateBiogen Inc.03/01/2018 03/03/2016 55,000.00 60,217.85 ---59,205.85 452.48 6.875 1.413A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294988J5B9 CorporateWells Fargo Bank, National Association01/22/2018--- 500,000.00 501,314.25 ---502,320.00 1,261.85 1.442 1.252AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 249327M2H6 CorporateKeyBank National Association06/01/2018--- 650,000.00 650,060.00 ---653,178.50 2,891.04 1.700 1.402A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2202795HU7 CorporateCommonwealth Edison Company03/15/2018 08/05/2016 255,000.00 273,819.00 ---271,707.60 (460.33) 5.800 1.252A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294974BGR5 CorporateWells Fargo & Company12/07/2020 07/12/2016 440,000.00 453,314.40 ---448,632.80 (4,063.97) 2.550 2.058A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238147MAA3 CorporateThe Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.07/19/2018 12/02/2015 100,000.00 102,578.00 ---102,369.00 582.82 2.900 1.561A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246849LSL6 CorporateJackson National Life Global Funding10/15/2018--- 650,000.00 655,151.00 ---656,090.50 1,425.49 1.875 1.408AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2209111ET6 CorporateConsolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc.04/01/2018 06/22/2015 220,000.00 245,828.00 ---234,883.00 744.05 5.850 1.290A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231677QAV1CorporateFifth Third Bank02/28/2018 06/08/2016 400,000.00 400,544.00 43,128.00 400,672.00 225.64 1.450 1.322A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2063679ZT4 CorporateBank of Montreal01/30/2017 06/12/2015 300,000.00 304,620.00 ---300,921.00 (22.47) 1.950 1.023AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 20258M0DZ9 CorporateAmerican Express Credit Corporation11/05/2018--- 450,000.00 453,007.50 43,378.00 453,676.50 1,058.92 1.875 1.462A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2233851CF9 CorporateDaimler Finance North America LLC07/05/2019 06/30/2016 370,000.00 369,448.70 ---367,942.80 (1,548.52) 1.500 1.707A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255279HAA8 CorporateManufacturers and Traders Trust Company03/07/2018 06/06/2016 400,000.00 400,012.00 43,136.00 399,924.00 (88.18) 1.450 1.463A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 259217GAY5 CorporateMetropolitan Life Global Funding I01/10/2018--- 550,000.00 550,406.00 ---551,512.50 1,079.33 1.500 1.282AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 280851QDA9 CorporateThe Charles Schwab Corporation09/01/2017 10/27/2015 65,000.00 71,075.55 ---68,108.95 57.41 6.375 1.130A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2780082AA1 CorporateRoyal Bank of Canada02/05/2020 06/24/2016 990,000.00 1,002,941.55 ---1,000,434.60 (1,617.14) 1.875 1.550AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246625HJF8 CorporateJPMorgan Chase & Co.01/25/2018 08/03/2016 265,000.00 266,831.15 ---266,317.05 (329.27) 1.615 1.389A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238141EC49 CorporateThe Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.12/15/2017 08/03/2016 275,000.00 275,558.25 ---275,841.50 344.27 1.650 1.417A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2842434CN0 CorporateSouthern California Gas Company06/15/2018 06/15/2015 250,000.00 249,992.50 ---251,620.00 1,624.39 1.550 1.165AAPage 8 of 3344 Source Account Account IdentifierSecurity Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade DateCurrent Face Value Original CostNext Call Date Base Market ValueBase Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon YieldSummarized Credit RatingSTAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended September 30, 2016256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 248121CYK6 CorporateJPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association10/01/2017 03/09/2016 250,000.00 265,022.50 ---260,730.00 964.87 6.000 1.666A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 26174467V5 CorporateMorgan Stanley04/25/2018--- 311,000.00 314,084.33 ---314,595.16 1,076.10 1.995 1.407A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 22254EAMN0 CPCredit Suisse (USA), Inc.12/22/2016 08/24/2016 1,100,000.00 1,096,327.53 ---1,097,844.00 374.61 0.000 0.863AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23454G0K56 CPFord Motor Credit Company LLC10/05/2016 08/30/2016 600,000.00 599,574.17 ---599,982.00 30.67 0.000 0.270AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 29AMMF05B2 MM FundU.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016---- 2,409,828.30 ---2,409,828.30 - 0.000 0.000NA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2955116AZ1 MuniWest Palm Beach, City of10/01/2017 06/09/2016 230,000.00 229,857.40 ---230,046.00 161.99 1.100 1.080AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265819WAC7 MuniNorth Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency07/01/2018--- 190,000.00 190,625.40 ---191,843.00 1,407.89 2.003 1.440A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2544587B98 MuniMunicipal Improvement Corporation of Los Angeles11/01/2018 11/04/2015 160,000.00 160,000.00 ---163,092.80 3,092.80 2.344 1.400A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2180848HP1 MuniClark, County of07/01/2017 07/06/2015 120,000.00 126,764.40 ---123,098.40 512.60 4.300 0.850AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 220772JL59 MuniConnecticut, State of08/01/2020 03/03/2016 130,000.00 132,577.90 ---134,539.60 2,278.28 2.500 1.558AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 213063BFU1 MuniCalifornia, State Of03/01/2019--- 140,000.00 158,412.45 ---156,798.60 1,516.20 6.200 1.156AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2937308AZ7 MuniWBRP 3.2 WASHINGTON BIOMED RES03/01/2018 09/25/2015 95,000.00 95,000.00 ---95,362.90 362.90 1.485 1.213AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 249130TRY4 MuniKentucky Housing Corporation01/01/2017 06/17/2015 275,000.00 274,634.25 ---275,066.00 126.25 0.937 0.840AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 291476PPG7 MuniUniversity of Oklahoma07/01/2020 11/17/2015 80,000.00 79,544.00 ---82,188.00 2,562.94 2.349 1.595A256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 262944BBC7 Non-US GovN.V. Bank Nederlandse Gemeenten07/14/2017--- 575,000.00 574,335.00 ---575,063.25 433.70 0.743 0.920AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2748148RV7 Non-US GovGouvernement de la Province de Quebec09/04/2018--- 375,000.00 374,252.10 ---375,333.75 906.71 1.065 1.051AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2500769FZ2 Non-US GovKfW12/15/2016--- 540,000.00 539,671.10 ---539,994.60 114.30 0.625 0.629AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2298785GK6 Non-US GovBanque Europeenne D'investissement (BEI)04/18/2017--- 575,000.00 575,503.50 ---575,074.75 (217.61) 0.875 0.851AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2302154BL2 Non-US GovThe Export-Import Bank of Korea01/14/2017--- 400,000.00 400,576.00 ---400,480.00 229.87 1.423 1.218AA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 245818WAN6 Non-US GovInter-American Development Bank12/12/2016 05/12/2016 250,000.00 250,025.00 ---250,045.00 38.22 0.835 0.746AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828K33 TIPSTreasury, United States Department of04/15/2020--- 2,158,107.00 2,174,799.95 ---2,200,211.67 26,986.07 0.125 -0.421AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828TG5 US GovTreasury, United States Department of07/31/2017--- 1,600,000.00 1,592,193.36 ---1,598,496.00 3,081.48 0.500 0.613AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828KD1 US GovTreasury, United States Department of02/15/2019--- 1,935,000.00 2,027,131.64 ---2,022,674.85 17,394.64 2.750 0.819AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UA6 US GovTreasury, United States Department of11/30/2017--- 3,465,000.00 3,454,861.14 ---3,462,297.30 4,153.74 0.625 0.692AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828B58 US GovTreasury, United States Department of01/31/2021--- 1,125,000.00 1,160,760.74 ---1,172,373.75 14,486.22 2.125 1.127AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UF5 US GovTreasury, United States Department of12/31/2019--- 3,775,000.00 3,776,018.56 ---3,796,253.25 20,380.01 1.125 0.949AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UR9 US GovTreasury, United States Department of02/28/2018--- 2,750,000.00 2,747,428.71 ---2,750,852.50 3,197.62 0.750 0.728AAA256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 US GovTreasury, United States Department of06/30/2018--- 3,475,000.00 3,511,639.86 ---3,511,383.25 9,720.81 1.375 0.771AAA68,466,592.13 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest31393EXC8 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae09/25/2018 07/24/2013 16,350.79 17,285.85 ---16,726.85 47.29 4.500 0.155AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest3136A4M89 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae01/25/2019 07/05/2013 155,781.24 156,773.13 ---157,191.06 1,106.20 1.934 1.479AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest3137ASNH3 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation09/25/2021 08/15/2013 301,952.62 294,026.36 ---302,052.26 4,966.29 1.459 1.407AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest3136A8G38 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae08/25/2017 07/08/2013 511,212.89 503,664.51 ---511,151.54 1,892.41 1.246 1.647AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest31393V2T7 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation06/15/2018 07/08/2013 82,933.25 87,714.87 ---84,793.44 440.77 4.500 -0.202AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest31402RBG3 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae09/01/2019--- 24,496.74 26,276.38 ---25,179.71 (130.68) 6.000 1.726AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest31385JLF3 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae08/01/2017 09/18/2013 37,452.00 39,980.01 ---37,887.19 (128.00) 6.000 1.509AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest38144LAB6 CorporateThe Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.09/01/2017 07/03/2013 300,000.00 322,515.00 ---312,945.00 7,618.25 6.250 1.505A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest05565QCC0 CorporateBP Capital Markets P.L.C.11/06/2017 07/03/2013 300,000.00 292,194.00 ---300,027.00 2,071.34 1.375 1.366A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest166764AE0 CorporateChevron Corporation06/24/2018 06/17/2015 300,000.00 301,848.00 43,244.00 302,643.00 1,591.69 1.718 1.177AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest891145TN4 CorporateThe Toronto-Dominion Bank03/13/2017 05/21/2015 700,000.00 707,168.00 ---701,435.00 (375.12) 1.500 1.044AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest48121CYK6 CorporateJPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association10/01/2017 07/03/2013 300,000.00 341,424.00 ---312,876.00 2,672.63 6.000 1.666A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest89236TAY1 CorporateToyota Motor Credit Corporation10/24/2018 06/17/2015 500,000.00 505,870.00 ---507,315.00 3,648.35 2.000 1.280AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest02580ECC5 CorporateAmerican Express Bank, FSB09/13/2017 07/08/2013 250,000.00 287,890.00 ---260,750.00 1,816.43 6.000 1.439A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest30231GAL6 CorporateExxon Mobil Corporation03/06/2018 06/10/2015 420,000.00 419,525.40 ---421,272.60 1,522.74 1.305 1.091AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest94974BGF1 CorporateWells Fargo & Company01/30/2020 06/03/2015 600,000.00 594,924.00 ---604,368.00 8,055.27 2.150 1.923A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest46625HJL5 CorporateJPMorgan Chase & Co.05/15/2018 06/03/2015 500,000.00 497,550.00 ---501,045.00 2,413.11 1.625 1.494A256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest63307EAB3 CorporateNational Bank of Canada10/19/2016 05/21/2015 900,000.00 918,414.00 ---900,441.00 (210.64) 2.200 1.259AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest78011DAC8 CorporateRoyal Bank of Canada09/19/2017 05/21/2015 700,000.00 700,763.00 ---699,699.00 (623.83) 1.200 1.245AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest0255E2KC3 CPAmerican Electric Power Company, Inc.10/12/2016 08/22/2016 275,000.00 274,656.25 ---274,964.25 39.88 0.000 0.426AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest43357LKR2 CPHitachi Capital America Corp.10/25/2016 09/30/2016 100,000.00 99,940.97 ---99,967.00 23.67 0.000 0.496AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest9AMMF05B2 MM FundU.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016---- 13,674.29 ---13,674.29 - 0.000 0.000NA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest235219JS2 MuniDallas, City of02/15/2017 07/10/2013 650,000.00 650,000.00 ---652,268.50 2,268.50 1.589 0.655AA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest912828RX0 US GovTreasury, United States Department of12/31/2016 09/13/2013 950,000.00 945,212.89 ---951,387.00 1,752.01 0.875 0.290AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest912828J84 US GovTreasury, United States Department of03/31/2020--- 600,000.00 591,146.48 ---607,854.00 14,390.07 1.375 0.994AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest912828UA6 US GovTreasury, United States Department of11/30/2017 07/05/2013 1,200,000.00 1,166,062.50 ---1,199,064.00 8,233.37 0.625 0.692AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest912828K41 US GovTreasury, United States Department of04/30/2017 07/30/2015 200,000.00 200,001.77 ---200,038.00 37.42 0.324 0.294AAA256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest912828UZ1 US GovTreasury, United States Department of04/30/2018 07/14/2015 700,000.00 693,656.25 ---698,852.00 2,463.12 0.625 0.729AAA11,657,867.70 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13135G0D75 AgencyFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae06/22/2020 05/06/2015 600,000.00 593,490.00 ---609,180.00 13,968.48 1.500 1.080AAA256350023LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137EADR7 AgencyFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation05/01/2020 05/15/2015 475,000.00 471,527.75 ---480,153.75 7,691.63 1.375 1.066AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137EACA5 AgencyFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation03/27/2019 07/05/2013 770,000.00 843,053.75 ---823,037.60 20,222.08 3.750 0.946AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137EADB2 AgencyFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation01/13/2022--- 750,000.00 737,385.50 ---789,780.00 45,801.36 2.375 1.332AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136G3JZ9 AgencyFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae04/26/2019 05/31/2016 200,000.00 200,960.00 42,669.00 200,174.00 3.79 2.000 0.788AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AJMF8 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation10/25/2021 08/05/2015 30,000.00 31,038.28 ---31,839.00 999.96 2.968 1.613AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377JZ89 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities10/20/2039 07/05/2013 108,446.70 111,763.64 ---112,727.09 1,645.04 3.500 1.866AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131392JJ83 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae03/25/2018 07/08/2013 11,262.39 11,881.83 ---11,488.99 58.92 5.000 -0.007AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138376GB33 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities10/16/2044 01/23/2015 322,865.12 331,409.83 ---327,485.32 (3,055.25) 3.500 2.211AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AUPE3 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation06/25/2022 07/03/2013 235,000.00 220,358.40 ---244,310.70 19,219.74 2.396 1.632AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378CRT6 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities10/20/2040 05/22/2014 93,606.50 90,388.78 ---93,716.02 2,948.98 2.000 1.939AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137A7E22 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation04/15/2028 07/08/2013 120,434.46 124,687.30 ---122,673.34 624.39 3.500 1.102AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138376T5Z1 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities01/16/2039 01/26/2015 134,607.82 140,631.52 ---139,796.95 (115.33) 3.000 1.794AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377RSZ9 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities06/16/2039 01/21/2015 43,196.63 45,780.18 ---44,833.79 (603.09) 4.500 2.035AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378BX20 Agency CMOGovernment National Mortgage Association06/16/2051 03/17/2015 63,299.96 61,891.99 ---61,590.86 (262.07) 1.240 1.845AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B7E3 Agency CMOGovernment National Mortgage Association05/16/2046--- 289,523.83 279,540.13 ---280,502.27 705.04 1.744 2.054AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377RVK8 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities04/20/2039--- 154,968.71 159,339.31 ---160,831.18 2,581.51 3.000 1.593AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137ASNH3 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation09/25/2021 07/03/2013 301,952.62 295,076.12 ---302,052.26 4,258.68 1.459 1.407AAAPage 9 of 3345 Source Account Account IdentifierSecurity Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade DateCurrent Face Value Original CostNext Call Date Base Market ValueBase Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon YieldSummarized Credit RatingSTAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended September 30, 2016256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A72D3 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae04/25/2022 07/03/2013 395,000.00 375,250.00 ---411,293.75 29,560.46 2.482 1.682AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B7F0 Agency CMOGovernment National Mortgage Association12/16/2042--- 450,000.00 427,324.22 ---438,538.50 10,325.16 2.273 2.084AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AQT24 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation01/25/2019 10/21/2013 169,709.93 170,903.20 ---172,584.81 2,486.17 2.130 1.291AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138376WA62 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities10/20/2039 01/21/2015 101,402.83 106,461.71 ---107,172.65 366.69 4.000 1.747AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378TAF7 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities07/20/2041 07/05/2013 200,851.53 200,881.81 ---206,903.19 6,174.89 2.500 1.604AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377DPX8 Agency CMOThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities11/20/2036 12/31/20131,081.89 1,134.17 ---1,081.68 (0.22) 2.500 0.485AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131395EZP5 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation08/15/2019 07/09/2013 54,435.89 57,591.47 ---55,823.46 156.32 4.500 0.820AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131394DVM9 Agency CMOFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae02/25/2034 06/19/2014 116,467.08 123,145.73 ---120,925.43 225.28 5.000 1.824AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KXW4 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities02/16/2037 12/11/2014 190,227.43 189,306.02 ---188,616.21 (748.17) 1.705 1.859AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131413XVG5 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae06/01/2019 08/04/2014 200,000.00 218,500.00 ---206,626.00 (2,099.41) 4.506 3.147AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138379KDN5 Agency MBSGovernment National Mortgage Association09/16/2055 08/05/2015 187,374.45 182,587.62 ---187,781.06 4,879.76 2.101 1.896AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A4M48 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae01/25/2022 07/05/2013 317,013.88 317,905.48 ---322,016.36 4,686.13 2.098 1.601AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131381PEB0 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae11/01/2020 09/26/2014 261,405.92 275,252.26 ---280,540.83 11,283.13 3.370 1.402AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KRS0 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities07/16/2043 05/08/2015 450,000.00 434,460.94 ---455,026.50 19,923.86 2.389 2.174AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KWU9 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities11/16/2041--- 82,246.90 80,315.51 ---79,948.10 (447.31) 1.400 1.701AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378XP62 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities05/16/2055 05/14/2015 398,476.35 403,395.04 ---409,701.43 6,564.68 2.500 1.931AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137B1U75 Agency MBSFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation01/25/2023 08/29/2016 380,000.00 394,917.97 ---394,728.80 23.76 2.522 1.783AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131404WTT3 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae05/01/2019 12/31/2013 47,128.93 52,536.62 ---48,462.21 (1,200.86) 4.500 1.661AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131417YKF3 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae01/01/2030 07/10/2013 117,078.44 123,517.75 ---128,512.32 5,254.07 4.500 1.644AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131385XBG1 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae03/01/2018 09/13/20134,450.70 4,739.99 ---4,502.42 (10.63) 6.000 1.509AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131416YXJ2 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae08/01/2026 07/03/2013 49,603.35 51,936.26 ---52,483.32 1,183.56 3.500 1.328AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KSL4 Agency MBSThe Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed Remic Pass-Through Securities12/16/2046--- 425,000.00 415,829.11 ---434,235.25 18,216.00 2.785 2.363AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13138EJPZ5 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae07/01/2022 08/29/2016 338,959.10 360,024.87 ---361,174.48 1,269.90 2.973 0.830AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131418AFW3 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae06/01/2022 07/10/2013 162,727.89 168,067.39 ---171,005.85 4,857.26 3.000 0.340AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13138L33G8 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae06/01/2020 11/12/2015 100,000.00 99,875.00 ---101,879.00 2,027.75 2.010 1.461AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131381Q6B7 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae06/01/2021 07/15/2016 191,008.94 211,840.86 ---212,281.61 1,367.19 4.295 1.662AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B6A2 Agency MBSGovernment National Mortgage Association11/16/2052 01/22/2015 133,767.04 129,550.24 ---131,792.64 2,253.18 1.826 2.050AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A7MN9 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae05/25/2022 08/29/2016 300,000.00 308,578.13 ---307,869.00 (582.59) 2.349 1.669AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13128MMAK9 Agency MBSFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation09/01/2019 07/08/2013 88,667.45 94,264.58 ---91,722.04 28.45 5.000 1.860AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136AEYG6 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae06/25/2018 11/20/2013 133,706.66 134,761.70 ---134,734.87 701.94 1.825 1.589AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-19AMMF05B2 MM FundU.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund09/30/2016---- 136,860.36 ---136,029.82 - 0.000 0.000NA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828WU0 TIPSTreasury, United States Department of07/15/2024 02/05/2016 608,124.00 591,883.10 ---617,002.61 23,906.61 0.125 -0.062AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828B58 US GovTreasury, United States Department of01/31/2021--- 1,640,000.00 1,677,556.65 ---1,709,060.40 37,774.95 2.125 1.127AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828UF5 US GovTreasury, United States Department of12/31/2019--- 1,000,000.00 985,496.10 ---1,005,630.00 16,884.74 1.125 0.949AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828VV9 US GovTreasury, United States Department of08/31/2020--- 235,000.00 241,525.78 ---244,501.05 3,933.94 2.125 1.068AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828VB3 US GovTreasury, United States Department of05/15/2023 07/05/2013 1,600,000.00 1,487,125.00 ---1,635,936.00 114,853.48 1.750 1.394AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828XB1 US GovTreasury, United States Department of05/15/2025 05/24/2016 1,200,000.00 1,228,546.88 ---1,254,564.00 27,045.75 2.125 1.559AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828RC6 US GovTreasury, United States Department of08/15/2021--- 1,775,000.00 1,804,427.73 ---1,853,632.50 52,208.27 2.125 1.187AAA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AEV77 Agency CMOFederal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation05/25/2018---364.82 364.82 ---372.46 - 0.000 2.640NA256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A7MJ8 Agency MBSFederal National Mortgage Association Fannie Mae04/25/2018---465.71 465.71 ---467.18 - 0.000 1.510NA19,513,332.88 Page 10 of 3346 Source Account Account Identifier DescriptionBeginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base SalesBase Maturities and Redemptions Base PaydownsNet Total Realized Gain/LossBase Amortization/AccretionBase Change In Net Unrealized Gain/LossEnding Base Market ValueEnding Accrued Income Balance205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 90327QCW7 USAA CAPITAL CORP4,025,400.00-----(10,890.88) (3,909.12) 4,010,600.00 250.00 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 084664BE0 BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY FINANCE CORP865,248.00-----(7,788.42) (3,731.58) 853,728.0016,320.00 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 64966H4E7 NEW YORK N Y1,205,825.40-----(4,137.15) (5,000.55) 1,196,687.70 18,369.00 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 822582AC6 SHELL INTERNATIONAL FINANCE BV412,488.00-----(3,448.67) (891.33)408,148.00520.00 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89114QAE8 TORONTO DOMINION BANK753,510.00-----(2,068.43) (999.07)750,442.508,015.63 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89236TAY1 TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CORP2,038,860.00-----(1,752.14) (7,847.86) 2,029,260.00 17,444.44 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36290WH47 GN 619551532,587.33---(66,783.34) (2,007.61)(1,710.76) 2,467.31 464,552.921,710.56 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31401MWC1 FN 712643440,353.32---(81,637.97) (2,022.88)(1,148.69) 615.55356,159.341,302.82 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31393V2T7 FHR 2627E GY344,803.65---(64,562.54) (1,208.82) (652.48) 798.06279,177.861,023.95 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31393EXC8 FNR 0388E TH185,662.52---(33,775.85) (733.69)(361.83) (249.46)150,541.68551.84 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 459200GX3 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORP465,274.35--(465,000.00) --(250.34) (24.01)-- 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128PGLY7 FH J0484365,964.10---(19,367.24) (228.33)(202.92) 26.3746,191.98187.36 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402QT68 FN 735073138,242.63---(25,006.50) (1,064.40) (191.99) (63.29)111,916.45539.15 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3132FEAK7 FH Z5001074,148.67---(21,539.18) (457.63)(169.61) 167.5552,149.81211.53 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31410GSQ7 FN 88892753,941.03---(15,820.31) (347.64)(159.16) 81.7537,695.66185.90 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392F6C6 FNR 0277C CB119,061.14---(29,255.53) (455.84)(150.99) 304.4189,503.20366.61 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402RBG3 FN 735439103,781.51---(26,180.89) (873.40)(150.77) 53.5176,629.95372.76 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128H4NR6 FH E9670046,519.57---(9,639.66) (235.43)(135.34) 152.9636,662.10148.71 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3137EADS5 FREDDIE MAC-320,188.80----(133.02) (1.38)320,054.401,298.89 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128MBTH0 FH G1305264,504.95---(10,780.89) (293.60)(127.80) 175.3853,478.03216.91 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3130A7P82 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS-700,134.40----(126.83) 6.43700,014.001,676.89 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3135G0YE7 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION350,080.50--(350,000.00) --(119.00) 38.50-- 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392FPP6 FNR 0274C PE71,493.17---(18,187.24) (268.28)(105.17) 237.9553,170.42218.05 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128PHVS7 FH J0602533,230.37---(7,381.73) (160.67)(103.96) 103.3125,687.32104.19 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36200AFG9 GN 59516715,327.50---(3,727.08) (84.65)(62.46)51.8411,505.1552.07 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128GNR59 FH E8590819,995.84---(17,425.99) (61.34)(49.47)41.352,500.3812.51 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31294LPZ0 FH E0224020,862.81---(16,103.39) (92.63)(40.47)57.394,683.7123.37 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392HWL3 FNR 033D BC19,603.03---(4,291.97) (67.10)(24.99)73.5515,292.5262.33 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402RBG3 FN 7354398,002.13---(2,018.69) (60.87)(10.66)(3.31)5,908.6028.74 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31392BVM5 FNR 023C PG7,524.05---(5,262.38) (32.45)(10.58)4.902,223.5410.16 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31402RBG3 FN 7354394,838.21---(1,220.53) (39.43)(6.84)1.013,572.4317.38 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3130A3CE2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS-275,027.50----(1.96)1.96275,027.50797.31 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 9AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund390,543.391,573,343.52(1,649,144.92) -----314,741.99- 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest CCYUSD Cash-----0.00---- 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest CCYUSD Payable(350,878.55)--------- 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 235219JS2 DALLAS TEX2,149,816.90------(7,365.75) 2,142,451.15 4,334.88 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 30231GAL6 EXXON MOBIL CORP584,524.00-----59.91(2,826.51) 581,757.40525.63 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 89153VAC3 TOTAL CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL SA160,832.00-----145.00(521.00)160,456.00640.67 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828RU6 UNITED STATES TREASURY3,356,867.50-----225.27(3,474.77) 3,353,618.00 9,850.92 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828M23 UNITED STATES TREASURY800,536.00-----229.282.72800,768.00664.93 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828J84 UNITED STATES TREASURY1,324,583.00-----886.77(8,452.77) 1,317,017.00 49.11 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 184126YS3 CLAYTON CNTY & CLAYTON CNTY GA WTR AUTH WTR & SEW775,351.50-----946.28(3,356.38) 772,941.404,170.83 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828J84 UNITED STATES TREASURY2,445,384.00-----1,614.55 (15,582.55) 2,431,416.00 90.66 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3136A8G38 FN 12M13A A21,829,081.59---(138,242.93) 634.95 1,859.80 (5,983.69) 1,687,349.72 1,752.24 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UA6 UNITED STATES TREASURY1,751,435.00-----2,864.02 (5,664.02) 1,748,635.00 3,675.72 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UZ1 UNITED STATES TREASURY3,402,244.00-----3,395.25 (11,215.25) 3,394,424.00 8,892.66 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 037833AJ9 APPLE INC3,007,380.00-----3,436.95 (14,986.95) 2,995,830.00 12,333.33 205091001LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 912828UB4 UNITED STATES TREASURY2,516,300.00-----3,698.60 (15,023.60) 2,504,975.00 8,401.64 36,631,134.10 2,868,694.22 (1,649,144.92) (815,000.00) (618,211.84) (10,161.75) (16,932.09) (111,710.45) 36,629,545.82 127,422.27 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 91324PCJ9 UNITEDHEALTH GROUP INC290,368.30-----(38.61)(54.19)290,275.50682.16 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 55314MAD8 MMAF 11A A43,625.09---(3,623.16) (0.01)(1.17)(0.75)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 9AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund164,097.7656,908,239.16 (44,679,789.86) -----12,392,547.06 - 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien CCYUSD Cash-----(0.00)---- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6116M2G52 Monsanto Company699,958.00--(700,000.00) --66.11(24.11)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 83700EKQ0 South Carolina Electric & Gas Company-999,377.78----111.11201.11999,690.00- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 04635PG60 AstraZeneca PLC1,599,872.00--(1,600,000.00) --151.11(23.11)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 78513KG62 S&P Global Inc.1,599,872.00--(1,600,000.00) --188.89(60.89)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 66765EG82 Northwest Natural Gas Company1,484,836.65--(1,485,000.00) --190.58(27.23)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 05333TG80 AutoZone, Inc.1,599,824.00--(1,600,000.00) --208.45(32.45)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 43357LG71 Hitachi Capital America Corp.1,499,865.00--(1,500,000.00) --225.00(90.00)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27743JGC1 Eastman Chemical Company1,599,728.00--(1,600,000.00) --352.00(80.00)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 07588LGC6 Becton, Dickinson and Company1,599,728.00--(1,600,000.00) --356.89(84.89)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 05635MGD9 Bacardi Corporation1,599,696.00--(1,600,000.00) --384.00(80.00)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 83701LGD7 South Carolina Fuel Company, Inc.1,599,696.00--(1,600,000.00) --394.67(90.67)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 69350AGD4 Ppg Industries, Inc.1,499,715.00--(1,500,000.00) --410.00(125.00)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 46015PH94 International Paper Company-1,599,566.67-(1,600,000.00) --433.33--- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 0255E2GF1 American Electric Power Company, Inc.1,599,648.00--(1,600,000.00) --491.56(139.56)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27805AJE8 Eaton Corporation-1,099,494.00-(1,100,000.00) --506.00--- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 28103AGJ7 Edison International1,599,584.00--(1,600,000.00) --506.22(90.22)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 69430LGJ1 Pacific Gas and Electric Company1,599,584.00--(1,600,000.00) --528.89(112.89)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 25737LGK0 Dominion Gas Holdings, LLC1,599,552.00--(1,600,000.00) --568.00(120.00)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 69339EHJ8 PG&E Corporation-999,416.67-(1,000,000.00) --583.33--- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 47836JGV5 Johnson Controls, Inc.1,000,000.00--(1,000,000.00) --583.34(583.34)-- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 44890MK43 Hyundai Capital America-824,365.43----585.7640.56824,991.75- 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 08465RJP7 Berkshire Hathaway Energy Company-1,099,412.72-(1,100,000.00) --587.28--- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 43357LKB7 Hitachi Capital America Corp.-1,099,096.16----592.17179.67 1,099,868.00 - 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 77434LJC2 Rockwell Collins, Inc.-1,099,401.12-(1,100,000.00) --598.88--- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 83700EJD1 South Carolina Electric & Gas Company-1,099,370.87-(1,100,000.00) --629.13--- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 78355AJM7 Ryder System, Inc.-1,099,358.34-(1,100,000.00) --641.66--- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 83701LJE2 South Carolina Fuel Company, Inc.-1,099,335.41-(1,100,000.00) --664.59--- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 82484LJC1 Shiseido Americas Corporation-1,299,332.67-(1,300,000.00) --667.33--- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 27743JHC0 Eastman Chemical Company-1,599,318.67-(1,600,000.00) --681.33--- 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6821A2JM0 Omnicom Capital Inc.-1,099,317.69-(1,100,000.00) --682.31--- STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by AccountQuarter ended September 30, 2016Page 11 of 33ATTACHMENT 447 Source Account Account Identifier DescriptionBeginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base SalesBase Maturities and Redemptions Base PaydownsNet Total Realized Gain/LossBase Amortization/AccretionBase Change In Net Unrealized Gain/LossEnding Base Market ValueEnding Accrued Income BalanceSTAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by AccountQuarter ended September 30, 2016256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 44890MGN6 Hyundai Capital America1,599,472.00 - - (1,600,000.00) - - 700.00 (172.00) - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6362P2GR1 National Grid USA1,599,408.00 - - (1,600,000.00) - - 714.67 (122.67) - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 82484LJC1 Shiseido Americas Corporation- 1,099,257.50 - (1,100,000.00) - - 742.50 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 07787PGN2 The Bell Telephone Company of Canada Or Bell Canad1,699,439.00 - - (1,700,000.00) - - 763.59 (202.59) - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 41282JJM4 Harley-Davidson Financial Services, Inc.- 1,099,208.62 - (1,100,000.00) - - 791.38 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 07787PJL3 Bell Canada- 1,049,183.33 - (1,050,000.00) - - 816.67 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 65475LKJ0 Nissan Motor Acceptance Corporation- 1,098,780.84 - - - - 855.55 121.61 1,099,758.00 - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 92780JH20 Virginia Electric and Power Company1,349,257.50 - - (1,350,000.00) - - 864.00 (121.50) - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 58507AKH5 Medtronic Global Holdings S.C.A.- 1,098,773.19 - - - - 869.92 125.89 1,099,769.00 - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 69430LHG6 Pacific Gas and Electric Company- 1,599,128.90 - (1,600,000.00) - - 871.10 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 83701LHB0 South Carolina Fuel Company, Inc.- 1,599,128.90 - (1,600,000.00) - - 871.10 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 05333THG1 AutoZone, Inc.- 1,599,097.78 - (1,600,000.00) - - 902.22 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 91842LJE5 VW Credit, Inc.- 1,099,090.97 - (1,100,000.00) - - 909.03 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 60920VGU0 Mondelez International, Inc.1,699,286.00 - - (1,700,000.00) - - 918.00 (204.00) - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 0255E2HJ2 American Electric Power Company, Inc.- 1,299,059.67 - (1,300,000.00) - - 940.33 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 58507AHP1 Medtronic Global Holdings S.C.A.- 1,599,059.10 - (1,600,000.00) - - 940.90 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 44890MHS4 Hyundai Capital America- 1,599,059.10 - (1,600,000.00) - - 940.90 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 88513AKQ4 Thomson Reuters Corporation- 998,443.06 - - - - 950.00 296.94 999,690.00 - 256350001LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 74432JJS1 Prudential Financial, Inc.- 1,099,037.80 - (1,100,000.00) - - 962.20 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 25737LHN3 Dominion Gas Holdings, LLC- 1,599,035.55 - (1,600,000.00) - - 964.45 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 41282JH20 Harley-Davidson Financial Services, Inc.1,599,120.00 - - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,009.78 (129.78) - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 83700EGT9 South Carolina Electric & Gas Company1,699,320.00 - - (1,700,000.00) - - 1,043.61 (363.61) - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 3454G0KK3 Ford Motor Credit Company LLC- 1,098,475.88 - - - - 1,051.12 209.00 1,099,736.00 - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 66807MHF7 NorthWestern Corporation- 1,598,933.33 - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,066.67 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 0255E2KC3 American Electric Power Company, Inc.- 1,098,625.00 - - - - 1,072.50 159.50 1,099,857.00 - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 91842LH98 VW Credit, Inc.- 1,598,791.10 - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,208.90 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 43357LHC9 Hitachi Capital America Corp.- 1,598,760.00 - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,240.00 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6116M2HH5 Monsanto Company- 1,598,753.33 - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,246.67 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 92939AHF0 WPP CP LLC- 1,598,753.33 - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,246.67 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 78513KHC8 S&P Global Inc.- 1,598,708.90 - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,291.10 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 6821A2HK6 Omnicom Capital Inc.- 1,598,699.55 - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,300.45 - - - 256350001 LC-Project Fund-2 Senior Lien 3454G0HH4 Ford Motor Credit Company LLC- 1,598,669.78 - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,330.22 - - - 35,484,552.30 107,546,917.87 (44,679,789.86) (77,385,000.00) (3,623.16) (0.01) 44,926.31 (1,801.14) 21,006,182.31 682.16 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue Bond9AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund5,226,632.41 293.19 (5,226,868.48) - - - - - 57.12 - 256350004 LC-PF-2 Sales Tax Revenue BondCCYUSD Cash(0.00) - - - - 0.00 - - (0.01) - 5,226,632.41 293.19 (5,226,868.48) - - 0.00 - - 57.11 - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2 912828KD1 UNITED STATES TREASURY 737,842.00 - - - - - (2,716.95) (3,408.05) 731,717.00 2,458.56 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 261747YDT9 MORGAN STANLEY307,440.00 - - - - - (2,666.08) 167.08 304,941.00 356.25 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A7JU5 FHMS K701 A2443,132.20 - - - - - (2,528.89) (1,435.71) 439,167.60 1,391.05 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828KD1 UNITED STATES TREASURY658,787.50 - - - - - (2,417.89) (3,050.86) 653,318.75 2,195.14 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 248121CYK6 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK NA264,052.50 - - - - - (2,417.61) (904.89) 260,730.00 7,500.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2209111ET6 CONSOLIDATED EDISON COMPANY OF NEW YORK INC237,912.40 - - - - - (2,334.16) (695.24) 234,883.00 6,435.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY1,979,640.00 - - - - - (2,171.24) (7,052.26) 1,970,416.50 6,775.99 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2202795HU7 COMMONWEALTH EDISON CO- 273,819.00 - - - - (1,651.07) (460.33) 271,707.60 657.33 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 259562VAT4 BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY ENERGY CO161,623.50 - - - - - (1,546.90) (280.10) 159,796.50 4,312.50 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AH6Q6 FHMS K704 A2484,571.54 - - - (2,236.24) (53.15) (1,519.42) (1,471.15) 479,291.58 945.78 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289837LAA3 TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY192,514.00 - - - - - (1,296.00) (1,379.75) 189,838.25 721.88 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY736,036.00 - - - - - (1,259.25) (5,299.75) 729,477.00 2,506.11 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 263307EAB3 NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA- 2,002,590.00 - - - - (1,218.82) (391.18) 2,000,980.00 19,800.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 213063BFU1 CALIFORNIA ST118,515.60 - - - - - (1,158.64) 241.99 117,598.95 542.50 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828KD1 UNITED STATES TREASURY326,758.60 - - - - - (1,131.32) (1,581.18) 324,046.10 1,088.79 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828KD1 UNITED STATES TREASURY316,218.00 - - - - - (1,065.23) (1,559.77) 313,593.00 1,053.67 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23133XY2H7 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS255,971.96 - - - (16,465.78) (196.41) (1,014.41) (49.37) 238,245.99 208.82 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 226442CAD6DUKE ENERGY CAROLINAS LLC124,203.52 - - - - - (1,009.35) (112.37) 123,081.80 2,727.93 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238141GRC0 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC506,720.00 - - - - - (863.26) (331.74) 505,525.00 2,276.04 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2180848HP1 CLARK CNTY NEV124,039.20 - - - - - (857.93) (82.87) 123,098.40 1,290.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 280851QDA9 CHARLES SCHWAB CORPORATION (THE)68,916.90 - - - - - (830.20) 22.25 68,108.95 345.31 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 259562VAT4 BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY ENERGY CO- 374,136.00 - - - - (727.29) (550.21) 372,858.50 10,062.50 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206416CAA6 BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA436,016.00 - - - - - (721.99) (2,380.51) 432,913.50 501.74 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2063679ZT4 BANK OF MONTREAL301,905.00 - - - - - (718.71) (265.29) 300,921.00 991.25 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A2AZ4 FHMS K009 A1349,403.92 - - - (12,341.96) (212.51) (692.02) (1,110.92) 335,046.52 759.73 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 209062XAB9 BIOGEN IDEC INC59,862.00 - - - - - (654.12) (2.03) 59,205.85 315.10 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AQT24 FHMS K708 A2307,218.00 - - - (511.89) (9.51) (623.58) (1,511.59) 304,561.43 531.59 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294974BGR5 WELLS FARGO & CO- 453,314.40 - - - - (617.63) (4,063.97) 448,632.80 3,553.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2780082AA1 ROYAL BANK OF CANADA683,862.75 - - - - - (599.40) (1,148.85) 682,114.50 1,968.75 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY446,879.00 - - - - - (583.64) (3,398.61) 442,896.75 1,521.57 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 291159HHD5 U.S. BANCORP301,437.00 - - - - - (448.85) (115.15) 300,873.00 1,870.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2891145W59 TORONTO DOMINION BANK- 461,686.50 - - - - (427.94) (1,925.56) 459,333.00 168.75 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2037833BR0 APPLE INC304,293.00 - - - - - (411.91) 780.91 304,662.00 532.06 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 213063BFU1 CALIFORNIA ST39,505.20 - - - - - (395.46) 89.91 39,199.65 180.83 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 202665WBB6 AMERICAN HONDA FINANCE CORP303,321.00 - - - - - (380.19) 680.19 303,621.00 545.33 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 217401QAC5 CITIZENS BANK NA303,927.00 - - - - - (378.76) (83.24) 303,465.00 2,261.67 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 291159HHD5 U.S. BANCORP251,197.50 - - - - - (377.22) (92.78) 250,727.50 1,558.33 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289837LAA3 TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY- 86,960.00 - - - - (363.39) 186.59 86,783.20 330.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2446438RR6HUNTINGTON NATIONAL BANK303,672.00 - - - - - (360.14) 435.14 303,747.00 2,658.33 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 26174467V5 MORGAN STANLEY243,328.06 - - - - - (358.98) 816.88 243,785.96 907.94 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 269353RET1 PNC BANK NA303,639.00 - - - - - (354.19) (728.81) 302,556.00 2,190.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 20258M0DZ9 AMERICAN EXPRESS CREDIT CORP303,192.00 - - - - - (320.71) (420.30) 302,451.00 2,281.25 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23138EKUP8 FN AL3289198,254.91 - - - (29,050.82) (1,375.74) (300.70) 555.50 168,083.15 677.82 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289114QBF4 TORONTO-DOMINION BANK402,692.00 - - - - - (299.96) 511.96 402,904.00 1,216.15 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246849LSL6 JACKSON NATIONAL LIFE GLOBAL FUNDING303,519.00 - - - - - (298.92) (409.08) 302,811.00 2,593.75 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231394GH22 FHR 2649G KA87,433.87 - - - (16,269.36) (301.82) (295.02) (86.39) 70,481.28 258.80 Page 12 of 3348 Source Account Account Identifier DescriptionBeginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base SalesBase Maturities and Redemptions Base PaydownsNet Total Realized Gain/LossBase Amortization/AccretionBase Change In Net Unrealized Gain/LossEnding Base Market ValueEnding Accrued Income BalanceSTAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by AccountQuarter ended September 30, 2016256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY304,560.00 - - - - - (272.04) (1,146.96) 303,141.00 1,042.46 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2780082AA1 ROYAL BANK OF CANADA319,135.95 - - - - - (271.77) (544.08) 318,320.10 918.75 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY304,560.00 - - - - - (270.06) (1,148.94) 303,141.00 1,042.46 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY304,560.00 - - - - - (270.06) (1,148.94) 303,141.00 1,042.46 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A7L26 FN 12M9 AQ2- 267,473.93 - - (6,894.81) (31.65) (252.50) (310.29) 259,984.67 326.87 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231374CNE2 FN 310089- 325,285.65 - - (23,648.44) (610.53) (252.09) 852.33 301,626.92 1,223.06 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136AEYG6 FN 13M9 AQ2212,133.02 - - - (967.00) (7.43) (251.71) (879.01) 210,027.88 316.95 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238147MAA3 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC102,617.00 - - - - - (244.44) (3.56) 102,369.00 580.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 205531FAP8 BB&T CORP261,385.80 - - - - - (236.83) 444.83 261,593.80 197.63 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 200138CAA6 AIG GLOBAL FUNDING401,744.00 - - - - - (225.47) 121.47 401,640.00 1,943.33 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UF5 UNITED STATES TREASURY656,981.00 - - - - - (215.04) (3,106.46) 653,659.50 1,848.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AH6B9 FHMS K015 A1148,536.86 - - - (10,664.39) (172.63) (212.96) (404.50) 137,082.39 254.55 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294988J5B9 WELLS FARGO BANK NA251,102.50 - - - - - (204.37) 261.87 251,160.00 710.79 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY131,976.00 - - - - - (190.61) (424.29) 131,361.10 451.73 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23138ELY64 FN AL4332- 255,177.70 - - (13,480.55) (1,355.90) (189.35) (1,273.36) 238,878.54 1,092.83 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY131,976.00 - - - - - (188.76) (426.14) 131,361.10 451.73 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY131,976.00 - - - - - (187.83) (427.07) 131,361.10 451.73 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY182,736.00 - - - - - (185.61) (665.79) 181,884.60 625.48 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246625HJF8 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO- 266,831.15 - - - - (184.83) (329.27) 266,317.05 808.15 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 205531FAQ6 BB&T CORP- 204,374.00 - - - - (178.99) (385.01) 203,810.00 750.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23138L1TX7 FN AM1465306,417.76 - - - (1,758.85) (3.42) (173.18) 134.01 304,616.33 421.46 256350005LC-Project Fund-Toll 236159LBW5 GEDFT 122 A300,714.00 - - - - - (172.99) 202.99 300,744.00 117.50 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2828807CM7 SIMON PROPERTY GROUP LP401,712.00 - - - - - (171.10) (304.90) 401,236.00 1,000.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 249327M2H6 KEYBANK NA401,904.00 - - - - - (164.50) 216.50 401,956.00 2,266.67 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246849LSL6 JACKSON NATIONAL LIFE GLOBAL FUNDING- 202,394.00 - - - - (153.11) (366.89) 201,874.00 1,729.17 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A85H7 FHR 3820F GJ141,761.53 - - - (10,690.48) (421.51) (142.38) (843.10) 129,664.06 362.71 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 220772JL59 CONNECTICUT ST135,848.70 - - - - - (141.42) (1,167.68) 134,539.60 541.67 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258768WAD1 MBART 131 A4350,227.50 - - - (67,793.59) (77.57) (140.99) 87.01 282,302.36 141.73 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 274256LAT6 PRINCIPAL LIFE GLOBAL FUNDING II- 361,533.60 - - - - (122.56) 118.96 361,530.00 402.63 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 259217GAY5 METROPOLITAN LIFE GLOBAL FUNDING I251,440.00 - - - - - (118.77) (633.73) 250,687.50 843.75 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 247787UAD5 JDOT 15 A3506,838.20 - - - - - (115.95) (454.70) 506,267.55 296.27 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231397SRT3 FNR 1124B PC- 274,754.71 - - (12,959.63) (487.34) (110.70) (2,532.54) 258,664.51 839.55 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571GJ7 CHAIT 141 A200,400.00 - - - - - (107.28) (172.72) 200,120.00 102.22 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258769AAD8 MBALT 15B A3175,442.75 - - - - - (106.60) 26.10 175,362.25 104.22 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246623EKD0 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO251,385.00 - - - - - (104.26) (520.74) 250,760.00 354.17 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258769AAD8 MBALT 15B A3170,430.10 - - - - - (103.56) 25.36 170,351.90 101.24 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2302154BL2 EXPORT IMPORT BANK OF KOREA200,276.00 - - - - - (102.82) 66.82 200,240.00 624.69 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238141GRC0 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC81,075.20 - - - - - (98.86) (92.34) 80,884.00 364.17 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AQVV7 FHMS K709 A1167,576.63 - - - (17,257.01) (65.40) (95.00) (345.60) 149,813.62 194.16 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 202582JGS3 AMXCA 142 A502,030.00 - - - - - (92.71) (932.29) 501,005.00 280.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2298785GK6 EUROPEAN INVESTMENT BANK275,275.00 - - - - - (85.08) (154.17) 275,035.75 1,089.50 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UF5 UNITED STATES TREASURY783,323.50 - - - - - (84.89) (3,875.36) 779,363.25 2,203.38 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A2HB2 FNR 11111B PC- 564,786.17 - - (8,698.91) (186.62) (84.67) 2,280.11 558,096.08 1,020.63 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A8G38 FN 12M13A A2125,116.33 - - - (9,456.35) (15.21) (82.63) (140.83) 115,421.32 119.86 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231677QAV1 FIFTH THIRD BANK401,984.00 - - - - - (81.82) (1,230.18) 400,672.00 531.67 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AQT24 FHMS K708 A240,962.40 - - - (68.25) (1.23) (80.55) (204.18) 40,608.19 70.88 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571GJ7 CHAIT 141 A200,400.00 - - - - - (76.07) (203.93) 200,120.00 102.22 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 200138CAA6 AIG GLOBAL FUNDING301,308.00 - - - - - (70.80) (7.20) 301,230.00 1,457.50 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255279HAH3 MANUFACTURERS AND TRADERS TRUST CO299,478.00 - - - - - (67.95) 655.95 300,066.00 574.88 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236225FLU1 G2 083038222,487.61 - - - (11,943.02) (391.83) (67.09) (306.87) 209,778.79 337.50 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 262888WAA4NGN 10R3 1A297,233.78 - - - (11,675.82) (45.60) (66.74) 69.18 285,514.80 205.09 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137A1LC5 FHR 3710F AB81,779.75 - - - (10,009.72) (121.53) (65.73) (129.25) 71,453.52 117.86 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 269353RET1 PNC BANK NA- 302,925.00 - - - - (64.32) (304.68) 302,556.00 2,190.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 274153WCE7 PRICOA GLOBAL FUNDING I- 200,466.00 - - - - (64.30) (427.70) 199,974.00 322.50 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2302154BL2 EXPORT IMPORT BANK OF KOREA- 200,196.00 - - - - (63.23) 107.23 200,240.00 624.69 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137AH6B9 FHMS K015 A146,683.01 - - - (3,351.66) (51.16) (63.17) (133.99) 43,083.04 80.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571GQ1 CHAIT 147 A120,622.80 - - - - - (62.57) (110.23) 120,450.00 73.60 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UR9 UNITED STATES TREASURY566,542.45 - - - - - (62.21) (1,305.09) 565,175.15 362.88 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238141EC49 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC- 275,558.25 - - - - (61.02) 344.27 275,841.50 201.70 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UR9 UNITED STATES TREASURY481,310.40 - - - - - (58.72) (1,102.88) 480,148.80 308.29 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2928668AF9 VOLKSWAGEN GROUP OF AMERICA FINANCE LLC300,126.00 - - - - - (54.15) (731.85) 299,340.00 1,746.67 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 262888YAA0NGN 11R1 NTS203,611.67 - - - (12,571.26) (46.81) (53.15) 57.16 190,997.61 123.19 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 290261XHJ4 UBS AG (STAMFORD BRANCH)- 250,817.50 - - - - (52.33) (60.17) 250,705.00 54.05 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2298785GK6 EUROPEAN INVESTMENT BANK300,300.00 - - - - - (48.64) (212.36) 300,039.00 1,188.54 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY55,836.00 - - - - - (48.60) (211.55) 55,575.85 191.12 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 26174467V5 MORGAN STANLEY70,676.20 - - - - - (46.89) 179.89 70,809.20 263.72 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238378NNA7 GNR 13194 AB579,059.70 - - - (55,132.90) (355.81) (46.15) (2,800.27) 520,724.57 970.82 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 262888WAA4NGN 10R3 1A220,173.17 - - - (8,648.76) (30.60) (44.87) 43.50 211,492.44 151.92 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294988J5E3 WELLS FARGO BANK NA- 255,731.85 - - - - (42.02) 641.27 256,331.10 383.68 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23133EECD0 FEDERAL FARM CREDIT BANKS FUNDING CORP499,865.00 - - - - - (38.57) 543.57 500,370.00 85.83 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265819WAC7 NORTH CAROLINA EASTN MUN PWR AGY REV35,394.45 - - - - - (35.82) (19.13) 35,339.50 175.26 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137ANLP8 FHMS K501 A255,579.46 - - - (50,977.06) (33.38) (34.67) 54.10 4,588.45 6.33 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236225FGM5 G2 082903105,974.17 - - - (7,649.55) (257.93) (33.40) 206.80 98,240.08 148.68 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236225EUY6 G2 08239896,777.18 - - - (847.22) (23.21) (28.26) 855.46 96,733.95 146.68 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265819WAC7 NORTH CAROLINA EASTN MUN PWR AGY REV30,338.10 - - - - - (25.48) (21.62) 30,291.00 150.23 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23137ANLP8 FHMS K501 A241,684.59 - - - (38,232.79) (23.69) (25.48) 38.71 3,441.34 4.75 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571HB3 CHAIT 161 A500,145.00 - - - - - (25.47) 2,025.47 502,145.00 207.62 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571GJ7 CHAIT 141 A100,200.00 - - - - - (22.91) (117.09) 100,060.00 51.11 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206367XF30 BANK OF MONTREAL- 500,975.00 - - - - (19.86) (2,300.14) 498,655.00 2,576.39 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 243814KAC5 HAROT 151 A3600,948.00 - - - (28,193.56) (3.17) (17.22) (721.75) 572,012.29 266.84 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 259217GAZ2 METROPOLITAN LIFE GLOBAL FUNDING I151,486.50 - (151,359.45) - - 1,221.50 (15.26) (1,333.30) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A8G38 FN 12M13A A259,579.20 - - - (4,503.02) (0.17) (13.98) (99.49) 54,962.53 57.08 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 245818WAN6 INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK249,985.00 - - - - - (12.09) 72.09 250,045.00 110.23 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265474VAL5 NMOTR-16A-A2- 224,967.96 - - - - (6.21) (708.75) 224,253.00 154.00 Page 13 of 3349 Source Account Account Identifier DescriptionBeginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base SalesBase Maturities and Redemptions Base PaydownsNet Total Realized Gain/LossBase Amortization/AccretionBase Change In Net Unrealized Gain/LossEnding Base Market ValueEnding Accrued Income BalanceSTAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by AccountQuarter ended September 30, 2016256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 260689LAC9 MMAF 13A A360,722.07 - - - (21,862.66) (3.19) (3.66) 11.24 38,863.79 24.46 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 24581X0CJ5 INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK100,043.00 - (100,006.00) - - 3.32 (3.63) (36.69) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2166754AK7 CHEVRON PHILLIPS CHEMICAL COMPANY LLC- 100,045.00 - - - - (3.15) (138.85) 99,903.00 708.33 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2748148RV7 QUEBEC, PROVINCE OF99,764.00 - - - - - (1.58) 326.58 100,089.00 73.97 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23136A7L26 FN 12M9 AQ2- 98,783.33 - - - - (1.48) (53.49) 98,728.36 124.13 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294974BFK1 WELLS FARGO & CO300,690.00 - (300,711.00) - - 669.36 (0.90) (647.46) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 240428HPQ9 HSBC USA INC250,157.50 - - - - - (0.81) 355.81 250,512.50 306.94 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294974BFK1 WELLS FARGO & CO140,322.00 - (140,331.80) - - 307.56 (0.52) (297.23) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 205531FAP8 BB&T CORP120,639.60 - - - - - (0.41) 96.41 120,735.60 91.21 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 29AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund419,117.65 23,267,365.78 (21,276,655.13) - - - - - 2,409,828.30 - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2865622CB8 SUMITOMO MITSUI BANKING CORP251,742.50 - - - - - - (480.00) 251,262.50 836.53 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 274368CAD6 PROTECTIVE LIFE GLOBAL FUNDING- 295,000.00 - - - - - (451.35) 294,548.65 216.62 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2037833BR0 APPLE INC152,146.50 - - - - - - 184.50 152,331.00 266.03 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289114QBF4 TORONTO-DOMINION BANK125,841.25 - - - - - - 66.25 125,907.50 380.05 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 294988J5B9 WELLS FARGO BANK NA251,102.50 - - - - - - 57.50 251,160.00 710.79 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2500769GE8 KFW325,009.75 - - (325,000.00) - - - (9.75) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 244890MG14 Hyundai Capital America1,200,000.00 - - (1,200,000.00) - - - - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2CCYUSD Payable(667,717.13) - - - - - - - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2CCYUSD Receivable554,433.08 - - - - - - - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265819WAC7 NORTH CAROLINA EASTN MUN PWR AGY REV126,408.75 - - - - - - (196.25) 126,212.50 625.94 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2544587B98 LOS ANGELES CALIF MUN IMPT CORP LEASE REV163,928.00 - - - - - - (835.20) 163,092.80 1,562.67 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 202665WBB6 AMERICAN HONDA FINANCE CORP121,328.40 - - - - - - 120.00 121,448.40 218.13 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2477877AD6 JDOT 14B A3361,958.05 - - - (66,256.72) 0.00 - (27.83) 295,673.50 140.55 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 231374CNE2 FN 310089- - - - - - - - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2937308AZ7 WBRP 3.2 WASHINGTON BIOMEDICAL RESH PPTYS WASH LE95,666.90 - - - - - - (304.00) 95,362.90 117.56 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255279HAA8 MANUFACTURERS AND TRADERS TRUST CO400,908.00 - - - - - 0.01 (984.01) 399,924.00 386.67 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2842434CN0 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GAS CO252,417.50 - - - - - 0.64 (798.14) 251,620.00 1,140.97 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255315FAB6 MMAF 16A A2275,269.50 - - - - - 0.95 230.05 275,500.50 169.89 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 265478QAD0 NALT 16A A3155,469.65 - - - - - 0.99 (138.94) 155,331.70 102.64 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 20258M0DZ9 AMERICAN EXPRESS CREDIT CORP151,596.00 - - - - - 1.11 (371.61) 151,225.50 1,140.63 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 213607RAB6 CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE- 429,922.60 - - - - 1.75 79.95 430,004.30 477.78 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 269353RET1 PNC BANK NA253,032.50 - (252,397.50) - - 2,424.40 2.43 (3,061.84) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258769AAD8 MBALT 15B A3255,645.15 - - - - - 3.92 (121.22) 255,527.85 151.87 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 245950KBY5 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORP99,994.00 - - (100,000.00) - - 4.51 1.49 - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2477877AD6 JDOT 14B A390,489.51 - - - (16,564.18) 5.28 4.87 (17.10) 73,918.38 35.14 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246849LSL6 JACKSON NATIONAL LIFE GLOBAL FUNDING151,759.50 - - - - - 6.44 (360.44) 151,405.50 1,296.88 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 245950KBY5 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORP499,970.00 - - (500,000.00) - - 6.69 23.31 - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 225152RVQ3 DEUTSCHE BANK AG (LONDON BRANCH)14,984.70 - (14,971.55) - - (18.07) 6.82 (1.90) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258772PAC2 MBART 151 A2B268,822.80 - - - (86,439.69) (33.96) 8.96 (47.67) 182,310.45 64.34 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828TG5 UNITED STATES TREASURY24,992.25 - - - - - 9.78 (25.53) 24,976.50 21.06 256350005LC-Project Fund-Toll 262944BBC7 BANK NEDERLANDSE GEMEENTEN NV299,703.00 - - - - - 9.95 320.05 300,033.00 489.37 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246623EKD0 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO180,997.20 - - - - - 12.23 (462.23) 180,547.20 255.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571BQ6 CHAIT 072A A299,793.00 - - - - - 23.00 334.00 300,150.00 76.57 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 291476PPG7 UNIVERSITY OKLA REVS82,361.60 - - - - - 23.86 (197.46) 82,188.00 469.80 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255315GAC2 MMAF 15A A335,043.40 - - - - - 24.18 (37.83) 35,029.75 20.27 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2446438RR6HUNTINGTON NATIONAL BANK253,060.00 - - - - - 24.76 37.74 253,122.50 2,215.28 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2955116AZ1 WEST PALM BEACH FLA SPL OBLIG230,535.90 - - - - - 26.61 (516.51) 230,046.00 604.39 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 217401QAC5 CITIZENS BANK NA253,272.50 - - - - - 26.75 (411.75) 252,887.50 1,884.72 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 290261XHJ4 UBS AG (STAMFORD BRANCH)250,215.00 - - - - - 29.29 460.71 250,705.00 54.05 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2748148RV7 QUEBEC, PROVINCE OF149,646.00 - - - - - 31.05 456.45 150,133.50 110.95 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2166754AK7 CHEVRON PHILLIPS CHEMICAL COMPANY LLC299,310.00 - - - - - 31.82 367.18 299,709.00 2,125.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 222546QAM9 CREDIT SUISSE AG (NEW YORK BRANCH)299,817.00 - - - - - 34.36 226.64 300,078.00 394.63 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 259217GAY5 METROPOLITAN LIFE GLOBAL FUNDING I301,728.00 - - - - - 34.45 (937.45) 300,825.00 1,012.50 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255315GAC2 MMAF 15A A3247,306.28 - - - - - 35.29 (131.62) 247,209.95 143.05 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 202582JGG9 AMXCA 132 A300,219.00 - - - - - 35.57 684.43 300,939.00 125.90 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2233851CF9 DAIMLER FINANCE NORTH AMERICA LLC- 369,448.70 - - - - 42.62 (1,548.52) 367,942.80 1,310.42 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2748148RV7 QUEBEC, PROVINCE OF124,705.00 - - - - - 45.51 360.74 125,111.25 92.46 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2828807CM7 SIMON PROPERTY GROUP LP140,599.20 - - - - - 49.90 (216.50) 140,432.60 350.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2553794AA6 MUFG AMERICAS HOLDINGS CORP50,047.50 - - - - - 49.98 (21.98) 50,075.50 117.36 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 236159LCR5 GEDFT 151 A109,654.60 - - - - - 51.83 234.17 109,940.60 34.68 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2500769FZ2 KFW249,995.00 - - - - - 54.73 (52.23) 249,997.50 460.07 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 274153WCE7 PRICOA GLOBAL FUNDING I301,020.00 - - - - - 56.40 (1,115.40) 299,961.00 483.75 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 216677AG66 Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LLC699,944.00 - - (700,000.00) - - 58.34 (2.34) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 249130TRY4 KENTUCKY HSG CORP HSG REV275,382.25 - - - - - 60.25 (376.50) 275,066.00 644.19 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UA6 UNITED STATES TREASURY120,098.40 - - - - - 61.49 (253.49) 119,906.40 252.05 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 246623EKD0 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO301,662.00 - - - - - 63.45 (813.45) 300,912.00 425.00 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 240428HPQ9 HSBC USA INC145,091.35 - - - - - 67.16 138.74 145,297.25 178.03 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 290290KAD7 USAOT 141 A4445,102.35 - - - - - 74.21 (140.96) 445,035.60 185.91 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 238378BR35 GNR 12142 AB332,298.38 - - - (2,459.12) 54.80 75.79 (1,290.10) 328,679.75 372.80 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UA6 UNITED STATES TREASURY800,656.00 - - - - - 84.04 (1,364.04) 799,376.00 1,680.33 256350005LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UA6 UNITED STATES TREASURY170,139.40 - - - - - 84.30 (356.30) 169,867.40 357.07 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206050TLY6 BANK OF AMERICA NA301,800.00 - - - - - 92.08 (647.08) 301,245.00 68.75 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2500769FZ2 KFW289,994.20 - - - - - 92.10 (89.20) 289,997.10 533.68 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 262944BBC7 BANK NEDERLANDSE GEMEENTEN NV274,727.75 - - - - - 98.70 203.80 275,030.25 448.59 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 247787UAD5 JDOT 15 A395,345.80 - - - - - 99.33 (206.68) 95,238.45 55.73 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 207787PG51 The Bell Telephone Company of Canada Or Bell Canad1,199,928.00 - - (1,200,000.00) - - 102.67 (30.67) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2161571FK5 CHAIT 124 A151,951.50 - - - - - 109.41 (743.91) 151,317.00 105.33 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 205634BG69 Bacardi U.S.A., Inc.999,920.00 - - (1,000,000.00) - - 109.72 (29.72) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2553794AA6 MUFG AMERICAS HOLDINGS CORP300,285.00 - - - - - 121.30 46.70 300,453.00 704.17 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 249327M2H6 KEYBANK NA251,190.00 - - - - - 123.35 (90.85) 251,222.50 1,416.67 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 222546QAM9 CREDIT SUISSE AG (NEW YORK BRANCH)254,844.45 - - - - - 132.58 89.27 255,066.30 335.44 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 278513KG70 S&P Global Inc.1,199,892.00 - - (1,200,000.00) - - 170.00 (62.00) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 244331BG56 HP Inc.1,999,880.00 - - (2,000,000.00) - - 175.55 (55.55) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 243357LG71 Hitachi Capital America Corp.1,199,892.00 - - (1,200,000.00) - - 180.00 (72.00) - - Page 14 of 3350 Source Account Account Identifier DescriptionBeginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base SalesBase Maturities and Redemptions Base PaydownsNet Total Realized Gain/LossBase Amortization/AccretionBase Change In Net Unrealized Gain/LossEnding Base Market ValueEnding Accrued Income BalanceSTAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by AccountQuarter ended September 30, 2016256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UA6 UNITED STATES TREASURY375,307.50 - - - - - 181.30 (781.30) 374,707.50 787.65 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 255279HAH3 MANUFACTURERS AND TRADERS TRUST CO249,565.00 - - - - - 190.27 299.73 250,055.00 479.07 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206050TKX9 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.249,182.50 - - - - - 204.97 497.53 249,885.00 127.81 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UF5 UNITED STATES TREASURY2,375,239.00 - - - - - 233.21 (12,241.71) 2,363,230.50 6,681.22 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 269430LGJ1 Pacific Gas and Electric Company899,766.00 - - (900,000.00) - - 297.50 (63.50) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 26821A2GC5 Omnicom Capital Inc.- 1,499,679.17 - (1,500,000.00) - - 320.83 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 292780JHF1 Virginia Electric and Power Company- 1,074,675.11 - (1,075,000.00) - - 324.89 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23454G0K56 Ford Motor Credit Company LLC- 599,574.17 - - - - 377.16 30.67 599,982.00 - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 282484LGJ9 Shiseido Americas Corporation- 1,374,610.42 - (1,375,000.00) - - 389.58 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 206050TKX9 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.254,166.15 - - - - - 415.99 300.56 254,882.70 130.37 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 289352HAP4 TRANSCANADA PIPELINES LTD149,365.50 - - - - - 429.70 (326.20) 149,469.00 491.77 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UR9 UNITED STATES TREASURY1,709,654.65 - - - - - 537.26 (4,663.36) 1,705,528.55 1,095.06 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828TG5 UNITED STATES TREASURY874,728.75 - - - - - 612.89 (1,164.14) 874,177.50 737.09 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 227743JHC0 Eastman Chemical Company- 1,499,330.84 - (1,500,000.00) - - 669.16 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 291842LH98 VW Credit, Inc.- 1,499,273.75 - (1,500,000.00) - - 726.25 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828TG5 UNITED STATES TREASURY699,783.00 - - - - - 756.12 (1,197.12) 699,342.00 589.67 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 283701LJE2 South Carolina Fuel Company, Inc.- 1,499,156.25 - (1,500,000.00) - - 843.75 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 258507AJC8 Medtronic Global Holdings S.C.A.- 1,499,136.66 - (1,500,000.00) - - 863.34 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 266807MHK6 NorthWestern Corporation- 1,499,093.75 - (1,500,000.00) - - 906.25 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 227805AHR1 Eaton Corporation- 1,499,018.34 - (1,500,000.00) - - 981.66 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 26821A2JD0 Omnicom Capital Inc.- 1,498,973.34 - (1,500,000.00) - - 1,026.66 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 23454G0HN1 Ford Motor Credit Company LLC- 1,498,965.84 - (1,500,000.00) - - 1,034.16 - - - 256350005LC-Project Fund-Toll 283701LGU9 South Carolina Fuel Company, Inc.1,499,370.00 - - (1,500,000.00) - - 1,057.49 (427.49) - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828UA6 UNITED STATES TREASURY2,001,640.00 - - - - - 1,061.89 (4,261.89) 1,998,440.00 4,200.82 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 22254EAMN0 Credit Suisse (USA), Inc.- 1,096,327.53 - - - - 1,141.86 374.61 1,097,844.00 - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 243357LHC9 Hitachi Capital America Corp.- 1,498,837.50 - (1,500,000.00) - - 1,162.50 - - - 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828K33 UNITED STATES TREASURY522,481.95 - - - - - 2,995.09 (1,617.11) 523,859.92 296.58 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828K33 UNITED STATES TREASURY522,481.95 - - - - - 3,005.80 (1,627.83) 523,859.92 296.58 256350005 LC-Project Fund-Toll 2912828K33 UNITED STATES TREASURY1,149,460.29 - - - - - 5,817.08 (2,785.54) 1,152,491.83 652.47 68,423,061.24 52,283,972.45 (22,236,432.43) (29,275,000.00) (698,533.02) (2,339.45) (23,016.12) (118,404.59) 68,466,592.13 202,953.07 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 63307EAB3 NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA902,934.00 - - - - - (3,330.60) 837.60 900,441.00 8,910.00 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 48121CYK6 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK NA316,863.00 - - - - - (2,516.75) (1,470.25) 312,876.00 9,000.00 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 02580ECC5 AMERICAN EXPRESS BANK LTD.263,375.00 - - - - - (2,324.18) (300.82) 260,750.00 750.00 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 38144LAB6 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC316,863.00 - - - - - (1,422.99) (2,495.01) 312,945.00 1,562.50 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 891145TN4 TORONTO DOMINION BANK702,786.00 - - - - - (1,004.55) (346.45) 701,435.00 525.00 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 89236TAY1 TOYOTA MOTOR CREDIT CORP509,715.00 - - - - - (438.04) (1,961.96) 507,315.00 4,361.11 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31385JLF3 FN 54582657,365.49 - - - (18,974.00) (355.41) (242.37) 93.47 37,887.19 187.26 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31393V2T7 FHR 2627E GY104,725.67 - - - (19,609.29) (367.15) (198.18) 242.39 84,793.44 311.00 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 166764AE0 CHEVRON CORP303,504.00 - - - - - (158.36) (702.64) 302,643.00 1,388.72 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 78011DAC8 ROYAL BANK OF CANADA701,519.00 - - - - - (82.99) (1,737.01) 699,699.00 280.00 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3136A4M89 FN 12M3B 2A1163,226.73 - - - (5,082.40) (11.13) (55.99) (886.15) 157,191.06 251.07 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31402RBG3 FN 73543931,639.20 - - - (7,981.60) (266.27) (45.96) 16.31 23,361.68 113.64 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31393EXC8 FNR 0388E TH20,629.17 - - - (3,752.87) (81.52) (40.20) (27.72) 16,726.85 61.32 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 31402RBG3 FN 7354392,462.19 - - - (621.14) (18.73) (3.28) (1.02) 1,818.03 8.84 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828K41 UNITED STATES TREASURY200,030.00 - - - - - (0.25) 8.25 200,038.00 133.85 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 9AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund75,774.61 312,261.34 (374,361.66) - - - - - 13,674.29 - 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest CCYUSD Cash- - - - - 0.00 - - - - 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 235219JS2 DALLAS TEX654,511.00 - - - - - - (2,242.50) 652,268.50 1,319.75 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 43357LKR2 Hitachi Capital America Corp.- 99,940.97 - - - - 2.36 23.67 99,967.00 - 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828J84 UNITED STATES TREASURY50,945.50 - - - - - 34.11 (325.11) 50,654.50 1.89 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 30231GAL6 EXXON MOBIL CORP423,276.00 - - - - - 43.38 (2,046.78) 421,272.60 380.63 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 78355AHP2 Ryder System, Inc.- 104,940.79 - (105,000.00) - - 59.21 - - - 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 92780JH20 Virginia Electric and Power Company149,917.50 - - (150,000.00) - - 94.66 (12.16) - - 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 46625HJL5 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO501,955.00 - - - - - 207.37 (1,117.37) 501,045.00 3,069.44 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3137ASNH3 FHMS K019 A1316,854.74 - - - (13,275.56) 221.35 261.07 (2,009.33) 302,052.26 367.12 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 94974BGF1 WELLS FARGO & CO610,176.00 - - - - - 266.80 (6,074.80) 604,368.00 2,185.83 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 0255E2KC3 American Electric Power Company, Inc.- 274,656.25 - - - - 268.13 39.88 274,964.25 - 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828RX0 UNITED STATES TREASURY952,194.50 - - - - - 369.02 (1,176.52) 951,387.00 2,100.71 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828J84 UNITED STATES TREASURY560,400.50 - - - - - 420.06 (3,621.06) 557,199.50 20.78 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 05565QCC0 BP CAPITAL MARKETS PLC301,047.00 - - - - - 459.23 (1,479.23) 300,027.00 1,661.46 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 3136A8G38 FN 12M13A A2554,086.61 - - - (41,878.15) 192.35 563.39 (1,812.65) 511,151.54 530.81 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828UZ1 UNITED STATES TREASURY700,462.00 - - - - - 565.69 (2,175.69) 698,852.00 1,830.84 256350022 LC-Sr Lien Ob Fund-1 Interest 912828UA6 UNITED STATES TREASURY1,200,984.00 - - - - - 1,963.90 (3,883.90) 1,199,064.00 2,520.49 11,650,222.42 791,799.35 (374,361.66) (255,000.00) (111,175.01) (686.52) (6,286.32) (36,644.55) 11,657,867.70 43,834.07 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EACA5 FREDDIE MAC863,744.00 - (32,241.21) - - 860.93 (3,225.97) (6,100.14) 823,037.60 320.83 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137A7JU5 FHMS K701 A2334,925.50 - (332,261.72) - - 950.32 (1,081.04) (2,533.05) - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131381Q6B7 FN 468066- 212,362.19 - - (470.06) (51.69) (926.02) 1,367.19 212,281.61 683.65 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131413XVG5 FN 958815208,638.00 - - - - - (819.25) (1,192.75) 206,626.00 751.00 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828RC6 UNITED STATES TREASURY500,569.25 - - - - - (738.02) (3,788.73) 496,042.50 1,289.15 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828XB1 UNITED STATES TREASURY1,267,548.00 - - - - - (733.60) (12,250.40) 1,254,564.00 9,631.79 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY767,580.40 - - - - - (649.01) (6,191.09) 760,740.30 2,613.52 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136G3JZ9 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION200,918.00 - - - - - (626.38) (117.62) 200,174.00 1,722.22 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828RC6 UNITED STATES TREASURY1,369,979.00 - - - - - (566.50) (11,822.50) 1,357,590.00 3,528.19 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY525,740.00 - - - - - (539.14) (4,145.86) 521,055.00 1,790.08 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137EADB2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP211,830.00 - - - - - (335.26) (886.74) 210,608.00 1,029.17 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131404WTT3 FN 78096257,622.85 - - - (8,903.17) (513.62) (279.73) 535.88 48,462.21 176.73 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AEV77 FHMS K703 A2256,268.17 - (254,262.75) - (1,127.57) 2,850.97 (264.57) (3,464.26) - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828VV9 UNITED STATES TREASURY157,324.50 - - - - - (264.56) (995.44) 156,064.50 272.96 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13128MMAK9 FH G18009105,310.88 - - - (12,762.71) (454.05) (221.02) (151.05) 91,722.04 369.45 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131381PEB0 FN 466430284,053.15 - - - (1,076.43) (32.97) (214.79) (2,188.12) 280,540.83 734.11 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137B1U75 FHMS KS01 A2- 394,917.97 - - - - (212.93) 23.76 394,728.80 798.63 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131395EZP5 FHR 2835G MD64,758.56 - - - (8,830.86) (225.28) (200.64) 321.68 55,823.46 204.13 Page 15 of 3351 Source Account Account Identifier DescriptionBeginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base SalesBase Maturities and Redemptions Base PaydownsNet Total Realized Gain/LossBase Amortization/AccretionBase Change In Net Unrealized Gain/LossEnding Base Market ValueEnding Accrued Income BalanceSTAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by AccountQuarter ended September 30, 2016256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131418AFW3 FN MA1080185,914.04 - - - (14,400.59) (314.58) (181.57) (11.45) 171,005.85 406.82 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY152,464.60 - - - - - (171.41) (1,187.24) 151,105.95 519.12 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377RVK8 GNR 10166F GP106,549.03 - - - (5,153.17) (87.64) (152.36) (636.37) 100,519.49 242.14 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377JZ89 GNR 10117A GK125,250.94 - - - (11,378.56) (289.56) (143.00) (712.74) 112,727.09 316.30 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138376GB33 GNR 116 BA340,123.53 - - - (11,832.96) (283.56) (132.10) (389.59) 327,485.32 941.69 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A7MN9 FN 12M8 A2- 308,578.13 - - - - (126.54) (582.59) 307,869.00 587.35 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138376T5Z1 GNR 104A PD147,859.20 - - - (6,912.68) (276.87) (125.69) (747.02) 139,796.95 336.52 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13138EJPZ5 FN AL2239- 360,024.87 - - - - (120.30) 1,269.90 361,174.48 839.77 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377RVK8 GNR 10166F GP63,929.42 - - - (3,091.91) (99.08) (116.06) (310.67) 60,311.69 145.28 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377RSZ9 GNR 10162D PQ51,557.90 - - - (6,125.96) (328.86) (114.89) (154.41) 44,833.79 161.99 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY120,920.20 - - - - - (104.57) (972.98) 119,842.65 411.72 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828VV9 UNITED STATES TREASURY89,150.55 - - - - - (82.10) (631.90) 88,436.55 154.68 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136AEYG6 FN 13M9 AQ2136,085.34 - - - (620.33) (1.75) (72.76) (655.63) 134,734.87 203.32 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AQT24 FHMS K708 A2174,090.20 - - - (290.08) (0.69) (65.43) (1,149.19) 172,584.81 301.24 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378XP62 GNR 14166 PL469,348.89 - - - (54,830.04) (644.93) (58.93) (4,113.57) 409,701.43 830.16 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131394DVM9 FNR 0543D PB133,253.00 - - - (11,282.48) (408.24) (58.66) (578.19) 120,925.43 485.28 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131417YKF3 FN MA0293134,943.06 - - - (6,624.94) (351.60) (53.85) 599.65 128,512.32 439.04 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131416YXJ2 FN AB338056,804.70 - - - (3,900.68) (136.73) (50.75) (233.22) 52,483.32 144.68 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AJMF8 FHMS K016 A231,911.00 - - - - - (43.77) (28.23) 31,839.00 74.19 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY52,574.00 - - - - - (42.10) (426.40) 52,105.50 179.01 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A4M48 FN 12M3A 1A1337,202.74 - - - (12,449.76) (13.35) (36.17) (2,687.09) 322,016.36 554.25 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131385XBG1 FN 5554396,907.12 - - - (2,344.17) (41.33) (27.07) 7.87 4,502.42 22.25 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137B6ZL8 FHMS K714 A132,196.44 - (29,554.29) - (2,487.55) (0.11) (21.16) (133.33) - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138376WA62 GNR 1015C PD120,908.86 - - - (12,323.10) (660.94) (17.40) (734.77) 107,172.65 338.01 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138376GRX0 GNR 1083 KB- 88,240.93 - - (87,911.26) (312.82) (16.85) - - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138377DPX8 GNR 10101E NC7,931.80 - - - (6,833.36) (29.47) (16.21) 28.92 1,081.68 2.25 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-131392JJ83 FNR 0317D HC14,622.85 - - - (3,092.18) (47.00) (13.95) 19.28 11,488.99 46.93 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378TAF7 GNR 1371A GA217,147.84 - - - (8,823.49) 5.06 (9.47) (1,416.74) 206,903.19 418.44 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13138L33G8 FN AM3498102,806.00 - - - - - (4.69) (922.31) 101,879.00 167.50 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY- 104,273.44 - - - - (2.62) (59.82) 104,211.00 358.02 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-19AMMF05B2 U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund145,788.27 766,778.06 (776,536.51) - - - - - 136,029.82 - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AEV77 FHMS K703 A2- 372.46 - - - - - - 372.46 - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1CCYUSD Receivable776.03 - - - - - - - - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1CCYUSD Cash- - - - - - - - - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A7MJ8 FN 13M8 AQ2- 467.18 - - - - - - 467.18 - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13138EJPZ5 FN AL2239- - - - - - - - - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137B03W2 FHMS K502 A234,841.29 - (25,479.10) - (9,292.53) 73.82 0.05 (143.53) - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KSL4 GNR 1374 AL230,888.25 - - - - - 1.76 (1,000.76) 229,889.25 522.12 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KWU9 GNR 1396 A- 17,053.55 - - (42.17) 0.74 1.81 (182.75) 16,831.18 20.20 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B7E3 GNR 1333 AC- 65,612.06 - - (137.89) 2.75 6.67 (752.30) 64,731.29 97.10 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KXW4 GNR 13105 A191,019.60 - - - (1,883.36) 8.61 9.23 (537.87) 188,616.21 270.28 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378BX20 GNR 12132 AB63,141.64 - - - (1,377.12) 31.67 14.80 (220.13) 61,590.86 65.42 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KWU9 GNR 1396 A64,055.26 - - - (737.35) 18.08 15.35 (234.42) 63,116.92 75.75 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378CRT6 GNR 1213E EG101,596.27 - - - (7,959.31) 242.07 16.61 (179.62) 93,716.02 156.01 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KSL4 GNR 1374 AL205,234.00 - - - - - 27.14 (915.14) 204,346.00 464.11 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B6A2 GNR 1312A AB133,138.05 - - - (729.43) 23.18 33.87 (673.03) 131,792.64 203.55 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B7F0 GNR 1333 B195,968.00 - - - - - 45.17 (1,107.17) 194,906.00 378.83 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B7E3 GNR 1333 AC219,729.49 - - - (3,041.94) 115.50 69.33 (1,101.41) 215,770.97 323.67 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138379KDN5 GNR 1529 AD192,961.84 - - - (4,059.75) 97.86 69.68 (1,288.58) 187,781.06 328.06 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A7MJ8 FN 12M8 AQ2125,947.80 - (119,980.34) - (5,732.93) 1,247.85 73.41 (1,555.79) - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828UF5 UNITED STATES TREASURY232,470.20 - (155,623.63) - - 1,563.59 78.43 (3,066.34) 75,422.25 213.23 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828UF5 UNITED STATES TREASURY96,020.30 - (95,382.23) - - 2,067.46 80.26 (2,785.80) - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378KRS0 GNR 1378 AG452,385.00 - - - - - 118.43 2,523.07 455,026.50 895.72 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828UF5 UNITED STATES TREASURY176,879.50 - - - - - 121.17 (1,015.42) 175,985.25 497.54 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-138378B7F0 GNR 1333 B244,960.00 - - - - - 129.02 (1,456.52) 243,632.50 473.54 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137EADR7 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP482,163.00 - - - - - 171.81 (2,181.06) 480,153.75 2,721.35 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137ASNH3 FHMS K019 A1316,854.74 - - - (13,275.56) 189.10 220.85 (1,936.87) 302,052.26 367.12 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13135G0D75 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION611,526.00 - - - - - 312.91 (2,658.91) 609,180.00 2,475.00 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137AUPE3 FHMS K021 A2244,012.25 - - - - - 386.50 (88.05) 244,310.70 469.22 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13136A72D3 FN 12M9 A2412,518.25 - - - - - 529.31 (1,753.81) 411,293.75 816.99 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137A7E22 FHR 3804A DA150,316.52 - - - (26,361.88) (207.62) 569.13 (1,642.81) 122,673.34 351.27 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-13137EADB2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORP582,532.50 - - - - - 588.99 (3,949.49) 579,172.00 2,830.21 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828UF5 UNITED STATES TREASURY758,055.00 - - - - - 691.25 (4,523.75) 754,222.50 2,132.30 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828VB3 UNITED STATES TREASURY1,650,560.00 - - - - - 2,726.27 (17,350.27) 1,635,936.00 10,576.09 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1912828WU0 UNITED STATES TREASURY610,569.16 - - - - - 4,104.69 2,328.76 617,002.61 161.12 19,516,171.71 2,318,680.84 (1,821,321.78) - (380,511.27) 4,535.22 (2,867.00) (120,578.82) 19,513,332.88 63,429.40 176,931,774.18 165,810,357.92 (75,987,919.13) (107,730,000.00) (1,812,054.30) (8,652.51) (4,175.23) (389,139.55) 157,273,577.95 438,320.98 Page 16 of 3352 STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments for quarter ended September 30, 2016Market SectorSecurity TypeAsset ClassIndustry GroupCredit RatingATTACHMENT 553 STAMP PortfolioToll Revenue Project Senior Lien Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended September 30, 2016Credit RatingIndustry GroupAsset ClassSecurity TypeMarket SectorATTACHMENT 654 STAMP PortfolioToll Revenue Project Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended September 30, 2016Credit RatingIndustry GroupAsset ClassSecurity TypeMarket SectorATTACHMENT 755 STAMP PortfolioSeries A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended September 30, 2016Credit RatingIndustry GroupAsset ClassSecurity TypeMarket SectorATTACHMENT 856 STAMP PortfolioToll Revenue Project Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended September 30, 2016Credit RatingIndustry GroupAsset ClassSecurity TypeMarket SectorATTACHMENT 957 STAMP PortfolioSales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended September 30, 2016Credit RatingIndustry GroupAsset ClassSecurity TypeMarket SectorATTACHMENT 1058 STAMP PortfolioSales Tax Equity Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended September 30, 2016Credit RatingIndustry GroupAsset ClassSecurity TypeMarket SectorATTACHMENT 1159 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMMCUSIP Security Type Category IssuerFinal Maturity Trade DateNext Call Date Original CostBase Market ValueUnrealized Gain/LossAccrued Income Coupon YieldCredit Rating31846V203 CASH EQUIVALENTSFIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y114,794.49 114,794.490.00 1.820.006022500037833AG5 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSAPPLE INC 0.9063% 5/03/1805/03/2018 05/03/2013250,408.81 250,585.00 176.19 371.33 1.01 0.904168562 AA+037833BB5 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSAPPLE INC 0.900% 5/12/1705/12/2017 05/13/2015119,917.20 119,997.6080.40 414.00 0.9 0.899775056 AA+037833BN9 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSAPPLE INC 1.300% 2/23/1802/23/2018 02/23/201629,987.10 30,088.20 101.10 41.17 1.3 1.296150433 AA+037833BQ2 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSAPPLE INC 1.700% 2/22/1902/22/2019 02/23/201639,993.20 40,453.20 460.00 71.78 1.7 1.686374097 AA+037833CB4 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSAPPLE INC 1.100% 8/02/1908/02/2019 08/04/201659,940.00 59,764.20 -175.80 104.50 1.1 1.106918239 AA+05581RAD8 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSBMW VEHICLE LEASE 1.340% 1/22/19 01/22/2019 02/17/2016599,929.50 601,242.00 1,312.50 245.67 1.34 1.338006371 N/A05582QAD9 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSBMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.160% 11/25/20 11/25/2020 07/20/2016454,997.95 455,104.65 106.70 87.97 1.16 1.161230905 N/A06406HCK3 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSBANK OF NY MTN 1.14499% 3/06/18 03/06/2018 03/06/2013750,701.99 751,177.50 475.51 596.35 1.28 1.143139314A084664CD1 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSBERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 0.98859% 1/12/18 01/12/2018 01/15/2015250,349.46 250,592.50 243.04 522.86 0.97 0.985437799 AA084664CK5 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSBERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 1.300% 8/15/19 08/15/2019 08/15/2016159,844.80 160,270.40 425.60 265.78 1.3 1.301340381 AA161571HC1 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSCHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 06/15/2021 06/17/2016750,858.58 752,197.50 1,338.92 456.67 1.37 1.369465908 AAA166764AV2 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSCHEVRON CORP 1.365% 3/02/18 03/02/2018 03/03/2015499,970.00 500,880.00 910.00 549.79 1.37 1.363786230 AA-166764BA7 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSCHEVRON CORP 1.790% 11/16/18 11/16/2018 11/17/2015252,882.50 252,587.50 -295.00 1,665.69 1.79 1.773980952 AA-17275RAU6 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSCISCO SYSTEMS INC 1.650% 6/15/18 06/15/2018 06/17/2015399,932.00 403,284.00 3,352.00 1,943.33 1.65 1.638920895 AA-17275RBG6 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSCISCO SYSTEMS INC 1.400% 9/20/19 09/20/2019 09/20/2016109,877.90 110,095.70 217.80 47.06 1.4 1.400812471 AA-191216BR0 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSCOCA COLA CO THE 0.875% 10/27/17 10/27/2017 10/27/201535,984.16 35,924.04 -60.12 134.75 0.88 0.876419800 AA-191216BV1 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSCOCA COLA CO 1.375% 5/30/19 05/30/2019 05/31/2016249,825.00 250,615.00 790.00 1,155.38 1.38 1.371803697 AA-19416QDU1 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSCOLGATE PALM MTN 2.625% 5/01/17 05/01/2017 05/04/2011513,597.43 510,125.75 -3,471.68 5,523.44 2.632.602333674 AA-30231GAL6 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSEXXON MOBIL 1.305% 3/06/1803/06/2018 03/06/2015460,000.00 461,393.80 1,393.80 416.88 1.31 1.302369214 AA+30231GAP7 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSEXXON MOBIL 1.708% 3/01/1903/01/2019 03/03/201640,000.00 40,426.40 426.40 56.93 1.71 1.694478065 AA+30231GAU6 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSEXXON MOBIL 1.439% 3/01/1803/01/2018 03/03/201640,000.00 40,167.20 167.20 47.97 1.44 1.433124191 AA+31680GAB2 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSFIFTH THIRD AUTO TRU 1.020% 5/15/18 05/15/2018 11/05/201598,102.77 98,122.1319.36 44.47 1.02 1.019765454 N/A36159LCN4 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSGE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.93036% 10/20/19 10/20/2019 10/21/2014475,198.14 475,256.5058.36 135.03 0.98 0.929875265 N/A36962G2G8 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSGEN ELEC CAP CRP MTN 5.400% 2/15/17 02/15/2017 02/13/2007106,285.76 105,695.20 -590.56 717.60 5.4 5.324183625 AA-36962G3H5 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSGEN ELEC CAP CRP MTN 5.625% 9/15/17 09/15/2017 09/24/2007521,755.00 521,355.00 -400.00 1,250.00 5.63 5.405171668 AA-47787UAB9 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSJOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18 02/15/2018 03/11/2015146,062.98 146,024.19 -38.79 56.48 0.87 0.870208850 N/A47788NAC2 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSJOHN DEERE OWNER 1.250% 6/15/20 06/15/2020 07/27/2016274,978.11 275,423.50 445.39 152.78 1.25 1.249200512 N/A48125LRD6 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSJP MORGAN CHASE MT 1.0556% 6/14/17 06/14/2017 06/19/2015750,000.00 750,067.5067.50 373.86 1.26 1.055504805 A+58933YAH8 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSMERCK CO INC 0.9861% 5/18/18 05/18/2018 05/20/2013751,549.92 753,015.00 1,465.08 903.92 1.16 0.982132086 AA594918BF0 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSMICROSOFT CORP 1.300% 11/03/18 11/03/2018 11/03/2015752,615.00 753,660.00 1,045.00 4,008.33 1.3 1.294949696 AAA650119AD2 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSNEW YORK UNIVERSITY 0.898% 7/01/17 07/01/2017 04/16/2015200,000.00 199,670.00 -330.00 449.00 0.9 0.899475139 AA-650119AE0 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSNEW YORK UNIVERSITY 1.315% 7/01/18 07/01/2018 04/16/2015120,000.00 120,073.2073.20 394.50 1.32 1.315723648 AA-717081DP5 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSPFIZER INC 0.76766% 5/15/1705/15/2017 05/15/2014250,006.66 250,252.50 245.84 250.56 0.97 0.767035031 AA717081DU4 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSPFIZER INC 1.450% 6/03/1906/03/2019 06/03/2016249,715.00 251,482.50 1,767.50 1,188.19 1.45 1.446239777 AA89236TAY1 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSTOYOTA MOTOR MTN 2.000% 10/24/18 10/24/2018 10/24/2013346,388.60 344,974.20 -1,414.40 2,965.56 2 1.975367171 AA-89236TCX1 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSTOYOTA MOTOR MTN 1.200% 4/06/18 04/06/2018 04/08/2016249,940.00 250,072.50 132.50 1,441.67 1.2 1.201465788 AA-89237CAD3 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSTOYOTA AUTO RECEIV 1.270% 5/15/19 05/15/2019 06/17/2015499,972.95 501,165.00 1,192.05 282.22 1.27 1.267503019 AAA89237KAD5 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSTOYOTA AUTO 1.250% 3/16/20 03/16/2020 03/02/2016199,988.66 200,452.00 463.34 111.11 1.25 1.248177661 AAA90331HMQ3 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSUS BANK NA MTN 1.350% 1/26/18 01/26/2018 01/27/2015 12/26/2017 500,492.68 500,795.00 302.32 1,218.75 1.35 1.347776169 AA-91159HHE3 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSUS BANCORP MTN 1.950% 11/15/18 11/15/2018 11/07/2013 10/15/2018 254,410.00 253,175.00 -1,235.00 1,841.67 1.95 1.926934593 A+92867VAB6 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSVOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17 06/20/2017 03/05/201540,331.26 40,369.3838.12 10.73 0.87 0.870008700 N/A94974BFK1 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSWELLS FARGO MTN 1.2681% 4/23/18 04/23/2018 04/23/2013501,610.90 501,175.00 -435.90 1,232.88 1.34 1.265341555A94974BFW5 CORPORATE OBLIGATIONSWELLS FARGO COM MTN 1.150% 6/02/17 06/02/2017 06/03/2014500,234.56 499,550.00 -684.56 1,900.69 1.15 1.151070496A13063CFD7 MUNICIPAL OBLIGATIONSCALIFORNIA ST 1.250% 11/01/16 11/01/2016 11/05/2013350,872.08 350,143.50 -728.58 1,822.92 1.25 1.249762545 AA-54473ERP1 MUNICIPAL OBLIGATIONSLOS ANGELES CNTY CA 1.507% 12/01/17 12/01/2017 09/02/201525,000.00 25,110.00 110.00 125.58 1.51 1.501788793 AA54473ERQ9 MUNICIPAL OBLIGATIONSLOS ANGELES CNTY CA 2.036% 12/01/18 12/01/2018 09/02/201550,000.00 50,258.00 258.00 339.33 2.04 2.015981306AA6055806F1MUNICIPAL OBLIGATIONSMISSISSIPPI ST SER D 3.381% 11/01/18 11/01/2018 11/10/2010104,642.76 104,987.00 344.24 1,408.75 3.38 3.227684964 AA702282ND2 MUNICIPAL OBLIGATIONSPASADENA CA UNIF 1.861% 11/01/18 11/01/2018 03/20/2014251,500.33 254,067.50 2,567.17 1,938.54 1.86 1.834328858 A+91412GD36 MUNICIPAL OBLIGATIONSUNIV OF CA 1.169% 5/15/1905/15/2019 04/20/2016140,000.00 139,927.20 -72.80 731.92 1.17 1.173470924 AA91412GPZ2 MUNICIPAL OBLIGATIONSUNIV OF CA 1.296% 5/15/1805/15/2018 03/14/2013251,067.50 251,092.5025.00 1,224.00 1.3 1.291917541 AA91412GWU5 MUNICIPAL OBLIGATIONSUNIV CALIFORNIA CA 1.418% 5/15/18 05/15/2018 03/25/2015250,000.00 251,582.50 1,582.50 1,339.22 1.42 1.410832969 AA91412GWV3 MUNICIPAL OBLIGATIONSUNIV OF CA 2.003% 5/15/1905/15/2019 03/25/2015250,000.00 255,240.00 5,240.00 1,891.72 2 1.968898675 AA3130A62S5 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L B 0.750% 8/28/1708/28/2017 07/24/2015339,238.40 340,275.40 1,037.00 233.75 0.75 0.749700120 AA+3130A6LZ8 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L B DEB 0.625% 10/26/1710/26/2017 10/09/2015748,372.50 749,332.50 960.00 2,018.23 0.63 0.625869959 AA+3130A7CX1 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L B 0.875% 3/19/1803/19/2018 02/18/2016519,838.80 520,416.00 577.20 151.67 0.88 0.874816289 AA+3130A9AE1 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L B 0.875% 10/01/1810/01/2018 08/26/2016509,653.20 509,775.60 122.40 433.85 0.88 0.875744383 AA+3133EEWS5 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F F C B DEB 0.56489% 1/02/1801/02/2018 04/02/2015699,961.01 700,273.00 311.99 318.54 0.56 0.564461010 AA+3134G72P5 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L M C 1.200% 10/29/1810/29/2018 10/29/2015 10/29/2016 500,000.00 500,065.0065.00 2,533.33 1.2 1.200000000 AA+3134G8L98 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L M C M T N 1.050% 2/26/1802/26/2018 02/26/2016 11/26/2016 500,000.00 500,025.0025.00 510.42 1.05 1.049632629 AA+3134G9AF4 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L M C M T N 1.050% 4/26/1804/26/2018 04/26/2016 07/26/2016 689,724.00 690,248.40 524.40 3,126.39 1.05 1.049916007 AA+3134G9UY1 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L M C M T N 1.000% 6/29/1806/29/2018 06/29/2016 12/29/2016 510,000.00 509,495.10 -504.90 1,303.33 1 0.999990000 AA+3134GAJQ8 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L M C M T N 1.150% 9/14/1809/14/2018 09/14/2016 12/14/2016 510,000.00 510,000.000.00 276.96 1.15 1.149965501 AA+Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category for Quarter ended September 30, 2016ATTACHMENT 1260 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMMCUSIP Security Type Category IssuerFinal Maturity Trade DateNext Call Date Original CostBase Market ValueUnrealized Gain/LossAccrued Income Coupon YieldCredit RatingPayden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category for Quarter ended September 30, 20163135G0E58 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F N M A DEB 1.125% 10/19/18 10/19/2018 09/01/2015 529,141.40 532,745.40 3,604.00 2,683.13 1.13 1.120350545 AA+3135G0J53 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F N M A DEB 1.000% 2/26/1902/26/2019 02/23/2016498,820.00 500,710.00 1,890.00 486.11 1 0.999630137 AA+3135G0K77 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F N M A DEB 1.250% 6/13/1906/13/2019 06/13/2016 12/13/2016 490,000.00 489,931.40 -68.60 1,837.50 1.25 1.254126075 AA+3135G0L68 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F N M A DEB 0.750% 7/27/1807/27/2018 07/27/2016 07/27/2017 509,235.00 508,750.50 -484.50 680.00 0.75 0.752739974 AA+3135G0N33 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F N M A 0.875% 8/02/1908/02/2019 08/02/2016529,109.60 527,938.30 -1,171.30 760.03 0.88 0.879971841 AA+3135G0P49 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F N M A 1.000% 8/28/1908/28/2019 09/02/2016509,204.40 509,765.40 561.00 410.83 11.003200209 AA+3136AMTM1 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845% 9/25/18 09/25/2018 03/01/2015432,074.03 432,154.5480.51 51.60 0.72 0.724117241 N/A3137BNN26 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 07/25/2019 04/01/2016216,872.90 216,980.15 107.25 318.92 1.78 1.766872140 N/A3137BPCF4 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 10/25/2020 05/01/2016376,396.23 376,598.73 202.50 86.32 1.38 1.377060336 N/A3137EADX4 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L M C 1.000% 12/15/1712/15/2017 12/11/2015819,155.40 822,829.00 3,673.60 2,414.44 1 0.997784917 AA+3137EAEB1 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L M C M T N 0.875% 7/19/1907/19/2019 07/20/2016350,150.58 349,775.01 -375.57 605.720.88 0.880095754 AA+3137EAED7 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS F H L M C M T N 0.875% 10/12/1810/12/2018 09/16/20161,509,720.70 1,509,305.40 -415.30 550.52 0.88 0.875726853 AA+912828D98 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/17 09/15/2017 09/15/20142,302,347.61 2,307,107.00 4,759.39 1,016.57 1 0.997237652 N/A912828H94 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 2/15/18 02/15/2018 02/17/2015546,210.78 547,043.75 549.60 696.06 10.997426639 N/A912828K25 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 0.750% 4/15/18 04/15/2018 04/15/20151,241,556.92 1,250,200.00 8,643.08 4,328.89 0.75 0.750788328 N/A912828L40 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/18 09/15/2018 09/15/2015386,124.73 386,547.70 489.27 170.17 10.997774962 N/A912828M72 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 11/30/17 11/30/2017 11/30/20151,579,024.70 1,583,081.00 3,656.30 4,646.11 0.88 0.873872704 N/A912828N22 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 1.250% 12/15/18 12/15/2018 12/15/20151,246,185.73 1,241,537.40 -4,648.334,536.89 1.25 1.241421776 N/A912828N55 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 12/31/17 12/31/2017 12/31/20151,263,601.71 1,269,452.80 5,851.09 3,196.87 1 0.997307270 N/A912828N63 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/19 01/15/2019 01/15/20161,107,304.69 1,107,392.00 -1,099.452,622.96 1.13 1.120227829 N/A912828P95 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 3/15/19 03/15/2019 03/15/20161,873,484.16 1,877,162.10 3,677.94 826.52 1 0.998791462 N/A912828R51 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 5/31/18 05/31/2018 05/31/20162,527,748.96 2,535,237.10 7,488.14 7,399.22 0.88 0.874484054 N/A912828R85 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/19 06/15/2019 06/15/2016526,054.39 524,141.48 -1,912.91 1,352.95 0.88 0.877536079 N/A912828S43 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 0.750% 7/15/19 07/15/2019 07/15/20163,535,162.11 3,538,498.00 3,335.89 5,643.34 0.75 0.754838515 N/A912828TS9 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 0.625% 9/30/17 09/30/2017 10/01/20122,499,101.76 2,497,825.47 -1,276.2942.91 0.63 0.625512921 N/A912828UA6 US TREAS & AGENCY OBLIGATIONS U S TREASURY NT 0.625% 11/30/17 11/30/2017 11/30/20122,023,823.43 2,038,408.80 14,585.374,284.84 0.63 0.625901298 N/A50,600,913.52 50,677,024.56 74,307.21 109,028.99 61 Account Number: 001050990415Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMMTransaction Date Trade DateSettlement Date CUSIP DescriptionUnits Price Commissions SEC FeesMiscellaneous Fees Net Cash AmountFederal Tax Cost AmountShort Term Gain/Loss AmountLong Term Gain/Loss Amount07/01/201631846V203INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 SHARES DUE 6/30/2016 INTEREST FROM 6/1/16 TO 6/30/160.0000 0.000000- - - 1.11 - - - 07/01/2016 07/01/2016 07/01/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y1,687.0000 1.000000- - - (1,687.00) 1,687.00 - - 07/01/2016650119AD2INTEREST EARNED ON NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 0.898% 7/01/17 $1 PV ON 200000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/1/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 898.00 - - - 07/01/2016650119AE0INTEREST EARNED ON NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 1.315% 7/01/18 $1 PV ON 120000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/1/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 789.00 - - - 07/05/20163133EEWS5INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 0.50885% 1/02/18 $1 PV ON 700000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/2/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 296.83 - - - 07/05/2016 07/05/2016 07/05/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y297.9400 1.000000- - - (297.94) 297.94 - - 07/12/2016084664CD1INTEREST EARNED ON BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 0.94114% 1/12/18 $1 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/12/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 588.21 - - - 07/12/2016084664CD1AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 0.94114% 1/12/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (57.18) - - 07/13/201607/13/2016 3130A5EP0RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF F H L B 0.625% 5/30/170.0000 0.000000- - - 746.53 - - - 07/13/201607/08/201607/13/2016 3130A5EP0SOLD PAR VALUE OF F H L B 0.625% 5/30/17 /WELLS FARGO SECURITIES, LLC/XOTC 1,000,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.016 %-1,000,000.0000 1.000160- - - 1,000,160.00 (999,170.00) - 990.00 07/13/2016 07/13/2016 07/13/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y364,979.2600 1.000000- - - (364,979.26) 364,979.26 - - 07/13/201607/13/2016 912828N22PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.250% 12/15/180.0000 0.000000- - - (1,864.75) - - - 07/13/2016 07/08/2016 07/13/2016 912828N22PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.250% 12/15/18 /JPMORGAN CHASE BANK/RBS SECURI/1,950,000 PAR VALUE AT 101.40234359 %1,950,000.0000 1.014023- - - (1,977,345.70) 1,977,345.70 - - 07/13/201607/13/2016 912828SS0RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/170.0000 0.000000- - - 2,352.47 - - - 07/13/2016 07/08/2016 07/13/2016 912828SS0SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/17 /CREDIT SUISSE SECURITIES (USA)/1,337,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.25 %-1,337,000.0000 1.002500- - - 1,340,342.50 (1,339,768.77) 573.73 - 07/13/2016912828SS0AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 4/30/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (131.80) - - 07/14/20163137EADV8INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C 0.750% 7/14/17 $1 PV ON 800000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/14/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 3,000.00 - - - 07/14/2016 07/14/2016 07/14/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y3,000.0000 1.000000- - - (3,000.00) 3,000.00 - - 07/15/2016161571HC1AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (147.40) - - 07/15/2016161571HC1INTEREST EARNED ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 799.17 - - - 07/15/2016 07/15/2016 07/15/2016 31680GAB2PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF FIFTH THIRD AUTO TRU 1.020% 5/15/18-17,378.8300 0.000000- - - 17,378.83 (17,378.35) 0.48 - 07/15/201631680GAB2INTEREST EARNED ON FIFTH THIRD AUTO TRU 1.020% 5/15/18 $1 PV ON 126.5400 SHARES DUE 7/15/2016 $0.00085/PV ON 148,871.28 PV DUE 7/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 126.54 - - - 07/15/2016 07/15/2016 07/15/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y25,938.6900 1.000000- - - (25,938.69) 25,938.69 - - 07/15/2016 07/15/2016 07/15/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y31,433.5000 1.000000- - - (31,433.50) 31,433.50 - - 07/15/2016 07/15/2016 07/15/2016 47787UAB9PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18-24,970.7900 0.000000- - - 24,970.79 (24,969.18) - 1.61 07/15/201647787UAB9INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18 $1 PV ON 168.7300 SHARES DUE 7/15/2016 $0.00072/PV ON 232,733.39 PV DUE 7/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 168.73 - - - 07/15/201689237CAD3INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO RECEIV 1.270% 5/15/19 $1 PV ON 529.1700 SHARES DUE 7/15/2016 $0.00106/PV ON 500,000.00 PV DUE 7/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 529.17 - - - 07/15/201689237KAD5INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.250% 3/16/20 $1 PV ON 208.3300 SHARES DUE 7/15/2016 $0.00104/PV ON 200,000.00 PV DUE 7/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 208.33 - - - 07/15/2016912828H37INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 1/15/18 $1 PV ON 2015000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 8,815.63 - - - 07/15/2016912828WT3AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 7/15/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (829.63) - - 07/15/2016912828WT3INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 7/15/17 $1 PV ON 1000000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 4,375.00 - - - 07/18/2016 07/18/2016 07/18/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y203.3300 1.000000- - - (203.33) 203.33 - - 07/18/2016 07/18/2016 07/18/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y200,484.3800 1.000000- - - (200,484.38) 200,484.38 - - 07/18/201643814NAC9INTEREST EARNED ON HONDA AUTO 1.570% 12/18/19 $1 PV ON 200000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/18/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 203.33 - - - 07/18/2016 07/13/2016 07/18/2016 43814NAC9SOLD PAR VALUE OF HONDA AUTO 1.570% 12/18/19 /TORONTO DOMINION SECURITIES (U/200,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.242188 %-200,000.0000 1.002422- - - 200,484.38 (199,971.58) 512.80 - 07/20/201605581RAD8INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE LEASE 1.340% 1/22/19 $1 PV ON 670.0000 SHARES DUE 7/20/2016 $0.00112/PV ON 600,000.00 PV DUE 7/20/160.0000 0.000000- - - 670.00 - - - Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction ReportQuarter ended September 30, 2016Page 26 of 33ATTACHMENT 1362 Account Number: 001050990415Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMMTransaction Date Trade DateSettlement Date CUSIP DescriptionUnits Price Commissions SEC FeesMiscellaneous Fees Net Cash AmountFederal Tax Cost AmountShort Term Gain/Loss AmountLong Term Gain/Loss AmountPayden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction ReportQuarter ended September 30, 201607/20/2016 07/12/2016 07/20/2016 05582QAD9PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.160% 11/25/20 /J.P. MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/455,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.99954945 %455,000.0000 0.999995 - - - (454,997.95) 454,997.95 - - 07/20/201607/20/2016 3137EADZ9RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF F H L M C M T N 1.125% 4/15/190.0000 0.000000- - - 1,078.44 - - - 07/20/2016 07/19/2016 07/20/2016 3137EADZ9SOLD PAR VALUE OF F H L M C M T N 1.125% 4/15/19 /BONY/TORONTO DOMINION SECURITI/290,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.573 %-290,000.0000 1.005730- - - 291,661.70 (289,904.30) 1,757.40 - 07/20/2016 07/19/201607/20/2016 3137EAEB1PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L M C M T N 0.875% 7/19/19 /PERSHING LLC/351,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.758 %351,000.0000 0.997580- - - (350,150.58) 350,150.58 - - 07/20/2016 07/20/2016 07/20/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y18,835.4300 1.000000- - - (18,835.43) 18,835.43 - - 07/20/2016 07/20/2016 07/20/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-450,052.2000 1.000000- - - 450,052.20 (450,052.20) - - 07/20/201636159LCN4AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.89805% 10/20/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (12.66) - - 07/20/201636159LCN4INTEREST EARNED ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.89805% 10/20/19 $1 PV ON 561.2800 SHARES DUE 7/20/2016 $0.00075/PV ON 750,000.00 PV DUE 7/20/160.0000 0.000000- - - 561.28 - - - 07/20/201607/20/2016 912828R85RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/190.0000 0.000000- - - 51.04 - - - 07/20/2016 07/19/2016 07/20/2016 912828R85SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/19 /JPMORGAN CHASE BANK/RBS SECURI/61,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.121094 %-61,000.0000 1.001211- - - 61,073.87 (61,252.37) (178.50) - 07/20/2016912828R85AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (141.48) - - 07/20/2016 07/20/2016 07/20/2016 92867VAB6PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF VOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17-18,766.6700 0.000000- - - 18,766.67 (18,748.19) - 18.48 07/20/201692867VAB6INTEREST EARNED ON VOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17 $1 PV ON 68.7600 SHARES DUE 7/20/2016 $0.00072/PV ON 94,849.10 PV DUE 7/20/160.0000 0.000000- - - 68.76 - - - 07/22/2016 07/22/2016 07/22/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y274,240.8700 1.000000- - - (274,240.87) 274,240.87 - - 07/22/201607/22/2016 36159LCN4RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.89805% 10/20/190.0000 0.000000- - - 14.31 - - - 07/22/2016 07/19/2016 07/22/2016 36159LCN4SOLD PAR VALUE OF GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.89805% 10/20/19 /MITSUBISHI UFJ SECURITIES (USA/XOTC 275,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.718749 %-275,000.0000 0.997187- - - 274,226.56 (275,123.66) - (897.10) 07/22/201636159LCN4AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.89805% 10/20/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (0.84) - - 07/25/2016TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 06/01/2016 THRU 06/30/2016 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT0.00000.000000- - - (527.81) - - - 07/25/2016 07/25/2016 07/25/2016 3136AMTM1PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845% 9/25/18-485.8400 67.972625- - - 485.84 (485.72) - 0.12 07/25/20163136AMTM1INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845% 9/25/18 $1 PV ON 242.6400 SHARES DUE 7/25/2016 $0.00054/PV ON 448,847.71 PV DUE 7/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 242.64 - - - 07/25/2016 07/25/2016 07/25/2016 3137BLVY1PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.639% 10/25/19-957.2900 1,184.985741- - - 957.29 (954.89) 2.40 - 07/25/20163137BLVY1INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.639% 10/25/19 $1 PV ON 191.6600 SHARES DUE 7/25/2016 $0.00137/PV ON 140,325.01 PV DUE 7/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 191.66 - - - 07/25/20163137BNN26AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (54.39) - - 07/25/20163137BNN26INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 $1 PV ON 318.9200 SHARES DUE 7/25/2016 $0.00148/PV ON 215,000.00 PV DUE 7/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 318.92 - - - 07/25/2016 07/25/2016 07/25/2016 3137BPCF4PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20-1,007.4000 1,126.042287- - - 1,007.40 (1,007.39) 0.01 - 07/25/20163137BPCF4INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 $1 PV ON 451.1900 SHARES DUE 7/25/2016 $0.00115/PV ON 393,481.85 PV DUE 7/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 451.19 - - - 07/25/201607/25/2016 07/25/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y200,809.8600 1.000000- - - (200,809.86) 200,809.86 - - 07/25/2016 07/25/2016 07/25/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y4,729.8700 1.000000- - - (4,729.87) 4,729.87 - - 07/25/201607/25/2016 912828M72RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 11/30/170.0000 0.000000- - - 262.98 - - - 07/25/2016 07/22/2016 07/25/2016 912828M72SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 11/30/17 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./XOTC 200,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.273438 %-200,000.0000 1.002734- - - 200,546.88 (199,636.53) 910.35 - 07/25/2016912828M72ACCREDITED DISCOUNT ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 11/30/17 MARKET DISCOUNT0.0000 0.000000- - - - 159.99 - - 07/25/2016912828M72AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 11/30/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (144.94) - - 07/25/201694974BFK1AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON WELLS FARGO MTN 1.2681% 4/23/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (227.06) - - 07/25/201694974BFK1INTEREST EARNED ON WELLS FARGO MTN 1.2681% 4/23/18 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/23/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 1,602.74 - - - 07/26/2016 07/26/2016 07/26/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y3,375.0000 1.000000- - - (3,375.00) 3,375.00 - - Page 27 of 3363 Account Number: 001050990415Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMMTransaction Date Trade DateSettlement Date CUSIP DescriptionUnits Price Commissions SEC FeesMiscellaneous Fees Net Cash AmountFederal Tax Cost AmountShort Term Gain/Loss AmountLong Term Gain/Loss AmountPayden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction ReportQuarter ended September 30, 201607/26/201690331HMQ3AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON US BANK NA MTN 1.350% 1/26/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (171.25) - - 07/26/201690331HMQ3INTEREST EARNED ON US BANK NA MTN 1.350% 1/26/18 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 7/26/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 3,375.00 - - - 07/27/2016 07/07/2016 07/27/2016 3135G0L68PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F N M A DEB 0.750% 7/27/18 /NOMURA SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/510,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.85 %510,000.0000 0.998500- - - (509,235.00) 509,235.00 - - 07/27/2016 07/27/2016 07/27/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-784,213.1100 1.000000- - - 784,213.11 (784,213.11) - - 07/27/2016 07/19/2016 07/27/2016 47788NAC2PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.250% 6/15/20 /RBC CAPITAL MARKETS, LLC/275,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.99204 %275,000.0000 0.999920- - - (274,978.11) 274,978.11 - - 08/01/201631846V203INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 SHARES DUE 7/31/2016 INTEREST FROM 7/1/16 TO 7/31/160.0000 0.000000- - - 1.70 - - - 08/02/20163133EEWS5INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 0.50505% 1/02/18 $1 PV ON 700000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/2/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 304.43 - - - 08/02/2016 07/29/2016 08/02/2016 3135G0N33PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F N M A 0.875% 8/02/19 /GOLDMAN, SACHS & CO./530,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.832 %530,000.0000 0.998320- - - (529,109.60) 529,109.60 - - 08/02/2016 08/02/2016 08/02/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y3,272.8800 1.000000- - - (3,272.88) 3,272.88 - - 08/02/201608/02/2016 912828R85RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/190.0000 0.000000- - - 608.20 - - - 08/02/2016 07/29/2016 08/02/2016 912828R85SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/19 /SOCIETE GENERALE NY/530,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.277009 %-530,000.0000 1.002770- - - 531,468.15 (532,166.01) (697.86) - 08/02/2016912828R85AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (84.36) - - 08/03/2016037833AG5AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON APPLE INC 0.9063% 5/03/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (57.62) - - 08/03/2016037833AG5INTEREST EARNED ON APPLE INC 0.9063% 5/03/18 $1 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/3/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 566.44 - - - 08/03/2016 08/03/2016 08/03/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y50,296.2000 1.000000- - - (50,296.20) 50,296.20 - - 08/03/2016 08/03/2016 08/03/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y566.4400 1.000000- - - (566.44) 566.44 - - 08/03/201608/03/2016 912828N55RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 12/31/170.0000 0.000000- - - 46.20 - - - 08/03/2016 08/02/2016 08/03/2016 912828N55SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 12/31/17 /MLPFS INC/FIXED INCOME/XOTC 50,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.5 %-50,000.0000 1.005000- - - 50,250.00 (49,944.73) 305.27 - 08/04/2016 07/28/2016 08/04/2016 037833CB4PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF APPLE INC 1.100% 8/02/19 /GOLDMAN, SACHS & CO./60,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.9 %60,000.0000 0.999000- - - (59,940.00) 59,940.00 - - 08/04/2016 08/04/2016 08/04/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-59,940.0000 1.000000- - - 59,940.00 (59,940.00) - - 08/09/2016084670BH0AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 1.550% 2/09/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (746.50) - - 08/09/2016084670BH0INTEREST EARNED ON BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 1.550% 2/09/18 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/9/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 3,875.00 - - - 08/09/2016 08/09/2016 08/09/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y3,875.0000 1.000000- - - (3,875.00) 3,875.00 - - 08/12/2016 08/12/2016 08/12/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y22,830.6100 1.000000- - - (22,830.61) 22,830.61 - - 08/12/2016 08/12/2016 08/12/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-33,918.5900 1.000000- - - 33,918.59 (33,918.59) - - 08/12/201608/12/2016 912828H37RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 1/15/180.0000 0.000000- - - 1,341.51 - - - 08/12/2016 08/11/2016 08/12/2016 912828H37SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 1/15/18 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./XOTC 2,015,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.222656 %-2,015,000.0000 1.002227- - - 2,019,486.52 (2,006,872.01) 12,614.51 - 08/12/2016912828H37ACCREDITED DISCOUNT ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 1/15/18 MARKET DISCOUNT0.0000 0.000000- - - - 1,074.74 - - 08/12/201608/12/2016 912828N63PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/190.0000 0.000000- - - (1,724.80) - - - 08/12/2016 08/11/2016 08/12/2016 912828N63PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/19 /BNP PARIBAS SEC CORP/2,015,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.7539062 %2,015,000.0000 1.007539- - - (2,030,191.21) 2,030,191.21 - - 08/15/2016 08/08/2016 08/15/2016 084664CK5PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 1.300% 8/15/19 /MLPFS INC/FIXED INCOME/160,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.903 %160,000.0000 0.999030- - - (159,844.80) 159,844.80 - - 08/15/2016161571HC1AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (185.11) - - 08/15/2016161571HC1INTEREST EARNED ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 856.25 - - - 08/15/2016 08/15/2016 08/15/2016 31680GAB2PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF FIFTH THIRD AUTO TRU 1.020% 5/15/18-16,155.4800 0.000000- - - 16,155.48 (16,155.04) 0.44 - 08/15/201631680GAB2INTEREST EARNED ON FIFTH THIRD AUTO TRU 1.020% 5/15/18 $1 PV ON 111.7700 SHARES DUE 8/15/2016 $0.00085/PV ON 131,492.45 PV DUE 8/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 111.77 - - - 08/15/2016 08/15/2016 08/15/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y1,593.7500 1.000000- - - (1,593.75) 1,593.75 - - 08/15/2016 08/15/2016 08/15/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y80,657.1900 1.000000- - - (80,657.19) 80,657.19 - - 08/15/201636962G2G8AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON GEN ELEC CAP CRP MTN 5.400% 2/15/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (2,274.59) - - 08/15/201636962G2G8INTEREST EARNED ON GEN ELEC CAP CRP MTN 5.400% 2/15/17 $1 PV ON 104000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 2,808.00 - - - 08/15/2016 08/15/2016 08/15/2016 47787UAB9PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18-35,765.4100 0.000000- - - 35,765.41 (35,763.11) - 2.30 Page 28 of 3364 Account Number: 001050990415Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMMTransaction Date Trade DateSettlement Date CUSIP DescriptionUnits Price Commissions SEC FeesMiscellaneous Fees Net Cash AmountFederal Tax Cost AmountShort Term Gain/Loss AmountLong Term Gain/Loss AmountPayden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction ReportQuarter ended September 30, 201608/15/201647787UAB9INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18 $1 PV ON 150.6300 SHARES DUE 8/15/2016 $0.00073/PV ON 207,762.60 PV DUE 8/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 150.63 - - - 08/15/2016717081DP5AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON PFIZER INC 0.76766% 5/15/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (2.19) - - 08/15/2016717081DP5INTEREST EARNED ON PFIZER INC 0.76766% 5/15/17 $1 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 490.45 - - - 08/15/201689237CAD3INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO RECEIV 1.270% 5/15/19 $1 PV ON 529.1700 SHARES DUE 8/15/2016 $0.00106/PV ON 500,000.00 PV DUE 8/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 529.17 - - - 08/15/201689237KAD5INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.250% 3/16/20 $1 PV ON 208.3300 SHARES DUE 8/15/2016 $0.00104/PV ON 200,000.00 PV DUE 8/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 208.33 - - - 08/15/201608/15/2016 912828D98RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/170.0000 0.000000- - - 748.37 - - - 08/15/2016 08/11/2016 08/15/2016 912828D98SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/17 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./XOTC 180,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.359375 %-180,000.0000 1.003594- - - 180,646.88 (180,198.85) - 448.03 08/15/2016912828D98AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (1,048.88) - - 08/15/2016912828H94AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 2/15/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (283.42) - - 08/15/2016912828H94INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 2/15/18 $1 PV ON 725000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 3,625.00 - - - 08/17/2016 08/17/2016 08/17/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y101,783.0700 1.000000- - - (101,783.07) 101,783.07 - - 08/17/2016 08/17/2016 08/17/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-105,081.5500 1.000000- - - 105,081.55 (105,081.55) - - 08/17/201608/17/2016 912828G20RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 11/15/170.0000 0.000000- - - 1,821.57 - - - 08/17/2016 08/16/2016 08/17/2016 912828G20SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 11/15/17 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./XOTC 815,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.210938 %-815,000.0000 1.002109- - - 816,719.14 (813,058.01) - 3,661.13 08/17/201608/17/2016 912828N63PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/190.0000 0.000000- - - (822.20) - - - 08/17/2016 08/16/2016 08/17/2016 912828N63PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/19 /BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC. FIXED IN/815,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.73828098 %815,000.0000 1.007383- - - (821,016.99) 821,016.99 - - 08/22/201605581RAD8INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE LEASE 1.340% 1/22/19 $1 PV ON 600000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/22/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 670.00 - - - 08/22/2016 08/22/2016 08/22/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y17,330.2500 1.000000- - - (17,330.25) 17,330.25 - - 08/22/2016 08/22/2016 08/22/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y670.0000 1.000000- - - (670.00) 670.00 - - 08/22/201636159LCN4AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 1.0302% 10/20/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (7.56) - - 08/22/201636159LCN4INTEREST EARNED ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 1.0302% 10/20/19 $1 PV ON 407.7900 SHARES DUE 8/20/2016 $0.00086/PV ON 475,000.00 PV DUE 8/20/160.0000 0.000000- - - 407.79 - - - 08/22/2016 08/20/2016 08/22/2016 92867VAB6PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF VOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17-16,867.3000 0.000000- - - 16,867.30 (16,850.69) - 16.61 08/22/201692867VAB6INTEREST EARNED ON VOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17 $1 PV ON 55.1600 SHARES DUE 8/20/2016 $0.00073/PV ON 76,082.43 PV DUE 8/20/160.0000 0.000000- - - 55.16 - - - 08/23/2016037833BN9INTEREST EARNED ON APPLE INC 1.300% 2/23/18 $1 PV ON 30000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/23/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 195.00 - - - 08/23/2016037833BQ2INTEREST EARNED ON APPLE INC 1.700% 2/22/19 $1 PV ON 40000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/23/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 340.00 - - - 08/23/2016 08/23/2016 08/23/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y535.0000 1.000000- - - (535.00) 535.00 - - 08/24/2016 08/24/2016 08/24/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y1,890.0200 1.000000- - - (1,890.02) 1,890.02 - - 08/24/201658933YAH8AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON MERCK CO INC 0.9782% 5/18/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (219.04) - - 08/24/201658933YAH8INTEREST EARNED ON MERCK CO INC 0.9782% 5/18/18 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/18/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 1,890.02 - - - 08/25/2016TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 07/01/2016 THRU 07/31/2016 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT0.0000 0.000000- - - (527.57) - - - 08/25/201605582QAD9INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.160% 11/25/20 $1 PV ON 455000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/25/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 513.14 - - - 08/25/2016 08/25/2016 08/25/2016 3136AMTM1PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845% 9/25/18-15,758.8800 0.000000- - - 15,758.88 (15,754.84) - 4.04 08/25/20163136AMTM1INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845% 9/25/18 $1 PV ON 254.0600 SHARES DUE 8/25/2016 $0.00057/PV ON 448,361.87 PV DUE 8/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 254.06 - - - 08/25/2016 08/25/2016 08/25/2016 3137BLVY1PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.639% 10/25/19-78,947.8900 14.368655- - - 78,947.89 (78,749.89) 198.00 - 08/25/20163137BLVY1INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.639% 10/25/19 $1 PV ON 1117.2700 SHARES DUE 8/25/2016 $0.00802/PV ON 139,367.72 PV DUE 8/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 1,117.27 - - - Page 29 of 3365 Account Number: 001050990415Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMMTransaction Date Trade DateSettlement Date CUSIP DescriptionUnits Price Commissions SEC FeesMiscellaneous Fees Net Cash AmountFederal Tax Cost AmountShort Term Gain/Loss AmountLong Term Gain/Loss AmountPayden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction ReportQuarter ended September 30, 201608/25/20163137BNN26AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (56.20) - - 08/25/20163137BNN26INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 $1 PV ON 318.9200 SHARES DUE 8/25/2016 $0.00148/PV ON 215,000.00 PV DUE 8/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 318.92 - - - 08/25/2016 08/25/2016 08/25/2016 3137BPCF4PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20-917.5700 1,236.281701- - - 917.57 (917.56) 0.01 - 08/25/20163137BPCF4INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 $1 PV ON 450.0400 SHARES DUE 8/25/2016 $0.00115/PV ON 392,474.45 PV DUE 8/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 450.04 - - - 08/25/2016 08/25/2016 08/25/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y513.1400 1.000000- - - (513.14) 513.14 - - 08/25/2016 08/25/2016 08/25/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y97,237.0600 1.000000- - - (97,237.06) 97,237.06 - - 08/26/2016 08/25/2016 08/26/2016 3130A9AE1PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L B 0.875% 10/01/18 /MLPFS INC/FIXED INCOME/510,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.932 %510,000.0000 0.999320- - - (509,653.20) 509,653.20 - - 08/26/20163134G8L98INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C M T N 1.050% 2/26/18 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/26/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 2,625.00 - - - 08/26/20163135G0J53INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A DEB 1.000% 2/26/19 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/26/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 2,500.00 - - - 08/26/201608/26/2016 08/26/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y9,836.4300 1.000000- - - (9,836.43) 9,836.43 - - 08/26/201608/26/2016 912828L40RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/180.0000 0.000000- - - 2,272.83 - - - 08/26/2016 08/25/2016 08/26/2016 912828L40SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/18 /GOLDMAN, SACHS & CO./XOTC 510,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.410156 %-510,000.0000 1.004102- - - 512,091.80 (511,469.28) 622.52 - 08/26/2016912828L40AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (347.19) - - 08/29/20163130A62S5INTEREST EARNED ON F H L B 0.750% 8/28/17 $1 PV ON 340000.0000 SHARES DUE 8/28/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 1,275.00 - - - 08/29/2016 08/29/2016 08/29/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y1,275.0000 1.000000- - - (1,275.00) 1,275.00 - - 08/30/2016 08/29/2016 08/30/2016 313384F87PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L B DISC NTS 9/14/16 /NOMURA SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/400,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.9889575 %400,000.0000 0.999890- - - (399,955.83) 399,955.83 - - 08/30/2016 08/30/2016 08/30/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y232,442.2600 1.000000- - - (232,442.26) 232,442.26 - - 08/30/2016 08/30/2016 08/30/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-231,069.9700 1.000000- - - 231,069.97 (231,069.97) - - 08/30/201608/30/2016 912828WT3RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 7/15/170.0000 0.000000- - - 437.50 - - - 08/30/2016 08/29/2016 08/30/2016 912828WT3SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 7/15/17 /BMO CAPITAL MARKETS CORP./400,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.222656 %-400,000.0000 1.002227- - - 400,890.62 (400,583.51) - 307.11 08/30/2016912828WT3AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 7/15/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (209.31) - - 09/01/201630231GAP7INTEREST EARNED ON EXXON MOBIL 1.708% 3/01/19 $1 PV ON 40000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/1/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 337.80 - - - 09/01/201630231GAU6INTEREST EARNED ON EXXON MOBIL 1.439% 3/01/18 $1 PV ON 40000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/1/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 284.60 - - - 09/01/2016 09/01/2016 09/01/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y622.4000 1.000000- - - (622.40) 622.40 - - 09/01/201631846V203INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 SHARES DUE 8/31/2016 INTEREST FROM 8/1/16 TO 8/31/160.0000 0.000000- - - 0.52 - - - 09/02/2016166764AV2INTEREST EARNED ON CHEVRON CORP 1.365% 3/02/18 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/2/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 3,412.50 - - - 09/02/20163133EEWS5INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 0.5359% 1/02/18 $1 PV ON 700000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/2/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 323.03 - - - 09/02/201608/31/2016 09/02/2016 3135G0P49PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F N M A 1.000% 8/28/19 /GOLDMAN, SACHS & CO./510,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.844 %510,000.0000 0.998440- - - (509,204.40) 509,204.40 - - 09/02/2016 09/02/2016 09/02/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y218,801.5300 1.000000- - - (218,801.53) 218,801.53 - - 09/02/201609/02/2016 912828R85RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/190.0000 0.000000- - - 963.22 - - - 09/02/2016 08/31/2016 09/02/2016 912828R85SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/19 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./XOTC 510,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.92827 %-510,000.0000 0.999283- - - 509,634.18 (512,023.13) (2,388.95) - 09/02/2016912828R85AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (137.16) - - 09/02/2016 09/02/2016 09/02/2016 977100AU0FULL CALL PAR VALUE OF WISCONSIN ST 5.050% 5/01/18 /CALLS/-200,000.0000 1.068362- - - 213,672.48 (212,255.25) 1,417.23 - 09/02/2016977100AU0AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON WISCONSIN ST 5.050% 5/01/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (2,447.31) - - 09/06/201606406HCK3AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON BANK OF NY MTN 1.14499% 3/06/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (115.84) - - 09/06/201606406HCK3INTEREST EARNED ON BANK OF NY MTN 1.14499% 3/06/18 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/6/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 2,146.86 - - - 09/06/201630231GAL6INTEREST EARNED ON EXXON MOBIL 1.305% 3/06/18 $1 PV ON 460000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/6/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 3,001.50 - - - 09/06/2016 09/06/2016 09/06/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y46,962.3200 1.000000- - - (46,962.32) 46,962.32 - - 09/06/2016 09/06/2016 09/06/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y3,394.7200 1.000000- - - (3,394.72) 3,394.72 - - Page 30 of 3366 Account Number: 001050990415Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMMTransaction Date Trade DateSettlement Date CUSIP DescriptionUnits Price Commissions SEC FeesMiscellaneous Fees Net Cash AmountFederal Tax Cost AmountShort Term Gain/Loss AmountLong Term Gain/Loss AmountPayden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction ReportQuarter ended September 30, 201609/06/201609/06/2016 912828N22RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.250% 12/15/180.0000 0.000000- - - 2,040.98 - - - 09/06/2016 09/01/2016 09/06/2016 912828N22SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.250% 12/15/18 /BNP PARIBAS SECURITIES BOND/720,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.902344 %-720,000.0000 1.009023- - - 726,496.88 (729,474.57) (2,977.69) - 09/06/2016912828N22AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.250% 12/15/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (1,685.40) - - 09/06/201609/06/2016 912828N63RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/190.0000 0.000000- - - 4,585.29 - - - 09/06/2016 09/01/2016 09/06/2016 912828N63SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/19 /UBS SECURITIES LLC/XOTC 2,830,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.625 %-2,830,000.0000 1.006250- - - 2,847,687.50 (2,849,462.95) (1,775.45) - 09/06/2016912828N63AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (558.49) - - 09/06/201609/06/2016 912828S43PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.750% 7/15/190.0000 0.000000- - - (3,834.58) - - - 09/06/2016 09/01/2016 09/06/2016 912828S43PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.750% 7/15/19 /UBS SECURITIES LLC/3,550,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.58203127 %3,550,000.0000 0.995820- - - (3,535,162.11) 3,535,162.11 - - 09/06/2016977100AU0INTEREST EARNED ON WISCONSIN ST 5.050% 5/01/18 $1 PV ON 200000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/2/2016 ACCRUED INTEREST ON 9/2/2016 FULL CALL0.0000 0.000000- - - 3,394.72 - - - 09/07/201609/07/2016 084670BH0RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 1.550% 2/09/180.0000 0.000000- - - 602.78 - - - 09/07/2016 09/01/2016 09/07/2016 084670BH0SOLD PAR VALUE OF BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 1.550% 2/09/18 /FTN FINANCIAL SECURITIES/500,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.738 %-500,000.0000 1.007380- - - 503,690.00 (502,150.07) - 1,539.93 09/07/2016084670BH0AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 1.550% 2/09/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (117.42) - - 09/07/2016 09/07/2016 09/07/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y504,292.7800 1.000000- - - (504,292.78) 504,292.78 - - 09/09/2016 09/09/2016 09/09/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-507,240.4900 1.000000- - - 507,240.49 (507,240.49) - - 09/09/201609/09/2016 912828N63PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/190.0000 0.000000- - - (1,883.15) - - - 09/09/2016 09/08/2016 09/09/2016 912828N63PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/19 /BNP PARIBAS SEC CORP/1,100,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.66406273 %1,100,000.0000 1.006641- - - (1,107,304.69) 1,107,304.69 - - 09/09/2016912828N63FED BASIS OF U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/19 ADJUSTED BY 1186.76 FIXED FEDRL TX CST FROM $1107304.69 TO $1108491.450.0000 0.000000- - - - 1,186.76 - - 09/09/2016912828N63FED BASIS OF U S TREASURY NT 1.125% 1/15/19 ADJUSTED BY -1186.76 FIXED FEDRL TX CST FROM $2029767.67 TO $2028580.910.0000 0.000000- - - - (1,186.76) - - 09/09/201609/09/2016 912828WT3RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 7/15/170.0000 0.000000- - - 798.91 - - - 09/09/2016 09/08/2016 09/09/2016 912828WT3SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 7/15/17 /BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC. FIXED IN/600,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.191407 %-600,000.0000 1.001914- - - 601,148.44 (600,848.02) - 300.42 09/09/2016912828WT3AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 7/15/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (27.24) - - 09/14/2016313384F87INTEREST EARNED ON F H L B DISC NTS 9/14/16 $1 PV ON 400000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/14/2016 400,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 %0.0000 0.000000- - - 44.17 - - - 09/14/2016 09/14/2016 09/14/2016 313384F87MATURED PAR VALUE OF F H L B DISC NTS 9/14/16 400,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 %-400,000.0000 1.000000- - - 399,955.83 (399,955.83) - - 09/14/2016 08/29/2016 09/14/2016 3134GAJQ8PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L M C M T N 1.150% 9/14/18 /BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC. FIXED IN/510,000 PAR VALUE AT 100 %510,000.0000 1.000000- - - (510,000.00) 510,000.00 - - 09/14/2016 09/14/2016 09/14/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y110,058.8400 1.000000- - - (110,058.84) 110,058.84 - - 09/14/2016 09/14/2016 09/14/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-107,976.7700 1.000000- - - 107,976.77 (107,976.77) - - 09/14/201648125LRD6INTEREST EARNED ON JP MORGAN CHASE MT 1.0556% 6/14/17 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/14/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 2,023.23 - - - 09/14/201609/14/2016 912828R85RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/190.0000 0.000000- - - 239.31 - - - 09/14/2016 09/13/2016 09/14/2016 912828R85SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/19 /NOMURA SECURITIES INTL., FIXED/110,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.835938 %-110,000.0000 0.998359- - - 109,819.53 (110,431.27) (611.74) - 09/14/2016912828R85AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.875% 6/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (29.36) - - 09/15/2016161571HC1AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (156.57) - - 09/15/2016161571HC1INTEREST EARNED ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 856.25 - - - 09/15/2016 09/15/2016 09/15/2016 31680GAB2PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF FIFTH THIRD AUTO TRU 1.020% 5/15/18-17,231.5200 0.000000- - - 17,231.52 (17,231.05) 0.47 - 09/15/201631680GAB2INTEREST EARNED ON FIFTH THIRD AUTO TRU 1.020% 5/15/18 $1 PV ON 98.0400 SHARES DUE 9/15/2016 $0.00085/PV ON 115,336.97 PV DUE 9/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 98.04 - - - 09/15/2016 09/15/2016 09/15/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y856.2500 1.000000- - - (856.25) 856.25 - - 09/15/2016 09/15/2016 09/15/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y82,958.2600 1.000000- - - (82,958.26) 82,958.26 - - 09/15/201636962G3H5AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON GEN ELEC CAP CRP MTN 5.625% 9/15/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (10,776.80) - - Page 31 of 3367 Account Number: 001050990415Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMMTransaction Date Trade DateSettlement Date CUSIP DescriptionUnits Price Commissions SEC FeesMiscellaneous Fees Net Cash AmountFederal Tax Cost AmountShort Term Gain/Loss AmountLong Term Gain/Loss AmountPayden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction ReportQuarter ended September 30, 201609/15/201636962G3H5INTEREST EARNED ON GEN ELEC CAP CRP MTN 5.625% 9/15/17 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 14,062.50 - - - 09/15/2016 09/15/2016 09/15/2016 47787UAB9PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18-25,924.8000 0.000000- - - 25,924.80 (25,923.13) - 1.67 09/15/201647787UAB9INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 0.870% 2/15/18 $1 PV ON 124.7000 SHARES DUE 9/15/2016 $0.00073/PV ON 171,997.19 PV DUE 9/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 124.70 - - - 09/15/201689237CAD3INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO RECEIV 1.270% 5/15/19 $1 PV ON 529.1700 SHARES DUE 9/15/2016 $0.00106/PV ON 500,000.00 PV DUE 9/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 529.17 - - - 09/15/201689237KAD5INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.250% 3/16/20 $1 PV ON 208.3300 SHARES DUE 9/15/2016 $0.00104/PV ON 200,000.00 PV DUE 9/15/160.0000 0.000000- - - 208.33 - - - 09/15/2016912828D98AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (193.19) - - 09/15/2016912828D98INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/17 $1 PV ON 2300000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 11,500.00 - - - 09/15/2016912828L40AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (26.70) - - 09/15/2016912828L40INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/18 $1 PV ON 695000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 3,475.00 - - - 09/15/2016912828P95AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 3/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (495.14) - - 09/15/2016912828P95INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 3/15/19 $1 PV ON 1870000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 9,350.00 - - - 09/16/201609/16/2016 3137EADV8RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF F H L M C 0.750% 7/14/170.0000 0.000000- - - 1,033.33 - - - 09/16/2016 09/15/2016 09/16/2016 3137EADV8SOLD PAR VALUE OF F H L M C 0.750% 7/14/17 /MORGAN STANLEY & CO. LLC/800,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.079 %-800,000.0000 1.000790- - - 800,632.00 (799,376.00) - 1,256.00 09/16/2016 09/15/2016 09/16/2016 3137EAED7PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L M C M T N 0.875% 10/12/18 /BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC. FIXED IN/1,000,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.994 %1,000,000.0000 0.999940- - - (999,940.00) 999,940.00 - - 09/16/2016 09/15/2016 09/16/2016 3137EAED7PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L M C M T N 0.875% 10/12/18 /BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC. FIXED IN/510,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.957 %510,000.0000 0.999570- - - (509,780.70) 509,780.70 - - 09/16/2016 09/16/2016 09/16/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-195,949.4800 1.000000- - - 195,949.48 (195,949.48) - - 09/16/201609/16/2016 912828L40RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/180.0000 0.000000- - - 14.09 - - - 09/16/2016 09/15/2016 09/16/2016 912828L40SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/18 /BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC. FIXED IN/510,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.410157 %-510,000.0000 1.004102- - - 512,091.80 (510,233.65) 1,858.15 - 09/16/2016912828L40AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (1.43) - - 09/19/20163130A7CX1INTEREST EARNED ON F H L B 0.875% 3/19/18 $1 PV ON 520000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/19/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 2,275.00 - - - 09/19/2016 09/19/2016 09/19/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y2,275.0000 1.000000- - - (2,275.00) 2,275.00 - - 09/20/201605581RAD8INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE LEASE 1.340% 1/22/19 $1 PV ON 600000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/20/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 670.00 - - - 09/20/2016 09/13/2016 09/20/2016 17275RBG6PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF CISCO SYSTEMS INC 1.400% 9/20/19 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./110,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.889 %110,000.0000 0.998890- - - (109,877.90) 109,877.90 - - 09/20/2016 09/20/2016 09/20/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-109,509.6300 1.000000- - - 109,509.63 (109,509.63) - - 09/20/2016 09/20/2016 09/20/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y19,557.0700 1.000000- - - (19,557.07) 19,557.07 - - 09/20/201636159LCN4AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.93036% 10/20/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (7.90) - - 09/20/201636159LCN4INTEREST EARNED ON GE DEALER FLOORPLA 0.93036% 10/20/19 $1 PV ON 368.2700 SHARES DUE 9/20/2016 $0.00078/PV ON 475,000.00 PV DUE 9/20/160.0000 0.000000- - - 368.27 - - - 09/20/2016 09/20/2016 09/20/2016 92867VAB6PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF VOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17-18,844.1400 125.765413- - - 18,844.14 (18,825.59) - 18.55 09/20/201692867VAB6INTEREST EARNED ON VOLKSWAGEN AUTO 0.870% 6/20/17 $1 PV ON 42.9300 SHARES DUE 9/20/2016 $0.00073/PV ON 59,215.13 PV DUE 9/20/160.0000 0.000000- - - 42.93 - - - 09/21/2016 09/21/2016 09/21/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y4.1300 1.000000- - - (4.13) 4.13 - - 09/21/2016 09/21/2016 09/21/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-200,759.7100 1.000000- - - 200,759.71 (200,759.71) - - 09/21/201647788NAC2INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.250% 6/15/20 $1 PV ON 275000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/15/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 458.33 - - - 09/21/201609/21/2016 912828L40PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/180.0000 0.000000- - - (33.15) - - - 09/21/2016 09/20/2016 09/21/2016 912828L40PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 9/15/18 /MLPFS INC/FIXED INCOME/200,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.36328 %200,000.0000 1.003633- - - (200,726.56) 200,726.56 - - 09/26/2016TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 08/01/2016 THRU 08/31/2016 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT0.0000 0.000000- - - (526.98) - - - Page 32 of 3368 Account Number: 001050990415Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMMTransaction Date Trade DateSettlement Date CUSIP DescriptionUnits Price Commissions SEC FeesMiscellaneous Fees Net Cash AmountFederal Tax Cost AmountShort Term Gain/Loss AmountLong Term Gain/Loss AmountPayden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction ReportQuarter ended September 30, 201609/26/201605582QAD9INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.160% 11/25/20 $1 PV ON 455000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/25/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 439.83 - - - 09/26/2016 09/25/2016 09/26/2016 3136AMTM1PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845% 9/25/18-418.2000 0.000000- - - 418.20 (418.09) - 0.11 09/26/20163136AMTM1INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 0.3845% 9/25/18 $1 PV ON 258.2700 SHARES DUE 9/25/2016 $0.00060/PV ON 432,602.99 PV DUE 9/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 258.27 - - - 09/26/2016 09/25/2016 09/26/2016 3137BLVY1PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.639% 10/25/19-822.3000 0.000000- - - 822.30 (820.24) 2.06 - 09/26/20163137BLVY1INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.639% 10/25/19 $1 PV ON 82.5200 SHARES DUE 9/25/2016 $0.00137/PV ON 60,419.83 PV DUE 9/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 82.52 - - - 09/26/20163137BNN26AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (56.20) - - 09/26/20163137BNN26INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 $1 PV ON 215000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/25/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 318.92 - - - 09/26/2016 09/25/2016 09/26/2016 3137BPCF4PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20-15,157.6400 0.000000- - - 15,157.64 (15,157.52) 0.12 - 09/26/20163137BPCF4INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 $1 PV ON 645.2200 SHARES DUE 9/25/2016 $0.00165/PV ON 391,556.88 PV DUE 9/25/160.0000 0.000000- - - 645.22 - - - 09/26/201609/26/2016 09/26/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y758.7500 1.000000- - - (758.75) 758.75 - - 09/26/2016 09/26/2016 09/26/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y16,857.1700 1.000000- - - (16,857.17) 16,857.17 - - 09/29/2016 09/29/2016 09/29/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y47,055.1400 1.000000- - - (47,055.14) 47,055.14 - - 09/29/2016 09/29/2016 09/29/2016 31846V203SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y-118,405.4000 1.000000- - - 118,405.40 (118,405.40) - - 09/29/201609/29/2016 912828H94RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 2/15/180.0000 0.000000- - - 220.11 - - - 09/29/2016 09/28/2016 09/29/2016 912828H94SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 2/15/18 /BMO CAPITAL MARKETS CORP./180,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.390625 %-180,000.0000 1.003906- - - 180,703.13 (180,400.18) - 302.95 09/29/2016912828H94AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 2/15/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (168.60) - - 09/29/201609/29/2016 91412GPZ2PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF UNIV OF CA 1.296% 5/15/180.0000 0.000000- - - (1,206.00) - - - 09/29/2016 09/27/2016 09/29/2016 91412GPZ2PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF UNIV OF CA 1.296% 5/15/18 /BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC. FIXED IN/250,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.427 %250,000.0000 1.004270- - - (251,067.50) 251,067.50 - - 09/30/201609/30/2016 3137BLVY1RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.639% 10/25/190.0000 0.000000- - - 78.69 - - - 09/30/2016 09/24/2016 09/30/2016 3137BLVY1SOLD PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.639% 10/25/19 /PERSHING LLC/59,597.53 PAR VALUE AT 100.425781 %-59,597.5300 1.004258- - - 59,851.28 (59,448.05) 403.23 - 09/30/2016 09/30/2016 09/30/2016 31846V203PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AMER GOVT OBLIG FUND CL Y67,739.3500 1.000000- - - (67,739.35) 67,739.35 - - 09/30/2016912828TS9AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 0.625% 9/30/17 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION0.0000 0.000000- - - - (50.64) - - 09/30/2016912828TS9ACCREDITED DISCOUNT ON U S TREASURY NT 0.625% 9/30/17 CURRENT YEAR ACQ. PREMIUM OID0.0000 0.000000- - - - (271.65) - - 09/30/2016912828TS9ACCREDITED DISCOUNT ON U S TREASURY NT 0.625% 9/30/17 CURRENT YEAR OID0.0000 0.000000- - - - 271.65 - - 09/30/2016912828TS9INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 0.625% 9/30/17 $1 PV ON 2499000.0000 SHARES DUE 9/30/20160.0000 0.000000- - - 7,809.38 - - - Total- - - - 129,632.76 12,548.99 7,971.96 Page 33 of 3369 Logan Circle Partners, L.P.  25 Deforest Avenue Summit, NJ 07901  908-376-0550 SHORT DURATION FIXED INCOME Third Quarter 2016 Client Review Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTACHMENT 14 70 ��GDP - Second-half GDP estimates rely on sustained strength in personal consumption, supported by rising wages and household incomes. Weak business fixed investment and anemic government spending continue to cap upside growth potential. Current forecasts suggest full-year economic growth to fall below 2%. A strengthening dollar and the potential for increased trade barriers could dampen the net exports component of GDP. ��Consumer - Higher healthcare costs, including insurance, represent an increasing share of consumer spending and disposable income. Both present situation and expectations components of consumer confidence reach highs not seen since the financial crisis although this confidence has yet to translate into improving retail sales. Rebound in savings rate skewed by strength of upper income earners. Sustained pace of student and auto loan debt growth represents a long-term demographic concern. ��Business - Persistent sluggish global growth hampers ability to grow revenues while rising labor costs pressure many industrial sub-sectors. Deterioration of credit metrics continues, highlighted by rising debt/equity ratios and declining operating margins. Although financials continue to build capital and improve balance sheets, the strength and stability of earnings are negatively impacted by less diverse business models and reduced net interest margins. Weak new business formations symptomatic of the broader challenges to growth. Election year and geopolitical uncertainty weigh on business confidence. ��Employment - Job growth rate downshifts to a more sustainable range consistent with low unemployment and participation rates. Service sector (e.g. health services, leisure and hospitality) accounts for all of the employment gains since the financial crisis. Overall increase in average hourly earnings led by labor shortages in select service sub-sectors and wage increases at the low end of the spectrum. ��Central Banks / International - Interest rates will remain at historically low levels for foreseeable future as Central Bank policies remain accommodative. Stimulus programs have failed to achieve economic growth and inflation objectives. BOJ shifts policy to target ten-year JGB yields at 0%. Although ECB floats tapering of bond buying program, accommodation will continue well into the future. Political posturing over Brexit terms will continue to impact currencies and financial markets. Brexit outcome may fuel broader nationalist sentiments. ��Housing - National home price appreciation will decelerate modestly to the low single digits driven by seasonality and a slowdown in higher priced homes sales. The number of homes currently on the market remains low at 4.4 months supply, however, inventory figures are skewed by a buildup of higher-priced homes. Affordability declines as price appreciation continues to outpace income growth. Refinancing activity will slow as most borrowers who could benefit from current mortgage rates have already acted. New home construction slows due to seasonality but continues to gain momentum on a year-over-year basis. ��Inflation - Core PCE continues to edge higher as rents, healthcare insurance and medical costs escalate. Energy prices and wage growth support headline inflation, while stronger dollar acts to mitigate upward pressure. Federal Reserve indicates a willingness to let inflation exceed previous target. Budding protectionist / populist movements expected to have negative (higher) long-term inflation implications as free trade policies are tested. ��U.S. Monetary and Fiscal Policy - Federal Reserve s data dependency trumped by geopolitical and market stability concerns, as timing of policy normalization pushed to December at the earliest. Dividing lines between hawks and doves deepen as both sides become more vocal in speeches and policy discussions. Three dissenters emerge at September meeting. Domestic fiscal policy initiatives unlikely to emerge in the near term as election year politics preclude substantive action. The views presented above are Logan Circle's and are subject to change over time. There can be no assurance that the views expressed above will prove accurate and should not be relied upon as a reliable indicator of future events. MARKET REVIEW Outlook and Current Themes 1 71 PORTFOLIO REVIEW – Construction Funds Portfolio Performance1 3Q 2016 YTD Since Inception (8/1/2013) Total Construction Fund (Gross of Fees) 0.18% 0.52% 0.50% Total Construction Fund (Net of Fees) 0.16% 0.45% 0.41% Citigroup 3-Month Treasury Bill 0.07% 0.19% 0.08% Past Performance is not indicative of future results. Performance returns for periods greater than one year are annualized. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County Construction Fund is the Citigroup 3–Month Treasury Bill, which tracks the return of one three-month Treasury bill until maturity. 2 As of June 30, 2016 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 0.69% Duration 0.05 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) A1 Corporate 1% CP 99% Asset Allocation Portfolio Characteristics As of September 30, 2016 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 0.63% Duration 0.02 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aa3 Corporate 1% CP 99% 72 PORTFOLIO REVIEW – Equity Contribution Past Performance is not indicative of future results. Performance returns for periods greater than one year are annualized. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County Construction Fund is the Bank of America Merrill Lynch 1-3 Year U.S. Treasury Index, which is a broad-based index consisting of U.S. Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater than or equal to $250 million and a maturity range from one to three years, reflecting total return. Corporate 37% Municipal 2% Agency 5% RMBS 5% CMBS 5% ABS 10% Treasury 30% CP 6% Portfolio Performance1 3Q 2016 YTD Since Inception (7/1/2015) Equity Contribution Fund (Gross of Fees) 0.13% 1.82% 1.62% Equity Contribution Fund (Net of Fees) 0.10% 1.74% 1.51% BofA ML U.S. Treasury Index 1-3 Year -0.11% 1.33% 0.96% Asset Allocation Portfolio Characteristics 3 As of June 30, 2016 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 0.94% Duration 1.33 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aa3 As of September 30, 2016 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 1.11% Duration 1.36 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aa2 Corporate 28% Municipal 2% Agency 6% RMBS 3% CMBS 5% ABS 10% Treasury 30% CP 16% 73 PORTFOLIO REVIEW – Capitalized Interest Funds Portfolio Performance1 3Q 2016 YTD Since Inception (8/1/2013) Total Capitalized Interest Fund (Gross of Fees) 0.04% 1.47% 1.29% Total Capitalized Interest Fund (Net of Fees) 0.02% 1.40% 1.19% BofA ML U.S. Treasury Index 1-3 Year -0.11% 1.33% 0.87% Past Performance is not indicative of future results. Performance returns for periods greater than one year are annualized. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County Capitalized Interest Fund is the Bank of America Merrill Lynch 1-3 Year U.S. Treasury Index, which is a broad-based index consisting of U.S. Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater than or equal to $250 million and a maturity range from one to three years, reflecting total return. Asset Allocation Portfolio Characteristics 4 As of June 30, 2016 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 0.83% Duration 1.47 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aa1 Corporate 37% Municipal 10% Agency 3% RMBS 4% CMBS 5% Treasury 40% CP 1% As of September 30, 2016 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 0.91% Duration 1.22 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aa1 Corporate 38% Municipal 10% Agency 1% RMBS 5% CMBS 6% Treasury 40% CP 1% 74 PORTFOLIO REVIEW – Debt Reserve Fund Portfolio Performance1 3Q 2016 YTD Since Inception (8/1/2013) Total Debt Service Fund (Gross of Fees) -0.07% 4.26% 3.21% Total Debt Service Fund (Net of Fees) -0.09% 4.19% 3.11% BofA ML U.S. Treasury Index 3-7 Year -0.30% 4.08% 2.72% Past Performance is not indicative of future results. Performance returns for periods greater than one year are annualized. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County Capitalized Interest Fund is the Bank of America Merrill Lynch US Treasury 3-7 Year, which is a broad-based index consisting of U.S. Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater or equal to $25 million and a maturity range from three to seven years, inclusive, reflecting total return. Asset Allocation Portfolio Characteristics 5 As of June 30, 2016 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 1.30% Duration 4.15 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aaa Agency 15% RMBS 9% CMBS 33% Treasury 42% CP 1% As of September 30, 2016 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 1.47% Duration 4.26 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aaa Agency 15% RMBS 9% CMBS 31% Treasury 44% CP 1% 75 PORTFOLIO REVIEW Portfolio Market Value Portfolio Market Value (7/3/2013) Net Flows Market Value (9/30/2016) Change in Market Value Construction (Sales Tax) $332,687,595 ($334,894,805) $0 +$2,207,210 Construction (Toll Revenue) $122,120,571 ($101,770,719) $21,005,523 +$655,671 Total Construction Funds $454,808,167 ($436,665,524) $21,005,523 +$2,862,880 Portfolio Market Value (7/3/2013) Net Flows Market Value (9/30/2016) Change in Market Value Capitalized Interest (Sales Tax) $103,683,353 ($69,986,349) $36,752,459 +$3,055,455 Capitalized Interest (Toll Revenue) $31,416,498 ($20,726,929) $11,701,626 +$1,012,057 Total Capitalized Interest Funds $135,099,851 ($90,713,278) $48,454,085 +$4,067,512 Portfolio Market Value (7/3/2013) Net Flows Market Value (9/30/2016) Change in Market Value Debt Service Reserve Fund $17,667,869 $0 $19,575,915 +$1,908,046 Portfolio Market Value (6/10/2015) Net Flows Market Value (9/30/2016) Change in Market Value Equity Contribution $32,793,399 $33,235,304 $68,666,876 +$2,638,173 6 76 DISCLAIMERS In general. This disclaimer applies to this document and the verbal or written comments of any person presenting it. This document, taken together with any such verbal or written comments, is referred to herein as the “Presentation.” Logan Circle Partners, L.P., a Fortress Investment Group LLC company, is referred to herein as “Logan Circle”. No offer to purchase or sell securities. This Presentation is being provided to you at your specific request. This Presentation does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any security and may not be relied upon in connection with the purchase or sale of any security. Projections. Projections contained in this Presentation are based on a variety of estimates and assumptions by Logan Circle, including, among others, estimates of future operating results, the value of assets and market conditions at the time of disposition, and the timing and manner of disposition or other realization events. These estimates and assumptions are inherently uncertain and are subject to numerous business, industry, market, regulatory, competitive and financial risks that are outside of Logan Circle’s control. There can be no assurance that the assumptions made in connection with the projections will prove accurate, and actual results may differ materially, including the possibility that an investor may lose some or all of its invested capital. The inclusion of the projections herein should not be regarded as an indication that Logan Circle or any of its affiliates considers the projections to be a reliable prediction of future events and the projections should not be relied upon as such. Neither Logan Circle nor any of its affiliates or representatives has made or makes any representation to any person regarding the projections and none of them intends to update or otherwise revise the projections to reflect circumstances existing after the date when made or to reflect the occurrence of future events, if any or all of the assumptions underlying the projections are later shown to be in error. For purposes of this paragraph, the term “projections” includes “targeted returns”. Past performance. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results and should not be relied upon as the basis for making an investment decision. The information presented is only available for institutional client use and is presented for use only as a one-on-one presentation. No reliance, no update and use of information. You may not rely on this Presentation as the basis upon which to make an investment decision. To the extent that you rely on this Presentation in connection with any investment decision, you do so at your own risk. This Presentation is being provided in summary fashion and does not purport to be complete. The information in the Presentation is provided to you as of the dates indicated and Logan Circle does not intend to update the information after its distribution, even in the event that the information becomes materially inaccurate. Certain information contained in this Presentation, includes performance and characteristics of Logan Circle’s strategies and any represented benchmarks, which may derive from calculations or figures that have been provided by independent third parties, or have been prepared internally and have not been audited or verified. Use of different methods for preparing, calculating or presenting information may lead to different results for the information presented, compared to publicly quoted information, and such differences may be material. Knowledge and experience. You acknowledge that you are knowledgeable and experienced with respect to the financial, tax and business aspects of this Presentation and that you will conduct your own independent financial, business, regulatory, accounting, legal and tax investigations with respect to the accuracy, completeness and suitability of this Presentation should you choose to use or rely on this Presentation, at your own risk, for any purpose. Risk of loss. An investment in the strategy will be highly speculative and there can be no assurance that the strategy’s investment objectives will be achieved. Investors must be prepared to bear the risk of a total loss of their investment. Distribution of this Presentation. Logan Circle expressly prohibits any reproduction, in hard-copy, electronic or any other form, or any redistribution to any third party of this Presentation without the prior written consent of Logan Circle. This Presentation is not intended for distribution to, or use by, any person or entity in any jurisdiction or country where such distribution or use is contrary to local law or regulation. No tax, legal or accounting advice. This Presentation is not intended to provide, and should not be relied upon for (and you shall not construe it as) accounting, legal, regulatory, financial or tax advice or investment recommendations. Any statements of U.S. federal tax consequences contained in this Presentation were not intended to be used and cannot be used to avoid penalties under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code or to promote, market or recommend to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein. Confidentiality. By accepting receipt or reading any portion of this Presentation, you agree that you will treat the Presentation confidentially. This reminder should not be read to limit, in any way, the terms of any confidentiality agreement you or your organization may have in place with Logan Circle. 7 77 QUARTERLY PORTFOLIO REVIEWQUARTERLY PORTFOLIO REVIEW PAYDEN.COM LOS ANGELES | BOSTON | LONDON | PARIS 3rd Quarter 2016 ATTACHMENT 15 78 October 2016 Dear Client, As we look to the closing quarter of 2016, I am reminded of twelve months ago when we were wondering whether the Federal Reserve would raise rates by the end of the year. As we all know, they increased the Federal Funds rate 0.25% at their December 2015 meeting. In the ensuing months, the U.S. economy has grown, job growth is on the right track and generally there are positive forces at work. On a global basis, there has been little change: sluggish economic growth and low or declining inflation. What should our focus be at this time? We would like to refer you to the chart on the opposite page, which takes the four major central banks in the world and shows the growth of their balance sheets. Central bank policy used to focus on short-term interest rates, but more recently they have tried to influence economic growth and the direction of inflation by growing their balance sheets. For example, the Bank of Japan’s balance sheet is now as large as the Federal Reserve’s. Such action has had little effect on growth or inflation. But it has forced the rest of the world to look to the US bond markets for attractive buying opportunities. This has been a beneficial trend for our clients. We find ourselves today in the same place we were last year at this time: asking when will the Federal Reserve raise rates again? December is a distinct possibility. But our expectation is the next rate hike will only have a minor effect on the short term markets and little effect on inflation, nor is it likely to inhibit the continued economic growth of the US. We believe that inflation will eventually settle in the 2-3% range and that there will be moderate growth over the next twelve months. Our focus on diversification, credit quality and liquidity will provide your portfolio with the tools to weather any unexpected surprises. Payden & Rygel recently celebrated our 33rd anniversary. During this time of global challenges, we want to assure you that we remain independent, with the same ownership and governance since inception. Our team- oriented culture has one focus and that is to meet the needs and exceed the expectations of our clients. My very best wishes go out to you and your family for the remainder of the year. Joan A. Payden President & CEO LETTER FROM THE CEO 79 Riverside County Transportation Commission 2812 ABJ VCL Portfolio Review and Market Update - 3rd Quarter 2016 PORTFOLIO CHARACTERISTICS (As of 9/30/2016) $50.8 millionPortfolio Market Value AA+Weighted Average Credit Quality 1.5 yearsWeighted Average Duration 0.9%Weighted Average Yield to Maturity DURATION DISTRIBUTION 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 0 - 1 1 - 2 2 - 3 Years SECTOR ALLOCATION 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45%TreasuriesAgenciesCreditAsset-BackedMunicipalMortgage-BackedPORTFOLIO RETURNS - Periods Ending 9/30/2016 Since Inception (3/1/15) 2016 YTD Trailing 1 Yr 3rd Quarter RCTC Operating Portfolio 0.02% 1.20% 0.94% 0.99% Bank of America Merrill Lynch 1-3 Treasury -0.11% 1.32% 0.88% 0.99% Periods over one year annualized Payden & Rygel • 333 South Grand Avenue • Los Angeles, California 90071 • (213) 625-1900 • www.payden.com80 Portfolio Review and Market Update - 3rd Quarter 2016 MARKET THEMES The third quarter was marked by low volatility as investors waited for new central bank action. Post-Brexit fears remained subdued, and investors continued their search for positive yield, especially given negative rates in several developed markets. US Treasury yields migrated higher in anticipation of potential movement by the Federal Reserve. Generally positive domestic employment and economic data suggested a hike could occur, but the Fed seemed focused on inflation and global factors. Continued demand for yield drove spreads tighter in non-government sectors during the period. STRATEGY The portfolio holds a diversified mix of credit sectors for income generation.n Corporate bond yield premiums remain attractive, and we expect to maintain our exposure through the purchase of bonds in the new issue market. n We maintained our allocation to high-quality asset-backed and mortgage-backed securities (ABS/MBS) with short duration profiles for their yield and diversification benefits. n INTEREST RATES Treasury yields across the curve were higher. Two- and three-year Treasury maturities increased by 18 basis points and ended the quarter at 0.76% and 0.87%, respectively. The front end of the US Treasury curve steepened with the yield difference between one- and two-year maturities ending at 0.18%. n The portfolio’s defensive duration positioning was beneficial given the move higher in interest rates.n Longer-maturity corporate holdings contributed to performance as the price pressure from interest rate movement was more than offset by the income generated. n SECTORS Credit exposure was beneficial to performance. The yield premium between corporates and treasuries compressed by seven basis points. n High-quality ABS spreads tightened and contributed positively to performance.n The MBS allocation was additive to performance as strong demand continues to shrink the yield difference between government securities and MBS. n Payden & Rygel • 333 South Grand Avenue • Los Angeles, California 90071 • (213) 625-1900 • www.payden.com81 The Ever-Expanding Balance Sheets MARKET PERSPECTIVE $0 $1 $2 $3 $4 $5 $6 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12 '14 '16 Federal Reserve Bank of Japan European Central Bank People's Bank of China -$0.5 $0.0 $0.5$1.0$1.5$2.0 BoJ ECB Fed PBoC $1.94 $1.11 -$0.02 -$0.45 $0 $1 $2 $3 $4 $5 $6 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12 '14 '16 Federal Reserve Bank of Japan European Central Bank People's Bank of China -$0.5 $0.0 $0.5 $1.0 $1.5 $2.0 BoJ ECB Fed PBoC $1.94 $1.11 -$0.02 -$0.45 Central banks dominate the global financial landscape now more than ever. In the old days, few could name a central banker other than Alan Greenspan. Today, Yellen, Draghi, Kuroda and Xiaochuan roll off the tongues of traders like the names of their favorite quarterbacks or midfielders. And it’s not merely due to more talkative central bankers. Ever since the global financial crisis, these monetary mavens control massive balance sheets. The chart to the right shows assets held by the four main central banks: the US Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank (ECB), the Bank of Japan (BoJ) and the People’s Bank of China (PBoC). These four behemoths collectively hold $18.5 trillion in assets. But it’s not just the size that matters–increases in two central bank balance sheets in particular have been key drivers of financial markets of late. Since the start of 2015, the BoJ balance sheet has ballooned by nearly $2 trillion, while the ECB’s balance sheet jumped by more than a trillion dollars. The result of central banks employing the world’s largest “buy-and-hold” portfolios? Asset prices near all-time highs and government bond yields near record lows, narrow credit spreads and low market volatility (buying assets and never selling or trading those assets reduces volatility, all else equal). During the third quarter of 2016, the high volume of central bank asset purchases cast a spell of calm over financial markets. In the wake of low volatility, central banks are taking a moment to evaluate their strategies and pause from further increasing their purchases. In our view, both the ECB and BoJ seem likely to do more in the months ahead, since both central banks are failing on their inflation mandates. With this backdrop of monetary accommodation globally, maybe December provides an opportune time for the Fed to move toward slightly tighter money? Central Bank Holdings Have Increased Over the Past Decade Balance Sheet Asset Holdings, USD Trillions The BoJ and ECB Are Increasing Asset Purchases Change in Asset Holdings Since January 2015, USD Trillions Source: Federal Reserve, European Central Bank, People’s Bank of China, Bank of Japan, Bloomberg 82 US DOMICILED MUTUAL FUNDS DUBLIN DOMICILED UCITS FUNDS CASH BALANCE Payden/Kravitz Cash Balance Plan Fund EQUITY Equity Income Fund GLOBAL FIXED INCOME Emerging Markets Bond Fund Emerging Markets Corporate Bond Fund Emerging Markets Local Bond Fund Global Fixed Income Fund Global Low Duration Fund TAX-EXEMPT FIXED INCOME California Municipal Income Fund US FIXED INCOME Absolute Return Bond Fund Cash Reserves Money Market Fund Core Bond Fund Corporate Bond Fund Floating Rate Fund GNMA Fund High Income Fund Limited Maturity Fund Low Duration Fund Strategic Income Fund US Government Fund EQUITY World Equity Fund FIXED INCOME Absolute Return Bond Fund Global Emerging Markets Bond Fund Global Emerging Markets Corporate Bond Fund Global Government Bond Index Fund Global High Yield Bond Fund Global Inflation-Linked Bond Fund Global Bond Fund Global Short Bond Fund Sterling Corporate Bond Fund – Investment Grade US Core Bond Fund USD Low Duration Credit Fund LIQUIDITY FUNDS Euro Liquidity Fund Sterling Reserve Fund US Dollar Liquidity Fund For more information about Payden & Rygel, contact us at a location listed below. LOS ANGELES 333 South Grand Avenue Los Angeles, California 90071 213 625-1900 BOSTON 265 Franklin Street Boston, Massachusetts 02110 617 807-1990 LONDON 1 Bartholomew Lane London EC2N 2AX United Kingdom + 44 (0) 20-7621-3000 PARIS Representative Office 54, 56 Avenue Hoche 75008 Paris, France + 33-607-604-441 PAYDEN.COM LOS ANGELES |BOSTON |LONDON |PARIS OVER 30 YEARS OF INSPIRING CONFIDENCE WITH AN UNWAVERING COMMITMENT TO OUR CLIENTS’ NEEDS. 83 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER’S POOLED INVESTMENT FUND IS CURRENTLY RATED: Aaa-bf BY MOODY’S INVESTOR’S SERVICE AND AAA/V1 BY FITCH RATINGS The Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund is comprised of the County, Schools, Special Districts, and other Discretionary Depositors. County of Riverside Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund Capital Markets Team Don Kent Treasurer-Tax Collector Jon Christensen Asst. Treasurer-Tax Collector Giovane Pizano Investment Manager Isela Licea Asst. Investment Manager The primary objective of the treasurer shall be to safeguard the principal of the funds under the treasurer's control, meet the liquidity needs of the depositor, and achieve a return on the funds under his or her control. Investment Objectives 2016 September Month End Market Value ($)* Month End Book Value ($) Paper Gain or Loss ($) Paper Gain or Loss (%) Book Yield (%) Yrs to Maturity Modified Duration September 5,916,650,304.83 5,911,244,395.48 5,405,909.35 0.09 0.73 1.23 1.20 August 6,110,619,759.63 6,102,082,969.94 8,536,789.69 0.14 0.72 1.23 1.20 July 6,514,396,169.33 6,504,638,893.37 9,757,275.96 0.15 0.69 1.15 1.12 June 6,945,949,047.77 6,940,509,804.70 5,439,243.07 0.08 0.67 1.08 1.05 May 7,336,685,334.21 7,329,824,096.33 6,861,237.88 0.09 0.65 1.02 0.99 April 6,319,190,571.12 6,312,840,233.99 6,350,337.13 0.10 0.65 1.07 1.04 Although the United States government closed its books for the fiscal year 2016 in September with a whisper, financial market participants were paying close attention and got the message loud and clear. The annual increase in national debt was an astound- ing $1.4 trillion, the 3rd largest in U.S. history. This increase in debt is equal to almost 8% of our GDP vs. the entire bailout of 2008 at just under 5% of GDP; the New Deal during the Great Depression amounted to 7% of GDP. Now some $19.6 trillion in the red and having doubled over the last eight years, it’s the equiv- alent of $60,536 for every U.S. citizen, or, $164,602 for every tax payer. Additionally, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) is sounding the alarm with worldwide debt hitting $152 trillion, or, 225% of world GDP. Accord- ing to the IMF, "two-thirds, amounting to about $100 trillion, consists of liabilities of the private sector which can carry greater risks than government debt at high levels. However, there are concerns that just the sheer size of debt could set the stage for an unprece- dented private deleveraging process that could stall the fragile global economic recovery." In other words, the debt itself can cause a slowdown so central banks are extremely limited how high and fast they can push interest rates; this debt load is only sustainable as long as the interest expense is affordable, thus forcing rec- ord low rates, which in turn leads to even more debt issuance, exacerbating the problem. These revelations are coming at the same time we are seeing tectonic shifts in the Eurozone banks and financial system as we covered in June. Deutsche Bank, being the most visible, is potentially looking at a $14 billion fine from the U.S. government’s lawsuit to settle the mortgage backed securities case; it’s big enough that there was talk of it becoming Europe’s Lehman Bros. and Germany is showing no appetite to bail them, or any other banks out. According to past history, we know recession is somewhere out there on the horizon as over the past 75 years, the longest period of time we’ve been with- out was about 10 years. When it does occur, one of the policy tools the FED has used most often to stimulate the economy is to cut interest rates, namely the Fed Funds, discount rate, or both. The average Fed Funds interest rate cut during a recession is about 4%. In every instance the FED has cut rates, and they were lower at the end of the recession than at the beginning, which begs the question, how high would rates have to be to have a meaningful impact for a cut later to spur the economy again down the road? The FED stated after its September 21st FOMC meet- ing, “The Committee judges that the case for an in- crease in the federal funds rate has strengthened but decided, for the time being, to wait for further evi- dence of continued progress toward its objectives.” In other words, they remain on the sidelines with Fed Funds at 50 bps. And, it’s highly unlikely an increase would come at the November 2nd meeting, especially just before the election leaving December 14th as their last date this year. We shall see and will continue to be observant of these concerning economic conditions and invest accordingly. Don Kent Treasurer-Tax Collector “Debt Time Bomb” 84 ATTACHMENT 16 Value Change Nymex Crude 48.24$ 3.54$ Gold (USD/OZ)1,315.75$ 6.78$ Value Change Dow Jones (DJIA)18,308.15$ (92.03)$ S&P 500 Index 2,168.27$ (7.85)$ NASDAQ (NDX)4,875.70$ 104.65$ Fed Move 11/02/2016 12/14/2016 Stay at 0.25%-0.50%76.4%36.4% Increase to 0.75%23.6%51.3% Increase to 1.00%0.0%12.4% Increase to 1.25%0.0%0.0% Current Fed Funds Rate: 0.25% - 0.50% Probability for FOMC Dates: Current Market Data Economic Indicators  Stock Indices Commodities  Fed Funds Target Rate COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 2 US Treasury Curve (M/M) FOMC Meeting Schedule Release %Risk Assessment 27-Jul .25 - 0.5 %Growth 21-Sep .25 - 0.5 %Growth Release Date Indicator Consensus Actual 09/02/2016 180,000 151,000 09/02/2016 4.8%4.9% 09/02/2016 4.4%4.4% 09/29/2016 1.3%1.4% 09/27/2016 99.0 104.1 09/02/2016 2.0%1.9% 09/16/2016 0.1%0.2% 09/16/2016 2.2%2.3%CPI Ex Food and Energy - M/M change: CPI Ex Food and Energy excludes food and energy. Consumer Price Index - M/M change: The Consumer Price Index is a measure of the average price level of a fixed basket of goods and services purchased by consumers. Non-Farm Payrolls M/M change: Counts the number of paid employees working part- time or full-time in the nation's business and government establishments. Employment Situation: Measures the number of unemployed as a percentage of the labor force. Durable Goods Orders - M/M change: Reflects the new orders placed with domestic manufacturers for immediate and future delivery of factory hard goods. Real Gross Domestic Product - Q/Q change: The broadest measure of aggregate economic activity and encompasses every sector of the economy.  GDP is the country's most comprehensive economic scorecard. Consumer Confidence: Measures consumer attitudes on present economic conditions and expectations of future conditions. Factory Orders M/M change: Represents the dollar level of new orders for both durable and nondurable goods. 85 Fund Symbol 7 Da y Yield Fidelity Prime Institutional MMF FIPXX 0.55% Federated Prime Obligations Fund POIXX 0.38% Wells Fargo Advantage Heritage WFJXX 0.46% JP Morgan CJPXX 0.49% AAA Rated Prime Institutional Money-Market Funds 0.43%0.46%0.50%0.55%0.62%0.66% 0.65%0.65%0.67%0.69%0.72%0.73%0.73% 0.12% 0.12% 0.14%0.22% 0.36%0.40%0.42% 0.42%0.41%0.42%0.40%0.39%0.47% 0.00% 0.50% 1.00% Sep‐15 Nov‐15 Jan‐16 Mar‐16 May‐16 Jul‐16 Sep ‐16 Pool Yield TIMMI The Pooled Investment Fund cash flow requirements are based upon a 12 month historical cash flow model. Based upon projected cash receipts and maturing investments, there are sufficient funds to meet future cash flow disbursements over the next 12 months. The Treasurer’s Institutional Money Market Index (TIMMI) is compiled and reported by the Riverside County Treasurer’s Capital Markets division. It is a composite index derived from four AAA rated prime institutional money market funds. Similar to the Treas- urer’s Office, prime money market funds invest in a diversified portfolio of U.S. dollar denominated money market instruments in- cluding U.S. Treasuries, government agencies, commercial paper, certificates of deposits, repurchase agreements, etc. TIMMI is cur- rently comprised of the four multi billion dollar funds listed below. TIMMI COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 3 Cash Flows Month Monthly Receipts Monthly Disbursements Difference Required Matured Investments Balance Actual Investments Maturing Available to Invest > 1 Year 10/2016 202.00 10/2016 1,040.00 1,175.00 (135.00) 67.00 1,414.26 11/2016 1,200.00 960.00 240.00 307.00 296.14 12/2016 2,110.00 1,030.00 1,080.00 1,387.00 40.37 01/2017 1,020.00 1,650.00 (630.00) 757.00 716.00 02/2017 810.00 1,200.00 (390.00) 367.00 590.00 03/2017 1,200.00 1,080.00 120.00 487.00 30.00 04/2017 1,800.00 950.00 850.00 1,337.00 98.14 05/2017 850.00 1,500.00 (650.00) 687.00 397.45 06/2017 1,400.00 1,850.00 (450.00) 237.00 197.02 07/2017 1,256.11 1,450.00 (193.89) 43.11 81.11 08/2017 1,017.89 1,200.00 (182.11) 139.00 - 17.89 09/2017 1,004.10 1,110.00 (105.90) 105.90 - 44.10 TOTALS 14,708.10 15,155.00 (446.90) 244.90 5,878.12 3,922.48 5,666.34 4.14% 66.36% 95.86% * All values reported in millions ($). 86 Asset Allocation COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 4 775,000.00 100.00% 0.37% .003 .003 70,000.00 100.00% 0.41% .003 .003 300.00 100.00% 1.23% 3.710 3.710 200,000.00 100.07% 0.45% .575 .575 280,000.00 100.30% 0.83% .977 .977 100,000.00 100.35% 0.51% .189 .189 889,435.00 100.04% 1.15% 1.091 2.987 90,000.00 100.40% 0.61% .238 .238 360,000.00 99.90% 1.18% 1.240 3.366 567,000.00 100.28% 0.52% .293 .293 518,589.72 99.98% 0.80% 1.306 1.857 465,000.00 100.27% 0.55% .440 .440 512,910.00 99.98% 0.72% 1.685 1.997 115,000.00 100.43% 0.63% .172 .172 58,850.00 100.09% 0.76% 1.448 1.448 100,000.00 100.02% 0.49% .091 .091 279,105.00 100.00% 0.90% 1.263 1.263 480,814.00 100.12% 0.65% .241 .241 5,916,003.72 100.09% 0.73% .734 1.224 512,889.93513,005.73 566,456.18 89,556.86 518,513.54 89,915.40 359,995.35 359,652.35 281,812.99 114,459.98 114,949.05 464,186.20 70,000.00 FFCB BONDS 58,850.00 58,904.45FARMER MAC 99,939.00 Mkt/ Sch Book YieldScheduled Book WAL (Yr) .003100.00% Mat (Yr)Scheduled MarketAssets (000's)Scheduled Par FHLMC BONDS 280,331.45 281,183.60 MMKT 300.00LOCAL AGCY OBLIG 775,000.00 775,000.00 CALTRUST FND 0.80% .003 Totals (000's): 54,000.00 54,000.00 54,000.00 281,812.99 99,955.78 DDA/PASSBK 70,000.00 300.00 COMM PAPER 99,600.19 MUNI BONDS FHLB BONDS 462,928.67 479,347.01 889,668.41 99,947.00 5,916,650.30 US TREAS BILLS 199,362.47 199,499.25 FHLB DISC NOTES 564,885.33 518,387.73 FNMA BONDS 5,911,244.40 479,941.99 FNMA DISC NOTES 889,355.82 FHLMC DISC NOTES US TREAS BONDS FMAC DISC NOTES MUNI ZER0 CPNS FFCB DISC NOTES 87 Maturity Distribution COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 5 Scheduled Par (000's) 0-1 Mos 1-3 Mos 3-12 Mos 1-2 Yr 2-3 Yr >3 Yr Totals (000's) MMKT 775,000.00 - - - - - 775,000.00 CALTRUST FND 54,000.00 - - - - - 54,000.00 DDA/PASSBK 70,000.00 - - - - - 70,000.00 LOCAL AGCY OBLIG - - - - - 300.00 300 US TREAS BILLS - - 200,000.00 - - - 200,000.00 US TREAS BONDS - - 185,000.00 45,000.00 25,000.00 25,000.00 280,000.00 FHLMC DISC NOTES 50,000.00 - 50,000.00 - - - 100,000.00 FHLMC BONDS - 14,625.00 115,000.00 185,850.00 93,000.00 480,960.00 889,435.00 FNMA DISC NOTES 50,000.00 - 40,000.00 - - - 90,000.00 FNMA BONDS - - - 40,000.00 102,500.00 217,500 .00 360,000.00 FHLB DISC NOTES 125,000.00 - 442,000.00 - - - 567,000.00 FHLB BONDS - 40,370.00 200,000.00 83,719.72 74,500.00 120,000.00 518,589.72 FFCB DISC NOTES 35,000.00 - 430,000.00 - - - 465,000.00 FFCB BONDS - 15,000.00 169,900.00 55,000.00 100,310.00 172,700.00 512,910.00 FMAC DISC NOTES 50,000.00 - 65,000.00 - - - 115,000.00 FARMER MAC - - 33,850.00 - 25,000.00 - 58,850.00 MUNI ZER0 CPNS 50,000.00 50,000.00 - - - - 100,000.00 MUNI BONDS - 75,960.00 45,940.00 110,000.00 27,665.00 19,540.00 279,105.0 0 COMM PAPER 105,264.00 165,550.00 210,000.00 - - - 480,814.00 Totals (000's):1,364,264.00 361,505.00 2,186,690.00 519,569.72 447,975.00 1,036,000.00 5,916,003.72 %23.06% 6.11% 36.96% 8.78% 7.57% 17.51% Cumulative %23.06% 29.17% 66.13% 74.92% 82.49% 100.00% 88 Credit Quality 100.12%0.56% Totals (000's):5,916,003.72 5,911,244.40 5,916,650.30 100.09%0.73% Aa2 481,134.00 NR 444,150.00 443,609.98 444,153.50 480,223.51 480,410.78 100.00%0.88% 100.04%0.60% Aa3 280,495.00 280,560.25 280,984.73 100.15%0.83% MKT/Book Yield Aaa 4,663,179.72 4,658,968.96 4,663,219.59 100.09%0.75% Moody (000's)Par Book Market Aa1 47,045.00 47,881.71 47,881.71 MOODY’S S & P Totals (000's):5,916,003.72 5,911,244.40 5,916,650.30 100.09%0.73% NR 444,150.00 443,609.98 444,153.50 100.12%0.56% AA-305,495.00 304,947.00 305,384.48 100.14%0.76% 100.11%0.81% AA 506,134.00 505,836.76 506,024.03 100.04%0.64% Book AA+3,964,569.72 3,949,286.32 3,963,523.96 Market MKT/Book Yield AAA 695,655.00 697,564.34 697,564.34 100.00% 0.42% ParS&P (000's) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 6 89 Description Maturity Date Coupon Par Value Book Value Market Price Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss CALTRUST HERITAGE 10/01/2016 .423 0.00 0.00 .000000 0.00 0.00 FIDELITY PRIME 10/01/2016 .416 0.00 0.00 .000000 0.00 0.00 FEDERATED PRIME 10/01/2016 .426 0.00 0.00 .000000 0.00 0.00 JP MORGAN PRIME 10/01/2016 .387 0.00 0.00 .000000 0.00 0.00 FIDELITY GOV 10/01/2016 .310 100,000,000.00 100,000,000.00 100.000000 100,000,000.00 0.00 WELLS FARGO GOV 10/01/2016 .334 200,000,000.00 200,000,000.00 100.000000 200,000,000.00 0.00 FEDERATED GOV 10/01/2016 .314 175,000,000.00 175,000,000.00 100.000000 175,000,000.00 0.00 BANK OF THE WEST 10/01/2016 .520 200,000,000.00 200,000,000.00 100.000000 200,000,000.00 0.00 GOLDMAN SACHS GOV 10/01/2016 .297 100,000,000.00 100,000,000.00 100.000000 100,000,000.00 0.00 .370 775,000,000.00 775,000,000.00 100.000000 775,000,000.00 0.00 CALTRUST SHT TERM 10/01/2016 .804 54,000,000.00 54,000,000.00 100.000000 54,000,000.00 0.00 .804 54,000,000.00 54,000,000.00 100.000000 54,000,000.00 0.00 UB MANAGED RATE 10/01/2016 .410 70,000,000.00 70,000,000.00 100.000000 70,000,000.00 0.00 .410 70,000,000.00 70,000,000.00 100.000000 70,000,000.00 0.00 US DIST COURTHOUSE 06/15/2020 1.231 300,000.00 300,000.00 100.000000 300,000.00 0.00 1.231 300,000.00 300,000.00 100.000000 300,000.00 0.00 U.S. TREASURY BILL 05/25/2017 .510 50,000,000.00 49,761,291.67 99.705000 49,852,500.00 91,208.33 U.S. TREASURY BILL 05/25/2017 .440 50,000,000.00 49,828,277.78 99.705000 49,852,500.00 24,222.22 U.S. TREASURY BILL 02/09/2017 .425 25,000,000.00 24,954,843.75 99.878000 24,969,500.00 14,656.25 U.S. TREASURY BILL 02/02/2017 .405 25,000,000.00 24,958,937.50 99.889000 24,972,250.00 13,312.50 U.S. TREASURY BILL 05/25/2017 .428 50,000,000.00 49,859,116.67 99.705000 49,852,500.00 -6,616.67 .448 200,000,000.00 199,362,467.37 99.749625 199,499,250.00 136,782.63 U.S. TREASURY BOND 06/30/2017 .750 5,000,000.00 4,971,875.00 100.109000 5,005,450.00 33,575.00 U.S. TREASURY BOND 05/15/2017 .875 25,000,000.00 25,077,148.44 100.203000 25,050,750.00 -26,398.44 U.S. TREASURY BOND 01/31/2017 .875 25,000,000.00 25,129,882.81 100.181000 25,045,250.00 -84,632.81 U.S. TREASURY BOND 02/15/2017 .625 20,000,000.00 20,008,593.75 100.097000 20,019,400.00 10,806.25 U.S. TREASURY BOND 01/15/2017 .750 25,000,000.00 25,095,703.13 100.121000 25,030,250.00 -65,453.13 U.S. TREASURY BOND 09/30/2017 .625 10,000,000.00 9,981,250.00 99.953000 9,995,300.00 14,050.00 U.S. TREASURY BOND 02/15/2018 1.000 10,000,000.00 10,017,968.75 100.375000 10,037,500.00 19,531.25 U.S. TREASURY BOND 01/31/2018 .875 25,000,000.00 24,936,523.44 100.211000 25,052,750.00 116,226.56 U.S. TREASURY BOND 01/15/2017 .750 25,000,000.00 25,027,343.75 100.121000 25,030,250.00 2,906.25 U.S. TREASURY BOND 02/15/2017 .625 25,000,000.00 24,978,515.63 100.097000 25,024,250.00 45,734.37 U.S. TREASURY BOND 02/15/2017 .625 25,000,000.00 24,964,843.75 100.097000 25,024,250.00 59,406.25 U.S. TREASURY BOND 05/31/2019 1.500 25,000,000.00 25,110,351.56 101.676000 25,419,000.00 308,648.44 U.S. TREASURY BOND 10/31/2019 1.500 25,000,000.00 25,028,320.31 101.758000 25,439,500.00 411,179.69 U.S. TREASURY BOND 02/15/2017 .625 10,000,000.00 10,003,125.00 100.097000 10,009,700.00 6,575.00 .886 280,000,000.00 280,331,445.32 100.422714 281,183,600.00 852,154.68 FHLMC DISC NOTE 10/19/2016 .575 25,000,000.00 24,873,420.14 99.992000 24,998,000.00 124,579.86 FHLMC DISC NOTE 10/19/2016 .465 25,000,000.00 24,920,885.42 99.992000 24,998,000.00 77,114.58 FHLMC DISC NOTE 01/05/2017 .520 25,000,000.00 24,885,888.89 99.930000 24,982,500.00 96,611.11 FHLMC DISC NOTE 02/17/2017 .480 25,000,000.00 24,920,000.00 99.874000 24,968,500.00 48,500.00 .510 100,000,000.00 99,600,194.45 99.947000 99,947,000.00 346,805.55 FHLMC 4Yr 11/01/2016 .625 10,000,000.00 9,991,200.00 100.024000 10,002,400.00 11,200.00 FHLMC 4Yr 11/01/2016 .625 4,625,000.00 4,629,301.25 100.024000 4,626,110.00 -3,191.25 FHLMC 2YrNc1YrE 12/30/2016 .750 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.123000 25,030,750.00 30,750.00 FHLMC 3YrNc1.5YrE 06/22/2018 1.200 15,000,000.00 14,986,800.00 100.044000 15,006,600.00 19,800.00 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoE 06/22/2018 1.250 25,000,000.00 24,993,750.00 100.659000 25,164,750.00 171,000.00 FHLMC 1.5Yr 01/27/2017 .500 25,000,000.00 24,973,250.00 100.031000 25,007,750.00 34,500.00 FHLMC 1.5Yr 01/27/2017 .500 15,000,000.00 14,980,119.90 100.031000 15,004,650.00 24,530.10 FHLMC 2YrNc6MoB 10/27/2017 .750 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.007000 10,000,700.00 700.00 FHLMC 1.25Yr 01/27/2017 .500 25,000,000.00 25,015,000.00 100.031000 25,007,750.00 -7,250.00 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 10/29/2018 1.050 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.017000 5,000,850.00 850.00 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 10/29/2018 1.050 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.017000 10,001,700.00 1,700.00 FHLMC 2YrNc6MoE 11/16/2017 .750 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.044000 15,006,600.00 6,600.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 10/29/2020 1.125 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.019000 15,002,850.00 2,850.00 FHLMC 2Yr 12/15/2017 1.000 20,000,000.00 19,979,400.00 100.345000 20,069,000.00 89,600.00 FHLMC 13MoNc6MoE 03/09/2017 .750 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.097000 10,009,700.00 9,700.00 FHLMC 13MoNc6MoE 03/09/2017 .750 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.097000 10,009,700.00 9,700.00 FHLMC 1.5YrNc3Mob 08/25/2017 .800 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 99.946000 4,997,300.00 -2,700.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 02/26/2021 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.024000 10,002,400.00 2,400.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 02/26/2021 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.039000 10,003,900.00 3,900.00 FHLMC 2.5YrNc1YrE 08/24/2018 1.000 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.018000 5,000,900.00 900.00 FHLMC 3YrNc1YrE 03/29/2019 1.300 9,000,000.00 9,000,000.00 100.099000 9,008,910.00 8,910.00 FHLMC 3YrNc1YrE 03/29/2019 1.270 4,000,000.00 4,000,000.00 100.118000 4,004,720.00 4,720.00 FHLMC 3.5YrNc6MoE 10/11/2019 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.098000 15,014,700.00 14,700.00 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoE 04/12/2019 1.430 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.010000 25,002,500.00 2,500.00 FHLMC 2YrNc6MoB 10/04/2018 1.120 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.000000 15,000,000.00 0.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 04/14/2021 1.500 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.013000 20,002,600.00 2,600.00 FHLMC 2.25YrNc6MoB 06/29/2018 1.125 5,850,000.00 5,850,000.00 100.035000 5,852,047.50 2,047.50 FHLMC 1.5YrNc6MoB 10/13/2017 .850 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.004000 15,000,600.00 600.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 04/21/2021 1.500 7,835,000.00 7,835,000.00 100.008000 7,835,626.80 626.80 FHLMC 1.5YrNc6MoB 10/13/2017 .850 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.004000 10,000,400.00 400.00 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 07/28/2020 1.300 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.005000 15,000,750.00 750.00 FHLMC 1.5YrNc3MoB 10/27/2017 .825 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.007000 25,001,750.00 1,750.00 FHLMC 1.5YrNc6MoB 10/27/2017 .850 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.007000 10,000,700.00 700.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 04/28/2021 1.500 12,500,000.00 12,500,000.00 100.011000 12,501,375.00 1,375.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 04/28/2021 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.005000 10,000,500.00 500.00 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 08/10/2020 1.350 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.019000 15,002,850.00 2,850.00 FHLMC 3.5YrNc3MoB 11/12/2019 1.000 10,425,000.00 10,425,000.00 100.000000 10,425,000.00 0.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 04/28/2021 1.500 8,700,000.00 8,700,000.00 100.009000 8,700,783.00 783.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 06/09/2021 1.600 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.032000 15,004,800.00 4,800.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 05/25/2021 1.500 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.012000 20,002,400.00 2,400.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 06/16/2021 1.500 15,000,000.00 14,997,000.00 100.029000 15,004,350.00 7,350.00 FHLMC 3YrNc3MoB 06/20/2019 1.000 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.035000 15,005,250.00 5,250.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 06/30/2021 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.999000 14,999,850.00 -150.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 06/30/2021 1.300 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.964000 14,994,600.00 -5,400.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 06/30/2021 1.500 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.816000 9,981,600.00 -18,400.00 FHLMC 3.5YrNc3MoB 12/30/2019 1.000 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.009000 15,001,350.00 1,350.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 07/13/2021 1.250 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.015000 15,002,250.00 2,250.00 FHLMC 2YrNc6MoE 07/20/2018 .820 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.810000 9,981,000.00 -19,000.003134G9C70.820 1.786 1.803 3134G9UH8 1.000 3.182 3.249 3134G9XA0 1.250 4.620 4.786 3134G9VA2 1.300 4.577 4.751 3134G9UX3 1.500 4.552 4.751 3134G9PC5 1.000 2.672 2.721 3134G9UM7 1.500 4.552 4.751 3134G9JW8 1.500 4.455 4.652 3134G9NU7 1.504 4.513 4.712 3134G8YZ6 1.500 4.381 4.578 3134G9JX6 1.600 4.481 4.693 3134G9AN7 1.350 3.743 3.863 3134G9BF3 1.000 3.050 3.118 3134G8XU8 1.500 4.381 4.578 3134G8XM6 1.250 4.413 4.578 3134G8YS2 .825 1.064 1.074 3134G8X61 .850 1.064 1.074 3134G8WC9 .850 1.025 1.036 3134G8X20 1.300 3.714 3.827 3134G8WC9 .850 1.025 1.036 3134G8VB2 1.500 4.361 4.559 3134G8VG1 1.500 4.342 4.540 3134G8V97 1.125 1.721 1.745 3134G8T82 1.430 2.463 2.532 3134G8TU3 1.120 1.972 2.011 3134G8QB8 1.270 2.450 2.493 3134G8TG4 1.500 2.931 3.030 3134G8L64 1.000 1.876 1.899 3134G8QE2 1.300 2.449 2.493 3134G8KU2 1.250 4.269 4.411 3134G8L31 1.250 4.269 4.411 3134G8LG2 .750 .436 .438 3134G8L49 .800 .897 .901 3137EADX4 1.052 1.195 1.208 3134G8LG2 .750 .436 .438 3134G73L3 .750 1.118 1.129 3134G7S77 1.125 3.959 4.082 3134G72T7 1.050 2.044 2.079 3134G72T7 1.050 2.044 2.079 3134G7V24 .750 1.065 1.074 3137EADU0 .453 .325 .326 3137EADU0 .570 .325 .326 3137EADU0 .592 .325 .326 3134G7AE1 1.230 1.699 1.726 3134G66M0 1.259 1.699 1.726 3134G3S50 .600 .087 .088 3134G5WA9 .750 .248 .249 FHLMC BONDS 3134G3S50 .647 .087 .088 313397BZ3 .482 .381 .384 .512 .187 .188 313396L35 .466 .052 .052 313397AE1 .522 .264 .266 FHLMC DISC NOTES 313396L35 .578 .052 .052 912828B74 .594 .377 .378 .833 .964 .983 912828WL0 1.370 2.594 2.666 912828F62 1.470 2.984 3.085 912828B74 .695 .377 .378 912828B74 .742 .376 .378 912828UJ7 .990 1.320 1.337 912828A91 .655 .292 .293 912828TS9 .723 .995 1.000 912828H94 .920 1.361 1.378 912828B74 .596 .377 .378 912828A91 .433 .292 .293 912828WH9 .752 .620 .622 912828SC5 .641 .336 .337 US TREAS BONDS 912828TB6 .932 .745 .748 912796JT7 .429 .646 .649 .450 .572 .575 912796KG3 .426 .360 .362 912796JA8 .406 .341 .342 912796JT7 .512 .646 .649 912796JT7 .442 .646 .649 1.231 1.740 3.710 US TREAS BILLS LOCAL AGCY OBLIG LAO 1.231 1.740 3.710 CASH .410 .003 .003 .410 .003 .003 .804 .003 .003 DDA/PASSBK CALTRUST FND CLTR .804 .003 .003 FGTXX .297 .003 .003 .370 .003 .003 GOFXX .314 .003 .003 CASH .520 .003 .003 FRGXX .310 .003 .003 WFFXX .334 .003 .003 POIXX .426 .000 .003 CJPXX .387 .000 .003 WFJXX .423 .000 .003 FIPXX .416 .000 .003 Yield To Maturity Modified Duration Years To Maturity MMKT CUSIP Month End Portfolio Holdings Fund: 1 POOL FUND COUNTY OF RIVERISIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 790 Description Maturity Date Coupon Par Value Book Value Market Price Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss Yield To Maturity Modified Duration Years To MaturityCUSIP Month End Portfolio Holdings FHLMC 1.25YrNc3MoB 10/27/2017 .700 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.851000 9,985,100.00 -14,900.00 FHLMC 3YrNc3MoB 07/26/2019 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.002000 10,000,200.00 200.00 FHLMC 2YrNc3MoB 07/27/2018 1.050 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.973000 9,997,300.00 -2,700.00 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 07/27/2020 1.150 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.909000 14,986,350.00 -13,650.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 08/10/2021 1.250 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.967000 14,995,050.00 -4,950.00 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 08/10/2020 1.150 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.848000 14,977,200.00 -22,800.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 08/10/2021 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.922000 9,992,200.00 -7,800.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 08/25/2021 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.796000 14,969,400.00 -30,600.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 08/25/2021 1.500 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.707000 9,970,700.00 -29,300.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 08/25/2021 1.375 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.008000 15,001,200.00 1,200.00 FHLMC 3.5YrNc1YrE 02/25/2020 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.003000 10,000,300.00 300.00 FHLMC 4.25YrNc3MoB 12/08/2020 1.250 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 99.944000 19,988,800.00 -11,200.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 08/24/2021 1.250 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 99.971000 19,994,200.00 -5,800.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 09/13/2021 1.500 16,500,000.00 16,500,000.00 99.979000 16,496,535.00 -3,465.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 09/30/2021 1.500 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.095000 20,019,000.00 19,000.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 09/30/2021 1.450 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.168000 15,025,200.00 25,200.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 09/30/2021 1.350 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.867000 14,980,050.00 -19,950.00 1.145 889,435,000.00 889,355,821.15 100.026242 889,668,407.30 312,586.15 FNMA DISC NOTE 10/11/2016 .660 25,000,000.00 24,862,500.00 99.996000 24,999,000.00 136,500.00 FNMA DISC NOTE 10/12/2016 .640 25,000,000.00 24,871,555.56 99.995000 24,998,750.00 127,194.44 FNMA DISC NOTE 01/17/2017 .530 15,000,000.00 14,946,558.33 99.921000 14,988,150.00 41,591.67 FNMA DISC NOTE 05/12/2017 .550 25,000,000.00 24,876,250.00 99.718000 24,929,500.00 53,250.00 .602 90,000,000.00 89,556,863.89 99.906000 89,915,400.00 358,536.11 FNMA 3YrNc1YrE 11/28/2018 1.200 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.062000 5,003,100.00 3,100.00 FNMA 3YrNc1YrE 11/28/2018 1.200 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.062000 5,003,100.00 3,100.00 FNMA 3YrNc1YrE 11/28/2018 1.200 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.062000 5,003,100.00 3,100.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoB 02/19/2020 1.350 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.018000 15,002,700.00 2,700.00 FNMA 5YrNc6MoB 02/26/2021 1.125 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.987000 14,998,050.00 -1,950.00 FNMA 4YrNC6MoB 03/09/2020 1.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.026000 10,002,600.00 2,600.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoB 03/09/2020 1.300 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.029000 15,004,350.00 4,350.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoB 03/30/2020 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.087000 10,008,700.00 8,700.00 FNMA 3YrNc6MoB 03/29/2019 1.000 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.057000 20,011,400.00 11,400.00 FNMA 5YrNc6MoB 03/30/2021 1.375 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.966000 14,994,900.00 -5,100.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoB 04/07/2020 1.300 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.000000 15,000,000.00 0.00 FNMA 5YrNc6MoB 06/09/2021 1.550 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.050000 15,007,500.00 7,500.00 FNMA 3.5YrNc6MoB 12/16/2019 1.500 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 99.723000 4,986,150.00 -13,850.00 FNMA 4.25YrNc6MoB 09/09/2020 1.400 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.012000 15,001,800.00 1,800.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoB 06/30/2020 1.150 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 99.997000 19,999,400.00 -600.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoE 07/13/2020 1.350 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.001000 10,000,100.00 100.00 FNMA 2YrNc6MoE 07/20/2018 1.000 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.805000 24,951,250.00 -48,750.00 FNMA 3.25YrNc6MoB 09/30/2019 1.250 7,500,000.00 7,500,000.00 99.846000 7,488,450.00 -11,550.00 FNMA 2YrNc6MoE 07/27/2018 .800 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.807000 14,971,050.00 -28,950.00 FNMA 5YrNc6MoB 07/27/2021 1.250 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.746000 14,961,900.00 -38,100.00 FNMA 3YrNc6MoE 07/26/2019 1.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.604000 9,960,400.00 -39,600.00 FNMA 3YrNc6MoE 07/26/2019 1.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.604000 9,960,400.00 -39,600.00 FNMA 2.5YrNc6MoE 01/25/2019 .875 7,500,000.00 7,495,350.00 99.562000 7,467,150.00 -28,200.00 FNMA 5YrNc6MoB 07/27/2021 1.250 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 99.815000 19,963,000.00 -37,000.00 FNMA 3YrNc1YrE 07/26/2019 1.050 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.916000 14,987,400.00 -12,600.00 FNMA 3.5YrNc1YrE 07/26/2019 1.125 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.867000 24,966,750.00 -33,250.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoB 11/24/2020 1.125 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.651000 14,947,650.00 -52,350.00 1.175 360,000,000.00 359,995,350.00 99.903431 359,652,350.00 -343,000.00 FHLB DISC NOTE 10/03/2016 .620 25,000,000.00 24,870,833.33 99.998889 24,999,722.22 128,888.89 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/05/2017 .600 7,000,000.00 6,964,066.67 99.925333 6,994,773.33 30,706.66 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/10/2017 .630 15,000,000.00 14,920,725.00 99.921444 14,988,216.67 67,491.67 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/10/2017 .630 15,000,000.00 14,920,725.00 99.921444 14,988,216.67 67,491.67 FHLB DISC NOTE 10/12/2016 .445 25,000,000.00 24,941,902.78 99.993889 24,998,472.22 56,569.44 FHLB DISC NOTE 02/08/2017 .570 20,000,000.00 19,904,050.00 99.895278 19,979,055.56 75,005.56 FHLB DISC NOTE 02/03/2017 .570 5,000,000.00 4,976,487.50 99.899306 4,994,965.28 18,477.78 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/05/2017 .530 5,000,000.00 4,980,272.22 99.925333 4,996,266.67 15,994.45 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/09/2017 .530 25,000,000.00 24,899,888.89 99.922222 24,980,555.56 80,666.67 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/17/2017 .530 25,000,000.00 24,898,048.61 99.916000 24,979,000.00 80,951.39 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/17/2017 .530 25,000,000.00 24,898,048.61 99.916000 24,979,000.00 80,951.39 FHLB DISC NOTE 02/17/2017 .560 25,000,000.00 24,882,555.56 99.888028 24,972,006.94 89,451.38 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/20/2017 .530 15,000,000.00 14,939,491.67 99.913667 14,987,050.00 47,558.33 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/19/2017 .530 25,000,000.00 24,901,361.11 99.914444 24,978,611.11 77,250.00 FHLB DISC NOTE 02/15/2017 .540 25,000,000.00 24,889,750.00 99.889639 24,972,409.72 82,659.72 FHLB DISC NOTE 02/21/2017 .570 35,000,000.00 34,833,750.00 99.884806 34,959,681.94 125,931.94 FHLB DISC NOTE 02/21/2017 .570 25,000,000.00 24,883,625.00 99.884806 24,971,201.39 87,576.39 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/10/2017 .465 25,000,000.00 24,933,156.25 99.921444 24,980,361.11 47,204.86 FHLB DISC NOTE 10/12/2016 .400 25,000,000.00 24,968,333.33 99.993889 24,998,472.22 30,138.89 FHLB DISC NOTE 10/12/2016 .400 25,000,000.00 24,968,333.33 99.993889 24,998,472.22 30,138.89 FHLB DISC NOTE 02/01/2017 .520 25,000,000.00 24,919,833.33 99.900917 24,975,229.17 55,395.84 FHLB DISC NOTE 10/03/2016 .410 25,000,000.00 24,971,243.06 99.998889 24,999,722.22 28,479.16 FHLB DISC NOTE 06/29/2017 .550 25,000,000.00 24,860,972.22 99.641000 24,910,250.00 49,277.78 FHLB DISC NOTE 06/15/2017 .550 25,000,000.00 24,868,611.11 99.657333 24,914,333.33 45,722.22 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/12/2017 .420 25,000,000.00 24,944,875.00 99.919889 24,979,972.22 35,097.22 FHLB DISC NOTE 01/11/2017 .440 25,000,000.00 24,944,388.89 99.920667 24,980,166.67 35,777.78 .517 567,000,000.00 564,885,328.47 99.904089 566,456,184.44 1,570,855.97 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/20/2018 1.250 3,719,720.08 3,719,720.08 100.123000 3,724,295.34 4,575.26 FHLB 1YrNc3MoB 11/25/2016 .550 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.025000 25,006,250.00 6,250.00 FHLB 2Yr 12/01/2017 1.020 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.248000 10,024,800.00 24,800.00 FHLB 1Yr 12/14/2016 .750 15,370,000.00 15,360,624.30 100.104000 15,385,984.80 25,360.50 FHLB 3YrNc1YrE 12/28/2018 1.360 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.135000 15,020,250.00 20,250.00 FHLB 1YrNc3MoB 02/17/2017 .720 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.037000 25,009,250.00 9,250.00 FHLB 1.5Yr 05/24/2017 .875 25,000,000.00 25,046,250.00 100.226000 25,056,500.00 10,250.00 FHLB 2.5YrNc1YrE 09/28/2018 1.100 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.054000 5,002,700.00 2,700.00 FHLB 5Yr 04/05/2021 1.375 5,000,000.00 4,996,350.00 100.420000 5,021,000.00 24,650.00 FHLB 4Yr 04/06/2020 1.200 10,000,000.00 9,996,000.00 100.185000 10,018,500.00 22,500.00 FHLB 1YrNc3MoB 04/28/2017 .650 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.003000 25,000,750.00 750.00 FHLB 1YrNc3MoB 04/28/2017 .650 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.003000 15,000,450.00 450.00 FHLB 1YrNc3MoB 04/28/2017 .650 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.003000 10,000,300.00 300.00 FHLB 1YrNc3MoB 06/30/2017 .650 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.026000 50,013,000.00 13,000.00 FHLB 1YrNc7MoE 07/20/2017 .750 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.006000 15,000,900.00 900.00 FHLB 1YrNc7MoE 07/20/2017 .750 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.006000 25,001,500.00 1,500.00 FHLB 1YrNc7MoE 07/20/2017 .750 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.006000 10,000,600.00 600.00 FHLB 3Yr 07/01/2020 .771 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.982000 24,995,500.00 -4,500.003130A8NF6.771 3.688 3.753 3130A8L35 .750 .801 .803 3130A8L35 .750 .801 .803 3130A8JR5 .650 .746 .748 3130A8L35 .750 .801 .803 3130A7TT2 .650 .574 .575 3130A7TT2 .650 .574 .575 3130A7PU3 1.210 3.413 3.518 3130A7TT2 .650 .574 .575 3130A7H57 1.100 1.967 1.995 3130A7PV1 1.390 4.333 4.515 3130A7BY0 .720 .382 .384 3130A1NN4 .728 .645 .647 3130A6VS3 .811 .205 .205 3130A6W94 1.360 2.196 2.244 3130A6R74 .550 .153 .153 3130A6V95 1.020 1.156 1.170 FHLB BONDS 313383EP2 1.250 1.693 1.721 313385AL0 .441 .281 .282 .519 .291 .293 313385GX8 .553 .702 .707 313385AM8 .421 .284 .285 313384J34 .410 .008 .008 313385HM1 .553 .741 .745 313384K40 .401 .033 .033 313385BH8 .522 .338 .340 313385AK2 .466 .278 .279 313384K40 .401 .033 .033 313385CD6 .573 .392 .395 313385CD6 .573 .392 .395 313385AU0 .532 .302 .304 313385BX3 .542 .376 .378 313385BZ8 .563 .381 .384 313385AV8 .532 .305 .307 313385AS5 .532 .297 .299 313385AS5 .532 .297 .299 313385AE6 .532 .264 .266 313385AJ5 .532 .275 .277 313385BQ8 .573 .357 .359 313385BK1 .573 .343 .345 313385AK2 .633 .278 .279 313384K40 .446 .033 .033 313397AE1 .603 .264 .266 313385AK2 .633 .278 .279 FHLB DISC NOTES 313384J34 .623 .008 .008 3136G3Y74 1.125 4.028 4.153 1.175 3.276 3.366 3136G3A62 1.050 2.769 2.819 3136G3P25 1.125 2.765 2.819 3136G3XS9 .900 2.287 2.321 3136G3ZW8 1.250 4.658 4.825 3135G0M26 1.000 2.771 2.819 3135G0M26 1.000 2.771 2.819 3136G3XE0 .800 1.806 1.822 3136G3XT7 1.250 4.658 4.825 3134G9B55 1.000 1.782 1.803 3136G3SY2 1.250 2.935 3.000 3136G3TG0 1.150 3.650 3.751 3136G3WC5 1.350 3.669 3.786 3136G3RL1 1.500 3.111 3.211 3136G3SG1 1.400 3.825 3.945 3136G3HL2 1.300 3.408 3.521 3136G3PB5 1.550 4.487 4.693 3136G3EE1 1.000 2.460 2.493 3136G3DV4 1.375 4.349 4.499 3136G3BX2 1.300 3.353 3.441 3136G3EH4 1.250 3.414 3.499 3136G2YT8 1.125 4.282 4.411 3136G2ZB6 1.000 3.373 3.441 3136G2SX6 1.200 2.119 2.162 3136G2XR3 1.350 3.294 3.389 3136G2SX6 1.200 2.119 2.162 3136G2SX6 1.200 2.119 2.162 .605 .236 .238 FNMA BONDS 313589AS2 .532 .297 .299 313589FM0 .553 .610 .614 313588K38 .664 .030 .030 313588K46 .643 .033 .033 1.150 2.890 2.986 FNMA DISC NOTES 3134GAKY9 1.450 4.806 5.003 3134GANB6 1.350 4.819 5.003 3134GADP6 1.500 4.753 4.956 3134GAET7 1.500 4.800 5.003 3134GAEB6 1.250 4.053 4.192 3134GAEG5 1.250 4.733 4.901 3134G96A0 1.375 4.719 4.904 3134GABZ6 1.250 3.317 3.405 3134G9U47 1.500 4.703 4.904 3134G95W3 1.500 4.703 4.904 3134G9S57 1.150 3.760 3.863 3134G9T23 1.250 4.694 4.863 3134G9S40 1.150 3.724 3.825 3134G9R66 1.250 4.694 4.863 3134G9Q75 1.250 2.759 2.819 3134G9Q67 1.050 1.800 1.822 3134G9M38 .700 1.066 1.074 COUNTY OF RIVERISIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 891 Description Maturity Date Coupon Par Value Book Value Market Price Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss Yield To Maturity Modified Duration Years To MaturityCUSIP Month End Portfolio Holdings FHLB 2Yr 08/07/2018 .625 5,000,000.00 4,989,600.00 99.610000 4,980,500.00 -9,100.00 FHLB 2Yr 08/07/2018 .625 25,000,000.00 24,948,000.00 99.610000 24,902,500.00 -45,500.00 FHLB 2Yr 08/07/2018 .625 10,000,000.00 9,979,200.00 99.610000 9,961,000.00 -18,200.00 FHLB 1.5Yr 01/08/2018 .650 15,000,000.00 15,007,200.00 99.816000 14,972,400.00 -34,800.00 FHLB 1.5Yr 01/08/2018 .650 10,000,000.00 10,006,200.00 99.816000 9,981,600.00 -24,600.00 FHLB 2YrNc1YrE 11/23/2018 1.000 9,500,000.00 9,500,000.00 99.970000 9,497,150.00 -2,850.00 FHLB 3YrNc3MoB 08/15/2019 .750 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.945000 24,986,250.00 -13,750.00 FHLB 3Yr 08/05/2019 .875 15,000,000.00 14,971,200.00 99.630000 14,944,500.00 -26,700.00 FHLB 2Yr 10/01/2018 .875 10,000,000.00 9,993,200.00 99.956000 9,995,600.00 2,400.00 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 09/30/2021 1.350 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.900000 14,985,000.00 -15,000.00 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 09/30/2021 1.350 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.978000 14,996,700.00 -3,300.00 FHLB 4Yr 09/22/2020 .693 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.804000 9,980,400.00 -19,600.00 FHLB 4Yr 09/22/2020 .693 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.804000 14,970,600.00 -29,400.00 FHLB 4Yr 09/28/2020 .677 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.804000 9,980,400.00 -19,600.00 FHLB 4Yr 09/28/2020 .677 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.804000 14,970,600.00 -29,400.00 .796 518,589,720.08 518,513,544.38 99.961050 518,387,730.14 -125,814.24 FFCB DISC NOTE 10/13/2016 .460 25,000,000.00 24,890,430.56 99.995000 24,998,750.00 108,319.44 FFCB DISC NOTE 10/17/2016 .650 10,000,000.00 9,950,166.67 99.993000 9,999,300.00 49,133.33 FFCB DISC NOTE 01/18/2017 .560 15,000,000.00 14,933,033.33 99.920000 14,988,000.00 54,966.67 FFCB DISC NOTE 02/22/2017 .600 10,000,000.00 9,946,333.33 99.870000 9,987,000.00 40,666.67 FFCB DISC NOTE 01/18/2017 .540 25,000,000.00 24,895,375.00 99.920000 24,980,000.00 84,625.00 FFCB DISC NOTE 02/16/2017 .560 25,000,000.00 24,880,611.11 99.875000 24,968,750.00 88,138.89 FFCB DISC NOTE 01/12/2017 .530 15,000,000.00 14,941,037.50 99.924000 14,988,600.00 47,562.50 FFCB DISC NOTE 01/12/2017 .530 10,000,000.00 9,960,838.89 99.924000 9,992,400.00 31,561.11 FFCB DISC NOTE 01/12/2017 .530 15,000,000.00 14,941,258.33 99.924000 14,988,600.00 47,341.67 FFCB DISC NOTE 01/12/2017 .530 10,000,000.00 9,960,838.89 99.924000 9,992,400.00 31,561.11 FFCB DISC NOTE 01/27/2017 .530 20,000,000.00 19,918,733.33 99.913000 19,982,600.00 63,866.67 FFCB DISC NOTE 01/27/2017 .530 20,000,000.00 19,919,027.78 99.913000 19,982,600.00 63,572.22 FFCB DISC NOTE 02/13/2017 .560 25,000,000.00 24,888,777.78 99.878000 24,969,500.00 80,722.22 FFCB DISC NOTE 02/09/2017 .550 25,000,000.00 24,893,437.50 99.882000 24,970,500.00 77,062.50 FFCB DISC NOTE 02/17/2017 .500 5,000,000.00 4,983,194.44 99.874000 4,993,700.00 10,505.56 FFCB DISC NOTE 05/10/2017 .610 25,000,000.00 24,864,020.83 99.720000 24,930,000.00 65,979.17 FFCB DISC NOTE 06/01/2017 .570 15,000,000.00 14,919,963.00 99.679000 14,951,850.00 31,887.00 FFCB DISC NOTE 02/14/2017 .460 20,000,000.00 19,941,222.22 99.877000 19,975,400.00 34,177.78 FFCB DISC NOTE 06/01/2017 .570 25,000,000.00 24,866,604.17 99.679000 24,919,750.00 53,145.83 FFCB DISC NOTE 06/29/2017 .570 25,000,000.00 24,856,312.50 99.641000 24,910,250.00 53,937.50 FFCB DISC NOTE 05/26/2017 .530 25,000,000.00 24,880,750.00 99.700000 24,925,000.00 44,250.00 FFCB DISC NOTE 06/19/2017 .600 25,000,000.00 24,872,916.67 99.655000 24,913,750.00 40,833.33 FFCB DISC NOTE 07/07/2017 .610 25,000,000.00 24,866,562.50 99.600000 24,900,000.00 33,437.50 FFCB DISC NOTE 01/31/2017 .440 25,000,000.00 24,957,222.22 99.910000 24,977,500.00 20,277.78 .546 465,000,000.00 462,928,668.55 99.824989 464,186,200.00 1,257,531.45 FFCB 5Yr 10/10/2019 .588 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.606000 14,940,900.00 -59,100.00 FFCB 5Yr 10/10/2019 .588 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.606000 24,901,500.00 -98,500.00 FFCB 5Yr 10/10/2019 .588 10,000,000.00 9,997,560.00 99.606000 9,960,600.00 -36,960.00 FFCB 2Yr 04/21/2017 .600 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.063000 10,006,300.00 6,300.00 FFCB 2Yr 05/08/2017 .650 15,000,000.00 14,991,000.00 100.054000 15,008,100.00 17,100.00 FFCB 1.5Yr 01/13/2017 .500 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.017000 10,001,700.00 1,700.00 FFCB 1.5Yr 02/06/2017 .590 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.051000 10,005,100.00 5,100.00 FFCB 1.5Yr 02/06/2017 .590 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.051000 10,005,100.00 5,100.00 FFCB 1.5Yr 02/06/2017 .590 15,000,000.00 14,989,950.00 100.051000 15,007,650.00 17,700.00 FFCB 3YrNc3MoA 10/15/2018 1.110 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.000000 5,000,000.00 0.00 FFCB 2Yr 09/25/2017 .900 25,250,000.00 25,371,578.75 100.163000 25,291,157.50 -80,421.25 FFCB 2Yr 05/22/2017 .625 15,650,000.00 15,669,343.40 99.885000 15,632,002.50 -37,340.90 FFCB 1.25Yr 01/13/2017 .430 24,000,000.00 23,994,480.00 100.021000 24,005,040.00 10,560.00 FFCB 1.5 Yr 04/21/2017 .500 25,000,000.00 24,987,765.25 99.955000 24,988,750.00 984.75 FFCB 1Yr 11/28/2016 .450 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.039000 15,005,850.00 5,850.00 FFCB 1.5Yr 03/27/2017 .520 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.001000 10,000,100.00 100.00 FFCB 2Yr 02/09/2018 .593 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.088000 15,013,200.00 13,200.00 FFCB 2Yr 02/09/2018 .593 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.088000 20,017,600.00 17,600.00 FFCB 3Yr 11/23/2018 .666 10,000,000.00 10,006,056.38 100.022000 10,002,200.00 -3,856.38 FFCB 3Yr 02/25/2019 .795 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.314000 15,047,100.00 47,100.00 FFCB 3Yr 02/25/2019 .795 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.314000 5,015,700.00 15,700.00 FFCB 2.5Yr 09/17/2018 .751 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.274000 5,013,700.00 13,700.00 FFCB 3 Yr 04/04/2019 .723 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.126000 25,031,500.00 31,500.00 FFCB 4Yr 04/01/2020 .758 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.056000 25,014,000.00 14,000.00 FFCB 3YrNc1YrA 03/29/2019 1.250 10,310,000.00 10,310,000.00 100.030000 10,313,093.00 3,093.00 FFCB 4Yr 04/13/2020 .772 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.087000 50,043,500.00 43,500.00 FFCB 4YrNc1YrA 04/27/2020 1.420 7,700,000.00 7,700,000.00 100.131000 7,710,087.00 10,087.00 FFCB 5Yr 05/25/2021 .795 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.110000 10,011,000.00 11,000.00 FFCB 5Yr 05/25/2021 .795 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.110000 10,011,000.00 11,000.00 FFCB 3Yr 07/15/2019 .714 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.028000 5,001,400.00 1,400.00 FFCB 2.5YrNc3MoA 01/28/2019 1.110 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.716000 24,929,000.00 -71,000.00 FFCB 4YrNc1YrA 08/24/2020 1.320 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.804000 9,980,400.00 -19,600.00 FFCB 1.25Yr 12/22/2017 .700 15,000,000.00 14,988,000.00 99.934000 14,990,100.00 2,100.00 FFCB 4YrNc1YrA 09/21/2020 1.350 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.855000 9,985,500.00 -14,500.00 .730 512,910,000.00 513,005,733.78 99.996087 512,889,930.00 -115,803.78 FAMCA DISC NOTE 10/17/2016 .720 10,000,000.00 9,937,400.00 99.993000 9,999,300.00 61,900.00 FAMCA DISC NOTE 10/03/2016 .700 15,000,000.00 14,918,625.00 100.000000 15,000,000.00 81,375.00 FAMCA DISC NOTE 10/03/2016 .700 25,000,000.00 24,864,375.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 135,625.00 FAMCA DISC NOTE 01/18/2017 .680 20,000,000.00 19,884,022.22 99.920000 19,984,000.00 99,977.78 FAMCA DISC NOTE 01/25/2017 .550 20,000,000.00 19,923,611.11 99.915000 19,983,000.00 59,388.89 FAMCA DISC NOTE 01/03/2017 .540 25,000,000.00 24,931,944.44 99.931000 24,982,750.00 50,805.56 .637 115,000,000.00 114,459,977.77 99.955696 114,949,050.00 489,072.23 FAMCA 3Yr 09/05/2017 1.120 8,850,000.00 8,850,000.00 100.396000 8,885,046.00 35,046.00 FAMCA 1Yr 02/23/2017 .500 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 FAMCA 3Yr 03/19/2019 .927 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.996000 9,999,600.00 -400.00 FAMCA 3Yr 07/26/2019 .861 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.132000 15,019,800.00 19,800.00 .758 58,850,000.00 58,850,000.00 100.092517 58,904,446.00 54,446.00 UC REGENTS 11/08/2016 .530 50,000,000.00 49,960,250.00 99.944056 49,972,027.78 11,777.78 UC REGENTS 10/27/2016 .450 50,000,000.00 49,978,750.00 99.967500 49,983,750.00 5,000.00 .490 100,000,000.00 99,939,000.00 99.955778 99,955,777.78 16,777.78 CONNECTICUT ST 08/01/2018 2.250 25,000,000.00 25,613,250.00 102.453000 25,613,250.00 0.00 WASHINGTON STATE 08/01/2017 .830 12,885,000.00 12,885,000.00 100.000000 12,885,000.00 0.00 TEXAS ST 10/01/2019 1.497 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.000000 5,000,000.00 0.00882723A331.497 2.907 3.003 20772JL34 1.398 1.791 1.836 93974DSZ2 .830 .831 .836 .490 .090 .090 MUNI BONDS 91411SL81 .530 .106 .107 91411SKT6 .450 .074 .074 .758 1.434 1.448 MUNI ZER0 CPNS 3132X0ED9 .927 2.447 2.466 3132X0EV9 .861 2.784 2.819 31315P2K4 1.120 .923 .932 3132X0CY5 .500 .399 .400 .632 .171 .172 FARMER MAC 31315LBA5 .552 .319 .321 31315LAC2 .501 .259 .260 31315KJ35 .704 .008 .008 31315LAT5 .684 .299 .301 31315KK90 .725 .046 .047 31315KJ35 .704 .008 .008 .722 1.972 1.997 FMAC DISC NOTES 3133EGVM4 .765 1.218 1.227 3133EGVK8 1.350 3.856 3.978 3133EGNY7 1.110 2.288 2.329 3133EGSA4 1.320 3.784 3.901 3133EGCE3 .795 4.575 4.652 3133EGLV5 .714 2.764 2.789 3133EF5D5 1.420 3.453 3.575 3133EGCE3 .795 4.575 4.652 3133EFV38 1.250 2.451 2.493 3133EF2Z9 .772 3.490 3.537 3133EFP84 .723 2.488 2.510 3133EFT56 .758 3.458 3.504 3133EFE52 .795 2.381 2.405 3133EFM61 .751 1.950 1.964 3133EFQJ9 .638 2.138 2.148 3133EFE52 .795 2.381 2.405 3133EFNK9 .593 1.355 1.362 3133EFNK9 .593 1.355 1.362 3133EFLN5 .450 .161 .162 3133EFLM7 .520 .486 .488 3133EFJK4 .449 .287 .288 3133EFKR7 .533 .556 .556 3133EFEM5 .650 .981 .986 3133EEN48 .547 .641 .641 3133EE6A3 .635 .352 .353 3133EFHH3 1.110 2.003 2.041 3133EE6A3 .590 .352 .353 3133EE6A3 .590 .352 .353 3133EEJ43 .680 .602 .603 3133EE3Y4 .500 .287 .288 3133EDXQ0 .596 3.016 3.027 3133EEZR4 .600 .555 .556 3133EDXQ0 .588 3.016 3.027 3133EDXQ0 .588 3.016 3.027 .548 .436 .439 FFCB BONDS 313313HV3 .613 .762 .767 313313BG2 .441 .335 .337 313313GB8 .533 .648 .652 313313HB7 .603 .713 .718 313313GH5 .573 .664 .668 313313HM3 .573 .740 .745 313313GH5 .573 .664 .668 313313BW7 .461 .373 .375 313313BZ0 .502 .381 .384 313313FK9 .613 .604 .608 313313BV9 .563 .370 .373 313313BR8 .552 .359 .362 313313BC1 .532 .324 .326 313313BC1 .532 .324 .326 313313AM0 .532 .283 .285 313313AM0 .532 .283 .285 313313AM0 .532 .283 .285 313313AM0 .532 .283 .285 313313AT5 .542 .300 .301 313313BY3 .563 .378 .381 313313AT5 .563 .299 .301 313313CE6 .603 .395 .397 313312K58 .462 .035 .036 313312K90 .653 .046 .047 .799 1.824 1.856 FFCB DISC NOTES 3130A9FR7 .677 3.945 3.997 3130A9FR7 .677 3.945 3.997 3130A9FU0 .693 3.922 3.981 3130A9FM8 .693 3.922 3.981 3130A9DH1 1.350 4.819 5.003 3130A9DA6 1.350 4.819 5.003 3130A8Y72 .940 2.802 2.847 3130A9AE1 .908 1.972 2.003 3130A8WS8 1.000 2.112 2.148 3130A8UH4 .750 2.836 2.874 3130A8NZ2 .618 1.263 1.274 3130A8NZ2 .608 1.264 1.274 3130A8PK3 .726 1.837 1.852 3130A8PK3 .726 1.837 1.852 3130A8PK3 .726 1.837 1.852 COUNTY OF RIVERISIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 992 Description Maturity Date Coupon Par Value Book Value Market Price Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss Yield To Maturity Modified Duration Years To MaturityCUSIP Month End Portfolio Holdings TEXAS ST 10/01/2017 .723 7,500,000.00 7,500,000.00 100.000000 7,500,000.00 0.00 CALIFORNIA STATE 11/01/2016 .500 55,960,000.00 56,014,840.80 100.098000 56,014,840.80 0.00 CALIFORNIA STATE 11/01/2016 1.250 15,000,000.00 15,062,100.00 100.414000 15,062,100.00 0.00 CALIFORNIA STATE 11/01/2016 1.250 5,000,000.00 5,020,700.00 100.414000 5,020,700.00 0.00 OHIO STATE 05/01/2017 1.250 9,215,000.00 9,268,354.85 100.579000 9,268,354.85 0.00 OHIO STATE 05/01/2018 1.250 9,535,000.00 9,597,549.60 100.656000 9,597,549.60 0.00 HAWAII STATE 04/01/2019 1.380 4,990,000.00 4,990,000.00 100.000000 4,990,000.00 0.00 HAWAII STATE 04/01/2020 1.660 5,055,000.00 5,055,000.00 100.000000 5,055,000.00 0.00 HAWAII STATE 04/01/2017 1.000 4,890,000.00 4,896,992.70 100.143000 4,896,992.70 0.00 HAWAII STATE 04/01/2018 1.250 4,925,000.00 4,933,569.50 100.174000 4,933,569.50 0.00 RHODE ISLAND STATE 05/01/2018 1.250 2,595,000.00 2,607,144.60 100.468000 2,607,144.60 0.00 RHODE ISLAND STATE 05/01/2017 .750 2,580,000.00 2,580,748.20 100.029000 2,580,748.20 0.00 RHODE ISLAND STATE 05/01/2020 1.625 2,660,000.00 2,670,719.80 100.403000 2,670,719.80 0.00 RHODE ISLAND STATE 05/01/2019 1.375 2,625,000.00 2,636,838.75 100.451000 2,636,838.75 0.00 CALIFORNIA STATE 04/01/2018 .900 41,290,000.00 41,120,711.00 99.590000 41,120,711.00 0.00 CALIFORNIA STATE 04/01/2017 1.500 8,245,000.00 8,295,129.60 100.608000 8,295,129.60 0.00 GEORGIA STATE 07/01/2017 3.000 6,110,000.00 6,247,413.90 102.249000 6,247,413.90 0.00 GEORGIA STATE 07/01/2020 3.000 6,825,000.00 7,254,770.25 106.297000 7,254,770.25 0.00 GEORGIA STATE 07/01/2018 3.000 6,345,000.00 6,602,480.10 104.058000 6,602,480.10 0.00 GEORGIA STATE 07/01/2019 3.000 6,580,000.00 6,943,874.00 105.530000 6,943,874.00 0.00 ARKANSAS STATE 06/01/2018 2.250 12,810,000.00 13,139,473.20 102.572000 13,139,473.20 0.00 ARKANSAS STATE 06/01/2019 2.000 13,470,000.00 13,837,192.20 102.726000 13,837,192.20 0.00 ARKANSAS STATE 06/01/2017 2.000 2,015,000.00 2,039,139.70 101.198000 2,039,139.70 0.00 1.371 279,105,000.00 281,812,992.75 100.970242 281,812,992.75 0.00 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 11/21/2016 .910 50,000,000.00 49,660,013.89 99.933417 49,966,708.33 306,694.44 NESTLE 10/12/2016 .600 13,264,000.00 13,223,986.93 99.985639 13,262,095.14 38,108.21 NESTLE 10/12/2016 .600 27,000,000.00 26,918,550.00 99.985639 26,996,122.50 77,572.50 NESTLE 02/06/2017 .650 50,000,000.00 49,832,986.11 99.736889 49,868,444.44 35,458.33 NESTLE 01/09/2017 .620 50,000,000.00 49,864,805.56 99.811111 49,905,555.56 40,750.00 TOYOTA 11/09/2016 .720 50,000,000.00 49,916,000.00 99.949083 49,974,541.67 58,541.67 TOYOTA 02/13/2017 .950 30,000,000.00 29,857,500.00 99.722500 29,916,750.00 59,250.00 NESTLE 05/12/2017 .750 50,000,000.00 49,736,458.33 99.436306 49,718,152.78 -18,305.55 NESTLE 05/11/2017 .790 30,000,000.00 29,843,316.67 99.438833 29,831,650.00 -11,666.67 WAL-MART STORES INC 10/31/2016 .430 50,000,000.00 49,976,111.11 99.960833 49,980,416.67 4,305.56 WAL-MART STORES INC 10/24/2016 .400 50,000,000.00 49,982,777.78 99.969972 49,984,986.11 2,208.33 WAL-MART STORES INC 11/14/2016 .460 15,550,000.00 15,539,667.89 99.942556 15,541,067.39 1,399.50 WAL-MART STORES INC 10/24/2016 .400 15,000,000.00 14,994,833.33 99.969972 14,995,495.83 662.50 .652 480,814,000.00 479,347,007.60 99.818638 479,941,986.42 594,978.82 .751 5,916,003,720.08 5,911,244,395.48 100.010929 5,916,650,304.83 5,405,909.35 .751 5,916,003,720.08 5,911,244,395.48 100.010929 5,916,650,304.83 5,405,909.35Grand Total .727 1.197 1.225 Total Fund .727 1.197 1.225 93114EKQ9 .400 .065 .066 .654 .239 .241 93114EKQ9 .400 .065 .066 93114ELE5 .460 .123 .123 64105GSB1 .794 .606 .611 93114EKX4 .430 .085 .085 89233GPD2 .955 .369 .373 64105GSC9 .754 .609 .614 64105GN91 .622 .275 .277 89233GL95 .721 .109 .110 64105GKC7 .602 .033 .033 64105GP65 .652 .351 .353 89233GLM6 .916 .141 .142 64105GKC7 .602 .033 .033 .904 1.240 1.272 COMM PAPER 041042ZT2 1.024 2.592 2.668 041042ZR6 .572 .664 .668 3733845K8 1.110 2.634 2.751 041042ZS4 .840 1.635 1.668 3733845L6 1.370 3.537 3.753 3733845J1 .930 1.703 1.751 13063CP61 .767 .498 .501 3733845H5 .701 .743 .751 76222RUL4 1.220 2.521 2.584 13063CP79 1.127 1.484 1.501 76222RUJ9 .720 .582 .584 76222RUM2 1.520 3.450 3.586 419792JF4 1.160 1.476 1.501 76222RUK6 1.010 1.560 1.584 419792JH0 1.660 3.364 3.504 419792JE7 .851 .498 .501 677522HW7 .940 1.560 1.584 419792JG2 1.380 2.436 2.501 13063CFD7 .642 .087 .088 677522HV9 .741 .581 .584 13063CXT2 .401 .087 .088 13063CFD7 .642 .087 .088 882723ZZ5 .723 .994 1.003 COUNTY OF RIVERISIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 1093 1 Mutual Funds maturity may be interpreted as weighted average maturity not exceeding 60 days. 2 Or must have an investment advisor with not less than 5 years experience and with assets under management of $500,000,000. THIS COMPLETES THE REPORT REQUIREMENTS OF CALIFORNIA GOVERNMENT C0DE 53646 Investment Category Maximum Maturity Authorized % Limit S&P/ Moody's Maximum Maturity Authorized % Limit S&P/ Moody's Actual % MUNICIPAL BONDS (MUNI) 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 3 YEARS 15% AA-/Aa3/AA-6.46% U.S. TREASURIES 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 5 YEARS 100%NA 8.11% LOCAL AGENCY OBLIGATIONS (LAO) 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 3 YEARS 2.5% INVESTMENT GRADE 0.01% FEDERAL AGENCIES 5 YEARS NO LIMIT AAA 5 YEARS 100%NA 62.10% COMMERCIAL PAPER (CP)270 DAYS 40% A1/P1 270 DAYS 40%A1/P1/F1 8.11% CERTIFICATE & TIME DEPOSITS (NCD & TCD) 5 YEARS 30% NA 1 YEAR 25% Combined A1/P1/F1 0.00% REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS (REPO) 1 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 45 DAYS 40% max, 25% in term repo over 7 days A1/P1/F1 0.00% REVERSE REPOS 92 DAYS 20% NA 60 DAYS 10%NA 0.00% MEDIUM TERM NOTES (MTNO) 5 YEARS 30% A 3 YEARS 20%AA/Aa2/AA 0.00% CALTRUST SHORT TERM FUND NA NA NA DAILY LIQUIDITY 1.0% NA 0.91% MONEY MARKET MUTUAL FUNDS (MMF) 60 DAYS (1)20% AAA/Aaa (2) DAILY LIQUIDITY 20% AAA by 2 Of 3 RATINGS AGC. 9.73% LOCAL AGENCY INVESTMENT FUND (LAIF) NA NA NA DAILY LIQUIDITY Max $50 million NA 0.00% CASH/DEPOSIT ACCOUNT NA NA NA NA NA NA 4.57% GOVERNMENT CODE COUNTY INVESTMENT POLICY The Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund was in FULL COMPLIANCE with the Treasurer’s Statement of Investment Policy. The County’s Investment Policy is more restrictive than the Califor- nia Government Code. This policy is reviewed annually by the County’s Investment Oversight Committee and approved by the County Board of Supervisors. Full Compliance COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 11 94 AGENDA ITEM 6F Agenda Item 6F RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: December 14, 2016 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Jennifer Crosson, Toll Operations Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Amendment to 91 Express Lanes RCTC-OCTA Facility Agreement WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 16-31-025-02, Amendment No. 2 to Agreement No. 16-31-025-00, with the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) for joint operating costs of the toll operations center in the amount of $2,536,500, plus a contingency amount of $126,825, for a total amount not to exceed $2,663,325; 2) Authorize Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director or designee to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Commission and OCTA entered into an agreement for State Route 91 Express Lanes and Corridor Improvements (cooperative agreement), dated December 16, 2011, which addresses the rights and obligations of the parties related to operation of the OCTA 91 Express Lanes and the RCTC 91 Express Lanes (collectively, the 91 Express Lanes). The Commission and OCTA subsequently entered into a facility agreement, also known as the RCTC-OCTA Facility Agreement or ROFA, dated November 24, 2015, to implement the cooperative agreement related to the lease, expansion, and joint use of the toll operations center. In October, the Commission approved a first amendment to the facility agreement to implement the cooperative agreement related to improvements to and joint use of the customer service center. The Commission and OCTA now desire to enter into a second amendment to the facility agreement in order for the Commission to allocate funding to reimburse OCTA and to pay for certain costs administered by the toll service provider, Cofiroute USA, LLC (Cofiroute), which the parties agreed, under the cooperative agreement, to jointly share in accordance with a 50/50 cost split. These costs are generally identified in Section 2.7.2 and Section 2.7.5 of the cooperative agreement and are for the joint operation and maintenance of the existing and 95 Agenda Item 6F new toll-related facilities, which include the built-out toll operations center and the customer services center, and in Section 7.1.4 of the cooperative agreement, related to certain additional vendor contracts and operational costs. Staff worked with OCTA and Cofiroute to identify shared costs for the initial 17 months of operation, February 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018. Staff and OCTA also assigned responsibility for the administration and payment of shared costs. Exhibits A, B, and C of the attached amendment provide details for those costs. Staff is requesting approval of an amendment to the facility agreement for the Commission’s share of the costs OCTA will administer on behalf of the 91 Express Lanes, in the amount of $1,900,500 (Exhibit A of amendment), and for the total amount of costs administered by Cofiroute and paid by the Commission, in the amount of $636,000 (Exhibit C of amendment). OCTA will reimburse the Commission for 50 percent of the costs identified in Exhibit C of the amendment. Exhibit B of the amendment includes costs that will be administered by the Commission on behalf of the Commission and OCTA. The items included in Exhibit B were approved by the Commission in a previous action (traffic operations center video systems) or are the subject of another staff report in this Commission cycle (changeable message signs). Staff is requesting approval of an amendment to the facility agreement, in substantially the form attached, to allocate the amount of $2,536,500 for joint operating costs to be paid by the Commission, and $126,825 for a 5 percent contingency for a total amount not to exceed $2,663,325. The Fiscal Year 2016/17 budget includes amounts for these operating costs as well as reimbursement revenues from OCTA. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes N/A Year: FY 2016/2017 FY 2017/2018 Amount: $783,331* $1,879,994* (*Excludes OCTA reimbursements totaling $333,900) Source of Funds: Toll Revenues, Toll Bond Proceeds Operations and Maintenance Fund Budget Adjustment: No N/A GL/Project Accounting No.: 009199 65XXX 00000 0000 591 31 65XXX (Professional Services) 009199 73XXX 00000 0000 591 31 73XXX (Operating Costs) 009199 90XXX 00000 0000 591 31 90XXX (Capital Outlay) Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 11/10/2016 Attachment: Draft Agreement 16-31-025-02, including Exhibits A, B and C 96 17336.02109\29283233. 5 1 AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO 91 EXPRESS LANES RCTC- OCTA FACILITY AGREEMENT (“ROFA”) This Amendment No. 2 to 91 Express Lanes RCTC-OCTA Facility Agreement No. 16-31-025-00 (“Amendment No. 2”) is made and entered into this _____ day of _________ 2016 by and between the Riverside County Transportation Commission (“RCTC”) and the Orange County Transportation Authority (“OCTA”). RCTC and OCTA are sometimes referred to herein individually as "Party", and collectively as the "Parties". Recitals A. RCTC and OCTA previously entered into that certain RCTC-OCTA Facility Agreement (“ROFA”), dated November 24, 2015, to set forth the rights and obligations of the Parties related to the lease, expansion, and joint use of the Toll Operations Center, as that term is defined in the ROFA. B. RCTC and OCTA previously entered into that Amendment No. 1 to the ROFA, dated October 26, 2016, to address the build-out of the Customer Services Center, as that term is defined in the ROFA, and CSC lease payments. C. RCTC and OCTA entered into that certain Cooperative Agreement for State Route 91 Express Lanes and Corridor Improvements, entered into by the Parties on December 16, 2011 (“Cooperative Agreement”) which, among other things, anticipated the sharing of certain joint operating costs. D. RCTC and OCTA now desire to enter into this Amendment No. 2 in order for the Parties (i) to identify certain third party vendor agreements entered into by OCTA or RCTC, respectively, related to operation of the 91 Express Lanes (“Third Party Vendor Agreements”), (ii) to identify certain purchases administered by one Party and to be jointly funded by the other Party, and (iii) for each Party to allocate funding to reimburse the other Party for its share of costs incurred under such Third Party Vendor Agreements and for such purchases. OCTA also desires to allocate funding to reimburse RCTC for payment of certain third party contracts and purchases administered by Cofiroute, USA LLC (“Cofiroute”) and not funded under that certain three party operating agreement, entered into by OCTA, RCTC and Cofiroute dated as of May 24, 2013 (“ORCOA”). NOW THEREFORE, for good and valuable consideration, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, it is mutually understood and agreed as follows: 1.Amendment. In accordance with Section 8, the ROFA is hereby amended by adding a new Addendum 1 entitled “ROFA Addendum for Funding and Payment of Certain Joint Operating Costs,” which is attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference, setting forth terms pertaining to the allocation of funding and payment by each Party for costs incurred by the ATTACHMENT 1 97 17336.02109\29283233. 5 2 other Party under Third Party Vendor Agreements, and for certain costs incurred by RCTC for third party contracts and purchases administered by Cofiroute for operation of the 91 Express Lanes, and not funded under the ORCOA. 2. Continuing Effect of Agreement. Except as amended by this Amendment No. 2, all provisions of the ROFA, as previously amended, shall remain unchanged and in full force and effect. 3. Counterparts. This Amendment No. 2 may be executed in duplicate originals, each of which is deemed to be an original, but when taken together shall constitute but one and the same instrument. 98 17336.02109\29283233. 5 3 Addendum 1 ROFA Addendum for Funding and Payment of Certain Joint Operating Costs This ROFA Addendum for Funding and Payment of Certain Joint Operating Costs (hereafter “Addendum”) sets forth the respective rights and obligations of RCTC and OCTA, respectively, pertaining to the payment and reimbursement of certain costs incurred by the other Party under the identified Third Party Vendor Agreements and of certain purchases made by one Party to be jointly funded by the other Party, and to the allocation of funding by OCTA to reimburse RCTC for payment of certain third party contract costs and purchases administered by Cofiroute and not funded under the ORCOA. 1. Defined Terms. Capitalized terms used in this Addendum, including in the recitals to Amendment No. 2, and not otherwise defined herein shall have the meanings set forth in the Cooperative Agreement. 2. Funding and Payment for Certain Joint Operating Costs. The Parties agree that there are certain joint operating costs for the Toll Related Facilities, as identified in Section 2.8.5 of the Cooperative Agreement, that will be incurred by one Party on behalf of the other Party, and by Cofiroute for the benefit of both Parties. Each Party agrees to reimburse the other Party for its share of the joint operating costs incurred from February 1, 2017 through June 30, 2018 according to the Percentage Cost Split as follows: A. RCTC Payments to OCTA for Third Party Vendor Agreements or Purchases Administered by OCTA. RCTC hereby allocates $1,900,500 for its share of joint operating costs incurred by OCTA. The initial list of Third Party Vendor Agreements or purchases to be administered by OCTA, and jointly funded by RCTC, are included in Exhibit “A” attached to this Addendum and incorporated herein by reference. OCTA agrees to obtain RCTC approval of any new or additional Third Party Vendor Agreements or purchases not listed in Exhibit “A”, and subject to cost sharing as set forth herein. Additions and changes to Exhibit “A” may be approved in writing by RCTC’s Executive Director, or designee, without an amendment to this Addendum provided that the total costs to be shared by RCTC do not exceed the amount set forth in this paragraph. OCTA shall invoice RCTC monthly for the joint operating costs identified in Exhibit “A”, and RCTC shall reimburse all approved costs within 30 days of receipt of an invoice from OCTA. B. OCTA Payments to RCTC for Third Party Vendor Agreements or Purchases Administered by RCTC. OCTA hereby allocates $113,308 for its share of joint operating costs incurred by RCTC. The initial list of Third Party Vendor Agreements or purchases to be administered by RCTC, and jointly funded by OCTA, are included in Exhibit “B” attached to this Addendum and incorporated herein by reference. RCTC agrees to obtain OCTA approval of any new or additional Third Party Vendor Agreements or purchases not listed in Exhibit “B”, and subject to cost sharing as set forth herein. Additions and changes to Exhibit 99 17336.02109\29283233. 5 4 “B” may be approved in writing by OCTA’s Chief Executive Officer, or designee, without an amendment to this Addendum provided that the total costs to be shared by OCTA do not exceed the amount set forth in this paragraph. RCTC shall invoice OCTA monthly for the joint operating costs identified in Exhibit “B”, and OCTA shall reimburse all approved costs within 30 days of receipt of an invoice from RCTC. C. OCTA Reimbursement to RCTC for Third Party Contracts and Purchases Up to $25,000 Initiated by Cofiroute in the name of the 91 Express Lanes and Initially Paid by RCTC. OCTA hereby allocates $318,000 for its share of costs for third party contracts and purchases up to $25,000 made in the name of the 91 Express Lanes, initiated by Cofiroute and not funded under the ORCOA. The initial list of such third party contracts and purchases to be initiated by Cofiroute in the name of the 91 Express Lanes and jointly funded by the Parties is included in Exhibit “C” attached to this Addendum and incorporated herein by reference. RCTC and OCTA shall each approve, in advance, any procurements to be made by Cofiroute and jointly funded in accordance with this paragraph. Additions and changes to Exhibit “C” may be approved in writing by RCTC’s Executive Director and OCTA’s Chief Executive Officer, or their designees, without an amendment to this Addendum. RCTC shall pay the full invoiced amount directly to the third party contractor or vendor for approved jointly funded procurements as described herein, and shall invoice OCTA monthly for OCTA’s share of such costs, which share shall be based on the Percentage Cost Split. OCTA shall reimburse RCTC for all approved costs within 30 days of receipt of an invoice. 2. Annual Cost Allocation The Parties agree to establish the annual fiscal year amounts for the funding and payment of joint operating costs as described herein by January 15 of each year, commencing on January 15, 2018. 3. Processing of Funding and Payment of Joint Operating Costs. The Parties agree to work together to establish administrative procedures for the processing of joint operating costs as described in this Addendum. [Signatures on following page] 100 17336.02109\29283233. 5 5 SIGNATURES TO AMENDMENT NO. 2 TO 91 EXPRESS LANES RCTC-OCTA FACILITY AGREEMENT (“ROFA”) BETWEEN RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AND ORANGE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY RIVERSIDE COUNTY ORANGE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY By: By: _______________________ Its: _________________________ Its: _______________________ APPROVED AS TO FORM: APPROVED AS TO FORM: BEST BEST & KRIEGER LLP WOODRUFF, SPRADLIN & SMART, APC By: ____________________________ By: _______________________ Counsel to the Riverside General Counsel to Orange County Transportation Commission County Transportation Authority 101 17336.02109\29283233. 5 6 EXHIBIT A CONTRACTS/PURCHASES ADMINISTERED BY OCTA OCTA Administered Costs February 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018 Description Total Shared Costs Shared Amount (RCTC Share) Trademark Counsel $ 6,000 $ 3,000 Contract Telecom Technician $ 20,000 $ 10,000 Customer Newsletter and Annual Report $ 30,000 $ 15,000 Credit Card Processing Fee $ 1,870,000 $ 935,000 Toll Road Property Insurance $ 150,000 $ 75,000 Armor Car Services $ 12,000 $ 6,000 91 Express Lanes Telecommunications Expense $ 125,000 $ 62,500 Printing of Customer Notification Materials $ 20,000 $ 10,000 Courier Service $ 1,000 $ 500 Bank Service Charge $ 12,000 $ 6,000 Transponders $ 1,500,000 $ 750,000 Telephone Software/Hardware Maintenance $ 50,000 $ 25,000 Other Miscellaneous Expenses $ 5,000 $ 2,500 Total $ 3,801,000 $ 1,900,500 102 17336.02109\29283233. 5 7 EXHIBIT B CONTRACTS/PURCHASES ADMINISTERED BY RCTC RCTC Administered Costs February 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018 Description Total Shared Costs Shared Amount (OCTA Share) Parsons (TOC) – Base contract $ 96,985 $ 48,493 Parsons (TOC) – Time and Material $ 75,000 $ 37,500 Daktronics* $ 54,631 $ 27,315 Total $ 226,616 $ 113,308 * Contract includes 10% contingency, if needed shared cost will be determined at the time of use 103 17336.02109\29283233. 5 8 EXHIBIT C CONTRACTS/PURCHASES ADMINISTERED BY COFIROUTE Cofiroute Administered Costs February 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018 Description Total Shared Costs Shared Amount Roadway Repair Materials $ 5,000 $ 2,500 Utilities $ 25,000 $ 12,500 Office Supplies and Equipment $ 15,000 $ 7,500 Postage Fees $ 15,000 $ 7,500 PC Workstations/Hardware $ 125,000 $ 62,500 Software $ 25,000 $ 12,500 Business Expenses $ 10,000 $ 5,000 Other Miscellaneous Expenses $ 5,000 $ 2,500 Network Evaluation/PCI (Payment Card Industry) Compliance $ 26,000 $ 13,000 91 Express Lanes Telecommunications Expense $ 7,000 $ 3,500 Printing of Customer Notification Materials $ 18,000 $ 9,000 Credit Card Processing Fees $ 130,000 $ 65,000 System Maintenance and Support $ 150,000 $ 75,000 Equipment Maintenance Services $ 80,000 $ 40,000 Total $ 636,000 $ 318,000 104 AGENDA ITEM 6G Agenda Item 6G RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: December 14, 2016 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Jennifer Crosson, Toll Operations Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Department of California Highway Patrol Agreement for RCTC 91 Express Lanes Toll Enforcement WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 17-31-044-00 to the Department of California Highway Patrol (CHP) for toll enforcement on the RCTC 91 Express Lanes for a three-year term in the amount of $1,443,310, plus a contingency amount of $56,690, for a total amount not to exceed $1.5 million; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve contingency work as may be required for the agreement. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In early 2017, the Commission will begin operating the RCTC 91 Express Lanes. As established in the RCTC 91 Express Lanes toll policy goals, the success of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes is dependent on the collection of toll revenue sufficient to support the operation of the express lanes and the repayment of debt. A critical element to ensuring that the toll revenue goals of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes are achieved is the enforcement of toll policies and toll violations. The RCTC 91 Express Lanes toll policies provide for free and discounted tolls to high occupancy vehicles with three or more occupants (HOV3+). In order to identify vehicles that are eligible for the HOV3+ discount, the motorist is instructed to drive through a dedicated HOV3+ lane when passing through a toll point. The RCTC 91 Express Lanes have two toll points where a customer can drive through an HOV3+ lane, one eastbound and one westbound. In order to discourage vehicles with less than three occupants from driving through the HOV3+ lane and receiving free or discounted tolls, it is proposed the CHP provide on-road enforcement. The proposed agreement provides for the CHP to be present during peak periods to visually observe motorists as they drive through the HOV3+ lane and issue citations to those that do not meet 105 Agenda Item 6G the minimum occupant requirement. Initially, the CHP enforcement hours will be from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. The CHP enforcement hours will be adjusted based on actual traffic volumes and enforcement needs. Additionally, the RCTC 91 Express Lanes toll policies and California Vehicle Code 23302(a) include a requirement for users of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes to have a FasTrak™ transponder associated with a valid account mounted in their vehicle. Customers without a transponder trigger the on-road violation enforcement cameras capturing an image of the license plate. These transactions will be submitted through a violation process as defined in the RCTC 91 Express Lanes Violation Ordinance adopted by the Commission in June 2016. The process prescribed in the violation ordinance will facilitate the collection of tolls and penalties from users that do not pay their toll at the time of travel via a FasTrak™ transponder and for which a legible image of the vehicle plate is captured. Some customers using the RCTC 91 Express Lanes without a FasTrak™ transponder will also not have a plate on their vehicle or a plate for which the on-road cameras can capture a legible image. These transactions will result in uncollectible transactions and a loss of toll revenue. The on-road violation enforcement system illuminates an overhead light when a vehicle passes through the toll point without a valid transponder. By observing the overhead light, officers can identify vehicles without a license plate and issue a citation. The RCTC 91 Express Lanes toll facility was designed and built to accommodate the positioning of CHP vehicles for enforcement. The RCTC 91 Express Lanes include a protected space in the median alongside the HOV3+ lane for officers to observe vehicles as they pass through the tolling points. They include adequate shoulder for the officer to safely pull over motorists without impeding the flow of traffic in the Express Lanes and a turnaround location allowing the officers to efficiently and safely reposition themselves for continued enforcement. CHP is used by toll agencies throughout the state of California to perform toll evasion enforcement. The Orange County Transportation Authority has a contract with CHP for toll enforcement and reports the use of the CHP and the presence of officers reduces the number of violators allowing for the collection of a higher percent of revenue. In October, the Commission approved an agreement with Caltrans for the maintenance of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes toll facility. Caltrans will be performing maintenance according to an established schedule and requires the use of CHP to provide a maintenance zone enhanced enforcement program (MAZEEP). The use of CHP to perform MAZEEP will enhance the safety of Caltrans, toll provider staff and Commission staff safety while in the maintenance work zone. The CHP agreement is a time and materials agreement that will be managed through the scheduling of CHP activity to ensure the RCTC 91 Express Lanes receives services during operating hours for which the loss of revenue is the highest and for all maintenance activities which involve Caltrans. The estimated annual contract value of $500,000 provides for 60 hours of enforcement per week and 24 hours of MAZEEP every three weeks and includes a contingency of approximately $18,900, or four percent, per year to allow for schedule changes. 106 Agenda Item 6G Enforcement is approximately 88 percent of the contract value, while MAZEEP support is 12 percent. The Toll Facility Agreement (TFA) between RCTC and Caltrans, which granted a lease to the Commission to use the SR-91 median for the operation of the RCTC 91 Express Lanes, provides the Commission with the option to engage the services of the CHP. CHP is designated by the state of California as the agency to perform enforcement on the state highways. The TFA and state designation of CHP as the agency to provide policing services on the RCTC 91 Express Lanes and the use of CHP across the state by toll agencies makes CHP the best choice for the performance of violation enforcement and MAZEEP at this time. If the Commission is not satisfied with CHP’s performance or determines a better option for police services on the RCTC 91 Express Lanes, the Commission has the right to terminate the contract with 30-day advance written notice. The Commission’s Procurement Policy Manual adopted September 9, 2015, allows for the non- competitive procurement of non-federally funded services if the services are to be provided by a government or other public entity. Toll enforcement and MAZEEP services on the RCTC 91 Express Lanes are essential to the collection of toll revenue and the safety of maintenance personnel. Staff recommends the Commission approve Agreement No. 17-31-044-00 with CHP for a term of three years at a cost not to exceed $1.5 million. The FY 2016/17 budget includes an amount for CHP services; therefore, no budget adjustment is required. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes N/A Year: FY 2016/17 FY 2017/18+ Amount: $ 250,000 $1,250,000 Source of Funds: Toll Bond Operations and Maintenance Funds and Toll Revenues Budget Adjustment: No N/A GL/Project Accounting No.: 009199 77114 00000 0000 591 31 73002 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 11/7/2016 Attachment: Draft Agreement No. 17-31-044-00 107 ATTACHMENT 1 108 109 110 111 112 113 AGENDA ITEM 6H Agenda Item 6H RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: December 14, 2016 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Reinland Jones, Toll Technology Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: RCTC 91 Express Lanes Changeable Message Signs Maintenance Agreement and Software Purchase WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 17-31-045-00 to Daktronics, Inc. (Daktronics) for the maintenance and repair of the changeable message signs (CMS) for the 91 Express Lanes for a four-year term, in the amount of $115,690, plus a contingency amount of $11,569, for a total amount not to exceed $127,259; 2) Award Agreement No. 17-31-046-00 to Daktronics for CMS software for the RCTC 91 Express Lanes, in the amount of $16,200, plus a contingency amount of $1,620, for a total amount not to exceed $17,820; 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 4) Authorize the Executive Director or designee to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for the agreements. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: As part of the SR-91 Corridor Improvement Project (91 Project), six Daktronics, Inc. changeable messages signs (CMS) were procured by Cofiroute USA, LLC (Cofiroute) under the Systems Integration and Installation Contract (SIIC) to meet the California Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices guidelines. These signs will be used to display information and toll rates. The maintenance and repair of the six CMS is covered under the warranty provision of the SIIC with Cofiroute for six months from the date of installation. The six-month warranty period will end on February 9, 2017, at which time the Commission is responsible for the maintenance and repair of the CMS. To ensure continued maintenance and repair services beyond the warranty period, the Commission is required to enter into a maintenance contract. 114 Agenda Item 6H DISCUSSION: The 91 Express Lanes Agreement No. 12-31-039-00 between the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) and the Commission stipulates that both parties agreed to joint operations and contracting to achieve economies of scale and cost benefits when feasible. OCTA is currently replacing its existing six CMS to match the Commission’s CMS to allow for consistency across the 91 Express Lanes. A maintenance and repair agreement for the 12 CMS on the 91 Express Lanes is required to provide for telephone help desk services, annual on-site service, and on-site diagnoses of hardware and software. Due to the specialized nature of the CMS, staff determined it was in the Commission’s best interest not to conduct a formal competitive procurement and to solicit bids from two providers with specific expertise in the equipment and the 91 Express Lanes communication network — Daktronics, the manufacturer of the CMS, and Brentwood Display Services, installer under the SIIC contract and the current OCTA maintenance provider. Daktronics submitted a proposal in the amount of $115,690, which was considerably less than Brentwood’s proposal. The SIIC contract provided the base software for the new CMS to control and manage the messages displayed. Cofiroute will manage the price and information displayed on the signs. The software provided under the SIIC requires Cofiroute to enter the messages and toll rates manually. With the addition of the Commission’s section of the 91 Express Lanes, the number of entries has tripled. The increase in CMS entries is a result of the display of up to three prices per sign rather than the single price that is displayed today for the OCTA 91 Express Lanes. This increase in Cofiroute effort and the risk for operator error resulting in posting an incorrect toll rate caused staff to explore an automated interface for the posting of toll rates. Daktronics has a proprietary software module to allow for the automation of the toll rate posting to the CMS. The add-on module is a one-time cost to the Commission of $17,820. Since Daktronics is the manufacturer of the CMS and the software developer, staff believes it is in the Commission’s best interest to procure the maintenance and repair services and software from Daktronics. Award of the agreements to Daktronics should result in minimizing operational risks related to the CMS. The CMS are vital to the 91 Express Lanes’ operation; therefore, staff recommends the award of Agreement No. 17-31-045-00 to Daktronics for maintenance and repair of the CMS for a four- year term in the amount of $115,690, plus a 10 percent contingency amount of $11,569, for a total amount not to exceed $127,259. OCTA will reimburse the Commission for 50 percent of the amount following expiration of its warranty period for its new CMS. Staff also recommends the award of Agreement No. 17-31-046-00 to Daktronics for the CMS software module add-on of $16,200, plus a 10 percent contingency amount of $1,620, for a total amount not to exceed $17,820. As this is a Commission requirement, the cost will be covered by the Commission. The FY 2016/17 budget includes an amount for CMS costs; therefore, a budget adjustment is not required. 115 Agenda Item 6H Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes N/A Year: FY 2016/17 FY2017/18+ Amount: $ 44,332* $100,746* (*Excludes OCTA reimbursements totaling $63,629) Source of Funds: Toll Revenues; OCTA reimbursements Budget Adjustment: No N/A GL/Project Accounting No.: 009199 73306 00000 0000 591 31 73306 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 11/7/2016 Attachments: 1) Draft Agreement No. 17-31-045-00 (maintenance and repair) 2) Draft Agreement No. 17-31-046-00 (software) 116 Proposal Date: 23 September 2016 Order No. E22428 -1 Copyright © Daktronics, Inc. DF-2940 Rev-11JAN16 Page 1 of 5 EXTENDED SERVICE AGREEMENT DAKTRONICS, INC. (‘Daktronics’) Revision IV 201 Daktronics Drive Brookings, SD 57006 Phone: (800 ) 325 -8766 Daktronics Contact: Katie Severson Purchaser: Riverside County Transportation Commission Address: 4080 Lemon St Customer ID: 187939 -001 City, State, Zip : Riverside, CA 92501 -3609 Country: United States Phone: (951) 280 -6369 Contact: Reinland Jones Email: rjones@rctc.org ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Riverside County Transportation Commission ('Purchaser') hereby agrees to purchase the services, peripherals and additional supplies (collectively, the ‘Services’) as described on Attachment A, subject to this Extended Service Agreement, the Terms and Conditions of Extended Service, and any and all applicable Attachments (collectively, the ‘Agreement’), which documents Purchaser has reviewed and agrees to accept. Term (Duration) of the Agreement Commencement Date: 1 September 2016 Expiration Date: 31 August 2021 Order No.: E22428 -1 Original Job No.: C22428, C24679 Description of Services Provided Price & Payment Terms See Attachment A Due upon Commencement Date Custom PLATINUM PLUS ® Services $115,690 plus tax *Price includes cost for annual training along with annual cost for after hours phone support on both the RCTC and OCTA projects. *Annual Preventative Maintenance checks will take place on Sunday evenings to accommodate customers current lane closure schedule. Original Job No. Description of Equipment covered under this Agreement Quantity Customer ID C22428 VF-2420-27X90-66-A, DFG, LTS, 5/8 HW 6 187939-001 C24679 VF-2420-27X90-66-A 6 188358-001 Unless specifically outlined in any Attachments or in the Agreement, this Agreement does not include the following: 1.Any applicable taxes. 2.Third party systems, hoist systems, and any ancillary equipment. Third party systems and ancillary equipment includes, but is not limited to, front end video control systems, audio systems, video processors and players, HVAC equipment, LCD screens, and static advertising panels. Daktronics will pass along any manufacturer’s warranty. For a list of products commonly excluded from the Standard Service and Extended Service scope and to view the manufacturer’s warranty, go to www.daktronics.com/exclusions . 3.Incorporation of accessories, attachments, software or other devices not furnished by Daktronics . For Internal Use Only Bill to Loc #: ___________________________ Bill to Contact:_________________________ Check #: ______________________________ ATTACHMENT 1 117 Proposal Date: 23 September 2016 Order No. E22428 -1 Copyright © Daktronics, Inc. DF-2940 Rev-11JAN16 Page 2 of 5 ATTACHMENT A Custom PLATINUM PLUS® Services Scope of Services Services Included 1. Scheduled on-site labor to diagnose and/or replace failed electronic components. 2. Costs of Standard Access* to the Display/Equipment. 3. Daktronics parts coverage, which includes: 3.1. Daktronics Rapid Parts™ Exchange Program for available parts only. 3.2. Repair or replacement of failed electronic parts or assemblies. 3.3. Shipping of repaired or replaced failed electronic components from Daktronics. 4. Technical support via telephone during business hours as defined below. 5. Access to the Service Coordination Center. 6. One Annual Systems Check to include annual filter replacement. Systems check may be provided in conjunction with any service call. *Standard Access is defined as unrestricted access to the entire display/equipment with up to a 45’ aerial lift or bucket truck for an outdoor display or 30’ for an indoor display. Custom Platinum Plus shall not include nor be construed to include any service or support that is not expressly stated above in the definition of the Custom Platinum Plus service. Examples of services that are not within the scope of Custom Platinum Plus service include, but are not limited to, the following:  Display Cleanings.  Remote monitoring services.  Extended service hours or expedited response times.  After hours telephone support.  Costs of access to the display with articulating or specialty lifts or any use of scaffolding or special equipment to protect customer facilities. Above listed exclusions are available as billable services. Quotes may be provided upon request. BUSINESS HOURS: Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5 pm CST (excludes Daktronics observed holidays). INITIATED RESPONSE TIME: 1. Daktronics shall respond to service requests within sixteen (16) business hours. 2. On-site service is to be scheduled during the business hours defined above. Response is defined as Daktronics must begin to work on a solution to the issue. Purchaser Responsibilities The items listed below are the responsibility of the Purchaser. 1. Purchaser is responsible for routine operator functions such as content creation or scheduling. 2. Purchaser is responsible for management of customer -owned spare parts inventory. 3. Purchaser is responsible for the maintenance items listed below; failure to properly maintain equipment may, at Daktronics’ sole discretion, relieve Daktronics of its responsibilities under the Terms and Conditions of Extended Service attached hereto. 3.1. Throughout the term of this Agreement, Purchaser shall maintain site conditions within the common environmental range of all system devices as specified by Daktronics. 3.2. Purchaser is responsible for routine maintenance functions. 3.3. Purchaser is responsible for purchasing and maintaining antivirus software on all control devices connected to Daktronics equipment. (See Daktronics Knowledge Base for list of supported software. DD2079868 http://www.daktronics.com/Support/KB/Pages/Antivirus-software-recommendations.aspx) Platinum Plus® is a registered Daktronics trademark. This Agreement shall be subject to the attached Terms and Conditions of Extended Service. 118 Proposal Date: 23 September 2016 Order No. E22428 -1 Copyright © Daktronics, Inc. DF-2940 Rev-11JAN16 Page 3 of 5 All invoices will be forwarded to Purchaser at the address indicated on page one (1) of this Agreement unless otherwise specified below: Billing Address: Company: Address: City, State, Zip: Country: Phone: Contact: Email: Purchaser hereby confirms that the Services are to be delivered at the address indicated on page one (1) of this Agreement unless otherwise specified below: Site Address: Company: Address: City, State, Zip: Country: ACCEPTANCE: In witness hereof, the parties hereto have executed this Agreement by and through their duly authorized officers. PURCHASER: Riverside County Transportation Commission By: _____________________________ Name/Title:_____________________________ Date: _________________ Signature Print or Type PURCHASER PO # ___________________________ DAKTRONICS, INC. By: _____________________________ Name/Title:_____________________________ Date: _________________ Signature Print or Type This form is an important part of your coverage. Please sign and return the entire Agreement to Daktronics, Inc. Once the signe d Agreement is entered into our system, you will receive a copy for your records. Offer expires 60 days from Proposal Date. 119 Proposal Date: 23 September 2016 Order No. E22428 -1 Copyright © Daktronics, Inc. DF-2940 Rev-11JAN16 Page 4 of 5 TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF EXTENDED SERVICE 1. Scope of Extended Service Agreement . The scope of the Extended Service Agreement (the “Service Agreement”) covers the Equipment and any Software delivered by Daktronics that is delivered under the terms of the applicable software agreement between Purchaser and Daktronics, and shall also include those services define d on Attachment A, SCOPE OF SERVICES (excluding maintenance services which are the responsibility of Purchaser as defined on Attachment A or services which may be purchased for an additional fee) (the “Services”). Response Tim es are defined on Attachment A . 2. Contract Documents . The parties agree that any subsequently -issued Purchaser form, such as a purchase order, shall incorporate the terms and conditions of this Service Agreement. The provisions of this Service Agreement shall control in the event of any conflicting provision in Purchaser’s form. 3. Commencement Date . The Services shall begin upon the date stated as the 'Commencement Date' as detailed elsewhere in this agreement. 4. Conditions Precedent . Daktronics reserves the right to suspen d its performance in the event Purchaser fails to: (a) make payment as required, (b) maintain the Equipment within the recommended environmental conditions, including but not limited to appropriate ventilat ion/air conditioning for its location (Air conditi oning systems must be maintained according to manufacturer’s specifications), (c) perform preventative maintenance not included within this Service Agreement, or (d) perform any other obligation including, without limitation, co mplying with the terms of an y software agreement between Purchaser and Daktronics. 5. Payment . Purchaser agrees to pay Daktronics according to the Payment Schedule. Unless otherwise stated, the price is exclusive of f ederal, state and local taxes, including without limitation sales, use, excise, privilege, or transactional taxes, but excluding Daktronics ’ income tax ('Tax'). Purchaser shall promptly pay upon demand such applicable Tax. Purchaser must present a valid exemption cer tificate if it claims any exemption from Tax. Late payments shall accrue interest at the rate of 1.5% per month or the highest amount permitted by law, whicheve r is lower. 6. Spare Parts Package . In the event the Equipment was purchased with a spare p arts package, the parties acknowledge and agree that the spare parts package is designed to exhaust over the life of the Equipment and, as such, the replenishment of the package is not inc luded in the scope of this Service Agreement. 7. Limitations of Coverage . This Service Agreement does not cover: (a) service due to: (i) inadequate or improper power, including without limitation a sudden surge of electrical power; (ii) improper handling, installation, adjustment, service, care, maintenance, storage o r use of the Equipment; (iii) a Force Majeure Event; (iv) environmental conditions outside the Equipment’s technical specifications (inclu ding, without limitation excessive temperatures, corrosives, and metallic pollutants); (v) defects or failures occurri ng during a lapse in service coverage; (vi) incorporation of accessories, attachments, software or other devices or systems not furnished by Daktronics; or (vii) any oth er cause other than ordinary use; (b) the provision of replacement communication method s (such as wire, metallic or fiber optic cable, conduit, trenching or other solutions) for the purpose of overcoming local site interference; (c) LED degradation occurring within Daktronics technical s pecifications (degradation means the LED continues to e mit light, but at some lesser level of brightness); (d) paint or refinishing the Equipment or furnishing material for this purpose; (e) pixel failure less than a total of .5% of the overall display, or in the case of free form ele ments, one entire element; (f) electrical work external to the Equipment; (g) batteries; (h) third -party systems and other ancillary equipment including without limitation front-end video control systems, audio systems, video processors and players, HVAC equipment, and LCD screens; and (i) the security or functionality of End User’s network or systems, including anti -virus software updates. 8. Actions that Void the Service Agreement . Daktronics shall be under no obligation to continue service under this Service Agreement if the Equ ipment or Software is: (a) moved from its location of initial installation or reinstalled without the prior written approval of Daktronics (unless the equipment was designed by Daktronics to be mobile), or (b) improperly repaired or altered in a manner inc onsistent with the Equipment manufacturer’s standards or recommendations. 9. Service Providers . Daktronics may select the parties delivering services under this Service Agreement at its reasonable discretion. 10. Access to the Equipment . The Purch aser shall provide unfettered, solid, safe and unrestricted access to the Equipment (including, if requested, any installed Software) taking into account environmental or site conditions. Unless otherwise specified on Attachment A, th e Purchaser shall be required to provide any lifts or access equipment. Additional equipment or personnel required for safety, as determined by D aktronics in its reasonable discretion, shall be billed separately on a time and material basis. 11. Adverse Conditions . In no event shall Daktronics be obliged to perform Services under this Service Agreement during the existence of Adverse Conditions. 'Adverse Conditions' include without limitation, the following: severe inclement weather, hazardous site conditi ons including infestations of animals or dangerous insects, saturated ground conditions, or residence or occupation by unauthorized personnel . The determination of a site condition as an Adverse Condition shall be at the reasonable discretion of Daktronics. Inaccessibil ity due to Adverse Conditions will exempt a location from coverage under this Service Agreement until such time as the Equipment becomes safely accessible once again. 12. Cooperation. Purchaser shall fully cooperate with Daktronics in connection with the service of the Equipment and Software. The Purchaser shall promptly notify Daktronics of Equipment and Software failure. Waiver of liability or other restrictions shall not be imposed as a requirement prior to accessing the site. 13. Return Items . All items returned to Daktronics must have a Return Material Authorization (RMA) number. For exchange items, the number is included with the shipment of the exchange unit. For repair items, an RMA number can be obtained by phone (800 -325-8766), (Internationa l +1-605-697-4000), fax (605 -697-4444) unless otherwise directed by Daktronics. 14. Shipping . When returning parts to Daktronics for repair or replacement, Purchaser assumes all risk of loss or damage, agrees to use any shipping containers, which might b e provided by Daktronics, and agrees to ship the Equipment in the manner prescribed by Daktronics. If returning equipment within the United States or within Canada, all Equipment must be returned by Purchaser FOB Daktronics’ de signated facility. If retur ning equipment across country borders, all Equipment must be returned by Purchaser DDP Daktronics’ designated facility per IN COTERMS 120 Proposal Date: 23 September 2016 Order No. E22428 -1 Copyright © Daktronics, Inc. DF-2940 Rev-11JAN16 Page 5 of 5 2010. Daktronics assumes all risk of loss or damage during return shipment to Purchaser and such Equipment shall be return ed by Daktronics FOB or DDP Purchaser’s designated facility as appropriate. 15. Confidentiality . To the extent permitted by law, Purchaser shall consider all information furnished by Daktronics, including the terms and conditions of this Service Agreement, to be confidential and shall not disclose any such information to any other person, or use such information itself for any purpose other than fulfillment of this Service Agreement unless Purchaser first obtains written permission fro m Daktronics to do so. Purchaser shall provide confidential information only to those of its agents, servants, and employees who have been informed of the requirements of this paragraph and have agreed to be bound by them. The provisions of this paragraph shall surv ive termination of the Service Agreement. 16. Default . Daktronics reserves the right to terminate this Service Agreement and accelerate all amounts due and payable if: (a) Purch aser fails to make payment to Daktronics within ten days of the agreed paym ent dates, (b) Purchaser otherwise fails to comply with any material provision of this Service Agreement, or (c) any proceeding is filed by or against Purchaser in bankruptcy. Daktronics reserves all its rights (both legal and equitable) under the Agreeme nt, applicable statutes, and the common law. If Purchaser fails to perform any covenant or obligation under this Service Agreement or any other agreement that Purchaser has with Daktronics, including without limitation the failure to pay when due any amou nts owed to Daktronics, Daktronics shall be excused from the performance of any of its obligations under this Service Agreeme nt and any other agreement it has with the Purchaser. Purchaser shall be liable for any and all costs and expenses (including reas onable attorney’s fees) incurred by Daktronics in enforcing any provision of this Service Agreement. 17. Indemnity . Daktronics shall indemnify, defend and hold harmless the Purchaser and their respective subsidiaries, officers, directors, shareholder s, partners, employees, agents, insurers, successors and assigns from any third -party claims for liability, losses, damages, costs or expenses (collectively, 'Losses') to the extent that such Losses arise out of: (i) any negligent act or omission by Daktr onics or its personnel, agents, subcontractors, or others engaged by Daktronics or under Daktronics’ control related to the execution of this Service Agreement; (ii) any claim against any indemnified party by reason of or alleging any unauthorized or infri nging use by an indemnified party of any patent, process, trade secret, copyright, trademark, or other intellectual property right regarding the Equipment or the Software and its comp onents; or, (iii) any fine or assessment with respect to any violation or alleged violation of any applicable laws regarding safety or health. The Purchaser shall indemnify, defend and hold harmless Daktronics and its subsidiaries, officers, directors, shareholders, p artners, representatives, employees, agents, insurers, succe ssors and assigns of each of the foregoing from any and all Losses arising out of or in any way related to: (i) any negligent act or omission by the Purchaser or its personnel, agents, subcontractors, or others engaged by the Purchaser or under their contr ol (other than Daktronics or its personnel, agents, subcontractors, or others engaged by Daktronics or under Daktronics’ cont rol), or (ii) any unauthorized or infringing use by an indemnified party of any patent, process, trade secret, copyright, trademark , or other intellectual property right. 18. Disclaimers; Limitation of Liability . Daktronics makes no representations or warranties under this Service Agreement. The damage limitation provided in this Service Agreement and the remedies stated herein shall be exclusive and shall be Purchaser’s sole remedies. THE PARTIES AGREE THAT IN NO EVENT WHATSOEVER SHALL THE LIABILITY OF EITHER PARTY EXCEED THE AMOUNT OF THE PURCHASE PRICE. IT IS AGREED THAT IN NO EVENT SHALL EITHER PARTY BE LIABLE FOR SPECIAL, IN CIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR INDIRECT DAMAGES, REGARDLESS OF CAUSE, WHETHER SUCH LOSSES ARISE DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY FROM THE OTHER PARTY’S ACTS, OMISSIONS, OR BREACH. For the purposes of this Agreemen t, the Parties agree that “Consequential Damages” include , but are not limited to, loss of use, loss of profit, loss of business opportunity, and loss of advertising revenue. Purchaser explicitly accepts the provisions of this paragraph in return for the prices granted under the Service Agreement. Purchaser unde rstands and agrees that the prices granted herein would be higher in the absence of this limitation of liability. No action a gainst Daktronics shall be commenced more than one year after the accrual of the cause of action. Daktronics shall have no liabilit y with respect to claims relating to or arising from use of third -party products and services. 19. Force Majeure . Both parties shall be excused from any liability under this Service Agreement for any delay in performance or failure to perform which del ay or failure to perform is caused by circumstances which are beyond the reasonable control of that party, including without limitation acts of God, natural disaster, fire, flood, labor or material shortages, war, vermin, earthquakes, tsunami, acts o f terr orism, etc. (a 'Force Majeure Event'). 20. A ssignment . Unless otherwise stated, this Service Agreement may not be assigned by either party without the prior written consent of t he other party. 21. Miscellaneous . This Agreement shall be governed by the laws of the state where the Services are provided without regard to its conflict of law principles. This Service Agreement is the product of negotiations between the parties hereto represented by counsel and any rules of construction relating to interpretation against the drafter of an agreement shall not apply to this Service Agreement and are expressly waived. This Service Agreement represents the entire agreement of the parties and supersedes any prev ious understanding or agreement regarding the Services. This Service Agreement may not be amended or altered in any manner except in a writing signed by both parties. Th is Service Agreement may be executed in counterparts. The Purchaser and Daktronics a re not partners or joint venturers. If any part of this Service Agreement is in any manner held to be invalid, illegal, void, or to be in conflict with any law, then the validity of the remaining portions or provisions of this Service Agreement shall not be affected, and such part, term, paragraph or provision shall be construed and enforced in a manner designed to effectuate the intent expressed in this Service Agreement to the maximum extent permitted by law. 121 Reference: Riverside County Transportation Authority - Travel Time Module Add-On Item No. Model Description Qty Unit Price Extended Price 1 Vanguard V4 Travel Time Vanguard V4 Professional Travel Time - Vanguard Software Travel Time Add-On. Includes one (1) Day of online Training. 1 $15,000.00 $15,000.00 Total Price Excluding Sales Tax:$15,000.00 Riverside County Transportation Commission Reinland Jones 4080 Lemon St Riverside, CA USA 92501 Phone: (951)280-6369 Fax: Email: rjones@rctc.org 1/Sep/2016 Quote valid for: 90 days Terms: AGREEMENT FOB: DAKTRONICS Delivery: 12-14 Weeks Upon Submittal Approval 201 Daktronics Drive Brookings, SD 57006 USA www.daktronics.com Quote # 594906-1 Rev 0 Page 1 of 3 DAKTRONICS QUOTE # 594906-1-0 122 ATTACHMENT 2 Installation Responsibilities: Please reference Installation Responsibilities Sheet(s). Optional Items: 1)Extra on-site VMS support - this fee is for instance when the buyer requests Daktronics on-site presence, but our personnel are unable to work because the VMS sites are not ready. These charges are not assessed in the event of inclement weather or if we underestimate our required on-site time: - On-site support labor: $1,250 per day - On-site support travel: $1,600 per round trip from South Dakota to job site 2)VMS signal cable (VMS to control equipment cabinet) in excess of the quantity quoted: $1.35 per linear foot Daktronics Project Lead Times: Below are some general lead time milestones for reference. Please contact Daktronics prior to placing order to confirm current available lead times, as they are subject to change. 1)VMS technical submittal: 30 days after receipt of Purchase Order. 2)VMS equipment and software delivery: 90-120 days after receipt of approved submittal. 3)Our VMS installation support and training staff can be on-site with two (2) weeks advance notice from buyer. Terms: -If a payment bond containing terms reasonably acceptable to Daktronics secures the order, we are generally flexible on terms. These terms may include progress payments or other options depending on credit review and contract structure. -If the contract is not secured with a payment bond, the payment terms are subject to review of the contract structure and credit of receiver. -If no prior arrangement has been agreed to, terms are 50% due with order and 50% prior to shipment. -Refer to standard terms & conditions for charge on late payments Policy with Regards to Order Cancellations: The purpose of having an order cancellation policy is to recuperate costs associated with partial performance on a purchase order for equipment. Daktronics incurs costs in processing the order, manufacturing the ordered equipment to the date of cancellation, storage, and efforts to resell the equipment. Daktronics shall charge a 25% restocking fee on all cancelled orders for standard products and may charge up to a 35% fee on non-standard products. Call Counsel with any questions or concerns. Taxes: Buyer must provide a sales tax exemption number/certificate to claim exemption. Sales tax will be included in the final price if the sales tax exemption number/certificate is unavailable. Contingencies: Any quotation to contractor is contingent upon the contractor receiving award of the contract. Any quotation also is contingent on Daktronics¶meeting applicable plans and specifications. Both Daktronics and contractor shall bear their own cost, and not be responsible to each other for any costs associated with attempts to meet or amend the plans and specifications. Brandy Louwagie PHONE: 605-692-0200 FAX: EMAIL: Brandy.Louwagie@daktronics.com Jesse Coudron PHONE: 605-691-9806 FAX: 605-697-4700 EMAIL: Jesse.Coudron@daktronics.com Terms And Conditions: The Terms and Conditions which apply to this quote are available upon request or by clicking the links below: SL-02374 Standard Warranty and Limitation of Seller's Liability SL-07862 Software License Agreement SL-02375 Standard Terms and Conditions of Sale (www.daktronics.com/terms_conditions/SL-02375.pdf) (www.daktronics.com/terms_conditions/SL-02374.pdf) (www.daktronics.com/terms_conditions/SL-07862.pdf) 201 Daktronics Drive Brookings, SD 57006 USA www.daktronics.com Quote # 594906-1 Rev 0 Page 2 of 3 DAKTRONICS QUOTE # 594906-1-0 123 SHIP TO:Same as Bill to BILL TO (if different from page 1): *Required Information Company *Company Contact Person Contact Person Address Address City *City State Zip *State *Zip Telephone Telephone Fax Fax Email Email Acceptance: The Undersigned has actual authority to execute this document and Daktronics, Inc is relying upon such authority. The parties hereby acknowledge and agree that the terms and conditions contained within this Quote along with the terms and conditions of the Daktronics Standard Terms and Conditions, the Standard Warranty and Limitations of Liability, and/or the Software License Agreement (together, the ''Terms and Conditions'') constitute the full and final understanding of the parties regarding the sale of equipment and/or the provision of services and entirely replace and supersede any previous understanding or agreement between the parties. By executing this agreement, Purchaser acknowledges that it has had opportunity and means to review the Terms and Conditions as provided in the website addresses above. In the alternative, hardcopy of these Terms and Conditions will be provided upon request. Further it is acknowledged and agreed that the price of the equipment and/or the provision of services contained within this agreement are expressly conditioned upon Purchaser's acceptance of the Terms and Conditions without change. Any modification of the Terms and Conditions may require a corresponding change in price. Accordingly, the Purchaser acknowledges and agrees to these Terms and Conditions as evidenced by its attestation below. Customer Signature Date Print Name Date 201 Daktronics Drive Brookings, SD 57006 USA www.daktronics.com Quote # 594906-1 Rev 0 Page 3 of 3 DAKTRONICS QUOTE # 594906-1-0 124 Attachment A Transportation Domestic Installation Responsibilities Checklist Daktronics Customer Description X 1.Add support for up to 3 destinations per message (no header in message) X 2.Manual/Documentation X 3.Package and installation (for deployment) X 4.Testing X 5.Maintenance of bugs or failures in the Vanguard Travel Time Module X 6.Installation and Training - One day, up to six hours via WebEx on line. X 7.New Features or Updated Scope of Work X 8.Hardware (Provided by Customer) Quote # 594906-1 Rev 0 Page 1 of 1 201 Daktronics Drive Brookings, SD 57006 USA www.daktronics.com DAKTRONICS QUOTE # 594906-1-0 125 AGENDA ITEM 6I Agenda Item 6I RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: December 14, 2016 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Western Riverside County Programs and Projects Committee Gary Ratliff, Facilities Administrator THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Agreement for Landscape Maintenance Services WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 17-24-023-00 to Tropical Plaza Nursery, Inc. (Tropical) for the provision of landscape maintenance services for a three-year term, and two, two-year options to extend the agreement, in an amount of $3,267,100, plus a contingency amount of $326,710, for a total amount not to exceed $3,593,810; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement, including option years, on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director or designee to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for these services. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Tropical Plaza Nursery, Inc. was awarded a landscape maintenance service contract by the Commission in December 2011; which expires on December 31, 2016. The contractual agreement included routine maintenance, repair, and aesthetics of the landscape and property grounds of the five commuter rail stations. With the addition of the Perris Valley Line expansion, nine commuter rail stations and an operations control center located in Riverside County are owned and operated by the Commission. The Commission has always dedicated the sufficient resources to maintain the highest standards, including the professional appearance of the multimodal transportation centers. This effort reflects the Commission's dedication to livability and sustainable practices for its citizens. These nine commuter rail stations offer high-quality service amenities including train and bus service, taxi and rideshare service, security, park and ride lots, bicycle lockers, and vending machines. The stations additionally provide landscape beautification as a necessary component to attract commuters use of multimodal options and attain the Commission’s objective to 126 Agenda Item 6I improve the environment, as well as preserve the property investment. As such, landscape maintenance services are required to maintain the grounds totaling 138 acres in a condition consistent with horticulturally accepted practices and standards for health, growth, and aesthetics. Procurement Process Staff determined the weighted factor method of source selection to be the most appropriate for this procurement, as it allows the Commission to identify the most advantageous proposal with price and other factors considered. Non-price factors include elements such as qualifications of firm, personnel, and the ability to respond to the Commission’s needs for landscape maintenance services as set forth under the terms of the request for proposals (RFP) No. 17-24-023-00. RFP No. 17-24-023-00 for landscape maintenance services was released on September 29, 2016. A public notice was advertised in the Press Enterprise, and the RFP was posted on the Commission’s PlanetBids website, which is accessible through the Commission’s website. Utilizing PlanetBids, emails were sent to 40 firms, 14 of which are located in Riverside County. Through the PlanetBids site, 18 firms downloaded the RFP; 2 of these firms are located in Riverside County. A pre-proposal conference was held on October 6 and attended by five firms; two firms are local to Riverside County. Staff responded to all questions submitted by potential proposers prior to the October 13 clarification deadline date. Four firms – Campesino Landscape, Inc. (Corona); Mariposa Landscape, Inc. (Irwindale); So Cal Land Maintenance, Inc. (Anaheim); and Tropical (Villa Park) – submitted proposals prior to the 2:00 p.m. submittal deadline on October 27. Of the four proposals submitted, three proposals were responsive and responsible as staff determined that the proposal submitted by Campesino Landscape Inc. was non-responsive due to several material defects within its proposal. Utilizing the evaluation criteria set forth in the RFP, the remaining three proposals were evaluated and scored by an evaluation committee comprised of Commission and Bechtel staff. As a result of the evaluation committee’s assessment of the written proposals, the evaluation committee recommends contract award to Tropical to perform landscape maintenance services for a three-year term, with two, two-year options to extend the agreement, in the amount of $3,267,100, plus a 10 percent contingency amount of $326,710, for a total amount not to exceed $3,593,810, as this firm earned the highest total evaluation score. Contingency work, which will be subject to Executive Director or designee approval, includes water conservation projects implementing drought tolerant and native plantings along with irrigation products to reduce water usage that will encourage sustainable practices and savings. Implementation of these capital improvements will also provide a reduction in future maintenance cost. 127 Agenda Item 6I The overall evaluation ranking, based on highest to lowest total evaluation score, and the total price are presented in the following table. Firm Price Overall Ranking Tropical $3,267,100 1 Mariposa Landscape, Inc. $2,975,621 2 So Cal Land Maintenance, Inc. $4,001,306 3 The Commission’s model on-call and maintenance services agreement will be entered into with the consultant subject to any changes approved by the Executive Director, and pursuant to legal counsel review. Staff oversight of the contract will maximize the effectiveness of the consultant and minimize costs to the Commission. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes N/A Year: FY 2016/17 FY 2017/18+ Amount: $ 305,000 $3,288,810 Source of Funds: 2009 Western County Measure A Rail Fund and Local Transportation Fund funds Budget Adjustment: No N/A GL/Project Accounting No.: 2440XX 73312 00000 0000 103 24 73301 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 11/9/2016 Attachment: Draft On-Call and Maintenance Services Agreement No. 17-24-023-00 128 17336.00600\29268990.1 1 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ROUTINE AND ON-CALL LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SERVICES AGREEMENT 1. PARTIES AND DATE. This Agreement is made and entered into this [***INSERT DAY***] day of [***INSERT MONTH***], [***INSERT YEAR***] by and between the Riverside County Transportation Commission (“Commission”) and Tropical Plaza Nursery, Inc., a Corporation, with its principal place of business at 9642 Santiago Blvd., Villa Park, CA 92861 (“Contractor”). Commission and Contractor are sometimes individually referred to as “Party” and collectively as “Parties” in this Agreement. 2. RECITALS. 2.1 Commission is the Transportation Commission for the County of Riverside and organized under the laws of the State of California with the power to contract for services necessary to achieve its purpose. 2.2 Commission owns and operates nine (9) commuter rail stations and one transit center serving Riverside County, the addresses and descriptions of which are set forth in Exhibit “A”, attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference (“Commuter Rail Stations”). 2.3 On or about September 29, 2016, Commission issued a Request for Proposals No. 17-24-023-00 (“RFP”), pursuant to which Commission sought proposals from contractors to provide routine and on-call landscape maintenance services for the Commuter Rail Stations. 2.4 Contractor desires to perform and assume responsibility for the provision of certain routine and on-call landscape maintenance services required by Commission on the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement and, for the on-call portions of the services, in the task order(s) to be issued pursuant to this Agreement and executed by the Commission and Contractor ("Task Order"). 2.5 The work generally includes the complete landscape maintenance of the Commuter Rail Stations including, but not limited to, controlling plant, disease and pests, irrigation material, maintaining and repairing irrigation systems, removing trash and debris, and other maintenance required to maintain the Commuter Rail Stations in a safe attractive and useable condition. Contractor represents that it is a professional Contractor, experienced in providing routine and on-call landscape maintenance services to public clients, and is familiar with the plans of Commission. 2.6 Commission desires to engage Contractor to render routine and on-call landscape maintenance services for the Commuter Rail Stations. Routine landscape maintenance services shall be as set forth in Exhibit “A”, attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. ATTACHMENT 1 129 17336.00600\29268990.1 2 On-call landscape maintenance services shall be ordered by Task Order(s) to be issued pursuant to this Agreement for future projects as set forth herein. The routine services set forth in Exhibit “A” and each individual project ordered under a Task Order shall be referred to, herein, collectively, as the “Project”. 3. TERMS. 3.1 Scope of Services and Term. 3.1.1 General Scope of Services. Contractor promises and agrees to furnish to Commission all labor materials, tools, equipment, services, and incidental and customary work, as necessary, to fully and adequately provide the routine landscape maintenance services for the Commuter Rail Stations as set forth in Exhibit “A” and any on-call landscape maintenance services for the Commuter Rail Stations required by Commission, as shall be set forth in a Task Order, collectively referred to herein as the "Services". On-call Services shall be more particularly described in the individual Task Orders issued by the Commission’s Executive Director or designee. No on-call Services shall be performed unless authorized by a fully executed Task Order in the form attached hereto as Exhibit "D". All Services shall be subject to, and performed in accordance with this Agreement, the relevant Task Order, the exhibits attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference, and all applicable local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations. 3.1.2 Term. The term of this Agreement shall be from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2019 unless earlier terminated as provided herein. The Commission, at its sole discretion, may extend this Agreement for two (2) additional two-year terms. Contractor shall complete the Services within the term of this Agreement, and shall meet any other established schedules and deadlines. The Parties may, by mutual, written consent, extend the term of this Agreement if necessary to complete the Services. 3.2 Responsibilities of Contractor. 3.2.1 Control and Payment of Subordinates; Independent Contractor. The Services shall be performed by Contractor or under its supervision. Contractor will determine the means, methods and details of performing the Services subject to the requirements of this Agreement. Commission retains Contractor on an independent contractor basis and not as an employee. Contractor retains the right to perform similar or different services for others during the term of this Agreement. Any additional personnel performing the Services under this Agreement on behalf of Contractor shall also not be employees of Commission and shall at all times be under Contractor’s exclusive direction and control. Contractor shall pay all wages, salaries, and other amounts due such personnel in connection with their performance of Services under this Agreement and as required by law. Contractor shall be responsible for all reports and obligations respecting such additional personnel, including, but not limited to: social security taxes, income tax withholding, unemployment insurance, disability insurance, and workers’ compensation insurance. 130 17336.00600\29268990.1 3 3.2.2 Schedule of Services. Contractor shall perform the routine landscape maintenance Services expeditiously, within the term of this Agreement, and in accordance with the schedule set forth in Exhibit “B” attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. Contractor shall perform any on-call Services in accordance with the schedule that shall be set forth in the Task Order (collectively, "Schedule of Services"). Contractor shall be required to commence work on a Task Order within five (5) days of receiving a fully executed Task Order. Contractor represents that it has the professional and technical personnel required to perform the Services in conformance with such conditions. In order to facilitate Contractor’s conformance with each Schedule, the Commission shall respond to Contractor’s submittals in a timely manner. Upon the Commission’s request, Contractor shall provide a more detailed schedule of anticipated performance to meet the relevant Schedule of Services. 3.2.3 Conformance to Applicable Requirements. All work prepared by Contractor shall be subject to the approval of Commission. 3.2.4 Commission’s Representative. The Commission hereby designates Gary Ratliff, or his or her designee, to act as its representative for the performance of this Agreement (“Commission’s Representative”). Commission’s Representative shall have the power to act on behalf of the Commission for all purposes under this Agreement. Contractor shall not accept direction or orders from any person other than the Commission’s Representative or his or her designee. 3.2.5 Contractor’s Representative. Contractor hereby designates Leslie T. Fields, or his or her designee, to act as its representative for the performance of this Agreement (“Contractor’s Representative”). Contractor’s Representative shall have full authority to represent and act on behalf of the Contractor for all purposes under this Agreement. The Contractor’s Representative shall supervise and direct the Services, using his best skill and attention, and shall be responsible for all means, methods, techniques, sequences and procedures and for the satisfactory coordination of all portions of the Services under this Agreement. 3.2.6 Coordination of Services. Contractor agrees to work closely with Commission staff in the performance of Services and shall be available to Commission’s staff, consultants and other staff at all reasonable times. 3.2.7 Standard of Care; Performance of Employees. Contractor shall perform all Services under this Agreement in a skillful and competent manner, consistent with the standards generally recognized as being employed by professionals in the same discipline in the State of California. Contractor represents and maintains that it is skilled in the professional calling necessary to perform the Services. Contractor warrants that all employees and subcontractors shall have sufficient skill and experience to perform the Services assigned to them. Finally, Contractor represents that it, its employees and subcontractors have all licenses, permits, qualifications and approvals of whatever nature that are legally required to perform the Services, and that such licenses and approvals shall be maintained throughout the term of this Agreement. As provided for in the indemnification provisions of this Agreement, Contractor shall perform, at its own cost and expense and without reimbursement from the Commission, any services necessary to correct errors or omissions which are caused by the Contractor’s failure to comply with the standard of care provided for herein. Any employee of the Contractor or its sub-contractors who is determined 131 17336.00600\29268990.1 4 by the Commission to be uncooperative, incompetent, a threat to the adequate or timely completion of the Project, a threat to the safety of persons or property, or any employee who fails or refuses to perform the Services in a manner acceptable to the Commission, shall be promptly removed from the Project by the Contractor and shall not be re-employed to perform any of the Services or to work on the Project. 3.2.8 Period of Performance. Contractor shall perform and complete all Services under this Agreement within the term set forth in Section 3.1.2 above (“Performance Time”). Contractor shall perform the Services in strict accordance with any completion schedule or Project milestones described in Exhibits “A” or “B” attached hereto, or which may be provided separately in writing to the Contractor. Contractor agrees that if the Services are not completed within the aforementioned Performance Time and/or pursuant to any such completion schedule or Project milestones developed pursuant to provisions of this Agreement, it is understood, acknowledged and agreed that the Commission will suffer damage. 3.2.9 Disputes. Should any dispute arise respecting the true value of any work done, of any work omitted, or of any extra work which Contractor may be required to do, or respecting the size of any payment to Contractor during the performance of this Contract, Contractor shall continue to perform the Work while said dispute is decided by the Commission. If Contractor disputes the Commission’s decision, Contractor shall have such remedies as may be provided by law. 3.2.10 Laws and Regulations; Employee/Labor Certifications. Contractor shall keep itself fully informed of and in compliance with all local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations in any manner affecting the performance of the Project or the Services, including all Cal/OSHA requirements, and shall give all notices required by law. Contractor shall be liable for all violations of such laws and regulations in connection with Services. If the Contractor performs any work knowing it to be contrary to such laws, rules and regulations and without giving written notice to the Commission, Contractor shall be solely responsible for all costs arising therefrom. Commission is a public entity of the State of California subject to, among other rules and regulations, the Public Utilities Code, Public Contract Code, and Labor Code of the State. It is stipulated and agreed that all provisions of the law applicable to the public contracts of a county transportation commissions are a part of this Agreement to the same extent as though set forth herein and will be complied with. These include but are not limited to the payment of prevailing wages, the stipulation that eight (8) hours' labor shall constitute a legal day's work and that no worker shall be permitted to work in excess of eight (8) hours during any one calendar day except as permitted by law. Contractor shall defend, indemnify and hold Commission, its officials, officers, employees and agents free and harmless, pursuant to the indemnification provisions of this Agreement, from any claim or liability arising out of any failure or alleged failure to comply with such laws, rules or regulations. 3.2.10.1 Employment Eligibility; Contractor. By executing this Agreement, Contractor verifies that it fully complies with all requirements and restrictions of state and federal law respecting the employment of undocumented aliens, including, but not limited to, the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, as may be amended from time to time. Such requirements and restrictions include, but are not limited to, examination and retention of documentation confirming the identity and immigration status of each employee of the Contractor. 132 17336.00600\29268990.1 5 Contractor also verifies that it has not committed a violation of any such law within the five (5) years immediately preceding the date of execution of this Agreement, and shall not violate any such law at any time during the term of the Agreement. Contractor shall avoid any violation of any such law during the term of this Agreement by participating in an electronic verification of work authorization program operated by the United States Department of Homeland Security, by participating in an equivalent federal work authorization program operated by the United States Department of Homeland Security to verify information of newly hired employees, or by some other legally acceptable method. Contractor shall maintain records of each such verification, and shall make them available to the Commission or its representatives for inspection and copy at any time during normal business hours. The Commission shall not be responsible for any costs or expenses related to Contractor’s compliance with the requirements provided for in Section 3.2.10 or any of its sub-sections. 3.2.10.2 Employment Eligibility; Subcontractors, Sub- subcontractors and consultants. To the same extent and under the same conditions as Contractor, Contractor shall require all of its subcontractors, sub-subcontractors and consultants performing any work relating to the Project or this Agreement to make the same verifications and comply with all requirements and restrictions provided for in Section 3.2.10.1. 3.2.10.3 Employment Eligibility; Failure to Comply. Each person executing this Agreement on behalf of Contractor verifies that they are a duly authorized officer of Contractor, and understands that any of the following shall be grounds for the Commission to terminate the Agreement for cause: (1) failure of Contractor or its subcontractors, sub- subcontractors or consultants to meet any of the requirements provided for in Sections 3.2.10.1 or 3.2.10.2; (2) any misrepresentation or material omission concerning compliance with such requirements (including in those verifications provided to the Contractor under Section 3.2.10.2); or (3) failure to immediately remove from the Project any person found not to be in compliance with such requirements. 3.2.10.4 Labor Certification. By its signature hereunder, Contractor certifies that it is aware of the provisions of Section 3700 of the California Labor Code which require every employer to be insured against liability for Workers’ Compensation or to undertake self-insurance in accordance with the provisions of that Code, and agrees to comply with such provisions before commencing the performance of the Services. 3.2.10.5 Equal Opportunity Employment. Contractor represents that it is an equal opportunity employer and it shall not discriminate against any subcontractor, employee or applicant for employment because of race, religion, color, national origin, handicap, ancestry, sex or age. Such non-discrimination shall include, but not be limited to, all activities related to initial employment, upgrading, demotion, transfer, recruitment or recruitment advertising, layoff or termination. Contractor shall also comply with all relevant provisions of Commission’s Disadvantaged Business Enterprise program, Affirmative Action Plan or other related programs or guidelines currently in effect or hereinafter enacted. 3.2.10.6 Air Quality. Contractor must fully comply with all applicable laws, rules and regulations in furnishing or using equipment and/or providing services, including, but not limited to, emissions limits and permitting requirements imposed by 133 17336.00600\29268990.1 6 the California Air Resources Board (CARB). Contractor shall specifically be aware of the CARB limits and requirements’ application to "portable equipment", which definition is considered by CARB to include any item of equipment with a fuel-powered engine. Contractor shall indemnify Commission against any fines or penalties imposed by CARB or any other governmental or regulatory agency for violations of applicable laws, rules and/or regulations by Contractor, its subcontractors, or others for whom Contractor is responsible under its indemnity obligations provided for in this Agreement. 3.2.10.7 Water Quality. (A) Management and Compliance. To the extent applicable, Contractor’s Services must account for, and fully comply with, all local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations that may impact water quality compliance, including, without limitation, all applicable provisions of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. §§ 1300); the California Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act (Cal Water Code §§ 13000-14950); laws, rules and regulations of the Environmental Protection Agency and the State Water Resources Control Board; the Commission’s rules regarding discharges of storm water; and any and all regulations, policies, or permits issued pursuant to any such authority regulating the discharge of pollutants, as that term is used in the Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act, to any ground or surface water in the State. (B) Liability for Non-Compliance. Failure to comply with the laws, regulations and policies described in this Section is a violation of law that may subject Contractor or Commission to penalties, fines, or additional regulatory requirements. Contractor shall defend, indemnify and hold the Commission, its officials, officers, employees, volunteers and agents free and harmless, pursuant to the indemnification provisions of this Agreement, from and against any and all fines, penalties, claims or other regulatory requirements imposed as a result of Contractor’s non-compliance with the laws, regulations and policies described in this Section, unless such non-compliance is the result of the sole established negligence, willful misconduct or active negligence of the Commission, its officials, officers, agents, employees or authorized volunteers. (C) Training. In addition to any other standard of care requirements set forth in this Agreement, Contractor warrants that all employees and subcontractors shall have sufficient skill and experience to perform the Services assigned to them without impacting water quality in violation of the laws, regulations and policies described in this Section. Contractor further warrants that it, its employees and subcontractors will receive adequate training, as determined by Commission, regarding the requirements of the laws, regulations and policies described in this Section as they may relate to the Services provided under this Agreement. Upon request, Commission will provide Contractor with a list of training programs that meet the requirements of this paragraph. 134 17336.00600\29268990.1 7 3.2.11 Insurance. 3.2.11.1 Time for Compliance. Contractor shall not commence work under this Agreement until it has provided evidence satisfactory to the Commission that it has secured all insurance required under this section, in a form and with insurance companies acceptable to the Commission. In addition, Contractor shall not allow any subcontractor to commence work on any subcontract until it has secured all insurance required under this section. 3.2.11.2 Minimum Requirements. Contractor shall, at its expense, procure and maintain for the duration of the Agreement insurance against claims for injuries to persons or damages to property which may arise from or in connection with the performance of the Agreement by the Contractor, its agents, representatives, employees or subcontractors. Contractor shall also require all of its subcontractors to procure and maintain the same insurance for the duration of the Agreement. Such insurance shall meet at least the following minimum levels of coverage: (A) Minimum Scope of Insurance. Coverage shall be at least as broad as the latest version of the following: (1) General Liability: Insurance Services Office Commercial General Liability coverage (occurrence form CG 0001 or exact equivalent); (2) Automobile Liability: Insurance Services Office Business Auto Coverage (form CA 0001, code 1 (any auto) or exact equivalent); and (3) Workers’ Compensation and Employer’s Liability: Workers’ Compensation insurance as required by the State of California and Employer’s Liability Insurance. (B) Minimum Limits of Insurance. Contractor shall maintain limits no less than: (1) General Liability: $2,000,000 per occurrence for bodily injury, personal injury and property damage. If Commercial General Liability Insurance or other form with general aggregate limit is used, either the general aggregate limit shall apply separately to this Agreement/location or the general aggregate limit shall be twice the required occurrence limit; (2) Automobile Liability: $1,000,000 per accident for bodily injury and property damage; and (3) if Contractor has an employees, Workers’ Compensation and Employer’s Liability: Workers’ Compensation limits as required by the Labor Code of the State of California. Employer’s Practices Liability limits of $1,000,000 per accident. 3.2.11.3 Insurance Endorsements. The insurance policies shall contain the following provisions, or Contractor shall provide endorsements on forms approved by the Commission to add the following provisions to the insurance policies: (A) General Liability. (i) Commercial General Liability Insurance must include coverage for (1) bodily Injury and property damage; (2) personal Injury/advertising Injury; (3) premises/operations liability; (4) products/completed operations liability; (5) aggregate limits that apply per Project; (6) explosion, collapse and underground (UCX) exclusion deleted; (7) contractual liability with respect to this Agreement; (8) broad form property damage; and (9) independent contractors coverage. 135 17336.00600\29268990.1 8 (ii) The policy shall contain no endorsements or provisions limiting coverage for (1) contractual liability; (2) cross liability exclusion for claims or suits by one insured against another; or (3) contain any other exclusion contrary to this Agreement. (iii) The policy shall give the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, and agents insured status using ISO endorsement forms 20 10 10 01 and 20 37 10 01, or endorsements providing the exact same coverage. (iv) The additional insured coverage under the policy shall be “primary and non-contributory” and will not seek contribution from the Commission’s insurance or self-insurance and shall be at least as broad as CG 20 01 04 13, or endorsements providing the exact same coverage. (B) Automobile Liability. The automobile liability policy shall be endorsed to state that: (1) the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be covered as additional insureds with respect to the ownership, operation, maintenance, use, loading or unloading of any auto owned, leased, hired or borrowed by the Contractor or for which the Contractor is responsible; and (2) the insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents, or if excess, shall stand in an unbroken chain of coverage excess of the Contractor’s scheduled underlying coverage. Any insurance or self-insurance maintained by the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be excess of the Contractor’s insurance and shall not be called upon to contribute with it in any way. (C) Workers’ Compensation and Employers Liability Coverage. (i) Contractor certifies that he/she is aware of the provisions of Section 3700 of the California Labor Code which requires every employer to be insured against liability for workers’ compensation or to undertake self-insurance in accordance with the provisions of that code, and he/she will comply with such provisions before commencing work under this Agreement. (ii) The insurer shall agree to waive all rights of subrogation against the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents for losses paid under the terms of the insurance policy which arise from work performed by the Contractor. (D) All Coverages. (i) Defense costs shall be payable in addition to the limits set forth hereunder. (ii) Requirements of specific coverage or limits contained in this section are not intended as a limitation on coverage, limits, or other requirement, or a waiver of any coverage normally provided by any insurance. It shall be a requirement under this Agreement that any available insurance proceeds broader than or in excess of the specified 136 17336.00600\29268990.1 9 minimum insurance coverage requirements and/or limits set forth herein shall be available to the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents as additional insureds under said policies. Furthermore, the requirements for coverage and limits shall be (1) the minimum coverage and limits specified in this Agreement; or (2) the broader coverage and maximum limits of coverage of any insurance policy or proceeds available to the named insured; whichever is greater. (iii) The limits of insurance required in this Agreement may be satisfied by a combination of primary and umbrella or excess insurance. Any umbrella or excess insurance shall contain or be endorsed to contain a provision that such coverage shall also apply on a primary and non-contributory basis for the benefit of the Commission (if agreed to in a written contract or agreement) before the Commission’s own insurance or self-insurance shall be called upon to protect it as a named insured. The umbrella/excess policy shall be provided on a “following form” basis with coverage at least as broad as provided on the underlying policy(ies). (iv) Contractor shall provide the Commission at least thirty (30) days prior written notice of cancellation of any policy required by this Agreement, except that the Contractor shall provide at least ten (10) days prior written notice of cancellation of any such policy due to non-payment of premium. If any of the required coverage is cancelled or expires during the term of this Agreement, the Contractor shall deliver renewal certificate(s) including the General Liability Additional Insured Endorsement to the Commission at least ten (10) days prior to the effective date of cancellation or expiration. (v) The retroactive date (if any) of each policy is to be no later than the effective date of this Agreement. Contractor shall maintain such coverage continuously for a period of at least three years after the completion of the work under this Agreement. Contractor shall purchase a one (1) year extended reporting period A) if the retroactive date is advanced past the effective date of this Agreement; B) if the policy is cancelled or not renewed; or C) if the policy is replaced by another claims-made policy with a retroactive date subsequent to the effective date of this Agreement. (vi) The foregoing requirements as to the types and limits of insurance coverage to be maintained by Contractor, and any approval of said insurance by the Commission, is not intended to and shall not in any manner limit or qualify the liabilities and obligations otherwise assumed by the Contractor pursuant to this Agreement, including but not limited to, the provisions concerning indemnification. (vii) If at any time during the life of the Agreement, any policy of insurance required under this Agreement does not comply with these specifications or is canceled and not replaced, Commission has the right but not the duty to obtain the insurance it deems necessary and any premium paid by Commission will be promptly reimbursed by Contractor or Commission will withhold amounts sufficient to pay premium from Contractor payments. In the alternative, Commission may cancel this Agreement. The Commission may require the Contractor to provide complete copies of all insurance policies in effect for the duration of the Project. 137 17336.00600\29268990.1 10 (viii) Neither the Commission nor any of its directors, officials, officers, employees or agents shall be personally responsible for any liability arising under or by virtue of this Agreement. Each insurance policy required by this Agreement shall be endorsed to state that: 3.2.11.4 Deductibles and Self-Insurance Retentions. Any deductibles or self-insured retentions must be declared to and approved by the Commission. If the Commission does not approve the deductibles or self-insured retentions as presented, Contractor shall guarantee that, at the option of the Commission, either: (1) the insurer shall reduce or eliminate such deductibles or self-insured retentions as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents; or, (2) the Contractor shall procure a bond guaranteeing payment of losses and related investigation costs, claims and administrative and defense expenses. 3.2.11.5 Acceptability of Insurers. Insurance is to be placed with insurers with a current A.M. Best’s rating no less than A:VIII, licensed to do business in California, and satisfactory to the Commission. 3.2.11.6 Verification of Coverage. Contractor shall furnish Commission with original certificates of insurance and endorsements effecting coverage required by this Agreement on forms satisfactory to the Commission. The certificates and endorsements for each insurance policy shall be signed by a person authorized by that insurer to bind coverage on its behalf. All certificates and endorsements must be received and approved by the Commission before work commences. The Commission reserves the right to require complete, certified copies of all required insurance policies, at any time. 3.2.11.7 Subcontractor Insurance Requirements. Contractor shall not allow any subcontractors or subcontractors to commence work on any subcontract until they have provided evidence satisfactory to the Commission that they have secured all insurance required under this section. Policies of commercial general liability insurance provided by such subcontractors or subcontractors shall be endorsed to name the Commission as an additional insured using ISO form CG 20 38 04 13 or an endorsement providing the exact same coverage. If requested by Contractor, the Commission may approve different scopes or minimum limits of insurance for particular subcontractors or subcontractors. 3.2.12 Safety. Contractor shall execute and maintain its work so as to avoid injury or damage to any person or property. In carrying out its Services, the Contractor shall at all times be in compliance with all applicable local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations, and shall exercise all necessary precautions for the safety of employees appropriate to the nature of the work and the conditions under which the work is to be performed. Safety precautions as applicable shall include, but shall not be limited to: (A) adequate life protection and life saving equipment and procedures; (B) instructions in accident prevention for all employees and subcontractors, such as safe walkways, scaffolds, fall protection ladders, bridges, gang planks, confined space procedures, trenching and shoring, equipment and other safety devices, equipment and wearing 138 17336.00600\29268990.1 11 apparel as are necessary or lawfully required to prevent accidents or injuries; and (C) adequate facilities for the proper inspection and maintenance of all safety measures. 3.2.13 Accounting Records. Contractor shall maintain complete and accurate records with respect to all costs and expenses incurred under this Agreement. All such records shall be clearly identifiable. Contractor shall allow a representative of Commission during normal business hours to examine, audit, and make transcripts or copies of such records and any other documents created pursuant to this Agreement. Contractor shall allow inspection of all work, data, documents, proceedings, and activities related to the Agreement for a period of three (3) years from the date of final payment under this Agreement. 3.3 Fees and Payments; Labor Code Requirements. 3.3.1 Compensation. Contractor shall receive compensation, including authorized reimbursements, for all Services rendered under this Agreement at the rates set forth in Exhibit "C" attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. The total compensation to be provided under this Agreement, including all Task Orders issued pursuant to this Agreement shall not exceed [__INSERT DOLLAR AMOUNT__]. The total compensation per Task Order shall be set forth in the relevant Task Order, and shall not exceed said amount without the written approval of the Commissioner’s Executive Director. Extra Work may be authorized, as described below, and if authorized, will be compensated at the rates and manner set forth in this Agreement. 3.3.2 Payment of Compensation. Contractor shall submit to Commission a monthly itemized statement which indicates work completed and hours of Services rendered by Contractor. The statement shall describe the amount of Services and supplies provided since the initial commencement date, or since the start of the subsequent billing periods, as appropriate, through the date of the statement. Commission shall, within 45 days of receiving such statement, review the statement and pay all approved charges thereon. 3.3.3 Reimbursement for Expenses. Contractor shall not be reimbursed for any expenses unless authorized in writing by Commission. 3.3.4 Extra Work. At any time during the term of this Agreement, Commission may request that Contractor perform Extra Work. As used herein, “Extra Work” means any work which is determined by Commission to be necessary for the proper completion of the Project, but which the parties did not reasonably anticipate would be necessary at the execution of this Agreement. Contractor shall not perform, nor be compensated for, Extra Work without written authorization from Commission’s Representative. 3.3.5 Prevailing Wages. Contractor is aware of the requirements of California Labor Code Section 1720, et seq., and 1770, et seq., as well as California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Section 16000, et seq., (“Prevailing Wage Laws”), which require the payment of prevailing wage rates and the performance of other requirements on “public works” and “maintenance” projects. Since the Services are being performed as part of an applicable “public works” or “maintenance” project, as defined by the Prevailing Wage Laws, and if the total compensation is $15,000 or more, Contractor agrees to fully comply with such Prevailing Wage Laws. Commission shall provide Contractor with a copy of the prevailing rates of per diem wages in 139 17336.00600\29268990.1 12 effect at the commencement of this Agreement. Contractor shall make copies of the prevailing rates of per diem wages for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to execute the Services available to interested parties upon request, and shall post copies at the Contractor’s principal place of business and at the project site. Contractor shall defend, indemnify and hold the Commission, its officials, officers, employees and agents free and harmless from any claim or liability arising out of any failure or alleged failure to comply with the Prevailing Wage Laws. 3.3.6 Payroll Records. In accordance with the requirements of California Labor Code Section 1776, Contractor shall keep accurate payroll records which are either on forms provided by the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement or which contain the same information required by such forms. Responsibility for compliance with California Labor Code Section 1776 shall rest solely with Contractor, and Contractor shall make all such records available for inspection at all reasonable hours. 3.3.7 Registration. Since the Services are being performed as part of an applicable “public works” or “maintenance” project, then pursuant to Labor Code Sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, the Contractor and all subcontractors must be registered with the Department of Industrial Relations. Contractor shall maintain registration for the duration of the Project and require the same of any subcontractor. This Project may also be subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. It shall be Contractor’s sole responsibility to comply with all applicable registration and labor compliance requirements. 3.3.8 Employment of Apprentices. This Agreement shall not prevent the employment of properly indentured apprentices in accordance with the California Labor Code, and no employer or labor union shall refuse to accept otherwise qualified employees as indentured apprentices on the work performed hereunder solely on the ground of race, creed, national origin, ancestry, color or sex. Every qualified apprentice shall be paid the standard wage paid to apprentices under the regulations of the craft or trade in which he or she is employed and shall be employed only in the craft or trade to which he or she is registered. If California Labor Code Section 1777.5 applies to the Services, Contractor and any subcontractor hereunder who employs workers in any apprenticeable craft or trade shall apply to the joint apprenticeship council administering applicable standards for a certificate approving Contractor or any sub-contractor for the employment and training of apprentices. Upon issuance of this certificate, Contractor and any sub-contractor shall employ the number of apprentices provided for therein, as well as contribute to the fund to administer the apprenticeship program in each craft or trade in the area of the work hereunder. The parties expressly understand that the responsibility for compliance with provisions of this Section and with Sections 1777.5, 1777.6 and 1777.7 of the California Labor Code in regard to all apprenticeable occupations lies with Contractor. 3.3.9 Eight-Hour Law. Pursuant to the provisions of the California Labor Code, eight hours of labor shall constitute a legal day's work, and the time of service of any worker employed on the work shall be limited and restricted to eight hours during any one calendar day, and forty hours in any one calendar week, except when payment for overtime is made at not less than one and one-half the basic rate for all hours worked in excess of eight hours per day ("Eight- 140 17336.00600\29268990.1 13 Hour Law"), unless Contractor or the Services are not subject to the Eight-Hour Law. Contractor shall forfeit to Commission as a penalty, $50.00 for each worker employed in the execution of this Agreement by him, or by any sub-contractor under him, for each calendar day during which such workman is required or permitted to work more than eight hours in any calendar day and forty hours in any one calendar week without such compensation for overtime violation of the provisions of the California Labor Code, unless Contractor or the Services are not subject to the Eight-Hour Law. 3.4 Termination of Agreement. 3.4.1 Grounds for Termination. Commission may, by written notice to Contractor, terminate the whole or any part of this Agreement at any time and without cause by giving written notice to Contractor of such termination, and specifying the effective date thereof, at least seven (7) days before the effective date of such termination. Upon termination, Contractor shall be compensated only for those services which have been adequately rendered to Commission, and Contractor shall be entitled to no further compensation. Contractor may not terminate this Agreement except for cause. 3.4.2 Effect of Termination. If this Agreement is terminated as provided herein, Commission may require Contractor to provide all finished or unfinished Documents and Data and other information of any kind prepared by Contractor in connection with the performance of Services under this Agreement. Contractor shall be required to provide such document and other information within fifteen (15) days of the request. 3.4.3 Additional Services. In the event this Agreement is terminated in whole or in part as provided herein, Commission may procure, upon such terms and in such manner as it may determine appropriate, services similar to those terminated. 3.5 General Provisions. 3.5.1 Delivery of Notices. All notices permitted or required under this Agreement shall be given to the respective parties at the following address, or at such other address as the respective parties may provide in writing for this purpose: CONSULTANT: COMMISSION: ______________________ Riverside County ______________________ Transportation Commission ______________________ 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor _____________________ Riverside, CA 92501 Attn: ________________ Attn: Executive Director Such notice shall be deemed made when personally delivered or when mailed, forty-eight (48) hours after deposit in the U.S. Mail, first class postage prepaid and addressed to the party at its applicable address. Actual notice shall be deemed adequate notice on the date actual notice occurred, regardless of the method of service. 141 17336.00600\29268990.1 14 3.5.2 Indemnification. 3.5.2.1 Scope of Indemnity. To the fullest extent permitted by law, Contractor shall defend, indemnify and hold the Commission, its officials, officers, employees, volunteers and agents free and harmless from any and all claims, demands, causes of action, costs, expenses, liability, loss, damage or injury of any kind, in law or equity, to property or persons, including wrongful death, in any manner arising out of, pertaining to, or incident to any alleged acts, errors or omissions of Contractor, its officials, officers, employees, subcontractors, contractors or agents in connection with the performance of the Services, the Project, this Agreement or any Task Order, including without limitation the payment of all consequential damages, expert witness fees and attorneys’ fees and other related costs and expenses. Notwithstanding the foregoing, to the extent Contractor's Services are subject to Civil Code Section 2782.8, the above indemnity shall be limited, to the extent required by Civil Code Section 2782.8, to claims that arise out of, pertain to, or relate to the negligence, recklessness, or willful misconduct of the Contractor. 3.5.2.2 Additional Indemnity Obligations. Contractor shall defend, with Counsel of Commission's choosing and at Contractor’s own cost, expense and risk, any and all claims, suits, actions or other proceedings of every kind covered by Section 3.5.2.1 that may be brought or instituted against Commission or its officials, officers, employees, volunteers and agents. Contractor shall pay and satisfy any judgment, award or decree that may be rendered against Commission or its officials, officers, employees, volunteers and agents as part of any such claim, suit, action or other proceeding. Contractor shall also reimburse Commission for the cost of any settlement paid by Commission or its officials, officers, employees, agents or volunteers as part of any such claim, suit, action or other proceeding. Such reimbursement shall include payment for Commission’s attorneys’ fees and costs, including expert witness fees. Contractor shall reimburse Commission and its officials, officers, employees, agents, and/or volunteers, for any and all legal expenses and costs incurred by each of them in connection therewith or in enforcing the indemnity herein provided. Contractor’s obligation to indemnify shall survive expiration or termination of this Agreement, and shall not be restricted to insurance proceeds, if any, received by the Commission, its officials officers, employees, agents, or volunteers. 3.5.3 Governing Law; Government Code Claim Compliance. This Agreement shall be governed by the laws of the State of California. Venue shall be in Riverside County. In addition to any and all contract requirements pertaining to notices of and requests for compensation or payment for extra work, disputed work, claims and/or changed conditions, Contractor must comply with the claim procedures set forth in Government Code sections 900 et seq. prior to filing any lawsuit against the Commission. Such Government Code claims and any subsequent lawsuit based upon the Government Code claims shall be limited to those matters that remain unresolved after all procedures pertaining to extra work, disputed work, claims, and/or changed conditions have been followed by Contractor. If no such Government Code claim is submitted, or if any prerequisite contractual requirements are not otherwise satisfied as specified herein, Contractor shall be barred from bringing and maintaining a valid lawsuit against the Commission. 3.5.4 Time of Essence. Time is of the essence for each and every provision of this Agreement. 142 17336.00600\29268990.1 15 3.5.5 Commission’s Right to Employ Other Contractors. Commission reserves right to employ other contractors in connection with this Project. 3.5.6 Successors and Assigns. This Agreement shall be binding on the successors and assigns of the parties. 3.5.7 Assignment or Transfer. Contractor shall not assign, hypothecate or transfer, either directly or by operation of law, this Agreement or any interest herein without the prior written consent of the Commission. Any attempt to do so shall be null and void, and any assignees, hypothecates or transferees shall acquire no right or interest by reason of such attempted assignment, hypothecation or transfer. Subcontracts, if any, shall contain a provision making them subject to all provisions stipulated in this Agreement. 3.5.8 Construction; References; Captions. Since the Parties or their agents have participated fully in the preparation of this Agreement, the language of this Agreement shall be construed simply, according to its fair meaning, and not strictly for or against any Party. Any term referencing time, days or period for performance shall be deemed calendar days and not work days. All references to Contractor include all personnel, employees, agents, and subcontractors of Contractor, except as otherwise specified in this Agreement. All references to Commission include its officials, officers, employees, agents, and volunteers except as otherwise specified in this Agreement. The captions of the various articles and paragraphs are for convenience and ease of reference only, and do not define, limit, augment, or describe the scope, content or intent of this Agreement. 3.5.9 Amendment; Modification. No supplement, modification or amendment of this Agreement shall be binding unless executed in writing and signed by both Parties. 3.5.10 Waiver. No waiver of any default shall constitute a waiver of any other default or breach, whether of the same or other covenant or condition. No waiver, benefit, privilege, or service voluntarily given or performed by a Party shall give the other Party any contractual rights by custom, estoppel or otherwise. 3.5.11 No Third Party Beneficiaries. Except to the extent expressly provided for in Section 3.5.7, there are no intended third party beneficiaries of any right or obligation assumed by the Parties. 3.5.12 Invalidity; Severability. If any portion of this Agreement is declared invalid, illegal, or otherwise unenforceable by a court of competent jurisdiction, the remaining provisions shall continue in full force and effect. 3.5.13 Prohibited Interests. Contractor maintains and warrants that it has not employed nor retained any company or person, other than a bona fide employee working solely for Contractor, to solicit or secure this Agreement. Further, Contractor warrants that it has not paid nor has it agreed to pay any company or person, other than a bona fide employee working solely for Contractor, any fee, commission, percentage, brokerage fee, gift or other consideration contingent upon or resulting from the award or making of this Agreement. Contractor further agrees to file, or shall cause its employees or subcontractors to file, a Statement of Economic Interest with the Commission’s Filing Officer as required under state law in the performance of 143 17336.00600\29268990.1 16 the Services. For breach or violation of this warranty, Commission shall have the right to rescind this Agreement without liability. For the term of this Agreement, no member, officer or employee of Commission, during the term of his or her service with Commission, shall have any direct interest in this Agreement, or obtain any present or anticipated material benefit arising therefrom. 3.5.14 Cooperation; Further Acts. The Parties shall fully cooperate with one another, and shall take any additional acts or sign any additional documents as may be necessary, appropriate or convenient to attain the purposes of this Agreement. 3.5.15 Authority to Enter Agreement. Contractor has all requisite power and authority to conduct its business and to execute, deliver, and perform the Agreement. Each Party warrants that the individuals who have signed this Agreement have the legal power, right, and authority to make this Agreement and bind each respective Party. 3.5.16 Counterparts. This Agreement may be signed in counterparts, each of which shall constitute an original. 3.5.17 Entire Agreement. This Agreement contains the entire Agreement of the parties with respect to the subject matter hereof, and supersedes all prior negotiations, understandings or agreements. This Agreement may only be modified by a writing signed by both parties. 3.5.18 Federal Provisions. Funding for the Services is provided, in whole or in part, by the Federal Transportation Administration (“FTA”). Contractor shall also fully and adequately comply with the provisions included in Exhibit “F” (Federal Requirements) attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference (“Federal Requirements”). With respect to any conflict between such Federal Requirements and the terms of this Agreement and/or the provisions of state law, the more stringent requirement shall control. [SIGNATURES ON NEXT PAGE] 144 17336.00600\29268990.1 17 SIGNATURE PAGE FOR ROUTINE AND ON-CALL LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SERVICES AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AND TROPICAL PLAZA NURSERY, INC. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Parties have entered into this Agreement as of the date first set forth above. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION [INSERT NAME] [INSERT TITLE] Approved as to form: Best Best & Krieger LLP General Counsel TROPICAL PLAZA NURSERY, INC. Signature Name Title ATTEST: Signature Name Title A corporation requires the signatures of two corporate officers. One signature shall be that of the chairman of board, the president or any vice president and the second signature (on the attest line) shall be that of the secretary, any assistant secretary, the chief financial officer or any assistant treasurer of such corporation. If the above referenced persons are not the intended signators, evidence of signature authority shall be provided to RCTC. 145 17336.00600\29268990.1 18 EXHIBIT “A” SCOPE OF SERVICES [***INSERT SCOPE***] 146 17336.00600\29268990.1 19 EXHIBIT “B” SCHEDULE OF SERVICES [***INSERT SCHEDULE***] 147 17336.00600\29268990.1 20 EXHIBIT “C” COMPENSATION [***INSERT RATES & AUTHORIZED REIMBURSABLE EXPENSES***] 148 17336.00600\29268990.1 21 EXHIBIT “D” SAMPLE TASK ORDER FORM RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TASK ORDER Task Order No. _____________ Agreement No. ______________ Contractor: _________________________ The Contractor is hereby authorized to perform the following work subject to the provisions of the Agreement identified above: List any attachments: (Please provide if any.) Dollar Amount of Task Order: Not to exceed $_____,_____.00 Completion Date: _____________, 201__ The undersigned Contractor hereby agrees that it will provide all equipment, furnish all materials, except as may be otherwise noted above, and perform all services for the work above specified in accordance with the Contract identified above and will accept as full payment therefore the amount shown above. Riverside County Transportation Commission Contractor Dated: _________________ Dated: _________________ By: ________________________ By: ____________________ Title: ________________________ Title: ____________________ 149 17336.00600\29268990.1 22 EXHIBIT “E” FEDERAL REQUIREMENTS [***TO BE INSERTED FROM RFP***] 150 AGENDA ITEM 7 PRESENTATION RCTC 40 th Anniversary A Commitment to Public Transit Original Responsibilities •Coordinate state highway planning •Adopt Short Range Transit Plans •Coordinate transit service •Identify projects for state and federal funding •Coordinate county plans with state and regional agencies RCTC’s Current Transit Role •RCTC provides financial oversight role –seven bus operators and one rail (SCRRA) •Primary funding comes from two state sources (LTF and STA) •Federal formula grants also available for capital and operating •Measure A funds are limited for bus operations The SRTP Process •Operators submit Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP) –Revenues –Expenditures –Service Plans –Must meet farebox requirements •RCTC’s role is to approve the SRTPs,process LTF,STA and Measure A payments and conduct specialized Transit Call for Projects Southern California Regional Rail Authority •Joint Powers Authority •Comprised of five county transportation agencies •536-mile network •Seven service lines •63 stations Paying for Metrolink RCTC’s Metrolink Budget FY 2013/14 FY 2014/15 FY 2015/16 Operating $7.5 million $9.8 million $13.8 million (includes PVL –41% increase) Rehab/Capital $1.5 million $3.1 million $9.1 million The Responsibility of Owning Stations •Nine Commuter Rail Stations = 138 Acres •Five Classic Stations = 67.9 Acres; 993 Trees, 16 Clocks, 223 Valves, 5415 Sprinklers •Four New PVL Stations = 69.89 Acres AGENDA ITEM 8 Agenda Item 8 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: December 14, 2016 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Robert Yates, Multimodal Services Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Officer SUBJECT: 2016 Coordinated Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Plan STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to approve the 2016 Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan (2016 Coordinated Plan). BACKGROUND INFORMATION: With the passage of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) several years ago, two funding sources for specialized transit service were made available to transportation planning and programming entities across the nation. These sources are identified as Jobs Access Reverse Commute (JARC) Section 5316 and New Freedom Section 5317 funds. At its April 2008 meeting, the Commission approved the first Coordinated Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Plan for Riverside County (2008 Coordinated Plan), which made the Commission eligible to receive and allocate the JARC and New Freedom funds. With the approval of the 2008 Coordinated Plan, the Commission also adopted a strategy for developing and conducting a specialized transit call for projects for Riverside County. This process was intended to be used to competitively disburse the JARC and New Freedom funds and to provide a vehicle in which to competitively disburse Measure A Specialized Transit funds to qualified non-profit providers and the public operators. Since that time, the Commission approved and awarded funds from three separate call for projects processes. The next call for projects is due to begin in December 2017, for projects starting in the Fiscal Year 2017/18. DISCUSSION: In accordance with the provisions originally contained in SAFETEA-LU, recipients under these programs must comply with all federal coordinated planning requirements to be eligible for funds. The authorization stipulates that projects selected for funding under these programs must be derived from a locally coordinated, public transit-human services transportation plan. 151 Agenda Item 8 Moreover, the coordinated plan must be developed through a process that includes representatives of public, private, and nonprofit transportation and human service providers and participation by the public. Requirements further state the coordinated plan must be updated at least every four years. Staff previously brought an update to the Commission in 2012, which was approved and subsequently provided the evaluation criteria for the 2013 and 2015 Specialized Transit Call for Projects. The projects awarded by the Commission from the 2013 Call for Projects have expired and the projects from the 2015 Call for Projects are currently in process and due to expire on June 30, 2018. While the 2008 Coordinated Plan was originally designed around JARC and New Freedom programs sponsored by the federal government, this funding stream has since been eliminated and subsumed by other programs related to the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP-21) Act and the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act) reauthorizations. As a result, the only federal funding stream remaining available which would be supported by an approved 2016 Coordinated Plan is the Section 5310 Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities Program. While limited, this funding stream is still quite useful to the county as it pertains to some of the smaller transit service providers and therefore, staff believes the 2016 Coordinated Plan and all of the work to support it continues to provide Riverside County with a strong foundation for assuring a competitive call for projects process. Approval of the 2016 Coordinated Plan will continue to provide a benefit by maintaining federal eligibility beyond the 5310 program should additional federal funds be made available for specialized transit projects. Plan Update Process Federal requirements dictate that the coordinated plan process, as well as any plan updates, be conducted publicly and therefore, a methodology for obtaining community input was deemed an essential element of staff’s planning for the 2016 Coordinated Plan. Staff prepared the 2016 Coordinated Plan with assistance provided by AMMA Transit Planning, including conducting outreach to comply with Federal Transit Administration requirements and applicable public participation and stakeholder consultation provisions. The development of the 2016 Coordinated Plan also considered existing documentation relevant to its target populations, including but not limited to Southern California Association of Governments’ Regional Transportation Plan, the Coachella Valley-San Gorgonio Pass Rail Corridor Service project, the Commission’s Strategic Transportation Assessment and Riverside Transit Agency’s Consolidated Operational Analysis. Various activities were conducted countywide to comply with the federal requirement that the 2016 Coordinated Plan be developed through local processes, including the following: 152 Agenda Item 8 •The Commission’s Transit Network Database, consisting of 880 stakeholder agencies contacts of either physical addresses or email addresses, was used to help distribute and promote public and agency participation opportunities. •Four consumer and stakeholder workshops, and a special North Shore Salton Sea Community Council meeting, were among events held across Riverside County involving over 75 agency and organization representatives and members of the public. The workshop was widely noticed by 10 email blasts to the Commission’s transit network database, a physical mailing to 607 addresses, and telephone recruitment to ensure representation by all of the target populations. •Written comments were accepted through the Coordination Plan project website. The website was promoted at all workshop events and through email blasts to the Commission’s transit network database. •Two Coordinated Plan prioritization workshops conducted at Coachella Valley Association of Governments and at the Commission’s offices involving almost 60 agency partners and participants. •Analysis of target group population demographics, trip demand projections through 2019, regional planning documents, and input from the public outreach to identify findings regarding mobility needs and gaps. •Constructed framework of five goals and 23 priority strategies for implementation to address identified needs and gaps. •Spanish translation was made available at all public participation opportunities, with opportunity for additional language translation with a 48-hour notice. 2016 Coordinated Plan Update Despite documented growth of public transit ridership countywide, the update process continued to identify new unmet transportation needs and service gaps for the target populations. Numerous sub-groups were identified beyond those previously identified in the 2008 and 2012 Coordinated Plan, some with unique trip needs. As described above, responses to outreach compiled from three years of Transportation Network Database comments and an estimated 200 individuals and/or organizations directly contributing to the 2016 Coordinated Plan process identified 10 key themes for the document: 1)Expanded transit service area needs exist throughout the county. 2)Improved connectivity will shorten trips and contribute to increased frequency of trips. 3)Expanded hours of service and days of service will help to meet additional trip needs. 4)Long-distance regional medical trip needs exist in all areas of the county. 5)Safe and comfortable rides can improve riders’ experience. 6)Safe pedestrian and bicyclist experiences will improve mobility choices. 7)Transit affordability and fare policies can be barriers to use. 8)Information topics and mobility management opportunities address transit promotion. 153 Agenda Item 8 9)Additional coordination opportunities with human service agencies, specialized transportation providers can result in meeting additional trip needs. 10)Securing of funding is critical to maintain, enhance and expand transit services. In light of these themes, the 2016 Coordinated Plan’s overarching goal is to enhance the mobility of individuals with disabilities, seniors, people with low incomes, and military veterans all of which continue to be the Coordinated Plan’s target populations. Additionally, and in compliance with MAP-21 regulation, projects selected for funding going forward shall be consistent with and compliant to the 2016 Coordinated Plan thus maintaining federal eligibility for the Commission’s Specialized Transit Program. 2018 Universal Call for Projects With respect to future project funding and selection, the 2018 Specialized Transit Call for Projects will require evaluation criteria and an application package consistent with an approved 2016 Coordinated Plan. Staff expects to begin this process sometime in the fall 2017. Evaluation criteria resultant from the 2016 Coordinated Plan will continue to be refined by staff and will be used to develop the 2018 Specialized Transit Call for Projects application package. This will allow proposers a complete and full understanding of the call for projects application process as well as allow those projects most consistent with the goals and objectives contained in the 2016 Coordinated Plan to rise to the top for funding. Staff will seek Commission authority at a later date in order to conduct the call for projects and award funds. There is no financial impact related to the staff recommendation to approve the 2016 Coordinated Plan as approval does not involve a funding commitment at this time. Attachment: Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan for Riverside County 2016 Update (Posted on Commission Website) 154 Final Report - November 2016 PUBLIC TRANSIT – HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY 2016 UPDATE                                            THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                i     PUBLIC TRANSIT – HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE Table of Contents  EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................. v  Purpose and Intent ............................................................................................................................... v  Changing Transportation Landscape .................................................................................................... v  Riverside County Transportation Context............................................................................................. v  Available Transportation ...................................................................................................................... vi  Mobility Needs and Gaps .................................................................................................................... vii  Defining Mobility Goals and Responsive Strategies ........................................................................... vii  1.0 PURPOSE AND APPROACH ............................................................................................ 1  1.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 1  Authorization ........................................................................................................................................ 1  The Future is Here ................................................................................................................................. 1  What Is This Plan’s Value to Riverside County? .................................................................................... 2  Plan Goal and Requirements ................................................................................................................ 3  Funding Coordinated Plan Projects, FTA Section 5310 ......................................................................... 3  1.2 Plan Objectives ........................................................................................................................... 4  1.3 Process and Public Engagement .................................................................................................. 4  2.0 CONTEXT ....................................................................................................................... 6  2.1 Demographics ............................................................................................................................ 6  Demographic Changes among Target Populations ............................................................................... 6  Current Economic Picture ..................................................................................................................... 8  2.2   Geography ................................................................................................................................ 9  Urbanized Areas of Riverside County ................................................................................................... 9  Target Population Density for the Western Riverside County Subarea ............................................. 12  Target Population Density for the Eastern Riverside County Subarea ............................................... 18  2.3 Regional Plans and Studies ....................................................................................................... 23  SCAG Regional Plans ........................................................................................................................... 23  Riverside County Regional Plans ......................................................................................................... 24  Comprehensive Operations Analyses ................................................................................................. 30  Individual Operators’ Short Range Transit Plans ................................................................................ 30  2.4 New Trip Demand Information from 211VetLink.org ................................................................ 33  2.5 Summary of Key Environment and Context Issues .................................................................... 36    PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                ii     3.0 ASSESSMENT OF AVAILABLE TRANSPORTATION ......................................................... 38  3.1 Mass Transportation ................................................................................................................ 38  Mass Transportation in Western Riverside County ............................................................................ 39  Mass Transportation in Eastern Riverside County .............................................................................. 42  Private Transportation Providers ........................................................................................................ 44  Information Resource Programs ......................................................................................................... 51  3.2 Specialized Transportation ....................................................................................................... 51  Specialized Transportation Funding .................................................................................................... 51  Specialized Transportation Providers ................................................................................................. 53  3.3 Performance Measurement ...................................................................................................... 57  Trips‐per‐Capita .................................................................................................................................. 57  Other Measures .................................................................................................................................. 59  4.0 ASSESSMENT OF MOBILITY NEEDS and GAPS .............................................................. 60  4.1 Outreach Approach .................................................................................................................. 60  4.2 Countywide Overview of Findings ............................................................................................. 61  4.3 Ten Key Themes Heard from Outreach ..................................................................................... 63  1.  Expanded transit service area needs exist throughout the county. .............................................. 64  2.  Improved connectivity will shorten trips and contribute to increased frequency of trips. ........... 65  3.  Expanded hours of service and days of service will help to meet additional trip needs. .............. 66  4. Long‐distance, regional medical trip needs exist in all areas of the County. ................................. 67  5. Safe and comfortable rides can improve the riders’ experience. ................................................... 68  6. Safe pedestrian and bicyclist experiences will improve mobility choices ...................................... 68  7. Transit affordability and fare policies can be barriers to use. ........................................................ 69  8. Information topics and mobility management opportunities address transit promotion. ............ 70  9. Coordination opportunities with human service agencies, specialized transportation providers  and public transit can meet more trip needs. .................................................................................... 71  10.  Securing funding is critical to maintain, enhance and expand transit services. .......................... 73  5.0 COORDINATED PLAN GOALS, STRATEGIES AND PRIORITIZATION ................................ 74  5.1 Funding Options to Support Strategies ..................................................................................... 74  FTA Section 5310 Funding ................................................................................................................... 74  Other Funding Sources Available to Support Coordinated Plan Projects ........................................... 75  Funding Direction from RCTC’s 2016 Strategic Assessment ............................................................... 79  5.2 Defining Goals, Responsive Strategies and Illustrative Projects ................................................. 81  Goal 1 – Grow Mobility Options ......................................................................................................... 81  Goal 2 – Connect and Coordinate Services ......................................................................................... 85  Goal 3 – Promote Safety and Comfort ................................................................................................ 88  Goal 4 – Improve Health Access ......................................................................................................... 92  Goal 5 – Promote and Improve Communication ................................................................................ 93  5.3 Prioritization of Strategies ........................................................................................................ 97  Priority Setting Process ....................................................................................................................... 97  Priorities .............................................................................................................................................. 98  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                iii     6.0 IMPLEMENTATION .................................................................................................... 100  Gaps but Definable ........................................................................................................................... 100  Crafting Partnerships to Leverage Resources ................................................................................... 100  Leadership Around Partnering and Project Development ................................................................ 100  7.0 APPENDICES .............................................................................................................. 101  Appendix A ‐ Area‐Specific Outreach Needs and Gaps Reported ................................................... 102  Western Riverside Outreach Findings ............................................................................................... 102  Coachella Valley Outreach Findings .................................................................................................. 105  Palo Verde Valley Outreach Findings ................................................................................................ 110  Appendix B – Public Outreach Flyers and Notices ......................................................................... 113  Appendix C – 5310 Fact Sheet ....................................................................................................... 116    List of Figures  Figure ES‐1, Urbanized Areas of Western Riverside County……………………………………………………………………vi  Figure ES‐2, Urbanized Area of the Coachella Valley………………….…………………………………………………………..vi  Figure 2‐1, Urbanized Areas of Western Riverside County.……………………………………………………………………10  Figure 2‐2, Urbanized Areas of Eastern Riverside County………………………………………………………………………11  Figure 2‐3, Older Adult Density in Western Riverside County………………………………………………………………..14  Figure 2‐4, Disabled Population Density in Western Riverside County…………………………………………………..15  Figure 2‐5, Low‐Income Population Density in Western Riverside County…………………………………..………..16  Figure 2‐6, Zero Vehicle Households in Western Riverside County…………………………………………………..……17  Figure 2‐7, Older Adult Density in Eastern Riverside County………………………………………………………………….19  Figure 2‐8, Disabled Population Density in Eastern Riverside County…………………………………………………….20  Figure 2‐9, Low‐Income Population in Eastern Riverside County………………………………………………..………...21  Figure 2‐10, Zero Vehicle Households in Eastern Riverside County……………………………………………..………..22  Figure 2‐11, 211VetLink Requested Destinations by User Characteristics……………………………………..………33  Figure 2‐12, 211VetLink Trip Requests Potentially Served by RTA…………………………………………………..…….34  Figure 2‐13, 211VetLInk Trip Requests – Request with No Transit Results…………………………………...…..…..35  Figure 2‐14, 211VetLink Trip Request, Requests with No Good Results……………………………………………..….36  Figure 3‐1, Transportation Trips By Mode……………………………………..……………………………………………………..38  Figure 4‐1, How Well Are Consumers’ Mobility Needs Met…………………………………..……….……………..………61  Figure 4‐2, Key Mobility Concerns………………………………………………………………………………………………..……….62  Figure 5‐1, Urbanized Areas:  West and East Riverside County…………………..…………………………………………74    List of Tables  Table ES‐1, Mobility Goals…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….viii  Table ES‐2, Prioritized 2016 COORDINATED PLAN Strategies……………………………………………………………….………ix  Table 2‐1, Coordinated Plan Target Populations………………………………………………………………………….………….7  Table 2‐2, 2015 Metrolink Study: Ethnicity……………………………………………………………………………………………26  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                iv     Table 2‐3, 2015 Metrolink Study: Employment Status…………………………………………………………………………..27  Table 2‐4, 2015 Metrolink Study: Frequency of Ridership……………………………………………………………………..27  Table 2‐5, 2015 Metrolink Study: Trip Purpose……………………………………………………………………………………..28  Table 2‐6, 2015 Metrolink Study: Fare Media……………………………………………………………………………………....28  Table 2‐7, 2015 Metrolink Study: Prior Travel Modes……………………………………………………………………………29  Table 3‐1, Public Transit Providers…………………………………………………………………………………………………………45  Table 3‐2, Large Urban Specialized Transportation Funding…..………………………………………………………………53  Table 3‐3, Specialized Transportation Providers…………………………………………………………………………………….54  Table 3‐4, Trips per Capita by Subarea…………………………………………………………………………………………………..57  Table 3‐5, Trips Provided by Provider for Five Reporting Periods…………………………………………………………..58  Table 5‐1, Goal 1 Strategies and Illustrative Projects……………………………………………………………………………..85  Table 5‐2, Goal 2 Strategies and Illustrative Projects……………………………………………………………………………..88  Table 5‐3, Goal 3 Strategies and Illustrative Projects……………………………………………………………………………..91  Table 5‐4, Goal 4 Strategies and Illustrative Projects……………………………………………………………………………..93  Table 5‐5, Goal 5 Strategies and Illustrative Projects……………………………………………………………………….…....95  Table 5‐6, Prioritized Strategies……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..98 PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                v     Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan for Riverside County, 2016 Update   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Purpose and Intent   This PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN is prepared in response to Federal  statute, initially required in 2005 and re‐authorized in the January 2016 legislation PL 114‐22 Fixing  America’s Surface Transportation (FAST Act).  Termed the COORDINATED PLAN, it identifies and addresses  transportation needs and gaps of seniors, persons with disabilities and persons of low‐income.  Through  mobility  goals,  strategies  and  projects,  it  provides  direction to  a  number  of  Riverside  County  stakeholders that include the Commission, the county’s public transit providers, human service agencies  and city and County personnel.     The COORDINATED PLAN’S projects can be supported with Federal Transit Administration Section 5310  funds which can provide capital and operating funds for projects identified in the Plan.  However, this  competitive funding source is modest, with less than $1 million in funding support annually secured by  agencies in Riverside County in the most recent 3‐year Call‐for‐Projects.  Even with funding available  through the County’s Measure A, averaging between $2.5 to $3 million annually over the last decade for  western county projects only, stakeholder organizations must be creative and pro‐active to develop  strategic responses to the mobility concerns of Riverside County residents described in this plan.   Changing Transportation Landscape  This is a period of tremendous change in the transportation field,  with  implications  that  are  being  discovered  for  public  transportation  and  specialized  transportation providers.  Changes in service  delivery models, in information dissemination and in fare payment technology are epitomized in the  new service models that Uber and Lyft are successfully implementing.   How these changes impact the  populations of concern to this COORDINATED PLAN will be better understood with time, as well as how to  craft responses that protect equitable access to new services and service innovations for older adults,  individuals with disabilities and low‐income households.  Riverside County Transportation Context  Chapter 2 of this COORDINATED PLAN describes the groups of interest among the County’s almost 2.3  million persons, and includes the 12.5% or 282,000 persons age 65 and older, growing in number and  proportion.  Persons with disabilities comprise 5.4% of the adult population, less than 1% of children or  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                vi     youth  under  age  17;  just  4.4%  of  seniors  report  that  they  are  disabled.  Combined,  the  represents  242,000 individuals reporting disabilities. Low‐income persons, living at or below 100% of the Federal  Poverty Level, total just under 240,000 persons.   U.S. military veterans are also of concern to this Plan.  The 132,000 Riverside County veterans comprise  5.8% of the County’s population, as reported in the 2014 American Community Survey 5‐Year Estimates.    Not surprisingly, these groups are not evenly distributed across the county but with differences by sub‐ region and neighborhood.  Chapter 2 describes some of those concentrations and differences, including  trip  origin  and  destination  information  from  211VetLink.org,  the  Riverside  Connect  trip  planning  partnership with the 211 in San Bernardino, a transportation information resource for the two counties.                    Figure ES‐1, Urbanized Areas of Western Riverside County    FTA Section 5310 funds, which can be pursued  for projects identified in this COORDINATED PLAN,  are allocated by urbanized area and must be  competitively  sought  within  these  areas.   Similarly, for projects serving rural areas of the  County,  areas  outside  of  the  demarcated  urbanized areas shown in Figures ES‐1 and ES‐ 2,  grant  applicants  must  compete  for  funds  through  Caltrans  in  its  5310  Rural  Call  for  Projects for funding.                                                                                                                                                                                                  Figure ES‐2, Urbanized Area of the Coachella Valley  Providing  additional  context,  Chapter  2  summarizes 14 regional plans and studies and  their  particular  findings  of  relevance,  which  include  SCAG’s  vision  of  “more  choices  for  getting around”, planning status for additional  inter‐city rail services, differences in utilization  of fare payment media by younger and poorer  persons and more.    Central among the reported studies is RCTC’s  RIVERSIDE COUNTY STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT,  completed  in  January  2016,  which  defines  strategic actions by which to meet the increased transportation‐related demands of Riverside County’s  population that continues to grow and the deficiencies in the current funding mix.   Available Transportation  Chapter  3  presents  the  assessment  of  available  transportation  in  Riverside  County.    While  these  programs have largely been described in the RIVERSIDE COUNTY STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT and in RCTC’s ANNUAL  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                vii     COUNTYWIDE REPORT  OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION, FY 2014/2015, additional  information  on  specialized  transportation services and funding is included in this COORDINATED PLAN.   The provision of 16.5 million passenger trips on public transit in Riverside County during FY 2014/15,  includes 543,000 specialized transportation programs of which many are supported by FTA Section 5310  funds and local Measure A Specialized Transportation Funding.   Together, all transit trips reflect a 7.2  trips per‐capita‐rate, a benchmark that has steadily improved despite a continuously growing population  and is now 14% above the 6.9 trips‐per‐capita rate documented in the first COORDINATED PLAN in 2005.   Future transportation use can be assessed against this rate.  Mobility Needs and Gaps  Described in Chapter 4, this Plan’s outreach processes included a formal public hearing, community  workshops in five locations around the county, input through RCTC’s Citizens Advisory Committee and  responses compiled from three years of Transportation Network Database comments (440 responses).    An estimated 200 individuals or organizations directly contributed to the Plan development process.    Themes characterizing the mobility needs and gaps of the target groups differed by area, reflecting both  different densities in population and in available services.  These are individually reported by the three  primary subregions of the county – Western Riverside County, the Coachella Valley and Palo Verde  Valley.   Ten key themes are identified in this COORDINATED PLAN:  1. Expanded transit service area needs exist throughout the County.  2. Improved connectivity will shorten trips and contribute to increased frequency of trips.  3. Expanded hours of service and days of service will help to meet additional trip needs.  4. Long‐distance regional medical trip needs exist in all areas of the County.  5. Safe and comfortable rides can improve riders’ experience.  6. Safe pedestrian and bicyclist experiences will improve mobility choices.  7. Transit affordability and fare policies can be barriers to use.  8. Information topics and mobility management opportunities address transit promotion.  9. Coordination  opportunities  with  human  service  agencies,  specialized  transportation  providers and public transit can meet more trip needs.  10. Securing funding is critical to maintain, enhance and expand transit services.  Defining Mobility Goals and Responsive Strategies  Chapter 5 presents a review of funding options, including and beyond FTA Section 5310.  It recapitulates  the  strategic  direction  from  the  2016 RIVERSIDE COUNTY STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT  which  recognized  a  substantial deficit over the long haul in available funding for transportation programs and services.   Within this broader context, Chapter 5 defines the five (5) goals  and  twenty‐three  implementing  strategies by which to address this 2016 COORDINATED PLAN’S findings, mobility needs and gaps.   Notably, almost 60% of the agency and organizational respondents to RCTC’s Transportation Network  Card annual survey indicate that all or most of their constituents’ transportation needs are met.  This  COORDINATED PLAN  is  focused  on  those  needs  and  gaps  that  otherwise  present,  recognizing  that  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                viii     significant public and specialized transportation services are in place and providing trips to target group  persons. The five goals of this COORDINATED PLAN are presented in Table ES‐1 following.   Table ES‐1                                    Chapter  5  describes  various  initiatives  underway  within  the  County  that  address each of these goals.  It also enumerates comments and findings from  this COORDINATED PLAN that point to the importance of further work.  Specific  responsive  strategies  are  articulated,  with  twenty‐three  (23)  strategies  enumerated and dozens of illustrative projects to move these goals forward.  With  RCTC’s  August  2016  Citizens  Advisory  Committee  meeting,                           a workshop was held to prioritize these strategies. Participants,  about forty persons, represented a range of constituencies from  across the county.  Table ES‐2 presents the ranked and prioritized  strategies  supporting  this  Plan’s  five  mobility  goals,  with  some  discussion of implementation.   Public Transit‐Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan            for Riverside County, 2016 Update  Mobility Goals    Goal 1 – Grow Mobility Options  Sustain, fund and continue to expand the array of public, human service  and private transportation services available in Riverside County.    Goal 2 – Connect and Coordinate Services  Improve connectivity among public transportation services and  coordination with human service transportation to address identified  mobility gaps.    Goal 3 – Promote Safety and Comfort  Ensure safety through new and well‐maintained rolling stock, attention  to passenger safety and physical environments that promote safety for  pedestrians and bicyclists.    Goal 4 – Improve Health Access  Promote transportation solutions, including new partnerships, to improve  the ability of Riverside residents to travel to and from local and regional  medical services and treatments.    Goal 5 – Promote and Improve Communication  Promote, improve and expand information portals that are multi‐cultural  and embrace technology and mobility management tools to increase  mobility options.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                ix       Table ES‐2, Prioritized 2016 COORDINATED PLAN Strategies          Goal Strategy Goal 1 ‐ Mobilty Options 1.1 Strategy: Expand transit services, as funding allows, to unserved areas of the county where sufficient demand presents. Goal 4 ‐ Health Access 4.1 Strategy: Improve health care access and address regional trip needs across the County through additional transportation options, including more direct fixed route, shuttles and lifeline services targeted to medical f iliti Goal 3 ‐ Saftey & Comfort 3.1 Strategy: Secure capital funding for vehicle replacement and ongoing maintenance to ensure safe, accessible transportation. Goal 4 ‐ Health Access 4.2 Strategy: Provide for door‐to‐door and door‐through‐door transportation to assist with medically‐related trips and to ensure the safety of frail or vulnerable riders. Goal 2 ‐ Connect & Coordinate 2.4 Strategy: Promote coordination between public transit and specialized transportation providers to help address mobility gaps. Goal 1 ‐ Mobilty Options 1.2 Strategy: Expand operating hours of service, as funding allows, to help meet additional need. Goal 5 ‐ Communication 5.5 Strategy: Develop mobility management tools, including travel training, to connect riders to available transportation services, to encourage new users and/or transition older adults from driving alone. Goal 1 ‐ Mobilty Options 1.6 Strategy: Secure funding, including discretionary sources, to maintain, enhance and expand transit and specialized transportation services. Goal 5 ‐ Communication 5.2 Strategy: Develop expanded information portals to promote the full range of available transportation options – including vanpool and shared ride, hail services – encouraging effective trip planning tools that improve the id iGoal 1 ‐ Mobilty Options 1.5 Strategy: Support and grow human service transportation operations, as funding allows and as cost‐effective alternatives to public transit. Goal 2 ‐ Connect & Coordinate 2.2 Strategy: Improve connectivity within and between transit services to shorten trip lengths and speed travel. Goal 3 ‐ Saftey & Comfort 3.2 Strategy: Promote safe and comfortable rides for transit users. Goal 5 ‐ Communication 5.1 Strategy: Promote multiple avenues of customer‐oriented information about available transit and specialized transportation, including paper, technology and telephone‐based platforms. Goal 2 ‐ Connect & Coordinate 2.1 Strategy: Support long‐range transportation planning and the integration of land use planning with transportation planning to improve mobility. Goal 5 ‐ Communication 5.3 Strategy : Increase effectiveness in use of social media to promote mobility options to the Target Populations. Goal 3 ‐ Saftey & Comfort 3.3 Strategy : Promote safe and comfortable pedestrian environments, bus stops and bus transfer locations. Goal 3 ‐ Saftey & Comfort 3.4 Strategy : Promote safe bicycling environments. Goal 1 ‐ Mobilty Options 1.4 Strategy : Support transit affordability through public transit fare policy and subsidy options. Goal 5 ‐ Communication 5.6 Strategy: Report public transit and specialized transportation performance and impacts on Riverside County residents’ mobility. Goal 5 ‐ Communication 5.7 Strategy: Ensure board‐based transit agency outreach to invite participation in planning processes that guide transit resource deployment. Goal 2 ‐ Connect & Coordinate 2.3 Strategy: Monitor and improve service reliability, including ensuring effective connections and transfers. Goal 5 ‐ Communication 5.4 Strategy: Promote and develop rider‐centric information tools that may be destination focused (e.g. medical) or user group‐focused (e.g. veterans). Goal 1 ‐ Mobilty Options 1.3 Strategy: Expand operating days service, as funding allows, to help meet additional needs. Ranking Immediate Immediate Immediate Immediate Immediate Immediate Immediate Immediate Immediate Near Term Near Term Near Term Near Term Near Term Near Term Near Term Near Term Long Term Long Term Long Term Long Term Long Term Long Term PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                1     Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan for Riverside County, 2016 Update 1.0 PURPOSE AND APPROACH 1.1 Introduction Authorization   The PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE  (COORDINATED PLAN) serves to document mobility needs and gaps of seniors, persons with disabilities  and persons of low‐income living and traveling within Riverside County.   Required by Federal statute, the first COORDINATED PLAN in 2005 was responsive to Public Law 109‐059  Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA‐LU). In 2012  the Coordinated Plan requirement was reaffirmed in authorizing legislation Public Law 112‐141 Moving  Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP‐21).  Within the Federal context, its direction narrowed  from three funding programs authorized in SAFETEA‐LU to just a single program under MAP‐21, Section  5310, Enhanced  Mobility  of  Seniors  and  Individuals  with  Disabilities.  In  January  2016,  Congress  authorized  new  transportation  legislation  with Public  Law  114‐22  Fixing  America’s  Surface  Transportation (FAST  Act)  with  five‐year  provisions  that  are  now  the  first  long‐term  transportation  legislation in many years.  As rules governing FAST Act implementation are still to be written, public  transit providers and planning agencies continue to implement the guidance provided under MAP‐21.    The Future is Here   This is a time of transformative change in mobility, change that is happening alongside of and, in some  cases,  despite  regulatory  direction  and  requirements.      New  service  models,  new  information  capabilities, new technology and new investment are shaping change and expanding individuals’ choices  for travel to work, school, medical, recreation and other key destinations.  And autonomous vehicles,  with all their unknown implications, loom.  New service models in the ride hail industry through Uber and Lyft are creating viable travel alternatives  to driving oneself.  The advantages of immediacy of pick‐up – often within 5 minutes, the convenience  of  ordering  and  paying  for  the  trip  from  one’s  phone,  and  the  assurance of seeing the driver and  approaching vehicle on one’s phone are all very attractive ingredients.  Competitive pricing – at least  during non‐surge, off‐peak hours – is its most compelling feature.   New  information  tools  coupled  with  technology  innovations  empower  that  hand‐held  “mobile  data  terminal” to enable riders and prospective riders to plan a trip according to various criteria that shape  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                2     their choices. Cost, speed of travel, distances to walk and the number of transfers are among the factors  influencing individual choice.  The proliferation of “apps” by which to discover and plan the trip is now  joined by “apps” delivering real‐time information about when a specific vehicle will be at this stop.  And  the growing ability to pay for the trip, via one’s phone and on the Internet, increases the convenience of  use.    The equity implications of these changes – disruptive to the taxi cab and public transit industries both –  are significant for the populations of concern in this COORDINATED PLAN.  Equity concerns are real.   The  transportation network companies (TNC), Uber and Lyft, seek out high‐density areas, not necessarily the  low‐density suburbs that typify Southern California including Riverside County.  Simply getting a TNC  pickup in some neighborhoods will remain difficult, if impossible, given our predominately suburban  spaces.  Trip costs that are lower than a taxi trip, perhaps $6 to $7 for a trip of 3 to 4 miles, can still add  up if taken daily to help connect a rider to a rail or high‐speed bus line.   Ordering a trip, whether via a  smart phone or on the computer, is not possible for some who do not have the ability to do so.  Paying  for a trip via a smart phone application is not possible for the “unbanked” for whom a cash‐based  economy is their reality. Finally, within the TNC industry, reliably providing accessible vehicles to serve  persons using mobility devices and ensuring that drivers are drug‐free and appropriately trained are as  yet unresolved challenges.  The COORDINATED PLAN and its implementation process will need to monitor these changes, all happening  at a very fast pace.  And the public transit industry itself will need to move nimbly and with greater  flexibility than it is generally known for, both to keep up with change and to craft its positions in the  coming world of the autonomous vehicles.   While historically public transit has been largely in a reactive  mode, the type and pace of changes in mobility now make every setting a potential laboratory in which  to introduce and test change.  Responding to these changes and monitoring the impacts of new services  from the viewpoint of older adults, persons with disabilities and persons of low‐income will be a critical  role of the COORDINATED PLAN audiences.    What Is This Plan’s Value to Riverside County?  This COORDINATED PLAN becomes an important tool both to catalog and monitor change, and to aid in  seeking funding for projects led by various stakeholders who are engaged with older adults, persons  with disabilities and persons of low‐income, including military veterans and persons of limited English  proficiency.  Addressing the mobility needs documented here and the strategies of response set forth,  multiple projects are envisioned. Stakeholders with concern for the mobility of these Riverside County  residents, and who are audiences of this COORDINATED PLAN, include:   the County Transportation Commission   Public transit agencies   Human service organizations – both public and private – that work directly with consumers   Cities and the County of Riverside     The COORDINATED PLAN will help to support grant funding requests from a wide range of sources, any of  which require the documentation of need and articulated strategies that this Plan presents.    PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                3     This COORDINATED PLAN is connected to other  core  planning documents of Riverside County  and  the  region.  Specifically, the COORDINATED PLAN has a role to play in furthering the aims of the 2016 RIVERSIDE  COUNTY STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT and the plan for the future that it envisions.  Chapter 2, in providing a  context for the populations and the transportation resources of import here, also identifies the linkages  to key county and regional planning documents that are extended by this COORDINATED PLAN.  Plan Goal and Requirements  The 2016 COORDINATED PLAN’S overarching goal is to enhance the mobility of individuals with disabilities,  seniors, people with low incomes, and military veterans, its target populations.  MAP‐21 regulation,  currently the guiding regulation, requires that projects selected for funding be included in a locally  developed, coordinated public transit‐human services transportation plan, the COORDINATED PLAN. It  also requires that the COORDINATED PLAN be developed and approved through a process that included  participation by seniors, individuals with disabilities, representatives of public, private and nonprofit  transportation and human services providers, and other members of the public.  The  Federal  Transit  Administration  (FTA),  as  the  implementing  agency,  maintains  flexibility  in  how  projects  appear  in  a  Coordination  Plan.  Projects  may  be  identified  as strategies,  activities,  and/or  specific  projects to  address  an  identified  service  gap  or  transportation  coordination  objective  articulated. Local prioritization of strategies and projects is required by MAP‐21.  To the maximum  extent feasible, funded services that may subsequently be funded with Section 5310 dollars are to be  coordinated with transportation services assisted by other federal departments and local agencies.   Funding Coordinated Plan Projects, FTA Section 5310  The single funding source directly associated with this COORDINATED PLAN is informally overseen by the  Riverside  County  Transportation  Commission  (RCTC),  as  the  County  Transportation  Commission.    Caltrans  provides  the  actual  administration  of  the Section  5310  Enhanced  Mobility  of  Seniors  and  Individuals with Disabilities program, responsible for the Call for Projects every two to three years, the  letting  contracts  and  recipient  of  regular  project  reporting.   Importantly, in some cycles, RCTC has  provided match funding to Western Riverside County projects and receives project outcome reporting.  The Federal Section 5310 funding to Riverside County is modest and in the last funding opportunity  awarded  a  total  of  $2.8  million.    Its  goal  is  to  improve  mobility  for  seniors  and  individuals  with  disabilities  by  removing  barriers  to  transportation  services  and  expanding  the  availability  of  transportation mobility options. Section 5310 funds are available for capital and operating expenses,  including those that exceed ADA requirements and for many of the projects that may be identified  within this COORDINATED PLAN.    Additionally, RCTC administers its Western Riverside County Specialized Transportation Program which  is a second important funding source for the needs articulated in this document, providing $2.5 to $3  million  dollars  in  annual  support  to  public  and  non‐profit  transit  operators  for  the  provision  of  specialized transit services.  The Specialized Transportation Program goal is to improve mobility and  sustain the independence of seniors, individuals with disabilities and persons of low‐income, although it  is limited to the western communities of Riverside County.  The Specialized Transit Program is funded by  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                4     Measure A, half‐cent sales tax receipts from Western Riverside County and has been used as match for  projects supported by FTA Section 5310.   1.2 Plan Objectives The PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATED PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE,  while  prepared  in  compliance  with  Federal  rules,  can  also  support the effective administration of  Western Riverside County’s Specialized Transportation Program whose services are geared to many of  the same populations as the COORDINATED PLAN’s target groups.   The 2016 COORDINATED PLAN therefore, towards achieving its goal of enhanced the mobility of individuals  with disabilities, seniors, persons of low income, and military veterans, supports this array of objectives:    Securing  grant  awards  from  the  Section  5310  program,  a statewide  competitive  program  administered by Caltrans;   Expanding vehicle and operating funding available to Western Riverside County Specialized  Transit Program participants;    Enhancing mobility for individuals with disabilities, seniors, of low income, or who served in the  military, or have limited English‐speaking proficiency;    Developing  better  coordinated  transportation between  public  transit  and  human  service  organizations, providing more trips to more people;    Supporting more stakeholder agencies in seeking funding by which to address mobility needs;  and    Monitoring the mobility landscape in relation to services to the COORDINATED PLAN populations.     1.3 Process and Public Engagement The 2016 COORDINATED PLAN Was developed in compliance with federal requirements and consistent with  the applicable planning process and seeking input from a wide array of constituents. RCTC prepared this  plan with assistance provided by AMMA Transit Planning, including conducting outreach to comply with  FTA  requirements  and  applicable  public  participation  and  stakeholder  consultation  provisions.  The  development  of  the  2016  COORDINATED PLAN also  considered  existing  documentation  relevant  to  its  target populations, including the SCAG’s Regional Transportation Plan, Coachella Valley Intercity Rail  Feasibility Study, Riverside County Strategic Assessment and the RTA Long Range Transportation Plan.  Various  activities  were  conducted  countywide  to  comply  with  the  federal  requirement  that  the  COORDINATED PLAN be developed through local processes, including the following:    Transit Network Database, consisting of 880 stakeholder agencies contacts of either physical  addresses  or  email  addresses,  was  used  to  help  distribute  and  promote public and agency  participation opportunities.    Agency input about transit needs conducted via the annual Transit Network Update Process  with 83 agencies providing comment about their client’s mobility needs.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                5      Four consumer and stakeholder workshops, and a special North Shore Salton Sea Community  Council meeting, were among events held across Riverside County involving over 75 agency and  organization representatives and members of the public. The workshop was widely noticed by  email  blasts  to  the  Transit  Network  Database,  a  physical  mailing  to  607  addresses,  and  telephone recruitment to ensure representation by all of the target populations.     Written comments were accepted through the Coordination Plan project website. The website  was promoted at all workshop events and through email blasts to the Network listing.   Two Coordinated Plan prioritization workshops conducted at Coachella Valley Association of  Governments and at RCTC involving almost 60 agency representatives and participants.   Analysis of  target  group  population  demographics,  trip  demand  projections  through  2019,  regional planning documents, and input from the public outreach to identify findings regarding  mobility needs and gaps.   Constructed  framework  of  five  (5)  goals  and  23  priority  strategies for implementation to  address identified needs and gaps.   Spanish  translation  was  made  available  at  all  public  participation  opportunities, with  opportunity for additional language translation with 48 hours’ notice.          PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                6     2.0 CONTEXT 2.1 Demographics Demographic Changes among Target Populations   Federal regulatory requirements necessitate that the Coordinated Plan focus on improving the transit  services for three target populations.  These target populations include:   Older adults   Persons with disabilities   Low income persons  The 2012 Update to the Public Transit – Human Services Transportation Coordination Plan for Riverside  County identified new unmet transportation needs and sub‐groups requiring improved transit service.   Among these groups, veterans returning from conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq as well as veterans from  the  last  century  were  in  need  of  transportation  to  employment  and  medical  services.    Veteran  populations as well as the veteran unemployment rate are indicated in Table 2‐1.  Riverside County experienced significant growth since the 2000 Census, among the highest rates of  population increase in the state.  A query of the 2014 American Community Survey (ACS) shows that the  population of Riverside County increased by 721,512, a 46.7% increase from the previous census in  2000.  With the growth in population comes the growth of specific target populations.  Table 2‐1 also  illustrates the growth in seniors, persons with disabilities, persons of low‐income, and veterans.  For the  purpose  of  this  discussion,  the  proportion  share  of  target  populations  is  important  to  note  as  it  demonstrates that a greater need exists to improve transportation services for individuals that need it  the most.  Seniors  From 2000 to 2014, the senior population grew by 45.1%.  While this represents significant growth, the  proportion of seniors in the County remained the same at 12.4% of the overall population.  The number  of seniors reporting low‐income status grew significantly by 2014. In 2000, 14,437 seniors (0.9% of the  total population) reported low‐income status.  By 2014, low‐income seniors grew by 82.1% to 26,293.   Persons with Disabilities  Measuring persons with disabilities for the two reporting years is difficult as the methodology and  output for the disabled population varies.  Under the 2000 Census, the disabled, non‐institutionalized  population represented 4.7% of the population.  As part of the 2010 Census, and subsequently the 2014  ACS, non‐institutionalized disabilities were further quantified as having a sensory, cognitive, or other  difficulty classified as a disability.  The 2014 ACS reports that 5.4% of the adult population ages 18‐64  reported having at least one of these disabilities.  Seniors age 65 and over reporting at least one of these  disabilities constituted 4.4% of the total population for Riverside County.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                7     Table 2‐1, Coordinated Plan Target Populations    2000 Census Attribute, Summary File 3 2010-2014 American Community Survey 5-year Estimates [2000 Census] Riverside County People by Category % of Total County Population [2014 ACS] Riverside County People by Category % of Total County Population % Change from 2000 to 2014 TOTAL POPULATION [1] 1,545,387 100% 2,266,899 100% 46.7% Children and Youth, Ages 0-17 467,079 30.2%616,767 27.2% Children with a Disbility, Ages 5 to 17 n/a 18,257 0.8% ADULTS 18-64 [2] 883,475 57.2% 1,367,444 60.3% 54.8% Low-income Adults, Ages 18-64 - 100% Federal Poverty Levels [3] 112,564 7.3% 208,533 9.2%85.3% with % of Adults 18-64 12.7% 15.2% Disability [4] (non-institutionalized) Ages 16-64 "go-outside- home" disability (2000)72,519 4.7% with % of Adults 18-64 8.2% Disability [4] (non-institutionalized) Ages 18-64 (2014)122,414 5.4% with a hearing difficulty 23,569 1.0% with a vision difficulty 21,443 0.9% with a cognitive difficulty 50,703 2.2% with an ambulatory difficulty 60,342 2.7% with a self-care difficulty 24,778 1.1% with an independent living difficulty 46,961 2.1% SENIORS [2] 194,833 12.6% 282,688 12.5% 45.1% Seniors, ages 65-74 103,117 156,869 with % of all seniors 52.9% 55.5% Seniors, ages 75-84 71,192 90,943 with % of all seniors 36.5% 32.2% Seniors, ages 85+ 20,524 34,876 with % of all seniors 10.5% 12.3% Low Income Seniors, Ages 65+ - 100% Federal Poverty Levels [3] 14,437 0.9% 26,293 1.2% 82.1% with % of all seniors 7.4% 9.3% Disability [4] (non-institutionalized) Ages 65+ "go-outside-home" disability (2000)35,593 2.3% with % of all seniors 18.3% Disability [4] (non-institutionalized) Ages 65+ (2014)100,612 4.4% with a hearing difficulty 42,841 1.9% with a vision difficulty 19,078 0.8% with a cognitive difficulty 24,661 1.1% with an ambulatory difficulty 65,145 2.9% with a self-care difficulty 25,753 1.1% with an independent living difficulty 44,137 1.9% VETERANS [5]132,145 5.8% n/a Civilian Population 18 years and over 1,645,829 72.6% Veterans Period of Service Gulf War (9/2001 or later) veterans 12.8% Gulf War (8/1990 to 2001) veterans 18.0% Vietnam era veterans 33.9% Korean War veterans 12.5% World War II veterans 7.8% Veterans ages 18 to 34 years 12,025 0.5% Veterans age 35 to 54 years 32,243 1.4% Veterans age 55 to 64 25,504 1.1% Veterans age 65 to 74 29,997 1.3% Veterans age 75 years and older 32,243 1.4% Veteran population unemplolyment rate 11.0% Veteran population poverty status in the past 12 months 6.5% [1] Census 2000 Summary File 3, Total Population P001. / B01003 Total Population 2014 American Community Survey 5-year Estimates [5] Extrapolated from S2101 Veteran Status - 2014 American Community Survey 5-year Estimates COORDINATED PLAN TARGET POPULATIONS IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY Seniors, Persons w/Disabilities, Persons of Low-Income and Veterans [2] Extrapolated from Census 2000 Summary File 3, Sex by Age P008 / B01001 Sex by Age, 2014 American Community Survey 5-year Estimates [3] Extrapolated from Census 2000 Summary File 3, Poverty Status in 1999 by age P087 / B1701 Poverty Status in the Past 12 Months by Sex by Age 2014 American Community Survey 5-year Estimates [4] Extrapolated from Census 2000 Summary File 3, Age by types of disability for the civilian non-institutionalized population 5 years & over with disabilities P041 / S1810 Disability Characteristics - 2014 American Community Survey 5-year Estimates PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                8     Persons with Low Income  The share of low‐income adults and low‐income seniors also increased during the analysis period.   The  2000 Census shows that the proportion of low‐income adults was at 7.3% in 2000 and increased to 9.2%  by 2014.  The low‐income population increased in both age cohorts (adults age 18 – 64 and seniors age  65 and over) as shown in Table 2‐1 previously.  According to SCAG’s 2015 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROFILE, 34%  of households in Riverside County earned less than $35,000 in 2014.     Veterans  Veteran status is examined in this COORDINATED PLAN to understand the need for service to this target  population.  The 2014 ACS indicates that veterans comprise 5.8% of Riverside County’s population.  The  majority of veterans are Vietnam era veterans at 33.9% of the veteran population.  As many of these  veterans have reached or are reaching senior status, it is important to provide service to healthcare and  related senior activities for this segment of the population.  Gulf War veterans, both 1990 and 2001 era,  constitute  a  significant  portion  of  the  veteran  population  as  well (a total of 30.8%).  Veteran  unemployment rate is 11.0% and mostly affects those that have served in the Gulf Wars.  Providing  access  to  employment  centers  within  Riverside  County  or  in  neighboring  areas  is  another  area  to  examine as part of the coordinated plan.  Current Economic Picture   Riverside County continues to recover from the economic recession of 2008 to 2010.  Employment is  recovering, as reported by the INLAND EMPIRE QUARTERLY REPORT, with opportunities continuing to grow in  different job sectors and further job creation anticipated.1  As economic conditions continue to improve,  highways and roadways become congested with increased automobile use from people traveling to  work, school, and retail opportunities.  Improved public transportation services can help alleviate some  congestion on the roadway and provide an opportunity for target populations to take advantage of the  improving economic condition.  Access to jobs is an important factor when considering the provision of transit services available to the  residents of Riverside County.  According to SCAG’s 2015 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROFILE, 42.12% of workers  living in Riverside County commute to work within the County.  The remaining residents either commute  to Los Angeles (13.85%), Orange (13.52%), or San Bernardino (13.08%).    The  majority  of  Riverside  County residents choose to drive alone when commuting to work:  82% of commuters as reported in the  2014 ACS.  Carpooling is the second mode choice at 13% for commuting to work, but is lower than the  18% reported in the 2000 Census.  Public transit provides only 2% of the mode share as of the 2014 ACS,  a 1% increase from the 2000 Census.  The total number of jobs has increased since the recession but has not reached prerecession levels.  Job  sectors such as construction, retail trade, and professional management have increased while jobs in  manufacturing  have  decreased  and  continue  to  remain  significantly  lower  than  its  peak  in  2007.  Analyzing the median household income for Riverside County gives an idea as to the propensity for                                                               1 Inland Empire Quarterly Economic Report. Inland Empire 2016 Forecast: Increasing Prosperity.  April 2016.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                9     transit  use  among  households.    The  median  household  income  for Riverside  County  as  of  2014  of  $52,648 is lower when compared to the 2010 figure of $57,768 (SCAG 2015 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PROFILE).  In  2014,  households  with  an  income  of  $50,000  to  $74,999  made  up  18%  of  households  in  Riverside  County.  However, approximately 48% of households made less than $50,000 annually as opposed to  21% that made $100,000 or more.  Since almost half of Riverside County households live with an income  of less than $50,000, it is likely that there is a need for efficient public transportation service enabling  these persons to access jobs, housing, retail and educational opportunities in the County.  Riverside County’s housing market was hit extremely hard during the recession and subsequent years.   The number of foreclosures started to increase in 2007 and peaked in 2008.  Subsequent years showed  a moderate decline in home foreclosures, but the damage was already done. Median sale price of  existing  homes  began  to  recover in  2012  and  continued  to  trend upward  in  2014.    Total  housing  production has not recovered since the recession demonstrating that  the  market  may  still  be  oversaturated  with  existing  housing  stock  or  that  the  market  cannot  support  additional  supply  of  housing.    2.2 Geography Urbanized Areas of Riverside County   MAP‐21 brought about a shift in allocations of many FTA discretionary grant programs for large urban  areas from statewide distributions  to  local disbursement  based on population. This means that for  programs like Section 5310, funding amounts are allocated to census designated Large UZA’s (Urbanized  Areas). The U.S. census defines a UZA as a compact area that is entirely urban in character, defined as a  contiguous  area  with  more  than  50,000  people  and  with  a  population  density  greater  than  1,000  persons per square mile. The area that meets the density definition is included in the boundary of the  UZA,  regardless  of  political  boundaries.  The  FTA  recognizes  large  UZA’s  as  urbanized  areas  with  populations greater than 250,000 people.  Western Riverside County is host to two large UZA’s and one small UZA which is defined as greater than  50,000 but less than 250,000 persons (Figure 2‐1). The Riverside‐San Bernardino large UZA stretches  across both counties and includes the cities of Corona, Eastvale, Jurupa Valley, Riverside, Moreno Valley,  Perris, Banning and some portions of Beaumont and other unincorporated areas of Western Riverside  County. The Murrieta‐Temecula large UZA spans from Temecula to Lake Elsinore and Menifee. The cities  of Hemet and San Jacinto are part of the Hemet small UZA. The only census designated UZA in Eastern  Riverside County is the Indio‐Cathedral City‐Palm Springs large UZA which covers most of the Coachella  Valley, between Palm Springs and portions of Coachella and Thermal (Figure 2‐2).  These  designations  become  most  important  during  the  development  of  grant  applications  in  consideration of project service areas.  Grant offerings for small urban and rural areas under programs  like section 5310 are administered at the state‐level through a competitive process. It is imperative to  understand  whether an  agency should apply for funding locally or at the state‐level based on UZA  boundaries and project service area.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                               10   Figure 2‐1, Urbanized Areas of Western Riverside County   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                               11   Figure 2‐2, Urbanized Areas of Eastern Riverside County   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                12     Target Population Density for the Western Riverside County Subarea   The Western Riverside County subregion encompasses the western half of the county from the Orange  County border to the west and bordered on the east by the San Jacinto Mountain range and the Pass  area.  The  region  is  home  to  80  percent  of  the  county’s  almost  2.3  million  people  and  the  City  of  Riverside; the largest incorporated city in the county. The Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) is the largest  public transit operator in the region and faces the difficult task of serving a vast 2,300 square mile area  of urban, suburban and rural communities.  This is the second largest service area of any transit agency  in the nation. The cities of Corona, Banning and Beaumont complement RTA’s network with their own  local fixed‐route circulators and demand response systems.    A series of four maps follow which depict the distribution of the COORDINATED PLAN target populations  and characteristics within Western Riverside County.   Older Adults  Seniors  age  65  and  older  account  for  10.7  percent  of  western  county  residents,  lower  than  the  countywide average of 12.5 percent. Figure 2‐3 shows the heaviest concentrations of seniors – more  than 45 percent of any given census block group – are within Beaumont, Menifee, Homeland, Hemet  and near the March Air Reserve Base in Riverside which is primarily driven by the Altavita Air Force  Village West retirement community.  Many of these density clusters are served by fixed transit routes by  either RTA or Pass Transit or lie within ¾ mile of these routes which would allow access to demand  response paratransit services for those that qualify.    Persons with Disabilities  Geographically, the highest population densities for disabled individuals between the ages of 16‐64 are  similar to those for older adults. In western county, almost 6 percent of the adult population ages 16‐64  has indicated having some form of disability which is one‐half percent higher than the average for the  county as a whole. Figure 2‐4 shows the public transit footprint may have difficulties in providing ADA  coverage for disabled persons living near Calimesa, Cherry Valley and Lakeland Village.   Persons of Low‐Income   The ratio of income to poverty for the region shows that almost 470,000 individuals, or more than 26  percent of western county residents, are living at or below 150% of the Federal poverty level. The  highest concentrations of low‐income individuals are observed in some of the most urbanized portions  of the city of Riverside and Moreno Valley as well as in more rural settings near Hemet and Perris (Figure  2‐5). Positively, fixed‐route transit has a presence in or near most of these areas.  Zero Vehicle Households  For some individuals, not owning a vehicle represents a lifestyle choice, but for others, the cost of  purchasing and maintaining a vehicle is not affordable. In western county, almost 5 percent or close to  25,000 of the regions 525,000 households, have no available vehicle for transportation. Higher densities  are seen in and around downtown Riverside; near the March Air Reserve Base, again likely driven by the  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                13     Altavita  retirement  village;  eastern  portions  of  Moreno  Valley near  mobile  home  communities;  in  multiple pockets throughout the Hemet area; and portions of Calimesa and rural Cabazon (Figure 2‐6).  The absence of a working vehicle for mobility can be offset by utilizing public transit. This is supported  by the presence of fixed transit routes near the clusters of households with no available vehicles.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                               14   Figure 2‐3, Older Adult Density in Western Riverside County   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                               15   Figure 2‐4, Disabled Population Density in Western Riverside County   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                               16   Figure 2‐5, Low‐Income Population Density in Western Riverside County   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                               17   Figure 2‐6, Zero Vehicle Households in Western Riverside County   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                18     Target Population Density for the Eastern Riverside County Subarea   The Eastern Riverside County subregion covers the entire Coachella and Palo Verde Valley subareas,  beginning just east of Cabazon and stretching east to the Arizona border. While the Coachella Valley is  an urbanized center, the Palo Verde Valley is predominantly desert; the City of Blythe, the Palo Verde  Valley’s  most  populous  area,  has  fewer  than  15,000  residents  plus  another  4,500  persons  in  the  Ironwood State Prison.  SunLine Transit Agency is the sole public transit agency for the Coachella valley  and the Palo Verde Valley Transportation Authority (PVVTA) covers the city of Blythe and its surrounding  communities. In all, the region is home to more than 460,000 people.   Four maps following depict Eastern Riverside County distribution of these groups and characteristics.   Older Adults  Eastern Riverside County has a significant senior population, in part a consequence of a retirement  lifestyle of the Coachella Valley, due to its year‐round sun, warmer winters, resorts and golf courses.   Almost 20 percent of the valley’s residents are over the age of 65, much higher than the county and  state  averages  of  12.5  and  13.3  percent  respectively.  For  this reason,  higher  densities  of  senior  populations can be seen in many areas of the Palo Verde Valley as shown in Figure 2‐7.    Conversely, the outermost communities of the Coachella Valley near Desert Hot Springs, Coachella,  Thermal and Mecca reveal much younger average populations.   Persons with Disabilities  Disability for the non‐senior adult population for eastern county is slightly higher than the western  county at almost 8 percent or almost 21,000 persons of the almost 270,000 total persons ages 16‐64 in  the region as seen in Figure 2‐8. Unlike the older adult population, densities of persons with disabilities  are seen in the outer edges of the urban area of the Coachella Valley, in Cathedral City, Thousand Palms,  Mecca  and  Thermal  where  populations  are  less  dense  and  providing  transportation  becomes  more  difficult.  Persons of Low‐Income   Eastern county residents living below 150% of the federal poverty line represent almost 35 percent of  residents, which is markedly higher than the 26 percent of residents in the western county. Figure 2‐9  shows higher concentrations of low‐income persons in Desert Hot Springs, Indio, Coachella, Thermal and  Mecca where greater than 60 percent of residents are low‐income.  Zero Vehicle Households  More than 6 percent of households within the region have no available vehicles. Figure 2‐10 shows  pockets  of  communities  in  Palm  Springs,  Palm  Desert,  Indio  and Coachella  where  there  are  higher  densities than the eastern county average of 6 percent.  Similar to the western county, many of these  areas are serviced by SunLine fixed‐route bus service, providing an option for mobility for the regions  residents that might need it the most.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                               19   Figure 2‐7, Older Adult Density in Eastern Riverside County   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                               20   Figure 2‐8, Disabled Population Density in Eastern Riverside County   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                               21   Figure 2‐9, Low‐Income Population in Eastern Riverside County   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                               22   Figure 2‐10, Zero Vehicle Households in Eastern Riverside County   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                23     2.3 Regional Plans and Studies Various plans and studies present a broad cross section of planning efforts in Southern California and,  more specifically, in Riverside County.  The following is a brief synopsis of planning documents approved  since the 2012 Update to the Coordinated Plan.  The synopsis presents relevant findings from:   broader‐base, regional planning efforts of the Southern California Association of Governments  (SCAG)  2016‐2040  REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION PLAN/SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES STRATEGY and  Riverside County’s STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT;   long‐range providers’ plans of comprehensive operational analyses; and    individual annual updates of the Short Range Transit Plans (SRTP) for the seven public transit  operators in Riverside County.  The synopsis of the SRTPs include major service improvements  that took place over a five‐year period beginning with the FY 11/12 plans and ending with the FY  15/16 plans.    In addition, a brief synopsis of the planning efforts for the Coachella  Valley  –  San  Gorgonio  Pass,  Corridor Rail Service is provided, related to this important corridor traveling through Riverside County.  SCAG Regional Plans  SCAG FY 11‐12 TRANSIT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE REPORT (March 2015)  The  Southern  California  Association  of  Governments  (SCAG)  FISCAL YEAR 11‐12 TRANSIT SYSTEM  PERFORMANCE REPORT  is  the  precursor  to  developing  a  transit  system  performance  report  that  was  subsequently  prepared  and  is  discussed  below,  SCAG’s  2016–2040 REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION  PLAN/SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES STRATEGY.  The PERFORMANCE REPORT, in March 2015, provides an analysis of  transit system performance for the region, county, and individual transit agencies operating in the six‐ county SCAG region.  System performance was analyzed for over a 20‐year period beginning in 1991,  where data is available and ending in 2012.  Transit operator data was obtained from the National  Transit Database 2012 dataset, which is the most current, published dataset at the time of the report’s  writing.    One of the most notable findings is that demand‐response trip lengths for the region have grown by  232%  since  2001.    Also  significant  is  the  document’s  discussion  of  the  trips‐per‐capita  measure,  a  regional performance measure goal set for transit service in 2001.  The trips‐per‐capita measure helps  the region understand transit utilization as it relates to population growth.  In 2001, SCAG’s Regional  Transit Task Force established a trips‐per‐capita rate of 34.9 trips per year.  Trips‐per‐capita is calculated  by dividing the number of total unlinked passenger trips by the region’s population.  Analysis of the  region’s performance shows that the region as a whole slightly exceeded this performance measure in  FY 12.  A positive direction for the region, it should be noted that the increased provision of transit  service and significant capital investment throughout Southern California has enabled the region as a  whole to keep up with continuing population growth and still maintain quality transit services for the  people that live here.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                24     2016 – 2040 REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION PLAN/SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES STRATEGY (April  2016)  The 2016‐2040 REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION PLAN/SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES STRATEGY (RTP/SCS) is a federally  mandated transportation plan that provides the framework for transportation projects in the six‐county  Southern California region.  The regional vision, presented as part of the RTP/SCS, is a desire for more  compact communities that are connected by “numerous public transit options, including bus and rail  service”.  Moreover, the region’s vision is to provide “more choices for getting around” which can lead  to a higher quality of life.  Broad‐based goals and policies are established to develop transportation  scenarios  that  improve  mobility  and  reduce  greenhouse  gas  emissions  with  a  limited  amount  of  transportation  revenue.    Development  of  the  plan  includes  extensive  input  from  the  county  transportation commissions, stakeholders, and the public.  The RTP acknowledges that the goals and  policies presented are consistent with county planning efforts including the efforts identified in the  COORDINATED PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION PLANS for the six individual counties in  Southern California.  Major initiatives of the RTP/SCS include “expanding [the] regional transit system to  give people more alternatives to driving alone” and “focusing new growth around transit” meaning that  the development of “complete” communities should be developed around high quality transit areas,  livable corridors, and neighborhood mobility areas.  Riverside County Regional Plans  RIVERSIDE COUNTY STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT (January 2016)  The  RIVERSIDE COUNTY STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT  examines  the  transportation  funding  needs  of  Riverside  County in relation to changing demographics and funding realities.  It is intended to propose strategic  actions to assist RCTC in creating a unified transportation vision for its transportation network and a  guiding coordinated strategy for local agencies to follow.  One key strategic action of relevance is to  encourage development of transit and rail plans serving transit dependent populations, among others.    The study takes inventory of existing conditions such as population and land use as well as an inventory  of the transportation network as a whole.  This inventory forecasts travel demand and travel markets  based on population and employment growth within the County.  Transportation network needs and  deficiencies are identified through modeling efforts showing areas of congestion and reduced travel  speeds.  Deficiencies in public transit service are a concern as the existing provision of transit service will  not be able to meet demand of a growing population. The STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT also identifies the need  for improved specialized transportation, especially the need for demand response operators to make  multiple  stops  on  a  single  trip,  long  distance  travel  to  regional medical centers and hospitals, and  transportation services for the homeless.  The STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT proposes various strategic actions to  help address these system‐wide deficiencies. Its four principal components are:   1) Plan for the Future  2) Maximize Our Assets                 3) Increase Funding, and   4) Communicate More    PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                25     Coachella Valley Intercity Rail Corridor Planning Study (May 2013)  The  COACHELLA VALLEY INTERCITY RAIL CORRIDOR PLANNING STUDY  examines  the  feasibility  of  intercity  rail  service between the cities of Los Angeles and Indio traveling approximately 200 miles along a proposed  alignment that spans four counties. The study demonstrates that rail service is feasible given the growth  in population in the Coachella Valley.  The plan outlines the next steps towards developing a Service  Development Plan (SDP), which leads to the selection of a preferred service option for the corridor.  The  SDP  will  develop  ridership  and  revenue  forecasts  for  both  alternatives  and  the  necessary  capital  improvements required to initiate service.  Ultimately, the SDP will help identify the most feasible and  cost effective option and a projected service start date.  Subsequent to the May 2013 planning study, RCTC released a draft alternatives analysis on October 12,  2015 for the Coachella Valley – San Gorgonio Pass Corridor Rail Service.  The alternatives analysis (AA)  included a purpose and need statement and market analysis.  The  market  analysis  indicated  that  approximately 130,000 people travel between the Coachella Valley and the Los Angeles Basin everyday  with more people traveling on the weekend.  The number is expected to increase over the next 20 years.   The AA examined six route alternatives and a no‐build alternative.  Based on the study’s methodology, a  preferred  corridor  was  selected  for  further  environmental  review  and  SDP  analysis.    The  selected  corridor travels along the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway (BNSF) San Bernardino Subdivision from  Los Angeles Union Station to Fullerton through Riverside and Colton then continues east on the Union  Pacific (UP) Yuma Subdivision from Colton to Indio.  This alternative proved to have the highest ridership  forecast and anticipates minimal environmental concerns compared to the other alignments.  One‐way  trips are expected to take over three‐hours one way.  Once RCTC determines that the project can  receive  further  study,  the  environmental  process  would  begin  and  the  SDP  drafted,  and  funding  identified and secured for this project.    Metrolink 2015 Origin‐Destination Study (2015)  The Southern California Regional Rail Authority commissioned the 2015 Onboard Survey to obtain a  current assessment of passenger demographic profiles, rider segments, trip characteristics, customer  satisfaction, access and egress modes, and average transit trip distances. The 2015 study expands and  updates the collected survey results from previous onboard surveys conducted in 2008 and 2010.   The  2015  Onboard  Survey  was  designed  to  yield  empirically  valid  trip  characteristics,  customer  satisfaction,  and  demographic  data  at  a  system,  line,  and  time‐segment  level,  whose  ridership  is  proportionately  reflected  at  the  boarding  station  level.  In  addition,  the  sampling  plan  and  project  designs provide identification of major origin‐destination travel patterns at the line level for the purpose  of regional transportation modeling needs.  This section reports on findings related to the lines traveling within Riverside County on weekdays:  the  Riverside Line, the 91/Perris Valley Line (at the time, known as the 91‐LA Line) and the Inland Empire –  Orange County (IEOC) Lines. IEOC line is unique in that outbound trips depart from Oceanside toward  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                26     San Bernardino, while all other outbound trips origin at LA’s Union Station. IEOC stops within Riverside  County include: Corona, North Main Corona, Riverside – La Sierra, and Riverside Downtown.  Demographics of Riverside County Line Riders  Ethnicity  Ethnic composition varies significantly across Metrolink lines, generally reflecting the ethnic composition  of the riders’ communities. The Riverside Line has the lowest percentage of Caucasian riders (19%) and  the highest proportion of Asian/Pacific Island riders (31%). The IEOC has one of the highest percentage  of Caucasian riders at forty‐four percent (44%). Details of ethnic makeup of riders are reported below:  Table 2‐2, Metrolink 2015 Study: Ethnicity  Ethnicity  Riverside  Line  91‐LA Line IEOC Line  African‐American 13%  13%  9%  Asian/Pacific  Islander  31%  22%  11%  Caucasian 19%  35%  44%  Hispanic 34%  26%  33%  Other 3%  4%  4%  Annual Household Income   Riverside Line: 78% of riders’ households have an income over $50,000. This is a significant drop  of $4,523 from 2010.   91‐LA Line: 76% of riders’ households have an income over $50,000. This is an increase from  2010 of $2,522.   IEOC Line: 74% of riders’ households have an income over $50,000. This is a slight drop from  2010 of $1,663.  Automobile Availability  Metrolink notes that the majority of riders are “choice” riders. When asked if they have a car to make  the trip, the vast majority of riders on most lines indicating that the train is their preference, and that  they had a vehicle available to make their trip instead of riding Metrolink. This is true for the lines  traveling through Riverside County.   Riverside Line: 91% have a vehicle available for the trip   91‐LA Line: 88% have a vehicle available for the trip   IEOC Line: 94% have a vehicle available for the trip        PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                27     Employment  Table 2‐3, 2015 Metrolink Study: Employment Status  Employment Status  Riverside  Line  91‐LA Line IEOC Line  Student 5%  8%  4%  Non  Employed/Retired  1%  3%  1%  Self Employed 3%  6%  3%  Part‐Time 2%  4%  2%  Full‐Time 88%  78%  90%  The Riverside and 91‐LA Line, similar to the system overall, experienced a mild decrease in full‐time  employment and an increase in student riders since the 2000 Metrolink Origin‐Destination Survey.  Of note, not all riders along these lines reside in Riverside County, though residents do make up a  significant portion of riders, as detailed below.    Riverside Line: 33% live in Riverside County   91‐LA Line: 49% live in Riverside County   IEOC Line: 77% live in Riverside County  Trip Patterns and Purposes  Frequency by Line  The majority of riders on the Riverside County lines use Metrolink at least five days a week. System  wide, the Riverside Line has the largest portion of riders using Metrolink 5 days a week.  Table 2‐4, 2015 Metrolink Study: Frequency of Ridership            Trip Purpose  The Inland Empire and Riverside Lines show the highest proportion of work related trips compared to all  lines  (ninety‐six  percent  and  ninety‐four  percent,  respectively),  reflecting  the  lack  of  midday  (non‐ commute) service.    Frequency  Riverside  Line  91‐LA Line IEOC Line  < Once/Mo. 2%  4%  1%  1‐3 Days/Mo. 1%  5%  2%  1‐2 Days/Wk. 2%  4%  3%  3 Days/Wk. 3%  7%  4%  4 Days/Wk.  9%  12%  10%  5+ Days/Wk. 83%  68%  81%  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                28     Table 2‐5, 2015 Metrolink Study: Trip Purpose          One hundred percent of work trips on the Riverside Line and 81% of work trips on the 91 Line have a  destination in Los Angeles County, consistent with system wide trends. Of note, two percent (2%) of  work trips on the 91 Line have a destination in Riverside County.  Fare Media  The use of different fare media varies significantly by line. At seventy‐three percent (73%), the Riverside  Line sees the highest monthly pass usage system wide. Of note, significant portions of riders on the  three lines in Riverside are using one‐way or round‐trip tickets.  Table 2‐6, 2015 Metrolink Study: Fare Media  Metrolink’s study reports on the different use of Fare Media by demographics, noting that media does  vary significantly with age, ethnicity and income. Notably, older adults (65+) and those under 30 are  more inclined to use one‐way/ round‐trip tickets. Asian/Pacific Islanders and Caucasians are more likely  to use monthly passes than Hispanics and African Americans. Additionally,  riders  with  incomes  of  $50,000 or more are more than twice as likely as those with lower incomes to use a monthly pass.  Travel Options  Riders were asked to provide their transportation mode before using Metrolink to make their current  trip. Importantly, over fifty percent of riders drove alone before Metrolink was an option. All responses  for the Riverside lines are reported below:            Trip Purpose  Riverside  Line  91‐LA Line IEOC Line  Business  Appointment  1%  1%  0%  Non‐Work 6%  14%  4%  Work 94%  86%  96%  Fare Media  Riverside  Line  91‐LA Line IEOC Line  7‐Day Pass 12%  15%  21%  Monthly Pass 73%  57%  61%  One‐Way/ Round  Trip  13%  26%  17%  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                29     Table 2‐7, 2015 Metrolink Study: Prior Travel Modes                Riders were also asked how they would make their trip if the specific Metrolink train they were on did  not exist.  Fewer than half on the Riverside and 91‐LA lines reported they would drive their own car,  while a majority on the IEOC line reported they would drive.  Other frequent responses included taking  an earlier or later train.   Riverside Line: 44% would drive a car they owned or leased   91‐LA Line: 45% would drive a car they owned or leased   IEOC Line: 60% would drive a car they owned or leased  Additionally, a small, but not insignificant group said they would no longer make the trip: three percent  on the Riverside Line, seven percent on the 91 Line and three percent on the IEOC line.  Discussion  The Metrolink 2015 Origin‐Destination Study demonstrates that Metrolink is providing a critical service  for various populations. While most riders are not target populations of the Coordination Plan (majority  of riders are full‐time employees with access to a personal vehicle), Metrolink is serving student trips,  part‐time or seasonal employees, as well as some non‐work trips on all the lines running in Riverside  County. and Importantly, too, Metrolink is providing an alternative to single occupancy vehicle trips.  Were this commuter service not available, a significant majority of these daily trips (over 40% on each  line) would be made by personal vehicles.   Directly  relevant  to  this  COORDINATION PLAN are the differences in fare media usage of various  populations. Riders under 30 and over 65 are more, with incomes under $50,000, and Hispanics and  African Americans are less likely to use weekly or monthly passes, opting instead for one‐way or round  trip tickets. This may point to occasional riders not utilizing the service frequently enough for a pass or  bankless households utilizing cash to purchase tickets.  Travel Mode Prior  to Metrolink  Riverside  Line  91‐LA Line IEOC Line  Always taken  Metrolink  25%  22%  15%  Drove alone 51%  55%  67%  Drove with  someone  9%  12%  12%  Took a bus or  subway  10%  5%  2%  Unknown other 5%  6%  4%  Used Amtrak  0%  4%  0%  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                30     Comprehensive Operations Analyses  City  of  Banning  Comprehensive  Operations  Analysis  (COA),  Service  Recommendations (May 2014)  The CITY OF BANNING COMPREHENSIVE OPERATIONS ANALYSIS, SERVICE RECOMMENDATIONS provides transit system  improvements based from the guiding principles of 1) matching service levels to market demand and 2)  improving  the  customer  experience.    Prior  to  developing  agency recommendations,  both  a  market  assessment and service assessment were completed to better understand the operating environment in  the  City  of  Banning  and  its  relationship  to  Pass  Transit  service  in  the  City  of  Beaumont  and  other  neighboring transit agencies.  Based on existing conditions, a phased‐approach of system improvements  is recommended in the short and long term. Implementation of the COA recommendations is further  defined in the agency’s FY 2013/14 Short Range Transit Plan.  Riverside  Transit  Agency  Comprehensive  Operations  Analysis  (COA)  (January  2015)  The purpose of the Riverside Transit Agency’s (RTA) COA, known as RTA’s TEN‐YEAR TRANSIT NETWORK  PLAN,  is  to  provide  a  guide  for  system  improvements  over  a  ten‐year  period.    These  system  improvements  were  developed  based  on  a  comprehensive  review  of existing and future market  conditions,  service  performance,  and  feedback  from  passengers  and key stakeholders.  This  comprehensive review is necessary in developing the existing conditions report that shape the guiding  principles  used  to  create  service  design  strategies  ultimately leading  to  service  recommendations.   Service recommendations are divided into four implementation phases:  immediate, short, mid, and  long‐term scenarios.  These four scenarios are developed with vehicle, facility, and financial constraints  in mind and provide optimal service provisions given revenue and capital planning forecasts.   Individual Operators’ Short Range Transit Plans  Pass Transit (City of Banning and City of Beaumont)  With the exception of fiscal year 2012/13, both the cities of Banning and Beaumont prepared individual  short range transit plans.  One of the major service highlights for Pass Transit is the introduction of  CommuterLink 120 service in March 2012.  Initial service operated on one‐hour headways as an on‐ demand commuter service from Beaumont to the San Bernardino Metrolink station.  The route would  eventually become a fixed‐route in fiscal year 2013/14 and provide service into Calimesa and the VA  Hospital in Loma Linda.  In addition to new service, the fare structure for Pass Transit was adjusted in  March 2012.  Major service changes in the City of Banning’s SRTP includes a Cabazon Evening Express Route beginning  in November 2012 between the hours of 7:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.  The purpose of this service was to  provide transportation service for employees at both Casino Morongo and Desert Hills Shopping Center.   The City of Banning also began coordinating travel training through the RTA.  Completion of the agency’s  Comprehensive Operations Analysis (COA) resulted in route configurations and the introduction of the  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                31     Cabazon Circulator.   The Cabazon Circulator provided service into the residential and commercial areas  of Cabazon.  In FY 2015/16, the agency reported that the service changes recommended under the COA  did not have the anticipated results prompting the agency to reconfigure several routes.  Route 1 was  realigned so that it would no longer travel into Beaumont beyond the Wal‐Mart Shopping Center.  In  addition, schedules for Routes 1 and 6 were adjusted to accommodate growth of the Mt. San Jacinto  Pass Campus.  In  fiscal  year  2013/14,  the  City  of  Beaumont  introduced  a  free shuttle  service  during  the  Summer  Concert Series and the Cherry Festival.  Saturday service was provided on three routes and Sunday  service provided on one route.  Starting in fiscal year 2014/15, veterans could travel on discounted fares  while active  military  personnel  could  travel for free.   Also in fiscal year 2014/15, route 120 began  providing Saturday service for individuals wanting to connect with Metrolink weekend service.  City of Corona – Corona Cruiser  As reported in its SRTPs, for Fiscal Years 2011/12 through 2015/16, the Corona Cruiser made minor  modifications to its schedules in order to accommodate service to schools (which the City of Corona  Transit Service [CCTS] indicates is one of the fastest growing markets in their service area in FY 2014/15),  Corona Metrolink stations, and shopping areas.  The Corona Cruiser improved accessibility to several bus  stops during the five‐year period.  During FY 2012/13, Corona Cruiser explored the idea of providing  travel‐training  activities  at  the  Senior  Center  and  other  community‐based  centers.    Under  the  FY  2015/16  SRTP,  Corona  Cruiser  introduced  a  marketing  strategy  titled  Transit  101,  which  provides  information on how Corona Cruiser connects with regional bus and rail service.  The presentation was  delivered to the Corona Senior Center and the Valencia Terrace and Corona Community Villas.  New  service was initiated in FY 2014/15 with service through Promenade Avenue/McKinley Street/Hamner  Avenue area.  In addition, the agency added Saturday service on the Red Line to the Dos Lagos Shopping  area.  City of Riverside Special Transportation Services  A major development for the City of Riverside, Special Transportation Services during the four‐year SRTP  review period includes expanding its revenue fleet and increasing the provision of transit service during  the weekday.  In addition, the agency implemented a new service module that automatically reminds  passengers of a scheduled trip and when the vehicle has arrived at the pick‐up location.  Palo Verde Valley Transit Authority  During the four‐year SRTP review period, the Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA) was able to  provide much needed service improvements with limited resources.  One of the key achievements is  becoming a member of the Western Arizona Council of Governments’  (WACOG)  Transportation  Coordinated Council.   This is a direct result of PVVTA providing trips to Ehrenberg, AZ in fiscal year  2013/2014.    WACOG,  PPVTA,  and  other  operators  such  as  Quartzsite  Transit  System  (QTS)  are  identifying service deficiencies and ways to bridge service gaps in the region.   Other notable service  improvements in the PVVTA service area include the addition of trips on Red Route 3, the creation of X‐ Tend‐A‐Ride, service to Palo Verde College, and improving timed transfers at the K‐mart Transfer Center.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                32     Riverside Transit Agency (RTA)  The Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) did not implement major service improvements until FY 2013/14 due  to declining revenue streams and continuing precautionary budgeting measures in the wake of the  economic  recession.    In  FY  2011/12,  RTA  initiated  a  travel  training  program  and  secured  Medi‐Cal  reimbursements for its demand responsive services, to help mitigate increasing expenses on its dial‐a‐ ride program.    Major RTA service improvements began in FY 2013/14 when Sunday‐level service was reinstated on  major holidays (i.e. Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Labor Day).  Expanding service hours and  improving frequencies continued to take place in subsequent years for a number of routes.  With the  proposed start of commuter rail service on the Perris Valley Line, RTA modified several routes and  created a new route to function as bus feeder service to the four new Metrolink Stations.  Additionally,  RTA initiated DAR Plus service, a pilot program that extends lifeline services for qualifying seniors and  persons with disabilities two‐miles beyond the traditional ¾‐mile buffer around local fixed‐route service.   This allows passengers to travel to senior centers, medical facilities, and grocery stores outside of the  mandated ¾ miles of a fixed‐route service area, the statutory ADA service boundary.  SunLine  SunLine Transit implemented several new service enhancements during the past five years.  One of the  major service improvements included Route 220, which provides service from Palm Desert to the cities  of  Cabazon,  Banning,  Beaumont,  Moreno  Valley,  and  downtown  Riverside.    Route  220  provides  connections to Metrolink trains giving the residents of the Coachella Valley an opportunity to travel  throughout Southern California.  Wi‐Fi service is available as of FY 2015/16 for those using Route 220.   Another important service enhancement implemented by SunLine is a discounted taxi voucher service  for seniors and persons with disabilities.  Other local routes were enhanced and extended to provide  service to areas in eastern Coachella Valley.   Finally, SunLine proposed to implement a vanpool program  in FY 2015/16 using funds from the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality improvement program.  Western Riverside Rail Program (Metrolink)  Major service improvements on Metrolink Commuter Rail service in Riverside County consist of the  addition of an additional peak round‐trip on the Inland Empire‐Orange County Line (IEOC) during the  week.  This service enhancement allows more passengers to travel between the Cities of Riverside and  Corona into the Cities of Anaheim, Santa Ana, Irvine, and other cities located in South Orange County.    Another major service improvement includes weekend service on the 91 Line, which provides service in  the  cities  of  Riverside  and  Corona  traveling  westerly  to  Anaheim  and  Fullerton  and  ultimately  Los  Angeles.  Finally, the end of FY 2015/16 saw the extension of the 91 Line from downtown Riverside to  the cities of Moreno Valley and Perris.  The Perris Valley Line (PVL) stops at four new Metrolink Stations  near the University of California, Riverside campus at Hunter Park, at March Air Field/Moreno Valley,  Downtown Perris, and at a station in South Perris.    PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                33     2.4 New Trip Demand Information from 211VetLink.org New origin and destination data is available from very recent information provided from the Riverside/  San Bernardino County’s Veterans Transportation and Community Living Initiative (VTCLI) Cycle I grantee  from the Federal Transit Administration, the VetLink program.  Awarded in 2011, this grant resulted in  the creation of a two‐county One Call‐One Click information portal. The portal’s intent was to help  connect  veterans  with  available  public  and  specialized  transportation,  based  upon  the  specific  trip  requests.  The VetLink portal, developed by Cambridge Systematics, was launched in late in 2013 and  began regularly assisting callers to the 211 organizations of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties or to  the  website  visitors  to www.211VetLink.org,  initially  available  on  the  IE511.org  website  until  the  program’s own server was up and running.   Figure 2‐11 following depicts trip requested destinations by one of three user characteristics: veterans,  seniors or persons who are ADA certified.  While veterans are, not surprisingly, the most common group  on this veteran‐oriented trip planning portal, there are also a significant number of older adult travelers  who are not ADA certified.  And there are a substantial number of ADA certified persons as well.    Figure 2‐11, 211VetLink Requested Destinations by User Characteristics                                              Figure 2‐12 shows the distribution of these trip origins and destinations in relation to the Riverside  Transit Agency service area, suggesting the proportion of them that can be well served by an RTA  connection    PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                34     Figure 2‐12, 211VetLink Trip Requests Potentially Served by RTA                            Figure 2‐13 following presents that subset of trip requests for which no transit result could be brought  back.  The 211VetLink database includes all the public transit providers’ fixed‐route GTFS information  and, importantly, includes all demand response service areas of the two counties’ providers.  It also  includes specialized transportation providers in either Riverside or San Bernardino Counties who are  Section 5310 grantees or, in the case of Riverside County, are Measure A Specialized Transportation  Program grantees.   In Figure 2‐13, some patterns emerge, including trip demand from the Morongo Basin area into Palm  Springs and into the Loma Linda VA.  Again, the “n” for each of these desire lines is small but presumably  also represent trip needs that never surfaced to the VetLink trip portal and for which there are other,  similar trip needs that can be characterized as “latent” demand.                     PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                35     Figure 2‐13, 211VetLInk Trip Requests – Request with No Transit Results    Figure 2‐14 following, the last in this series of the 211VetLink origin and destination plots, presents the  trip requests for which there is no transit, no demand response trip and no “cheap” taxi service with  that being defined as a taxi fare of less than $50.   Again the number of requests is small but do  represent trip needs that presented to the VetLink portal.   These overall trip patterns, while focused on  several  very  specific  subsets  of  predominately  veteran  populations, provide some insight into the  regional and cross‐county nature of some non‐work trips for which transportation assistance is sought.      PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                36     Figure 2‐14, 211VetLink Trip Request, Requests with No Good Results      2.5 Summary of Key Environment and Context Issues  Among the multiple planning documents that help to shape Riverside County’s transportation network,  the 2016 RIVERSIDE COUNTY STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT proposes four main actions to help address system‐wide  deficiencies in the transit network.  These actions are both directly relevant to this COORDINATED PLAN and  resonate throughout the other studies produced since 2012. They are:  1) Plan for the Future  2) Maximize Our Assets                 3) Increase Funding, and   4) Communicate More  As detailed in Section 2.2, Riverside County’s population increased impressively by 46.7% since the 2000  census. The County and regional studies and plans noted this growth and prescribed planning, both for  the long and short term. Keeping up with population growth and maintaining quality transit services for  the people that live here will continue to require increased provision of transit service and significant  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                37     capital investment. Additionally, meeting demand of the growing population will require that the transit  network’s deficiencies are addressed.  Among other themes of this chapter, were the following:    Goals, strategies, desires, of constituents and commissioners and planners, continue to include  “expanding [the] regional transit system to give people more alternatives to driving alone,”  more choices to get around, and “focusing new growth around transit,” including developing  “complete” communities.   One key strategic action of relevance is to encourage development of transit and rail plans  serving trip purposes and trip requirements common to transit dependent populations, among  others.     The  STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT  also  identifies  the  need  for  improved  specialized  transportation  especially the need for demand response operators to make multiple stops on a single trip, long  distance travel to regional medical centers and hospitals, and transportation services for the  homeless  Guiding principles that were articulated in the CITY OF BANNING COMPREHENSIVE OPERATIONAL ANALYSIS but  are threads running through many of these studies are to:    match service levels to market demand; and    improve the customer experience.   Finally, the new origin and destination information brought forward by the 211VetLink.org project, a  collaboration of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties with the 211 organizations including Riverside  Connect, is encouraging.   Of the requested trips, albeit a small total “n” over the course of a two‐year  period,  significant  numbers  of  these  trips  can  be  met  by  existing public transportation.   Demand  presenting to the 211 organizations is low but unmet trip needs still exist and these will take creative,  collaborative problem‐solving.       PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                38     3.0 ASSESSMENT OF AVAILABLE TRANSPORTATION 3.1 Mass Transportation Riverside County’s public mass transportation network includes regional rail, fixed‐route bus and ADA  and non‐ADA demand response paratransit services. Details of this network are described in this chapter  in relation to whether services are located in either Western or Eastern Riverside County and by modes  of rail, fixed‐route, demand response, other specialized transportation and information services.    Figure 3‐1, shows the steady increase in trips provided across all modes of public transportation, with  approximately 16.5 million transit passenger trips taken in FY 2014/15, the most recent year for which  audited ridership data is available.  Fixed route trips are the largest share of those trips, 14.2 million at  86%.  Metrolink’s regional rail boardings in Riverside account for an additional 965,000 trips.  Public  demand  response  transportation  represents  5%  of  trips  at  almost  841,000  trips.    And  specialized  transportation trips account for 3% at 542,000 passenger trips.  This chapter includes a detailed matrix  of all available transportation services and trips.    Figure 3‐1, Public Transportation Trips by Mode    PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                39     Mass Transportation in Western Riverside County  Public  transportation  in  Western  Riverside  County  consists  of  regional  rail  service  provided  by  the  Southern California Regional Rail Authority (Metrolink); regional bus and paratransit service operated by  the  Riverside  Transit  Agency  (RTA);  and  localized  transportation  services  provided  by  the  City  of  Riverside’s Special Transit, the city of Corona, and the cities of Banning and Beaumont.  Metrolink  The Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA) operates Metrolink as  a joint powers authority between five Southern California counties. Currently,  three of the seven Metrolink rail lines serve Riverside County with a connection to the downtown  Riverside transit station.  The Perris Valley Line began operation in the summer of 2016, adding an  additional line to the Metrolink network and to Riverside County.  In FY 2014/15, there were more than  965,000 boardings at Riverside County Metrolink stations.   Inland Empire‐Orange County Line  The  Inland  Empire‐Orange  County  spans  across  three  counties  with  end  points  in  downtown  San  Bernardino and Oceanside. This is Metrolink’s longest line at just over 100 miles in length. Service is  provided to almost 27,000 riders per week, at 14 stations, seven days per week.  Riverside Line  The Riverside Line begins in the City of Riverside at the downtown Riverside Metrolink   Station and ends at Los Angeles Union Station, traveling mostly along the 60 freeway corridor. Stops are  also  available  in  the  cities  of  Ontario,  Pomona,  Industry  and  Montebello.  This  line  only  runs  on  weekdays.  91 Line  Similar to the Riverside Line, the 91 Line connects downtown Riverside to Los Angeles Union Station, but  travels east and west along the 91 freeway corridor through Orange County, Norwalk and Commerce.  The 91 Line has only eight stations, but operates seven days per week.   Perris Valley Line  In  2016,  the  Perris  Valley  Line  opened,  connecting  downtown  Riverside  with  stops  along  the  215  freeway down to south Perris. This allows greater mobility for commuters in Western Riverside County.    Construction on the line began in October 2013.  Metrolink Fares  Fares  are  calculated  based  on  trip  length  between  origin  and  destination  stations.  Fares  can  be  purchased  for  one‐way  or  round‐trip  tickets,  or  passes  good  for 7 days, a weekend or a month.  Metrolink passes can allow free all‐day travel on many Southern California bus lines of participating  operators.   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                40     Riverside Transit Agency  The Riverside Transit Agency is Western Riverside County’s multi‐modal  transportation provider. The RTA service area spans approximately 2,500  square miles with a population of almost 1.75 million people, of which 1.3 million live within ¾ miles of  an RTA fixed route. This is accomplished with a total fleet of 301 vehicles. The Western Riverside County  service area stretches from the west, north and south county lines to the San Jacinto mountain range to  the east. RTA has experienced record breaking ridership over the last few years and is challenged with  the  need  to  expand  services  into  new  communities  and  neighborhoods  while  maintaining  efficient  quality service. RTA also provides curb‐to‐curb, origin to destination service for persons over the age of  65 and persons with disabilities to travel to locations that are within ¾ of a mile from an existing fixed‐ route, excluding commuter service.  Motor Bus  RTA operates 37 regional, local, rural and trolley services on fixed, timed scheduled routes throughout  18 incorporated cities and the unincorporated areas of Western Riverside County. Two of the local  routes began operating with the start of service on the Metrolink Perris Valley Line in 2016. The RTA  motor bus network is made up of key corridor service supporting local routes, regional connectors and  community feeders. There is a base passenger fare of $1.50 for the general public and $0.70 for seniors  and persons with disabilities.    Commuterlink  RTA operates eight CommuterLink routes, which are long‐distance routes, operated during peak service  hours  and  provide  both  inter  and  intra‐county  connections.  They connect commuters directly with  major employment centers or indirectly through connections at major multi‐modal bus and rail hubs.  CommuterLink has a base fare of $3.00 with a discounted fare of $2.00 for seniors and persons with  disabilities.  ADA Priority Dial‐A‐Ride Service  Trip reservation priority is given to persons with a certified disability under ADA law that prevents them  from using the fixed‐route service. Origin‐to‐destination service IS provided during the same hours and  within ¾ mile of existing fixed‐routes. Passenger fares are based on travel zones within the Dial‐A‐Ride  system at $3.00 per zone for a maximum of $9.00 per one‐way trip.   Senior & Disabled Dial‐A‐Ride  Demand response service is available to adults ages 65 and older and to persons with disabilities to  travel within a single city. Trips must be taken during the same hours and within ¾ mile of the local  fixed‐route. The base fare for this service is $3.00.    Dial‐A‐Ride Plus, RTA Lifeline Service  Dial‐A‐Ride Plus is a lifeline service that operates as an extension of RTA’s existing Dial‐A‐Ride which  allows seniors and persons with disabilities to extend the DAR service boundary by an additional two  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                41     miles. Service is provided in accessible taxis and fares are the same as those charged for traditional DAR  service.  City of Corona  The City of Corona provides a fixed route bus system called the Corona Cruiser and a  general public dial‐a‐ride service that travels within the city limits.   Corona Cruiser  The  fixed‐route  service  for  the  city  of  Corona  consists  of  the Blue  and  Red  lines  that  connect  the  residential areas with the larger trip generators within the city. Service is available Monday through  Friday between 7:00am and 7:00pm and on Saturdays between 9:00am and 5:00pm. Base fare is $1.50  for the general public and discounted to $0.70 for seniors and persons with disabilities.  ADA Complementary & General Public Paratransit  Demand responsive paratransit service is available to the general public to travel anywhere within city  limits. Priority ADA paratransit service is also provided with the same fleet to persons with disabilities  within ¾ miles of the Corona Cruiser fixed‐route footprint. Service is provided from curb‐to‐curb and  requires  a  general  public  fare  of  $4.00  with  a  discounted  fare of  $2.50  for  seniors,  persons  with  disabilities or persons on Medicare. The fare for ADA priority service is $2.50. The hours of service span  from 6:40am to 6:00pm on weekdays and 8:52am to 5:09pm on Saturdays. No service is available on  Sunday.    City of Riverside Specialized Transportation  The Special Transportation program is operated by the City of Riverside and is available to  seniors ages 60 and older and persons with disabilities to travel within the city limits or to  designated  transfer  points  to  travel  in  to  Corona,  Loma  Linda, Mira Loma, San Bernardino and  Woodcrest. Curb‐to‐curb service is offered between the hours of 8:00am and 5:30pm Monday through  Friday and 9:00am to 4:00pm on weekends and holidays with a one‐way base fare of $2.00. The Special  Transportation Program currently delivers more than 175,000 annual one‐way trips by utilizing a fleet of  36 vehicles.   Cities of Banning and Beaumont  The neighboring cities of Banning and Beaumont lie on the eastern edge of  Western Riverside County in what is called “The Pass”, which is 10‐15 miles removed from the more  urbanized areas of Moreno Valley.  To meet the transportation needs of the residents of this area, the  two cities fund public transit systems for their respective areas. In efforts to make travel between the  two cities easier, an agreement was reached to coordinate bus schedules, fares and transfers under a  uniform brand called Pass Transit.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                42     Pass Transit  Pass Transit actually operates as two separate entities, one for each city. The City of Beaumont has a  more robust fixed‐route system consisting of weekday, limited weekday, weekend and regional service.    Beaumont service begins at 6:00am and ends at 7:30pm and includes a regional commuter route that  connects the Pass Area to Loma Linda and the San Bernardino Metrolink station. The general fare is  $1.15  with  an  option  to  purchase  day  passes,  monthly  passes,  punch  passes  and  ticket  books  for  discounted rides.  Service in Banning begins as early as 4:30am on weekdays and runs as late as 11:00pm  supporting travel needs as far east as Cabazon.  Together, Pass Transit’s fixed route service provides  almost 340,000 annual passenger trips.    Dial‐A‐Ride  Origin to destination service in the two Pass area communities is supported by ADA paratransit or  community dial‐a‐ride service. ADA service is available to certified persons with disabilities within ¾ mile  of any Pass Transit fixed‐route while dial‐a‐ride service is open to seniors and non‐certified persons with  disabilities within ¼ mile of a Pass Transit route. Trip reservations must be made at least 24 hours prior  to trip pick‐up for service that mirrors the same hours of the fixed‐route service for ADA riders, and  8:00am to 6:00pm for dial‐a‐ride passengers. The one‐way passenger fare is $2.00 with a 10‐ride punch  pass available for $18.00. Currently, these combined demand response services are providing more than  28,000 annual trips.   Mass Transportation in Eastern Riverside County  SunLine Transit   SunLine is a Joint Powers Authority that provides public transit service to its member  cities and unincorporated communities in the Coachella Valley. Member cities stretch across Desert Hot  Springs,  Palm  Springs,  Cathedral  City,  Rancho  Mirage,  Palm  Desert,  Indian  Wells,  La  Quinta,  Indio,  Coachella,  and  the  unincorporated  communities  are  Thermal,  Mecca,  Oasis,  Bermuda  Dunes,  and  Thousand Palms.  SunBus  The SunBus, SunLine Transit’s fixed‐route network, consists of 15 routes including one commuter route  that travels from the Coachella Valley in to the Pass area and terminating in the city of Riverside. Service  begins at 4:32am and spans as late as 11:23pm on weekdays.  Weekend service starts at 4:55am and  runs until 10:48pm. The cash fare for adults is $1.00, $.85 for youth and $.50 for seniors, persons with  disabilities and persons on Medicare. Other forms of pass fare include day passes, 31‐day passes, 10‐ride  passes and employer passes. Transfers between SunBus routes cost $.25.  In FY 2014/15, SunLine’s  fixed‐route service delivered 4.6 million passenger trips with a fleet of 71 vehicles.   PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                43     SunDial  To comply with the ADA requirements of public operators of fixed‐route service, SunLine’s SunDial  service offers curb‐to‐curb complementary demand response service within ¾ mile of any SunBus route  during the operating hours of the fixed‐route service. With a fleet of 33 vehicles, SunDial transported  more than 153,000 passengers during FY 2014‐15. ADA certified passengers are able to schedule trips  seven days per week and are able to travel within a single city for $1.50 or between cities for $2.00.   SunTaxi  To help manage the high cost of providing demand responsive paratransit service, SunLine is currently  implementing a subsidized taxi service that will utilize qualified existing taxi providers to augment the  existing SunDial service by increasing its capacity. The service is available to any ADA certified passenger  under the same geographic parameters as the SunDial service.   Additionally, SunLine offers a Taxi Voucher program that subsidizes half of the price of taxi trips for  seniors 60 years and older and persons with disabilities by loading up to $75 per month on a taxi smart  card based on a participant’s initial deposit.   Palo Verde Valley Transit Authority (PVVTA)   PVVTA is the service provider for the desert communities of Blythe, Ripley and  Mesa Verde at the Arizona border along the 10 freeway. Additionally, regular  service is provided to the Chuckawalla and Ironwood State Prisons and limited service is provided across  the border into Ehrenburg Arizona.   Desert Roadrunner  Branded as the Desert Roadrunner, buses operate as a deviated fixed‐route service with the ability to  diverge up to ¾ mile from the route to pick‐up or drop‐off ADA passengers at the curb of their desired  location. Deviations can be made by phone or to a driver at least 30 minutes prior to pick‐up or drop‐off.  The hours of service span from 5:00am to 6:30 pm on weekdays and 8:00am to 1:00pm on Saturday.  The  cash  fare  for  the  general public  is  $1.65,  $.80  for  seniors  or  persons  with  disabilities.  Route  deviations cost an additional $.80 on top of the cash fare, and travel to and from Ehrenburg, AZ is $5.00.  Transportation Reimbursement and Information Project (TRIP)  The  TRIP  program  allows  seniors  and  persons  with  disabilities  the  ability  to  provide  a  mileage  reimbursement to a driver of their choice. This program is made possible through a partnership with the  Independent Living Partnership, supplying the program model and administrative support.   Table  3‐1,  Public  Transportation  Providers’  Inventory  provides further  service  details  of  Riverside  County’s public transit providers, in both the eastern and western regions of the county.      PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                44     Private Transportation Providers  Greyhound  Greyhound is the largest provider of intercity bus travel in North America with access to more than  3,800 locations. The majority of Greyhound lines are regularly scheduled passenger services, but the  company  has  recently  added  premium  city‐to‐city  service  Greyhound  Express  and  its  Greyhound  Connect service that connects rural communities with larger Greyhound markets. Greyhound can be  accessed in downtown Riverside, Banning and Thousand Palms.   Megabus  The  Megabus  is  a  low‐cost  express  bus  service  that  can  be  boarded  at  the  downtown  Riverside  Metrolink Station for as little as $1.00, and can provide links to Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Oakland, San  Francisco, and San Jose. Coach style buses are wheelchair accessible, offer free Wi‐Fi connection and are  equipped with AC power at each seat.     PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                             45  Table 3‐1, Public Transit Providers        Agency Description Eligibility Service Area Fare Operating Hours TransfersPassenger Trips# of VehiclesRiverside Transit Agency (RTA)Motor Bus(Local, Regional and Community bus) RTA operate 35 regional, local, rural and trolley service routes throughout Western Riverside County and two additional local routes are expected to be added to provide connectivity with the Perris Valley Rail Line, which is due to commence operations in Summer 2016General PublicBase Fares:General/Youth (Grades 1‐12) ‐ $1.50Sen/Dis/Medicare/Veteran ‐ $0.70Child (46" tall or under) ‐ $0.25Day Pass:General/Youth (Grades 1‐12) ‐ $4.00Sen/Dis/Medicare/Veteran ‐ $2.007‐Day PassGeneral/Youth (Grades 1‐12) ‐ $16.00Sen/Dis/Medicare/Veteran ‐ $16.0030‐Day Pass:General ‐ $50.00Youth (Grades 1‐12) ‐ $35.00Sen/Dis/Medicare/Veteran ‐ $23.00Start and end times vary from route to  route. 8,862,752 178Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) CommuterLink (express bus)RTA operates eight (8) CommuterLink routes, that are long‐distance, peak‐hour express services that provide both inter and intra‐county connections.General PublicBase Fares:General/Youth (Grades 1‐12) ‐ $3.00Sen/Dis/Medicare/Veteran ‐ $2.00Child (46" tall or under) ‐ $2.00Day Pass:General/Youth (Grades 1‐12) ‐ $7.00Sen/Dis/Medicare/Veteran ‐ $5.0030‐Day Pass:General/Youth (Grades 1‐12)‐ $75.00Sen/Dis/Medicare/Veteran ‐ $50.00Start and end times vary from route to  route. 370,877 11Public Fixed Route Providers ‐ Western RiversideRTA has transfer agreements with the following agencies: Metrolink, Omnitrans, Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA), Corona Cruiser, SunLine and Pass Transit. Metrolink tickets and passes are accepted on RTA fixed routes that serve Metrolink stations during the period from one hour before to one hour after Metrolink’s service hours and are valid on the day of travel. Fare media from Omnitrans, Corona Cruiser and Pass Transit are accepted at transfer locations at the equivalent base fare rate, excluding CommuterLink service. OCTA fare media is accepted for base fare on CommuterLink Route 216 at transfer locations in Orange County as well as La Sierra Metrolink between RTA Route 15 and OCTA Route 794. Current and retired employees as well as dependents of Omnitrans and OCTA are eligible to ride any local fixed route or CommuterLink in the RTA service area.RTA serves eighteen (18) incorporated cities including Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Corona, Eastvale, Hemet, Jurupa Valley, Lake Elsinore, Menifee, Moreno Valley, Murrieta, Norco, Perris, Riverside, San Jacinto, Temecula and Wildomar and unincorporated areas of Western Riverside County. PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                             46  Table 3‐1, Public Transit Providers Cont’d  Agency Description Eligibility Service Area Fare Operating Hours TransfersPassenger Trips# of VehiclesCity of CoronaCorona CruiserThe red and blue lines service the City of Corona with a fixed‐route, regularly scheduled bus service.General PublicThe Blue Line serves the McKinley Street retail area then travels on to Magnolia Avenue and Main Street to the River Road area. The Red Line connects the residential areas of central Corona with commercial areas along Sixth Street and the Ontario Avenue/California Avenue retail area. The Red Line also covers South Corona along Ontario Avenue/Temescal Canyon Road to serve the county area of El Cerrito and The Crossings shopping complex at Cajalco Road/Temescal Canyon Road and The Shops at Dos Lagos on Saturdays.Per Ride:Gen Public/Students: $1.50Sen/Dis/Medicare: $0.70Child (Under 46"): $0.25Day PassGen Public/Students: $4.00Sen/Dis/Medicare: $2.0015 Day PassGen Public: $17.50Students: $12.25Sen/Dis/Medicare: $8.0531 Day PassGen Public: $35.00Students: $24.50Sen/Dis/Medicare: $16.10Blue Line Mon ‐ Fri:  6:42 a.m. ‐ 7:09 p.m. Sat:  8:52 a.m. – 3:50 p.m. Red LineMon ‐ Fri:  6:50 a.m. ‐ 7:05 p.m.Sat:  9:00 a.m. ‐ 5:09 p.m.Sunday no serviceCorona Cruiser bus routes connect with Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) regional bus routes, North Main Metrolink Commuter Train Station and Park and Ride lots.168,303 6City of BanningPass TransitBanning's Pass Transit provides three fixed route services: Routes 1, 5 and 6General PublicThe commercial and residential areas of Banning and Cabazon, as well as the commercial areas of the Morongo Indian Reservation and limited commercial areas of Beaumont.Start and end times vary. The earliest and latest times are as follows: Mon ‐ Fri  4:30 AM ‐ 11:00 PMSat ‐ Sun 8:00 AM ‐ 6:00 PMIf you are transferring from an RTA bus you must have purchased their day pass or monthly pass to be able to transfer to Routes 1, 5 & 6 and you will still be required to pay a Zone fare of $.25 to and from Cabazon. When you return back to Sun Lakes Village or Walmart to connect with RTA you will have to pay our fare of $1.15 per person for Routes #1, #5 and #6 plus the $0.25 Zone fare.Passes are accepted from RTA Routes 31 & 35 only at the Albertson's & Wal‐Mart transfer points with an additional $0.25 Zone fare if traveling to Cabazon to cross over into the Southeast portion of Cabazon.135,244 5City of BeaumontPass TransitFixed schedule, regional, commuter and special event shuttlesGeneral Public Beaumont, Banning, Cherry Valley, and Cabazon. Commuter link service to Calimesa, the Loma Linda Veteran's Hospital and the San Bernardino Metrolink Station. M ‐ F: 6:00 am to 7:30 pmSat/Sun: 8:00 am to 6:00 pmPassengers can use Day Passes to transfer between the Pass Transit System fixed routes and the RTA Line 31 to Hemet and Line 35 to Moreno Valley.204,112 13Base FareGeneral: $1.15  ‐  Youth: $1.00Sen/Dis/Vets: $0.65  ‐  Child: $0.25Day PassGeneral: $3.00  ‐  Youth: $3.00Sen/Dis/Vets: $1.80  ‐  Child: N/A10‐Tripper Punch PassYouth: $10.0010 ‐ Ticket BookGeneral: $10.35  ‐  Sen/Dis/Vets: $5.85  Monthly PassGeneral: $36.00  ‐  Youth: $30.00Sen/Dis/Vets: $21.00  ‐  Child: N/ATransfer/Deviations: $0.25Military/GoPass/Jury Duty: FreePublic Fixed Route Providers ‐ Western Riverside PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                             47  Table 3‐1, Public Transit Providers Cont’d   Agency Description Eligibility Service Area Fare Operating Hours TransfersPassenger Trips# of VehiclesSunLine Transit AgencySunBusSunLine’s local fixed route network (SunBus) currently consists of 15 routes in total, including 14 localroutes and one (1) commuterlink.General PublicDesert Hot Springs, Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, Palm Desert, Indian Wells, La Quinta, Indio, and Coachella, with service also provided to the unincorporated Riverside County communities of Desert Edge, Thousand Palms, Bermuda Dunes, Thermal, Mecca, Oasis and North ShoreCash FareAdult: $1.00; Youth $0.85; Sen/Dis/Med: $0.50Day PassAdult: $3.00; Youth $2.00; Sen/Dis/Med: $1.5031‐Day PassAdult: $34.00; Youth: $24.00; Sen/Dis/Med: $17.0010‐Ride PassAdult: $10.00; Youth: $8.50; Sen/Dis/Med: $5.00Employer Pass: $24.00Commute Exp (CE): Adult $6  ‐ S/D/M $4CE Day Pass: Adult $14 ‐ S/D/M $10CE 30‐Day Pass: Adult $150 ‐ S/D/M $100Weekdays: 4:32 am to 11:23 pm Weekends: 4:55 am to 10:48 pmSystem transfers between routes are $0.255,073,888 71Agency Description Eligibility Service Area Fare Operating Hours TransfersPassenger Trips# of VehiclesPalo Verde Valley TransitDesert RoadrunnerPVVTA provides five deviatedfixed routes.General PublicWithin the City of Blythe, and the unincorporated Riverside County areas of Mesa Verde and Ripley. Also, part of the greater area is the California State prison facilities of Ironwood and Chuckawalla,Cash FareGen Public: $1.65Sen/Dis: $0.80Child (5 & under): 1st child FreeAZ fare to/from Ehrenberg: $5.00Route 3 Fare: $3.30Route Deviations: $0.8010 Ride Punch PassesGen Pub: $16.50, Sen/Dis: $8.00Ehrenberg, AZ: $50.00, Route 3: $33.0031‐Day PassGen Pub: $43.00, Sen/Dis: $28.00Route 3: $120.00X‐Tend‐A‐Ride: $5.00M‐F: 5:00 am to 6:30 pm8:00 am to 1 :00 pm on Saturday and limited holidaysN/A 46,043 13Public Fixed Route Providers ‐ Palo Verde ValleyPublic Fixed Route Providers ‐ Coachella Valley PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                             48 Table 3‐1, Public Transit Providers Cont’d      Agency Description Eligibility Service Area Fare Reservations Operating HoursPassenger Trips# of VehiclesRiverside Transit Agency (RTA)Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Priority DAR ServiceADA Priority DAR is an origin‐to‐destination advanced reservation transportation service that RTA gives priority service to individuals who are certified under ADA law.Persons who are certified under ADA law to have a disability that prohibits them from using fixed‐route service.Persons who are ADA certified are eligible for trips throughout the RTA service area that are within three‐quarters of a mile of a fixed route bus service, excluding express routes. DAR service is provided at times equivalent to local fixed route bus service in the area.Riverside Transit Agency (RTA)Senior/Disabled DAR ServiceSenior/Disabled DAR is an origin‐to‐destination advanced reservation transportation service within a single city.Seniors age 65 and above and persons with disabilities.Seniors age 65 and above and persons with disabilities are eligible for local DAR service within a single city and within three‐quarters of a mile  excluding express service. Transportation is provided only within the city in which the trip begins.During the hours of fixed routebus service operation.Riverside Transit Agency (RTA)Dial‐a‐Ride Plus,RTA Lifeline ServiceTwo‐year pilot program approved under the RCTC Measure A Call for Projects, provide wheelchair accessible taxi service.Seniors aged 65 and over and to persons with disabilities for lifeline services.Extends the DAR service boundary by an additional two miles.During the hours of fixed routebus service operation.11,963 N/APublic Demand Response Providers ‐ Western Riverside93406,000Base Fare*Sen/Dis:  $3.00Medicare:  $3.00child (under 46"):  $0.5010‐Ticket BookSen/Dis:  $30.00Medicare:  $30.00Child (Under 46"): N/A Buddy FareA special program, for two to 10 eligible customers can share the fare for each fare zone. The entire group must be picked up within a half‐mile radius of each other and travel to the same destination.* Base fare is per fare zone for a maximum of $9.00. Personal care attendants pay the same fare as the rider.Dial‐A‐Ride customers may schedule rides one to three days in advance.Dial‐A‐Ride requests are taken Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and weekends from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (800) 795‐7887 or TTY (800) 396‐3610 PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                             49  Table 3‐1, Public Transit Providers Cont’d   Agency DescriptionEligibilityService Area Fare Reservations Operating HoursPassenger Trips# of Vehicles City of Corona ADA Complimentary ParatransitCurb‐to‐curb paratransit service. Door‐to‐door service is available if driver can see the vehicle at all times and vehicle is parked in a safe place. Persons who are certified under ADA law to have a disability that prohibits them from using fixed‐route service. Person w Disability:  $2.50 Children:  $0.50 Mon ‐ Fri:  6:42 am ‐ 6:00 pmSat:  8:52 am ‐ 5:09 pm Sunday no service City of Corona General Public ParatransitCurb‐to‐curb paratransit service General Public General Public:  $4.00Sen/Dis/Med:  $2.50Children:  $0.50 Mon ‐ Fri:  6:42 am ‐ 7:09 pmSat:  8:52 am ‐ 5:09 pmSunday no serviceCity of Riverside Special TransitOrigin‐to‐destination rideshare transportation service. Limited to senior citizens (60+) and persons with disabilities (w/ physician doc) Within the 81.54 square mile incorporated citylimits of the City ofRiverside.$2.00 for a one‐way ride; a punch card may be purchased for $40.00 and isequivalent to 20 rides. Call 951‐687‐8080 M‐F 8:00 am ‐ 5:00 pm,  9:00 am ‐3:00 pm Wknd/Holidays Mon ‐ Fri: 8:00 am ‐ 5:30 pm Wknd/Holiday 9:00 am ‐ 4:00 pm175,276 37City of Banning Dial‐A‐Ride Origin‐to‐destination shared ride transportation service Senior citizens, persons with disabilities, and individuals certified for ADA transport. City of Banning andneighboring areas ofBeaumont and CabazonCall 951‐922‐3252 Reservations must be made no later than 3 p.m. the day of the trip.  M‐F: 8:00 am to 3:00 pm ADA Riders:M ‐ F: 6 am to 6:45 pm Sat/Sun: 8 am to 4:45 pm (must have 3‐ADA certified passengers in order to transport on Sat/Sun) 9,734 6City of Beaumont Dial‐A‐Ride Origin‐to‐destination shared ride transportation service Senior citizens (65+), persons with disabilities, and individuals certified for ADA transport. Beaumont and parts ofCherry Valley Call 951‐769‐8532 at least 24 hours in advance to make a reservation Monday through Sunday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. ADA CertfifiedM ‐ F: 6.00 am to 7.00 pmSat/Sun: 8:00 am to 6:00 pm(ADA only on Sunday)18,640 3Base FareOne‐way: $2.00Companion: $3.00No‐Show: $2.00PCA: Free  10‐Ride Punch Card One‐way: $18.00 Reservations can be made from one to fourteen days in advance; however, same day service may be accommodated if space is available.  (951) 734‐7220 Throughout the City ofCorona and neighboringcounty areas of Coronita,El Cerrito and Home Gardens as well as satellitelocations in the City of Norco (Department ofMotor Vehicles, Department of PublicSocial Services and Norco College).1266,015 Public Demand Response Providers ‐ Western Riverside PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                             50  Table 3‐1, Public Transit Providers cont’d AgencyDescription EligibilityService Area FareReservations Operating HoursPassenger Trips# of Vehicles SunLine Transit Agency  SunDial Curb‐to‐curb service designed to meet requirements of the ADA and next‐day complementary Demand‐response service to Coachella Valley Certified riders thathave the required ADACertificationIdentification CardWithin ¾ mile of theexisting SunBus routenetworkCash Fare ‐ Single Ride Same City: $1.50City to City: $2.00  10‐Ride PassSame City: $15.00City to City: $20.00 1‐800‐347‐8628 seven days a week between 8 am and 5 pm SunDial operates the same hours as any specific SunBus fixed‐route. 153,18333 SunLine Transit Agency  SunTaxi Subsidized taxi service to supplement SunDial inproviding ADA paratransit serviceCertified riders thathave the required ADACertificationIdentification CardWithin ¾ mile of theexisting SunBus route networkN/A SunLine Transit Agency  Taxi Vouchers Providing half price taxitripsSeniors (60+) and thedisabledThroughout SunLine service area Loading onto a prepaid taxifare payment card up to$75 every 30 days.SunLine then doubles the deposit. Maximum balance allowed on a card at anytime is $ 450.00 AgencyDescription EligibilityService Area FareReservations Operating HoursPassenger Trips# of Vehicles Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Road Runner ADA Paratransit is also provided after hours on the Fixed Routes through routedeviation requests. The routes can deviate up to 3/4 of a mile away from the actual mapped routes.General PublicWithin the City of Blythe, and the unincorporated Riverside County areas of Mesa Verde and Ripley.Also, part of the greater area is the California Stateprison facilities ofIronwood and Chuckawalla,Route deviations are $0.80 in addition to the normal fixed‐route fare.  DV8 Card that proivides 8 one‐way deviations is$6.40Request a deviation by calling 760‐922‐1140. Deviation requests should be made at least 30 minutes prior to the p/u time. Deviations can also be requested from the driver at least 30 minutes prior to the p/u or d/o time.M‐F: 5:00 am to 6:30 pm  8:00 am to 1 :00 pm on Saturday and limited holidays PVVTA delivered 49,673 fixed‐route trips with 13 vehicles in FY 14‐15.  The number of route deviations is not available.Taxi Smart Card is accepted by all three Coachella Valley taxicab franchises; American Cab, Desert City Cab and Yellow Cab of the Desert. Taxis are equipped with areader to accept the Smart Card. Swipe your Smart Card to pay your fare. A standard tip is paid in cash. Taxi Smart Cards cannot be used for tips. For more information call 1‐760‐343‐3456. Bring a completed Taxi Voucher Program Application to 32‐505 Harry Oliver Trail, Thousand Palms, CA, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Program implemented in FY 15‐16 12,416 Trips Annually  $89,148 in Taxi Voucher Sales; Matched with $89,148 from SunLinePublic Demand Response Providers ‐ Coachella Valley Public Demand Response Providers ‐ Palo Verde Valley PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                              51  Information Resource Programs  IE 5‐1‐1   RCTC partners with the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG) to provide  traveler information to residents and visitors of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.  This program,  marketed as IE‐511, is a telephone and online traffic and commuter resource.  Travelers have access to  real‐time traffic information and travel times for Southern California freeways; bus and rail trip planning  using Google Transit; carpool, rideshare and vanpool opportunities and the identification of park‐and‐ ride locations. Dialing 5‐1‐1 from a cell phone or landline will connect commuters to the automated  resource line while those seeking access via the internet can connect through the program website at  www.IE511.org.   2‐1‐1 VetLink   The 2‐1‐1 VetLink program is a dynamic information resource available by phone  through the existing 2‐1‐1 agencies in San Bernardino and Riverside counties, and  an online trip planning portal that includes both fixed‐route and demand responsive transportation  options. The program was initially funded through the FTA’s Veterans Transportation and Community  Living Initiative (VTCLI) grant program which funded the online trip planner module.   Partnerships  and  financial  contributions  from  both  counties’  transportation  commissions  and  local  public  transit  agencies  helped  to  establish  2‐1‐1  VetLink  as  fully  functioning  mobility  management  center with live‐person and real‐time transportation information assistance and trip planning. Access to  trip information can be reached by dialing 2‐1‐1 on any phone while in Riverside or San Bernardino  counties or by visiting www.211VetLink.org. In the near future, there are plans to develop additional  branding and imagery that welcomes the general public as well as veterans to use the services that are  available to them.   3.2 Specialized Transportation Specialized Transportation Funding   In  2009,  RCTC  held  its  first  Universal  Call  for  Specialized  Transportation  Projects.  This  funding  opportunity combined funding from Western Riverside County’s allocation of Measure A specialized  transportation funds along with FTA’s Section 5316 Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) and FTA  Section 5317 New Freedom apportionments for the urbanized areas of the county.  A total of twenty‐ two  projects  were  awarded  in  2009  using  a  combination  of  the  available  funding.  A  subsequent  Specialized Transportation Call for Projects of these same funding programs was conducted in 2011 and  2013.  PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                              52  Measure A Specialized Transportation  Specialized transportation programs deemed eligible under the Measure A program must meet the  transportation needs of seniors, persons with disabilities and the truly needy.  To meet these needs  applicants may use awarded funds to FOR operational and/or capital expenditures. Under this program,  discretionary funding for transportation projects is only available in Western Riverside County.   FTA Section 5316 JARC and Section 5317 New Freedom  The  Federal  Transit  Administration’s  SAFTEA‐LU  legislation  required  that  applicants  interested  in  applying for two of its discretionary funding programs, do so through inclusion in and in reference to the  Coordinated Plan for their respective counties. The JARC program was eligible to public and non‐profit  agencies that were implementing projects that served persons of low‐income and promoted access to  employment related locations and the reverse commute of any persons. The New Freedom program  was designed to create transportation options for persons with disabilities that went beyond what the  ADA mandated programs could provide.   While these programs provided a viable funding opportunity for many Riverside County agencies, there  was  difficulty  nationwide  in  finding  non‐profit  applicants  to  spend  down  the  JARC  allocations.  Additionally,  the New Freedom program was deemed to have  much overlap with  the long existing  Section 5310 funding program for seniors and persons with disabilities. Both of these funding programs  were discontinued with the expiration of SAFETEA‐LU. Under the replacing MAP‐21 legislation, JARC  funding became formulized to designated recipients of urbanized areas (UZA) and the New Freedom  program was combined with FTA’s Section 5310 program.   FTA Section 5310  Historically, in the state of California, the 5310 program has been procured and administered by the  California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). With the passage of MAP‐21 and the merging of  5310 and New Freedom programs, the distribution of 5310 funding allocations was based on population  by  UZA.  Through  an  MOU  between  RCTC,  Caltrans  and  the  Southern California  Association  of  Governments (SCAG), the 2015 call‐for‐projects for 5310 funds was held and awarded by RCTC while  fiduciary administration and program monitoring responsibilities remained with Caltrans.  5310 funding  for the Hemet‐San Jacinto region and non‐urbanized areas was still awarded and funded as part of the  Caltrans statewide process.   A summary of the available funding for specialized transportation programs is presented in Table 3‐2.  In  the most recent large urban funding cycle, an annualized total of just over $3 million in funding was  awarded to specialized transportation programs in Western Riverside County and the Coachella Valley,  across  the  various  funding  opportunities  made  accessible  as  a  result  of  the  Coordinated  Planning  process.       PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                              53    Table 3‐2, Specialized Transportation Funding      Specialized Transportation Providers  There are a number of different programs that have been funded through RCTC’s specialized funding  program. These organizations are providing a wide array of options to fill the transportation gaps of the  target populations of this plan. The types of services they provide and specialized projects that have  been funded include:   Directly  operated  demand  responsive  transportation;  including  senior  and  non‐emergency  medical transportation, veterans’ transportation, lifeline service and youth transportation.   Mileage reimbursement programs for seniors and persons with disabilities as well as mileage  reimbursement for youth escorts to court and social services activities.   Travel training for person with disabilities.   Subsidies for clients of human and social services agencies to obtain public transit bus tokens.   Mobility management activities.     A listing, current as of this writing, of RCTC funded specialized transportation organizations and the  types of services they provide is presented in Table 3‐3, Specialized Transportation Providers.       Measure A JARC New Freedom Section 5310 Totals 2009 Call‐for‐Projects Western Riverside County 6,000,000.00$     1,316,009.00$     547,592.00$        358,150.00$       8,221,751.00$     Coachella Valley 357,169.00$        180,350.00$        72,939.00$          610,458.00$        2011 Call‐for‐Projects Western Riverside County 4,158,313.00$     1,460,228.00$     652,467.00$        291,263.00$       6,562,271.00$     Coachella Valley 400,839.00$        201,067.00$        589,038.00$       1,190,944.00$     2013 Call‐for‐Projects Western Riverside County 5,798,983.00$     1,441,885.00$     657,605.00$        222,503.00$       8,120,976.00$     Coachella Valley 393,126.00$        201,351.00$       594,477.00$        2015 Call‐for‐Projects (3‐years) Western Riverside County* 8,000,000.00$     1,879,114.00$    9,879,114.00$     Coachella Valley 726,593.00$       726,593.00$        Totals 23,957,296.00$  5,369,256.00$     2,440,432.00$     4,139,600.00$     35,906,584.00$  5310 funding was procured and administered statewide by Caltrans The 2013 and 2015 calls‐for‐projects for 5310 included funding for "Expanded" project needing operating assistance. JARC/NF funding in the Hemet‐San Jacinto small UZA and non‐urbanized areas of Western Riverside County is not included in this  table. JARC/NF programs were discontinued under MAP‐21 legislation and were not available in the 2015 call‐for‐projects PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                                                                                                                                                                                                  54   Table 3‐3, Specialized Transportation Providers    Service Provider Service Description Cities ServedDays OperatingWhere to Call Who QualifiesUnits of Service ProvidedFunding SourcesAbility CountsTransportation from Ability Counts site to client job site.Western Riverside County and part of San Bernardino County.M‐Sat (951) 734‐6595Persons with developmental disabilities.134,000 Annual Trips 5310 TraditionalBlindness Support(Travel Training program)Provides persons blind/visually impaired/disabled with the skills and knowledge to use the local fixed‐route bus system.Western Riverside County.M‐F (951) 341‐9244Adults that are legally blind, disabled, 55 years or older or a veteran.Trains 70 Individuals and Distributes 180 Bus Passes AnnuallyMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitBoys & Girls Clubs of Southwest CountyChildren receive round trip transportation to school and back to their clubhouse.Temecula, Murrieta, Lake Elsinore, Canyon Lake, Wildomar, Menifee.M‐F (951) 699‐1526Elementary and Middle School low‐income family youths participating in the Before and After School Transportation program.38,767 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitCare‐A‐Van Transit, Inc.Provides door‐to‐door non‐emergency transportation.Hemet/San Jacinto Valley, Lake Elsinore area and the Sun City/Menifee area; unincorporated county areas of Winchester and Val Vista.M‐F (951) 791‐3572Low‐income, seniors and disabled individuals including:  Riverside County Hemet Service Center customers, Valley Restart Homeless Shelter, Da Vita, Riverside Co. Office on Aging, KinCare, Job Training and Education through HOPE Bus, Care Connexxus, Inland Regional, and Veteran Services.22,394 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized Transit/ 5310 TraditionalCare Connexxus, Inc.Provides specialized curb‐to‐curb paratransit non‐emergency medical transportation. City of Riverside and surrounding cities.M‐F (951) 509‐2500Clients of Adult Day Service Center of Riverside County.17,296 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized Transit/ 5310 TraditionalCommunity Connect Transit Access Program (TAP)Bus transit tokens/tickets are distributed to human services agencies to give to their clients to fulfill emergency need transportation. Public Transit Providers in Western Riverside County.M‐F (951) 686‐4402Seniors, persons with disabilities, and low‐income.Distributes 71,230 Bus Passes to 14,956 Persons AnnuallyMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitCommunity Connect 2‐1‐1 VetLinkProvides a Veterans Specialist call taker for 2‐1‐1 information calls and an online trip planner for providers in Riverside County.Riverside County‐wide. 24 hoursDial 2‐1‐1www.211VetLink.orgFocus on Veterans, but open to General Public.2,005 Mobility Management ContactsMeasure A ‐ Specialized Transit/Veterans Transportation and Community LivingEXCEED(Valley Resource Center)Provides transportation related activities and services beyond those required by ADA by providing door‐to‐door service allowing travel to work and/or day program.Hemet/San Jacinto Valley; unincorporated county areas of Winchester and Valle Vista.M‐F (951) 766‐8659Adults with disabilities who are clients of EXCEED (a division of Valley Resource Center for the Retarded, Inc.).198,000 Annual Trips5310 Traditional & ExpandedSpecialized Transit Providers ‐ Western Riverside PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                                                                                                                                                                                                  55   Table 3‐3, Specialized Transportation Providers cont’d   Service Provider Service Description Cities ServedDays OperatingWhere to Call Who QualifiesUnits of Service ProvidedFunding SourcesForest Folk, Inc. (Idyllwild Area Shuttle)Provides a shuttle service in Idyllwild and its surrounding communities and lifeline service to and from Hemet and Palm Desert.Communities of Idyllwild, Pine Cove, Fern Valley, and Mountain Center.M‐F (951) 292‐8467Seniors, persons with disabilities, and low‐income.Began FY 15‐16; Projecting 2,700 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitFriends of Moreno Valley Senior Center (a.k.a. "MoVan")Paratransit service for travel within Moreno Valley and outside of Moreno Valley for doctor appointments.Trips originating in Moreno Valley to areas within a 35‐mile radius.M‐F (800) 351‐6571Seniors (60+) and adults with disabilities.4,574 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized Transit/ 5310 TraditionalIndependent Living Partnership (TRIP)Provides a mileage reimbursement for volunteer drivers of eligible participants. Western Riverside County24 hours (800) 510‐2020 Seniors and persons with disabilities.89,828 Annual Trips;1,344,778 Miles ReimbursedMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitInland AIDS ProjectDoor‐to‐door non‐emergency medical transportation to medical and dental appointments.Western Riverside County M‐F(951) 683‐2427 x136Clients with HIV/AIDS. 1,723 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitCity of Norco, Dept of Parks & RecreationDoor‐to‐door transportation through the Rose M. Eldridge Senior Center.Norco, Mira Loma M‐TH (951) 270‐5647Norco residents: seniors and persons with disabilities.2,189 Annual tripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitOperation Safehouse, Inc.Provides transportation through screened volunteers to social service appointments.Western Riverside County 24 hours (951) 369‐4921 Homeless, at‐risk youth ages 18‐21. 765 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitRiverside University Health Systems – Behavioral HealthDoor‐to‐door transportation non‐emergency medical transportation.Western Riverside County Mon ‐ Fri (951) 955‐1647Low‐income or elderly individuals with behavioral health issues.Began FY 15‐16; Projecting 1,000 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitRiverside University Health Systems – Medical Transportation Department (Formerly RCRMC).Door‐to‐door transportation non‐emergency medical and dialysis transportation.Western Riverside County Mon ‐ Fri ‐ NEMTSat/Sun ‐ Dialysis(866) 909‐4881(951) 486‐4380Low‐income Medi‐Cal and Medicare clients of the RUHS Medical Center, outside Dialysis patients, the elderly and disabled.7,640 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitUnited States Veterans InitiativeDoor‐to‐door transportation for March ARB residents to critical appointments.Riverside County  M‐F (951) 656‐6892Low‐income and/or homeless Veterans residing onsite at March Air Reserve Base as well as offsite areas located in Riverside County.2,333 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitVoices for ChildrenProvides mileage reimbursement to Court Appointed Special Advocate's to transport children that pass through Riverside County's foster care system to court, school, appointments and outings. Western Riverside CountyM‐F (858) 598‐2211Children placed in the juvenile dependency court system (foster children) in Western Riverside County.Began in FY 15‐16; Projecting 2,850 Annual TripsMeasure A ‐ Specialized TransitSpecialized Transit Providers ‐ Western Riverside PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                                                                                                                                                                                                  56   Table 3‐3, Specialized Transportation Providers cont’d     Specialized Transit Service ProviderService Description Cities ServedDays OperatingWhere to Call Who QualifiesUnits of Service ProvidedFunding SourcesAngel View, Inc.Transportation to and from Angel View day program.  Transportation is provided to residential clients 7 days a week; Day Program clients.Coachella Valley/Joshua TreeM‐SU (760) 329‐6471Children and adults with disabilities who are clients of Angel View's residential care program and Adult Day Program32,000 Annual TripsFTA 5310 Traditional & ExpandedDesert ArcOperates a bus and van service that provides daily transportation and para‐transit services to facility and work sites.Coachella Valley and the Morongo BasinM‐Su (888) 771‐7784Persons with developmental disabilities.161,000 Annual TripsFTA 5310 TraditionalDesert Blind and Handicapped AssociationDoor‐through‐door transportation design to help clients be able to remain in their private homes and fully participate in the community and local economy.Palm Springs, Cathedral City, Rancho Mirage, and Desert Hot Springs, including much of the intervening unincorporated areas.M‐F (760) 969‐5025Individuals with a disability that prevents safe driving. The disability may be permanent or temporary such as out‐patient surgery or a Project is still being implemented. Projecting FTA 5310 Traditional & ExpandedIndependent Living Partnership (TRIP)Provides a mileage reimbursement for volunteer drivers of eligible participants. Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley (Blythe)24 hours (800) 510‐2020Seniors and persons with disabilities.19,779 Annual Trips; 297,578 Miles ReimbursedFTA 5310 ExpandedSalud Health ClinicProvides volunteer transportation for healthcare clinic patients on an as‐needed basis when space and volunteer driver are available to provide the service. Trips outside of the Blythe areaWhen capacity is available(800) 510‐2021 Any patient of the clinic Not available Clinic FundsSpecialized Transit Providers ‐ Coachella Valley PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                                                                                                                                                                                                   57   3.3 Performance Measurement Trips‐per‐Capita  Trips‐per‐capita  is  a  significant  measure  of  the  relationship  between  transit  trips  provided  and  population growth.  The use of per capita transit trips as a measure of transit performance can be an  informative  tool  to  track  transit  investment  and  its  utilization  over  time,  particularly  in  relation  to  population growth.  As in Section 2.3 Regional Plans and Studies, SCAG has identified a regional goal of  34.9 trips per capita, establishing a regional average of almost 35 public transit trips annually provided  and taken for each resident of this vast seven county region.   For Riverside County as a whole and considering all public transportation modes of rail, fixed route,  demand response and specialized transportation, Riverside County’s contribution to that regional goal is  a trips‐per‐capita rate of 7.2.   Table 3‐4 following documents the total reported public transit trips of  16.5 million across all modes.  Importantly, this shows that the County has held its own in relation to  population growth. An additional 105,000 passenger trips were provided over the prior reporting year, a  1 percent increase, while population increased by 25,000 persons, also a 1 percent increase.   Table 3‐4, Trips per Capita by Subarea    Table 3‐5 following presents trips per capita by provider and by year, going back to the first Riverside  County  COORDINATED PLAN  to  document  steady  increases  in  this  measure.  Over  the  past  decade,  population has grown by almost 275,000 people, a 13 percent increase.  During this same period, the  County has added more than 2.6 million annual transit trips, a 19 percent increase, illustrating the level  of transit resources that have been invested and used over the life of the coordinated planning process.   Service by Mode Trips  % of  Total  Trips Western  Riverside  County Coachella  Valley Palo Verde  Valley Trips  % of  Total  Trips Rail [1]898,216 5.5%965,136 965,136 5.8% Public Bus, Fixed Route [2]14,102,821 86.0%9,464,541 4,645,097 49,673 14,159,311 85.8% Public Demand Responsive 823,649 5.0%687,628 153,183 840,811 5.1% Specialized Transportation/Universal Call Program 577,736 3.5%464,256 78,009 542,265 3.3% ALL TRIPS:  Including Rail, Public Transit, Measure A,  JARC and New Freedom Programs  [3]16,402,422 100% 11,581,561 4,876,289 49,673 16,507,523 100% TOTAL POPULATION [4]2,255,059 1,812,438        442,756          24,773           2,279,967   Trips per Capita for FY 2014/15 Total Population [4]7.2 6.4 11.0 2.0 7.2 Notes: [1] Annualized from average weekday daily boardings at Riverside County stations: Riverside, 91 and Inland Empire‐Orange County Lines. [2] 'Public Bus, Fixed Route' trips counts do not include Speci alized Transportation funded fixed route trips. [3] Public transit trips extracted from TransTrack 'Table 2 ‐ SRTP Service Summary' on May 10, 2016. Rail and Specialized Transit operators reported trips directly. [4] RCTC Mid‐Year Revenue Projections 2015 and 2016 Agenda: CA Department of Finance, Demographic Research Unit as of January 1, 2014 and 2015. Public Transportation Trips Provided Countywide     FY 14/15 Countywide    FY  13/14 PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                                                                                                                                                                                                   58   Table 3‐5, Trips Provided by Provider for Five Reporting Periods         Public Transportation Trips Provided Service by Mode [1] Trips %of Total Trips Trips % of Total Trips % Chng from FY 05/06 # of Vehicles in Active Service Trips % of Total Trips % Chng from Prior Year # of Vehicles in Active Service Trips % of Total Trips % Chng From Prior Year # of Vehicle s in Active Service Trips % of Total Trips % Chng From Prior Year Rail [2]2,700,117 19%878,438 6% N/A 888,844 6%1.2%898,216 5%1.1% 965,136 6%7% RCTC Commuter Rail - Riverside Line 1,101,646 215,864 208,230 175,032 160,388 RCTC Commuter Rail - Inland Empire Orange County Line 1,066,541 455,510 500,786 553,520 626,557 RCTC Commuter Rail - 91 Line 531,930 207,064 179,828 169,664 261,058 Public Bus, Fixed Route [3] 10,575,445 76%13,115,046 86% 24.0%269 13,603,825 86%3.7%380 14,102,821 86%3.7% 306 14,188,868 86%1% RTA FR 5,718,234 6,555,135 94 6,861,830 191 7,155,365 124 7,203,364 SunLine FR 3,474,361 4,436,917 69 4,494,549 69 4,643,147 71 4,674,654 RTA Contract FR 916,366 1,635,377 80 1,713,555 90 1,744,652 79 1,753,518 Banning FR 183,265 127,499 5 138,503 5 146,981 5 135,244 Corona FR 146,983 153,783 4 163,054 4 169,745 6 168,303 Beaumont FR 89,962 164,390 9 190,589 13 198,499 13 204,112 Palo Verde Valley FR 46,274 41,945 8 41,745 8 44,432 8 49,673 Public Demand Responsive 548,845 4%767,883 5%206 795,503 5%3.6%219 823,649 5%3.5% 188 840,811 5%2% RTA DAR 199,322 372,322 125 384,442 106 398,636 98 406,000 Riverside Special Transportation Services DAR 145,223 174,058 29 172,725 47 182,878 36 175,276 SunLine DAR 83,956 124,720 31 136,208 45 139,042 33 153,183 Corona DAR 58,892 61,285 12 65,635 12 68,852 12 66,015 Beaumont DAR 28,656 18,786 4 18,710 3 16,899 3 18,640 RTA Taxi 18,536 7,648 -8,539 - 8,271 - 11,963 Banning DAR 9,463 9,064 5 9,244 69,071 69,734 Palo Verde Valley DAR 4,797 ----- -- Specialized Transportation/ Universal Call Program 61,859 0.4%494,516 3% 699%45 559,104 4% 13.1%54 577,736 4%3.3% 50 542,265 3%-6% Fixed Route: RTA Extended Service (Dial-a-Ride Plus)-101,038 108,180 68,726 50,851 RTA Commuter Link -58,466 64,171 62,542 73,635 SunLine Commuter Link 220 -- 12,868 14,528 12,921 SunLine Line 95 North Shore ---26,603 15,605 Paratransit/ Community Shuttle Services: Boys & Girls Club of Southwest County -57,044 13 49,135 16 41,676 14 38,767 Care-A-Van/ HOPE Bus 9,295 20,115 10 25,060 12 29,845 13 22,394 Care Connexxus 13,755 15,829 4 17,597 5 16,333 5 17,296 City of Norco - Senior Shuttle 2,606 1,130 1 2,066 1 1,956 1 2,189 CVAG Roy's Desert Resource Center -38,945 2 46,561 2 45,272 2 17,288 Friends of Moreno Valley MoVan 4,842 5,364 1 4,941 1 3,002 1 4,574 Inland AIDS Project 1,974 2,377 2 2,354 2 2,342 1,723 Operation Safehouse -524 1 309 1 624 1 765 Riverside County Regional Medical Center -10,071 10 9,208 10 5,835 10 7,640 United States Veterans Initiative ----4 5,217 3 2,333 Wildomar Senior Community -440 1 446 -- -- Mileage Reimbursement (one-way trips supported): Court Appointed Special Advocates- CASA -9,380 6,696 5,702 - TRIP - Partnership to Preserve Independent Living (W. County) 24,393 82,383 83,831 87,850 89,828 RIP - SunLine/Partnership to Preserve Independent Living (E. County)--19,779 Bus Passes/ Taxi Vouchers/ Van Pool Trips Community Connect/ TAP Bus Pass Trips -65,263 62,742 65,212 71,230 RCTC Commuter benefits/ Coachella Van Pool Trips -19,037 17,700 18,740 - RTA - Travel Training -5,026 39,334 65,354 81,031 SunLine Taxi Voucher Program -2,084 5,905 10,377 12,416 Mobility Management and Travel Training Projects Care Connexxus - Driver Sensitivity Training -n/a n/a n/a n/a Community Connect/ 211 -n/a n/a n/a n/a Blindness Support - Travel Training -n/a n/a n/a n/a RTA Travel Training -n/a n/a n/a n/a ALL TRIPS: Including Rail, Public Transit, Measure A , JARC and New Freedom 13,886,266 100%15,255,883 100%10%520 15,847,276 100%4%653 16,402,422 100%4%544 16,537,080 100%1% TOTAL POPULATION 2,005,477 2,217,778 2,227,577 2,255,059 2,279,967 Trips per Capita for 2006 Total Population (2,005,477) [4]6.9 Trips per Capita for 2012 Total Population [5]6.9 Trips per Capita for 2013 Total Population [6] Trips per Capita for 2014 Total Population [7]7.3 Trips per Capita for 2015 Total Population [8]7.3 Notes: [1] Public transit operator ridership data extracted from TransTrack 'Table 2 - SRTP Service Summary' on May 10, 2016. Vehicle data reported directly from operators on April 28, 2016. [4] State of California, Department of Finance, July 2007, and July 2011 RCTC's Annual Report FY 14/15 7.1 2007 Coordinated Plan FY 05/06 FY 11/12 RCTC's Annual ReportRCTC's Annual Report FY 12/13 RCTC's Annual Report FY 13/14 [5] RCTC FY 2011/12 Mid-Year Revenue Projects - Department of Finance January 1, 2011, Demographic Research Unit [6] RCTC FY 2012/13 Mid-Year Revenue Projects - Department of Finance January 1, 2012, Demographic Research Unit [8] RCTC FY 2014/15 Mid-Year Revenue Projec ts - Department of Finance January 1, 2014, Demographic Research Unit [2] FY 11‐12 through 13‐14 Annualized from average weekday dail y boardings at Riverside County stations: Riverside, 91 and Inland Empire‐Orange County Lines. FY14‐15 Annualized from average weekday AND average weekend daily boardings at Riverside County stations. There is no weekend service on the Riverside line. [3] Public bus, Fixed Route trip counts for RTA and SunLine do not include Specialized Transportation funded fixed route trips (RTA Extended, Commuterlink and Travel Training, SunLine Commuter, and Community Connect TAP) [7] RCTC FY 2013/14 Mid-Year Revenue Projects - Department of Finance January 1, 2013, Demographic Research Unit PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                                                                                                                                                                                                   59   Other Measures  Other  performance  measures  are  important  to  track,  to  measure  impact  and  to  ascertain  whether  COORDINATED PLAN mobility goals are being realized.  RCTC now regularly produces its RIVERSIDE COUNTY  PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT, FY 2014/2015  the  most  recently  prepared  report.    The  five  indicator  areas  this  document  presents,  while  certainly  not  exhaustive,  provide a comprehensive and comparative picture – from year to year – of public transportation.  This  enables policy makers, providers and members of the public to develop an up‐to‐date reading on the  state of public transit in Riverside County.  Those indicator areas are:   Policy and Compliance – Fare box recovery ratios   Utilization – Trips‐per‐capita   Accessibility and coverage – Population within ¾ mile of fixed‐route transit services   Connectivity – Bus and rail transfers within the county and between counties   Resources – State and local transit funding; transit vehicles; vehicle revenue miles and transit  service area square mileage  All modes of public transportation, including rail, bus, demand response and specialized transportation,  are included in the ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT, providing a full picture each year of transit  initiatives and of the utilization of these services by Riverside County residents and visitors.        PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                                                                                                                                                                                                   60   4.0 ASSESSMENT OF MOBILITY NEEDS and GAPS 4.1 Outreach Approach During January, February and March 2016, the RCTC  team undertook a series of activities to invite  comment  and  input  across  Riverside  County  about  mobility  needs  of  older  adults,  persons  with  disabilities  and  persons  of  low‐income.    These  activities  included  public  meetings  and  workshops,  opportunity  for  e‐comment,  and  compilation  of  written “need” comments received by RCTC over a  three‐year period.   A public hearing on unmet transportation needs was  held  on  January  26 th,  advertised  and  noticed  to  RCTC’s master mailing list and information provided  on the home page of RCTC’s website.  Five outreach  workshops were held at locations across the County  through  February  with  information  about  these  workshops in both English and Spanish mailed to 880  agencies  and  emailed  to  326  individual  email  addresses, including both agencies and some citizen  participants.    A project website provided for an on‐ line capability for receiving input and its availability was advertised.  Attendance at RCTC’s Citizens  Advisory Committee and the North Shore Community Council brought back additional input.  Three  years of written comments, “Transportation Network” respondents, were compiled and involved over  440 agency responses.   Between participation at RCTC workshops, through its Transportation Network process, public meetings,  and public comments received, more than 200 individuals or organizations contributed in some manner  to this public input process.           PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                                                                                                                                                                                                   61   4.2 Countywide Overview of Findings This section highlights countywide findings while the subsequent sections focus on outreach findings for  specific geographic sub‐areas of Riverside County.    Every year, RCTC distributes an invitation to public agencies and other human service organizations to  be included in RCTC’s Transportation Network database.  This provides for a regular updating of RCTC’s  contacts and some opportunity for a basic level of input from participating entities, generally agency  representatives.  A review of three years of Transportation Network cards, a total of 441 records, found  that about one‐third reported on how well their consumers’ transportation needs were met.  Figure 4‐1  shows  that  more  than  half  of  these  149  respondents  who  reported  constituents’  mobility  needs,  indicated these were “always” met (18%) or “often” met (36%).  Another 37% indicated that mobility  needs are “sometimes” met.   Less than 10% indicated mobility needs are “rarely” (9%) or “never” (1%)  met, suggesting that in these cases public transportation solutions are unlikely.     Figure 4‐1, How Well are Consumers’ Mobility Needs Met        The  general  distribution  of  responses  to  this  question  underscores  the  importance  of  specialized  transportation options to address unique mobility challenges, those specific, particular needs that mean  “sometimes” mobility needs are not met.   18% 36%37% 9% 1% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Always Often Sometimes Rarely Never Riverside Transportation Network Respondents: How well are your consumers' mobility needs met? n=149 PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                                                                                                                                                                                                   62   More detail as to the nature of the constituents’ mobility needs was reported by one hundred twenty‐ eight (128) agency representatives.   Figure 4‐2 shows responses grouped into 18 categories.  The three  categories of mobility need most frequently identified were:    1) affordability   2) coverage     3) long ride times on bus or van.     Figure 4‐2, Key Mobility Concerns      Affordability comments (15.6%) included requests for further discounts on bus passes because it was  difficult for the lowest‐income to afford bus fare.  Commenters noted that their constituents have  difficulty  affording  car  ownership  while  others  reiterated  that bus fare, modest though it is, is  sometimes beyond the means of some transit users or for some trips.  Coverage comments (11.7%) included numerous references to the limited to no transportation available  in rural and unincorporated areas of Riverside County.   Three agencies noted that they wished the ADA  dial‐a‐ride service traveled farther.    Ride times long on buses or vans comments (8.6%) reflect both the distances that define Riverside  County  and  sometimes  the  multiple  trips  or  transfers  that  individuals  must  make,  but  also  the  0.8% 1.6% 2.3% 2.3% 3.1% 3.9% 3.9% 4.7% 4.7% 4.7% 5.5% 5.5% 7.0% 7.0% 7.0% 8.6% 11.7% 15.6% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% Pedestrian safety Driver courtesy/ senior frierndly transportation Bus stop amenities for wheelchairs and safety Equipment concerns (AC/ Vehicle breakdowns) Wheelchair access issues DAR wait times for pick‐up Weekend service expanded Connectivity issues Door‐thru‐door/ rider asssistance needed Information ‐ trip planning Medical transport Sustainable/ adequate funding for agency… First / last mile & distance to stops Frequency Later evening hours Ride times long on buses/ van Coverage Affordability Riverside County Transportation Network Respondents Key Mobility Concerns, n=128 comments PUBLIC TRANSIT‐HUMAN SERVICES TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN  FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, 2016 UPDATE                                                                                                                                                                                                                   63   implications of making them on public transportation.  Many trips are long.  For some, the amount of  time it takes to travel from origin to destination on public transit is an impediment to mobility.     Three topics were tied for the fourth‐ranked position, each with 7% of all comments:  later evening  hours, increased frequency, and first and last mile concerns including distances to bus stops.     Another two topics were tied in the fifth‐ranked position at 5.9% of comments:  sustainable funding for  agency transportation and medical transport options.    The remaining ten topics each received fewer than 5% of all comments but was reinforced by comments  heard in other outreach activities of this Coordinated Plan update.    Appendix A presents the area‐specific detail from public meetings and public input presented for each of  the three geographic sub‐areas of Riverside County: Western Riverside County, the Coachella Valley and  Palo Verde Valley.      4.3 Ten Key Themes Heard from Outreach This concluding section identifies the general themes emerging from outreach discussions across the  county.  In each of the three sub‐regions, various compliments were noted and service elements that  are “working well” were reported, while areas of gap and need were also identified.     Important  to  this  review  of  needs  and  mobility  gaps,  is  that  among  Transportation  Network  card  respondents – about 150 agencies – more than half indicated that mobility needs were “always” or  “often met.”  Mobility needs were reported as only “sometimes” met by 37% of respondents.  This  suggest that needs are specific and targeted and that, by and large, a basic mobility network does  exist in Riverside County.  It appears to be doing its job most of the time.  Commentary received also  suggests that