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09 September 12, 2018 CommissionComments are welcomed by the Commission. If you wish to provide comments to the Commission, please complete and submit a Speaker Card to the Clerk of the Board. SPECIAL MEETING AGENDA TIME/DATE: 9:00 a.m. / Wednesday, September 12, 2018 LOCATION: BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside COMMISSIONERS Chair – Dana Reed Vice Chair – Chuck Washington Second Vice Chair – Ben J. Benoit Kevin Jeffries, County of Riverside, District 1 John F. Tavaglione, County of Riverside, District 2 Chuck Washington, County of Riverside, District 3 V. Manuel Perez, County of Riverside, District 4 Marion Ashley, County of Riverside, District 5 Deborah Franklin / Art Welch, City of Banning Lloyd White / Nancy Carroll, City of Beaumont Joseph DeConinck / Tim Wade, City of Blythe Jim Hyatt / Linda Molina, City of Calimesa Randall Bonner / Vicki Warren, City of Canyon Lake Greg Pettis / Shelley Kaplan, City of Cathedral City Steven Hernandez / To Be Appointed, City of Coachella Karen Spiegel / Randy Fox, City of Corona Scott Matas / Russell Betts, City of Desert Hot Springs Adam Rush / Clint Lorimore, City of Eastvale Linda Krupa / Russ Brown, City of Hemet Dana Reed / To Be Appointed, City of Indian Wells Michael Wilson / Glenn Miller, City of Indio Brian Berkson / Verne Lauritzen, City of Jurupa Valley Kathleen Fitzpatrick / Robert Radi, City of La Quinta Bob Magee / Natasha Johnson, City of Lake Elsinore Bill Zimmerman / John Denver, City of Menifee Victoria Baca / Ulises Cabrera, City of Moreno Valley Rick Gibbs / Jonathan Ingram, City of Murrieta Berwin Hanna / Ted Hoffman, City of Norco Jan Harnik / Kathleen Kelly, City of Palm Desert Lisa Middleton / Jon R. Roberts, City of Palm Springs Michael M. Vargas / Rita Rogers, City of Perris Ted Weill / Charles Townsend, City of Rancho Mirage Rusty Bailey / Andy Melendrez, City of Riverside Andrew Kotyuk / Scott Miller, City of San Jacinto Michael S. Naggar / Matt Rahn, City of Temecula Ben J. Benoit / Timothy Walker, City of Wildomar John Bulinski, Governor’s Appointee Caltrans District 8 COMM-COMM-00095 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ROLL CALL SEPTEMBER 12, 2018 County of Riverside, District I County of Riverside, District II County of Riverside, District Ill County of Riverside, District IV County of Riverside, District V City of Banning City of Beaumont City of Blythe City of Calimesa City of Canyon Lake City of Cathedral City City of Coachella City of Corona City of Desert Hot Springs City of Eastvale City of Hemet City of Indian Wells City of Indio City of Jurupa Valley City of La Quinta City of Lake Elsinore City of Menifee City of Moreno Valley City of Murrieta City of Norco City of Palm Desert City of Palm Springs City of Perris City of Rancho Mirage City of Riverside City of San Jacinto City of Temecula City of Wildomar Governor's Appointee, Caltrans District 8 Absent LI ~ LI D LI g I ~ RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION COMMISSIONER SIGN-IN SHEET SEPTEMBER 12, 2018 NAME AGENCY E_MAIL ADDRESS Tara Byerly From: Sent: To: Cc: Subject: Tara Byerly Thursday, September 06, 2018 11 :00 AM Tara Byerly Lisa Mobley; Anne Mayer; JOHN STANDIFORD RCTC: September Commission Special Meeting Agenda -September 12, 2018 Good morning Commissioners, The September Agenda for the Commission Special meeting scheduled for Wednesday, September 12 @ -is available. Please copy the link: http:Urctcdev .info/ uploads/media items/se pte m be r-specia 1-meeti ng-agenda-se pt em be r-12-2018.o rigi na I. pdf Also, attached for your review and information is the conflict of interest memo and form. Conflict of Conflict of Interest Form.pelf Interest Memo.p ... Please let me know if you have any questions. Thank you. Respectfully, Tara Byerly Deputy Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 951.787.7141 W 1951.787.7906 F 4080 Lemon St. 3rd Fl. I P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502 rctc.org f 'tJ1 in EJ 1 Tara Byerly From: Sent: To: Subject: Tara Byerly Thursday, September 06, 2018 11 :22 AM Tara Byerly RCTC: September Commission Special Meeting Agenda -September 12, 2018 Good afternoon Commission Alternates, The September Agenda for the Commission Special meeting scheduled for Wednesday, September 12 @ -is available. Please copy the link: http://rctcdev.info/uploads/media items/september-special-meeting-agenda-september-12-2018.original.pdf Respectfully, Tara Byerly Deputy Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission 951.787.7141 W 1951.787.7906 F 4080 Lemon St. 3rd Fl. I P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92502 rctc.org f W in E> 1 TO: FROM: DATE: SUBJECT: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Riverside County Transportation Commission Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board September 4, 2018 G.C. 84308 Compliance -Potential Conflict of Interest California Government Code 84308 states a Commissioner may not participate in any discussion or action concerning a contract or amendment if a campaign contribution of more than $250 is received in the past 12 months or 3 months following the conclusion from a bidder or bidder's agent. This prohibition does not apply to the awarding of contracts that are competitively bid. The Commission's procurement division asks potential vendors to disclose any contributions made to the campaigns of any Commissioner as part of their submitted bid packets. As an additional precaution, those entities are included below in an effort to give Commissioners opportunity to review their campaign statements for potential conflicts. Please note the entities listed in this memo are not encompassing of alf potential conflicts and are in addition to any personal conflicts of interest such as those disclosed on Statement of Economic Interests -Form 700 or prohibited by Government Code Section 1090. Please contact me should you have any questions. Agenda Item No. 6A -Closed Session -Conference with Real Propertv Neqotiator(s} Item APN(s) Property Owner(s) Buyer(s) 1 349-090-028 Riverside County Transportation Commission Luis Arreguin 2 345-080-073 Riverside County Transportation Rod Arsalan and Commission Roberto de la Torre 3 285-210-018 Riverside County Transportation Conrad Thuy and and 285-210-019 Commission Marie Pham 4 279-190-046 Riverside County Transportation Diana and Bruce Luo and Commission (Best Investment, LLC) '" .. ~ .. ~~~-919-····· -~~· ... ··~·· 1-" --~ '"·'•···" --··-·····t-· ....... ----····--··--·--·-···-··----.. -------·----·--·---~·-·-··--·-· ------· ·-· -····----· -·-· -· -----"> ···-· .-, __ ... Alice Dilworth, Nelson Dilworth, Gloria Riverside County 5 465-100-001 Lynn Gatton, George Michael Dilworth Transportation and Janet Kaye Dilworth Parish Commission RCTC Potential Conflicts of Interest September 4, 2018 Page 2 Agenda Item No. BF -Enterprise Resource Planning ·Software Implementation Project Management Ot1ersight Consultant(s): SDI Presence LLC Sharee L. Wolff, CFO 200 E. Randolph Street, Suite 3550 Chicago, IL 60601 . .. RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION www.rctc.org SPECIAL MEETING AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, September 12, 2018 BOARD ROOM County of Riverside Administrative Center 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, CA In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting at the Commission office, 4080 Lemon Street, Third Floor, Riverside, CA, and on the Commission’s website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Government Code Section 54954.2, and the Federal Transit Administration Title VI, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141 if special assistance is needed to participate in a Commission meeting, including accessibility and translation services. Assistance is provided free of charge. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to the meeting time will assist staff in assuring reasonable arrangements can be made to provide assistance at the meeting. 1. CALL TO ORDER 2. ROLL CALL 3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS – Each individual speaker is limited to speak three (3) continuous minutes or less. The Commission may, either at the direction of the Chair or by majority vote of the Commission, waive this three-minute time limitation. Depending on the number of items on the Agenda and the number of speakers, the Chair may, at his/her discretion, reduce the time of each speaker to two (2) continuous minutes. In addition, the maximum time for public comment for any individual item or topic is thirty (30) minutes. Also, the Commission may terminate public comments if such comments become repetitious. Speakers may not yield their time to others without the consent of the Chair. Any written documents to be distributed or presented to the Commission shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board. This policy applies to Public Comments and comments on Agenda Items. Under the Brown Act, the Commission should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda that are not listed on the agenda. Commission members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – JULY 11, 2018 Riverside County Transportation Commission Special Meeting Agenda September 12, 2018 Page 2 6. CLOSED SESSION 6A. CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS Pursuant to Government Code Section 54956.8 Agency Negotiator: Executive Director or Designee Property Owner(s): See Below Item APN(s) Property Owner(s) Buyer(s) 1 349-090-028 Riverside County Transportation Commission Luis Arreguin 2 345-080-073 Riverside County Transportation Commission Rod Arsalan and Roberto de la Torre 3 285-210-018 and 285-210-019 Riverside County Transportation Commission Conrad Thuy and Marie Pham 4 279-190-046 and 279-240-019 Riverside County Transportation Commission Diana and Bruce Luo (Best Investment, LLC) 5 465-100-001 Alice Dilworth, Nelson Dilworth, Gloria Lynn Gatton, George Michael Dilworth and Janet Kaye Dilworth Parish Riverside County Transportation Commission 7. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS – The Commission may add an item to the Agenda after making a finding that there is a need to take immediate action on the item and that the item came to the attention of the Commission subsequent to the posting of the agenda. An action adding an item to the agenda requires 2/3 vote of the Commission. If there are less than 2/3 of the Commission members present, adding an item to the agenda requires a unanimous vote. Added items will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 8. CONSENT CALENDAR – All matters on the Consent Calendar will be approved in a single motion unless a Commissioner(s) requests separate action on specific item(s). Items pulled from the Consent Calendar will be placed for discussion at the end of the agenda. 8A. SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY REPORT Page 1 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the fourth quarter ended June 30, 2018. Riverside County Transportation Commission Special Meeting Agenda September 12, 2018 Page 3 8B. QUARTERLY INVESTMENT REPORT Page 3 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended June 30, 2018. 8C. FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION TRIENNIAL REVIEW RESULTS Page 80 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file a report on the 2018 Triennial Review of the Commission performed by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). 8D. PROPOSITION 1B CALIFORNIA TRANSIT SECURITY GRANT PROGRAM 2018 SITE VISIT SUMMARY Page 99 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Proposition 1B California Transit Security Grant Program (CTSGP) 2018 Site Visit Summary. 8E. FISCAL YEAR 2016/17 TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT ACT AND MEASURE A AUDIT RESULTS Page 101 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Transportation Development Act (TDA) and Measure A audit results report for Fiscal Year 2016/17. 8F. ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING SOFTWARE IMPLEMENTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Page 109 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve sole source Agreement No. 19-19-003-00 to SDI Presence, LLC (SDI) for Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software implementation project management oversight for a two-year period in the amount of $436,800, plus a 15 percent contingency amount of $65,500, for a total amount not to exceed $502,300; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; Riverside County Transportation Commission Special Meeting Agenda September 12, 2018 Page 4 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve contingency work pursuant to the agreement terms up to the total amount; and 4) Approve a budget adjustment in the amount of $251,100. 8G. QUARTERLY PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT METRICS REPORT, APRIL – JUNE 2018 Page 134 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Report for April – June 2018. 8H. SB 132 AGREEMENT FOR MCKINLEY GRADE SEPARATION PROJECT Page 139 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 19-31-005-00 with the city of Corona for the McKinley Grade Separation project that received an allocation of $84,450,000 of SB 132 funds; and 2) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement and any future amendments considered minor, with the exception of changes to funding. 8I. FISCAL YEAR 2018/19 ANNUAL LOCAL TRANSPORTATION FUND PLANNING ALLOCATIONS TO WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS AND COACHELLA VALLEY ASSOCIATION OF GOVERNMENTS Page 165 Overview This item is for the Commission to approve an allocation of Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds for planning in the amount of $775,500 for Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) and $423,000 for the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) for efforts identified in each agency’s Fiscal Year 2018/19 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan (Work Plan) that supports transportation planning programs and functions consistent with regional and subregional plans, programs, and requirements. Riverside County Transportation Commission Special Meeting Agenda September 12, 2018 Page 5 8J. RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY FISCAL YEAR 2018/2019 SHORT RANGE TRANSIT PLAN AMENDMENT Page 175 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve an amendment to the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) Fiscal Year 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) for $22.1 million related to the payment of RTA’s current unfunded pension liability; 2) Approve an allocation of $22.1 million in Local Transportation Fund (LTF) Western County Bus Unallocated LTF fund balance to provide funding for RTA to pay its current unfunded pension liability; and 3) Approve an adjustment to the FY 2018/19 budget in the amount of $22.1 million to increase transit operating expenditures. 8K. RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016/17 Page 177 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Riverside County Public Transportation: Annual Countywide Performance Report (Countywide Report) for Fiscal Year 2016/17. 8L. CONSTRUCTION AGREEMENT WITH SPECTRUM CONSTRUCTION GROUP FOR THE INTERSTATE 15 EXPRESS LANES REGIONAL OPERATIONS CENTER AND STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE FACILITY AND THE 91 EXPRESS LANES CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTER Page 225 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 18-31-170-00 to Spectrum Construction Group, Inc. (Spectrum), as the lowest responsible bidder submitting a responsive bid, for the construction of the Interstate 15 Express Lanes Regional Operations Center (ROC) and Storage and Maintenance Facility (SAM) and the 91 Express Lanes Customer Service Center (CSC) project (Project) in the amount of $3,600,075, plus a contingency amount of $360,000, for a total amount not to exceed $3,960,075; 2) Waive informalities and minor irregularities in the Spectrum bid; 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 4) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve contingency work up to the total amount not to exceed as required for the Project; and Riverside County Transportation Commission Special Meeting Agenda September 12, 2018 Page 6 5) Approve a $1,157,550 adjustment to the Fiscal Year 2018/19 budget to increase toll building construction costs. 8M. AGREEMENT WITH THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FOR A SENATE BILL 1 FUNDED OPERATION OF THE FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL PROGRAM IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY Page 249 Overview This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 19-45-007-00 with the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) for the operation of the Riverside County Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) program in an amount not to exceed $1,656,973 in SB 1 funding; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 3) Approve an adjustment to the Fiscal Year 2018/19 motorist assistance budget in the amount of $347,900, to increase revenues for the Freeway Service Patrol program; and 4) Adopt Resolution No. 18-015 “Approving the Agreement with the California Department of Transportation For SB 1 Funded Operation of FSP Program in Riverside County”. 9. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Page 261 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. 10. UPDATE ON THE REGIONAL TRUCK AND LOGISTICS MITIGATION FEE STUDY AND REVIEW OF THE DRAFT NEXUS STUDY Page 269 Overview This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on the Regional Truck Study. 11. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR AGENDA 12. COMMISSIONERS / EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR REPORT Overview This item provides the opportunity for the Commissioners and the Executive Director to report on attended meetings/conferences and any other items related to Commission activities. Riverside County Transportation Commission Special Meeting Agenda September 12, 2018 Page 7 13. ADJOURNMENT The next meeting of the Commission is scheduled to be held on Wednesday, October 10, 2018, Board Room, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. DATE: I ~ DETACH AND SUBMIT TO THE CLERK OF THE BOARD q /) C< I I CD CHECK IF SUBJECT OF PUBLIC COMMENTS: a PUBLIC COMMENTS: _________________ _ AGENDA ITEM NO.: / ~1 J SUBJECT OF (AS LISTED ON THE AGENDA) ~flj AGENDA ITEM: __________________ _ NAME: joJ!v /'1of?l9AJV PHONE NO.:. ____ _ ADDRESS: ;)..(}&, ?z VJ r ( f1 01.. \/£-. STREET CITY ZIP CODE REPRESENTING: PHONE NO.:. ______ _ NAME OF AGENCY I ORGANIZATION I GROUP BUSINESS ADDRESS:_--=---------------------------STREET CITY ZIP CODE DETACH AND-SUBMIT TO THE-CLERK OF THE BOARD DATE: 'Jj.n/Jl g CHECK IF SUBJECT OF k f":. PUBLIC COMMENTS: ,t. PUBLIC COMMENTS:._1..L..1-.(_,,_V=Cc..z..._,,.__....._n-='=E-~----------AGENDA ITEM NO.: L\ SUBJECT OF (AS LISTED ON THE AGENDA) AGENDA ITEM:. __________________ _ NAME: , \of\ Sh~r o\\ovv PHONE NO.:. _____ _ ADDRESS: ______________________________ _ STREET CITY ZIP CODE REPRESENTING: NA!oP PHONE NO.:. _____ _ NAME OF AGENCY I ORGANIZATION I GROUP BUSINESS ADDRESS: ___________________________ _ STREET CITY ZIP CODE AGENDA ITEM 5 MINUTES RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION MINUTES Wednesday, July 11, 2018 1. CALL TO ORDER The Riverside County Transportation Commission was called to order by Chair Dana Reed at 9:30 a.m. in the Board Room at the County of Riverside Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, First Floor, Riverside, California, 92501. 2. ROLL CALL Commissioners/Alternates Present Commissioners Absent Marion Ashley Clint Lorimore Rick Gibbs Victoria Baca Bob Magee Kevin Jeffries Ben J. Benoit Scott Matas John F. Tavaglione Brian Berkson Andy Melendrez Ted Weill Randall Bonner Lisa Middleton City of Menifee Joseph DeConinck Michael Naggar Ray Desselle V. Manuel Perez Kathleen Fitzpatrick Greg Pettis Deborah Franklin Dana Reed Berwin Hanna Karen Spiegel Jan Harnik Michael M. Vargas Steven Hernandez Chuck Washington Jim Hyatt Michael Wilson Andrew Kotyuk Lloyd White Linda Krupa 3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE Clerk of the Board Lisa Mobley led the Commission in a flag salute. 4. PUBLIC COMMENTS Jon Shardlow, representing NAIOP, expressed concern about the pace of the fee study that was presented at the June Commission meeting. He explained seeing the technical data there are questions, they tried to engage staff with technical, policy and legal issues, and tried to offer data and was told it will come later. He explained it is NAIOP’s understanding several of the member cities just learned about the fee and NAIOP has not reached out to their members about the fee since they were told it was preliminary and Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 2 based on incomplete and limited data. Mr. Shardlow requested to put this as an agenda item in the future, conduct workshops, and be given some of the documents to back up the fee. He expressed NAIOP wants to be a stakeholder and appreciative they have a seat at the technical meetings. He provided a few examples of the fee issues included in NAIOP’s letter, which was received on July 9 and distributed to the Commissioners. Chris Sanford, Black Creek Group representative, explained they currently own and operate over 500 million square feet of assets within the Inland Empire 2 million is in Riverside County. Mr. Sanford concurred with Mr. Shardlow’s comment there are some preliminary flaws in the truck fee study. He explained as a developer they want to be more involved in the process in the study, as many of the impacts have not been assessed. He discussed some of the initial truck fees that will broadly be applied within Riverside County. Mr. Sanford expressed this will detract interest for them to invest in several of those cities in Riverside County especially in some that do not realize the true value from that investment. He suggested the Commissioners and staff reach out to the development community to keep them involved as this study moves forward. Jason Korengold, Conor Commercial Real Estate representative, stated they are a national developer focusing on cities throughout the nation especially the Inland Empire in Riverside County. He expressed concern as a stakeholder about the regional logistics fee proposed by the Commission and staff and requested an opportunity to be a member and to be included in the review of the study and the fees as proposed. John Semcken, Majestic Reality representative, explained they are the largest privately held real estate development in the country with over 10 million square feet in Southern California. He requested an active participation process between the Commission and Majestic Reality. Mr. Semcken explained understanding the issues with traffic and the issues with respect to competition within not only California and the Inland Empire, but also the many tenants that are going to other states due to the cost of doing business in Southern California. Mr. Semcken stated they recognize there is not a need there has to be some nexus that they are required to do to see that there is a transportation fee. He reiterated being a part of the process and it is imperative the truck fee is fair, and it is charged equitably based on where the impact comes from. In response to Commissioner Michael Naggar’s request to have an agenda item at the next Commission meeting to discuss having a stakeholder workshop as it relates to the Nexus Study, Anne Mayer, Executive Director, replied all of the conversations regarding this Nexus Study and stakeholder input will take place at this Commission meeting, a committee meeting, or an established stakeholder meeting that is open to the public. She stated staff could certainly put this on the agenda in September. Commissioner Naggar clarified it is not an agenda item so there is no in depth discussion and requested having the workshops complete before the Commission scopes the Nexus Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 3 Study as public speakers could of had valuable information that would have went into the scope. He suggested it is very important to have stakeholder meetings that also govern the scope of the Nexus Study and to put this on a future agenda so the Commission could approve stakeholder meetings. Commissioner Michael Vargas expressed support for Commissioner Naggar’s comments. Steve DeBaun, Legal Counsel, stated there will be a future agenda item and requested the Commissioners refrain from further discussion of this item until it is agendized for a future item. 5. APPROVAL OF MINUTES – JUNE 13, 2018 M/S/C (Baca/Ashley) to approve the June 13, 2018 minutes as submitted. 6. PUBLIC HEARING – RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSIT SERVICES FUNDING ALLOCATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018/19 At this time, Chair Reed opened the public hearing. John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director, presented the Fiscal Year 2018/19 funding allocation for Riverside County transit services, highlighting the following areas: • Short Range Transit Plans (SRTPs) FYs 2018/19 – 2020/21 – Cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, Riverside; the Commission’s Commuter Rail Program; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency; Riverside Transit Agency; and Sunline Transit Agency (SunLine) John Standiford referred to Commissioner Jim Hyatt’s concern raised at the June Budget and Implementation Committee about the need for transit in the city of Calimesa and possibly a private sector involvement looking and Uber and Lyft. Staff is continuing to study this also staff is aware there is a concern and are looking to work with cities in the San Gorgonio Pass Area as there are two operators in that area. Mr. Standiford explained there are some discussions between the cities of Banning and Beaumont on transit issues. He stated the Commission wants to be able to play the leadership role and help both cities address some of those concerns as well as the city of Calimesa. He stated staff will return at a future Commission meeting with an update. At this time, John Standiford referred to the public hearing for the proposed FTA Section 5307 and presented the FY 2018/19 transit funding request, highlighting the following: • Riverside County FY 2018/19 transit funding request • Operating and capital program funds – FY 2018/19 versus FY 2017/18 Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 4 • FY 2018/19 Transit Revenue Outlook: LTF, Measure, and STA • FY 2018/19 transit financial plan by revenue source At this time, Chair Reed asked if there were any comments from the public. No comments were received. At this time, Chair Reed closed the public hearing. Commissioner Russell Betts stated as past Chair for SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine) there is an issue that came up regarding SunLine’s funding. He explained when the Commission’s estimate is received it ended up being a lower number and SunLine had to make some service line adjustments as there was not enough funding to meet the needs of riders. He is uncertain where this one is and is requesting to ensure in those variances that are necessary to keep it as narrow as possible for budgeting and transit agency purposes. John Standiford replied staff strives to do that and reiterated the Commission had more revenue these past few years than originally expected. He explained staff tries to take a very conservative approach and part of that collaborative process is the SRTPs. Staff reaches out to the transit agencies early, find out what those expectations are, and the Commission has some reserves to address additional service. Staff is in communication with SunLine’s General Manager Lauren Skiver, regarding this issue as staff does not want this to be a problem. Commissioner Betts expressed gratitude and said they have enjoyed the working relationship. Anne Mayer explained it is a matter of timing since the Commission is required by law to provide transit operators with an estimate of their next year’s revenue by March 1 of the previous year, yet staff does not receive the final true up for the previous fiscal year until the end of September. She stated the Commission is running on projected numbers in addition some of that carry over is money that was not spent the previous year. Before the next round of projections there will be a workshop with the transit agencies to discuss how to make this process more flexible so they are not in the situation that Commissioner Betts mentioned. Commissioner Andrew Melendrez stated in regards to Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) there have been minimal increases in ridership since there are alternative choices. He explained some of the things RTA struggles with is finding the funds or budgeting for more innovative approaches. He asked if there is a certain amount of funding that could be put in a budget through the Commission in order to look at more innovative approaches and adding a pilot project to RTA to create more of a competitive edge as a bus service. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 5 John Standiford explained there are meetings on a regular basis, RTA’s Chief Executive Officer Larry Rubio brings innovative ideas, and as part of the SRTPs that are submitted each year technology improvements can definitely be part of the service. M/S/C (Vargas/Hyatt) to: 1) Conduct a public hearing at its July Commission meeting on the proposed Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Section 5307 Program of Projects (POP); 2) Approve the Fiscal Year 2018/19 FTA Sections 5307 and 5311 POP for Riverside County (County); 3) Approve the FY 2018/19 Local Transportation Fund (LTF) and State Transit Assistance (STA) fund allocations for transit; 4) Direct staff to add projects into the Federal Transportation Improvement Program (FTIP); and 5) Adopt Resolution No. 18-011, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission to Allocate State Transit Assistance Funds”. 7. ADDITIONS / REVISIONS There were no additions or revisions to the agenda. 8. CONSENT CALENDAR At this time, Commissioner Greg Pettis left the meeting. M/S/C (Vargas/White) to approve the following Consent Calendar items. Abstain: Spiegel on Agenda Item 8G 8A. STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATIVE UPDATE 1) Receive and file an update on state and federal legislation; and 2) Adopt the following bill position: a) AB 2734 (Frazier) – Support. 8B. SB 1 LOCAL PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM FORMULA CYCLE 2 PROJECT NOMINATION 1) Approve the project nomination for the SB 1 Local Partnership Program (LPP) Formula Cycle 2 funds for the Interstate 215/Placentia Interchange project; 2) Approve match funds by programming $7,042,000 of Measure A Community and Environmental Transportation Acceptability Program (CETAP) funds; and Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 6 3) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review and upon California Transportation Commission (CTC) adoption of the LPP Formula program of projects, to execute agreements required for programming SB 1 LPP Formula funding. 8C. FISCAL YEARS 2018/19 – 2022/23 MEASURE A FIVE-YEAR CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANS FOR THE LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROGRAM Approve the Fiscal Years 2018/19 – 2022/23 Measure A Five-Year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) for Local Streets and Roads (LSR) as submitted by the participating agencies. 8D. ON CALL PURCHASE AGREEMENT FOR FASTRAK® 6C TRANSPONDERS 1) Award the following on call purchase agreements to provide FasTrak® 6C transponders for an initial three-year term, in an amount not to exceed an aggregate value of $7,266,000: a) Agreement No. 18-31-094-00 to Kapsch TrafficCom USA, Inc.; and b) Agreement No. 18-31-161-00 to Neology; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to execute purchase orders awarded to the contractors under the terms of the agreements. 8E. REVISED 91 EXPRESS LANES TRANSPONDER AND CUSTOMER ACCOUNT PLAN FEE POLICIES Adopt Resolution No. 18-012 “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Regarding the Revised 91 Express Lanes Transponder and Customer Account Plan Fee Policies”. 8F. CHANGE ORDER TO AMEND THE INTERSTATE 15 EXPRESS LANES PROJECT TOLL SERVICES AGREEMENT WITH KAPSCH TRAFFICCOM USA FOR THE INTERSTATE 15/STATE ROUTE 91 EXPRESS LANES CONNECTOR PROJECT 1) Approve Change Order No. 5 to Agreement No. 16-31-043-00 for the Interstate 15 Express Lanes Project (I-15 ELP) with Kapsch TrafficCom USA Inc. (Kapsch) to design, install, and maintain a replacement (and upgrade) of the 91 Express Lanes roadside toll system to support the Interstate 15/State Route 91 Express Lanes Connector (15/91 ELC) project in the amount of $4,478,461, plus a contingency amount of $500,000 for a total amount not to exceed $4,978,461; Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 7 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the change order on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director or designee to approve contingency work up to the total amount not to exceed as required for the project. 8G. CONSTRUCTION AGREEMENT WITH RIVERSIDE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. FOR THE NORTHMOOR DRIVE SOUNDWALL 1) Award Agreement No. 18-31-141-00 to Riverside Construction Company, Inc. (Riverside Construction), as the lowest responsive, responsible bidder, for the construction of the Northmoor Drive Soundwall project (Project) in the amount of $1,705,000, plus a contingency amount of $170,500 for a total amount not to exceed $1,875,500; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve contingency work pursuant to the agreement terms up to the total amount. 8H. CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT RE-VALIDATION AND ADDENDUM; AGREEMENT WITH JACOBS ENGINEERING GROUP, INC. FOR THE SWEENEY MITIGATION SITE OF THE MID COUNTY PARKWAY PROJECT 1) Adopt Resolution No. 18-013, “Resolution of the Riverside County Transportation Commission Adopting an Addendum to the Previously Certified Environmental Impact Report (SCH #2004111103) for the Mid County Parkway and Approving the Proposed Changes to the Mid County Parkway Associated with the Addition of the Sweeney Mitigation Site and Approving a Contract for Associated Plans”; 2) Award sole source Agreement No. 18-31-147-00 with Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. (Jacobs) for preparation of plans, specifications and estimates (PS&E) of construction documents and construction support services for the Sweeney mitigation site in the amount of $295,844, plus a contingency amount of $29,584, for a total amount not to exceed $325,428; 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; and 4) Authorize the Executive Director or designee to approve the use of the contingency amount as may be required for these services. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 8 8I. AMENDMENT WITH T.Y. LIN INTERNATIONAL FOR THE MID COUNTY PARKWAY INTERSTATE 215/PLACENTIA AVENUE INTERCHANGE IMPROVEMENT PROJECT 1) Approve Amendment No. 16-31-066-01, Amendment No. 1 to Agreement No. 16-31-066-00, with T.Y. Lin International (T.Y. Lin) to perform additional biological surveys and design services related to the Interstate 215/Placentia Avenue interchange improvement (I-215/Placentia Avenue) project for an additional amount of $299,498, and a total amount not to exceed $4,053,498; 2) Approve Agreement No. 18-73-162-00 with the Riverside County Transportation Department (County) as a cooperative agreement to identify responsibilities for the final design, construction management services, and construction related to the Harvill Avenue and Placentia Street traffic signal and the County’s cost share estimated at $210,000; and 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreements on behalf of the Commission. At this time, Commissioner Pettis rejoined the meeting. 9. PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT PROGRAM Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director, presented the Public Engagement Program where by the Commission will directly communicate with County’s residents and highlighted the following areas: • Touch choices ahead – Riverside County faces a $12 billion shortfall in capital funding to meet the infrastructure needs of the County by 2039 • Might get tougher – Funding to meet capital needs in Riverside County by 2039 No SB 1, due to construction materials cause cost to increase beyond their original estimates, which could delay projects or raise revenue • A list of projects in need of funding the Commission or the public have prioritized within the last few years, which remain without a certain funding source • Insight from former President Abraham Lincoln describes the power and necessity of public sentiment • Information is more freely available then anytime in human history: Displayed a quote, “The trouble with quotes on the internet is that you can never know if they are genuine” • Over 81 percent of the voters in Riverside County sees a need for more transportation investment • More than 59 percent of the voters feel there is a need to invest more • Nearly two-thirds of people in the County do not know enough to offer an opinion about what the Commission is doing Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 9 • At the focus groups last year it was made clear to the Commission is that the public wants something to be done and it does not matter who it is that does it • The reason for proposing the Public Engagement Program: the financial realities, public sentiment, and the needs of this County today and in the future • Specific measurable agreed upon Realistic and time bound (SMART) goals, descriptions, and deadlines At this time, Aaron Hake welcomed and introduced CEO Scott Wilkinson of Alpha Vu to discuss what Alpha Vu is proposing to do for the Commission and highlighted the following: • Multi-media approach strategy, measure and analyze overview – developing content, content distribution, advertising, target group response, and public database • Comprehensive plan outreach calendar over 31 months to reach the Commission’s goals • Comprehensive team – the team members, specialized roles, and local experience highlights • Holistic, actionable data – the Commission sentiment score for April 2018 graphic At this time, Aaron Hake presented the costs associated with the Public Engagement Program, highlighting the following: • Small cost, high impact: 1) .04 percent of total Commission Budget for FY 2018/19; 2) 3 cents/month per adult resident; 3) Direct engagement and education; and 4) Enhanced decision-making data Commissioner Michael Naggar expressed appreciation to Mr. Hake and Mr. Wilkinson for a very comprehensive presentation and stated the city of Temecula supports it as this is very important. He inquired if the intent is to get this program up and running before this November’s election especially since it relates to SB 1 and this Commission’s position on SB 1. Aaron Hake replied it is not designed towards that specific milestone though the public will see content from the Commission almost immediately in August, September, and October leading up to the election. The Commission is also educating the public on SB 1, which is one component of the communications. Aaron Hake then discussed what the Commission is trying to integrate related to this program and how it is multifaceted. In response to Commissioner Naggar’s question if there is any virtue on focusing certain communications in certain areas, Aaron Hake replied absolutely and that is one of the reasons when looking at the candidates for this program that Alpha Vu really appealed to staff. He explained Alpha Vu was able to use data to segment the market for the Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 10 Commission and to use data to show what do the people in this community care about and discuss it. Staff will also be evaluating what type of communities are responding to what media that they respond to best. Anne Mayer stated as Mr. Wilkinson mentioned the lessons learned process and one of the lessons learned last year is if the Commission is going to put a mea mount on social media that has a picture of a road improvement it better be a picture of a road that is in that jurisdiction where it is being posted at. Commissioner Jan Harnik explained there was a very healthy discussion at the June Budget and Implementation Committee about this issue. She stated $1.6 million seems like a lot of money however, it is over 31 months and when there is billions in funding gaps it sounds like a very prudent investment. In the Coachella Valley they recognize that having a consistent and strategic communication can make or break a project, which was learned under some difficult situations. She expressed appreciation for the presentation and being resilient and nimble in the approach as it is critical there is that positive public sentiment. Commissioner Lisa Middleton expressed support for this program and noticed in the staff report there was a mention of advertising in the Press Enterprise, which is rarely read in the Coachella Valley and the Desert Sun was not mentioned. Scott Wilkinson replied that is not meant to mean that they will not advertise in the Desert Sun. This was based on the goal they were given for numbers of used for the annual report one of those was done by counting the distribution of the Press Enterprise and was relying on more heavily approach on digital in Coachella Valley, Central and East part of the County. Commissioner Middleton replied she would encourage Mr. Wilkinson to do that. Commissioner Debbie Franklin expressed appreciation for the presentation and she is in support of communication. She asked if there is outgoing information and will there be real time ability to respond if replies are received by paper mail or phone call. Aaron Hake replied that is a capability staff has been ramping up as the social media program was created in addition to trying to make improvements. Staff usually responds within 24 hours of anyone who responds to something on line or people that email the Commission and staff will be measuring that response time and provide an update to the Commission at a future meeting. Anne Mayer stated staff does not respond to every single comment that is posted. There is a written protocol in place regarding what staff responds to, when staff responds, and Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 11 the challenge can be is that people are generally expecting someone to be manning those sites 24 hours a day, which is not necessarily possible. Aaron Hake explained on the Commission’s website and social media page staff does set an expectation that on weekends and holidays the Facebook page or the front desk line are not managed 24 hours a day. There will be a protocol set in place to make sure there is an expectation as to when someone will get a response. Commissioner Karen Spiegel requested to display the comprehensive plan outreach calendar chart with the individual types of outreach and referred to Mr. Hake’s comment about Tele-town Hall and asked if there are no basic workshops or town hall that are face to face. Mr. Wilkinson replied there are, and they will be developing a list of public meetings and events where there will be in person presence. In response to Commissioner Clint Lorimore’s inquiry about how the 31-month timeframe was determined, Aaron Hake replied staff wanted to take this program through the end of 2020 and into the Commission Workshop in January 2021. This provides the opportunity for the Commission to gather and reflect the accomplishments and allows the consultant to be available to report on the results and have decisions made going forward. Commissioner Lorimore stated noticing the timeframes seem to match up with the election. Although he understands the Commission wanting to promote what it approves his concern is this might be getting too political. Aaron Hake expressed appreciation for Commissioner Lorimore’s comment and referred to the fourth goal, which is to prepare a funding plan that could achieve a two-thirds voter support in 2020 in the November election if the Commission decided to put something on the ballot. Aaron Hake explained another element of the request for proposal was the consultant and staff were to remain in compliance with the Fair Political Practices Commission regulations. Also with all laws related to public agencies and advocacy, and legal counsel is carefully watching and guiding the Commission on all the activities being done to ensure they are all education and not advocacy. In response to Commissioner Andy Melendrez’s inquiry in regards to the numbers and there was no break down on the different languages, Scott Wilkinson replied he is not able to provide the percent but that can be provided to the Commission. Translation services are included and they are planning to produce content in multiple of languages as appropriate for each sub region of the County. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 12 In response to Commissioner Melendrez’s clarification that this will not only be on social media but on television and news medias as well, Mr. Wilkinson clarified they are not planning to do television at this point but for all the modes there will be a range of languages as the local areas demand. In regards to Commissioner Brian Berkson’s question how does this program work in conjunction or differentiate between what its goals are versus the other programs the Commission has for site-specific projects, Aaron Hake replied those programs operate differently than this Public Engagement Program will. He provided the Interstate 15 Express Lanes Project as an example or other construction projects there is a public outreach team devoted to that specific area. Aaron Hake explained with this program they will actually measure some of the outcomes of what some of those efforts are and provide feedback to those teams to educate and boost the other efforts going on. M/S/C (Benoit/Vargas) to: 1) Award Agreement No. 18-15-086-00 to AlphaVu for a Public Engagement Program for a term of 31 months, in an amount not to exceed $1,649,662; and 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. At this time, Chair Reed announced with the Commission’s permission Brian Cunanan would like to present Agenda Item 10 and 11 concurrently beginning with Agenda Item 11, Funding Agreement with the California Highway Patrol for Freeway Service Patrol Supervision, then Agenda Item 10, 25th Anniversary of Freeway Service Patrol in Riverside County. 11. FUNDING AGREEMENT WITH THE CALIFORNIA HIGHWAY PATROL FOR FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL SUPERVISION Brian Cunanan, Commuter and Motorist Assistance Manager, presented the funding agreement with the California Highway Patrol (CHP) for Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) supervision, highlighting the following areas: • Service Authority Freeway Emergencies (SAFE) for Riverside County comprises of the Call Box Program, 511 traveler information services, and a FSP Program • FSP – consists of fleet of roving tow trucks, assist motorists, tow vehicles off the highway, and clear small debris • FSP by the numbers – 10 Beats, 21 tow trucks, 101 centerline miles of Western Riverside County, more than 46,00 assists were provided to motorists in FY 2018 • A map that reflect the beats currently in operation in Riverside County Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 13 • Statewide benefit – cost model: The new south county beats projected benefit: cost 8:1 over double the required amount • A map reflecting the SB 1 funded expansion of the FSP along the Interstates 15 and 215 as far south as the I-15/SR-79 south interchange • FSP/RCTC logo with three parties displayed, the regional SAFE, Caltrans, and the CHP • A map displaying the new south county FSP service expansion – 3 new beats, 6 more trucks, and 39 more miles Commissioner Manuel Perez expressed appreciation of what is going on in Riverside County however, the East County is not engaged and he asked what the theory is for that. Brian Cunanan replied the program has been ran conservatively over the years and it has been limited due to funding and the last expansion was back in 2006 and 2007. The way the beats are prioritized is based on that statewide benefit cost model, apply traffic volumes, and evaluate all those factors. Chair Reed requested the statewide benefit: cost model slide be displayed and clarified staff did look at the Coachella Valley, the I-10, and other areas but in ranking these items that area did not score high enough to be considered. Brian Cunanan replied in a previous study the Coachella Valley ranked lower in terms of benefit costs but when there are events in the Coachella Valley those are times where the Commission could allocate some funding to support those. In response to Anne Mayer clarification to Brian Cunanan if Measure A is contributing to the Commission’s existing program, Brian Cunanan replied no. In response to Anne Mayer’s question the Commission is completely dependent on state funding, Brian Cunanan replied state funding and the SAFE revenues received. Anne Mayer stated considering the Commission is completely dependent on other people’s money staff has to follow their cost model. She expressed the fact the Commission has not been able to add new beats in 12 years says something about the status of state funding for this program. She explained working very hard with other partners throughout the state to convince the State Transportation Agency to include additional funding in the budget and to include funding in this program in the SB 1 allocations, as it is very important. In response to Commissioner Perez’s inquiry when this study was conducted, Brian Cunanan replied for the Coachella Valley study it was back in 2012. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 14 Commissioner Perez suggested looking at another study and continuing to advocate at a state level. He explained it is important to advocate for the entire County but he believes the Coachella Valley deserves their fair share as well. He suggested meeting with staff and the Chair to see how to make this work. Anne Mayer explained having an updated study could definitely help the Commission with the argument coming up in the legislative cycle to advocate for additional money. However, if SB 1 goes away in November it will be a challenge. Brian Cunanan stated Caltrans had increased the amount for research to monitor the benefit costs so it will be applied to the Coachella Valley and other areas within the County on a more real time basis. Commissioner Russell Betts mentioned his experience with FSP when he had car trouble on SR-60 and was on the side of the road and an FSP tow operator pulled up behind him to help. He expressed this is a very good program and is sure the commuters appreciate the things that government provides. He referred to the additional traffic during the Coachella events and if a study was done during those times there would be a need. Commissioner Marion Ashley concurred with Commissioner Perez’s comments as he represents part of the Coachella Valley and the San Gorgonio Pass Area and suggested the traffic warrants stretching that out. Commissioner Ashley suggested having that same service for the San Gorgonio Pass Area, the desert, and to extend it out through I-10. Commissioner Karen Spiegel mentioned there was an incident with her daughter on the freeway where there was confusion as to where her location was and it took an hour and a half to get to her. She asked if the tow operators are trained to know when the disabled vehicle is in the Fastrack, which may require a different towing. Brian Cunanan replied depending on what time she was there but there actually is FSP service in the express lanes. M/S/C (Benoit/Vargas) to: 1) Award Agreement No. 18-45-163-00 with the California Highway Patrol (CHP) – Border Division (Border) to provide supervision and operation of the Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) program in southern Riverside County in an amount not to exceed $1,320,000; 2) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission. At this time, Commissioner Perez left the meeting. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 15 10. 25TH ANNIVERSARY OF FREEWAY SERVICE PATROL IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY Brian Cunanan announced the 25th anniversary for the FSP in Riverside County and in celebration of the anniversary FSP cookies and an FSP registration holder was distributed to the Commissioners and he noted the registration holders would be provided to the motorists this year. At this time, Brian Cunanan played a short FSP video in celebration of 25 years with their customers. M/S/C to receive and file a report on the 25th Anniversary for providing Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) in Riverside County. 12. ITEM(S) PULLED FROM CONSENT CALENDAR FOR DISCUSSION There were no items pulled from the Consent Calendar. 13. COMMISSIONERS/EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S REPORT 12A. Chair Reed announced: • The August 8 Commission meeting is cancelled therefore the Budget and Implementation and the Western Riverside County Programs and Projects are cancelled in July • The next Commission meeting will be held on September 12, which is also the opening day of the League of California Cities Annual Conference • There were pictures displayed from a summit meeting held on June 29 in Los Angeles and Commissioners Franklin, Spiegel, Vargas and himself attended on behalf of the Commission. Mayor Eric Garcetti attended and was the Chairman for LA Metro and Chair Reed requested John to come up to discuss the adopted resolution that was jointly signed At this time, Commissioner Magee left the meeting. John Standiford discussed how the Commission was invited to attend the summit meeting on June 29 by Chairman Garcetti to discuss transportation issues in both counties and provided an overview of the presentations. As part of that, there is a memorandum of understanding staff will bring back to the September Commission meeting for ratification that spells out the mutual desire to work together on transportation issues of mutual interest. 12B. Brian Berkson requested to send the 25th Anniversary FSP video to share it with their constituents. Riverside County Transportation Commission Minutes July 11, 2018 Page 16 12C. Commissioner Betts mentioned Commissioners Naggar and Vargas made a request to put an agenda item on that would expand public input on the transportation Nexus Study and concurred with the same request. 12D. Commissioner Spiegel expressed appreciation to Caltrans for the meter off that was done on SR-91 and requested about doing another trial on two cars per lights. Ray Desselle replied yes and stated the Caltrans Operations Deputy is at this meeting and is certain he received Commissioner Spiegel’s message. 12E. Anne Mayer announced there is an executed settlement agreement with the plaintiffs who filed suit on the Mid County Parkway and the SR-60 Truck Climbing Lane Projects. Staff is currently getting final environmental permits for the SR-60 Truck Climbing Lane project and working with Caltrans and the California Transportation Commission (CTC). The project should be on the CTC agenda for an allocation of funding in August and hopefully be advertising for bid in the early fall. 14. ADJOURNMENT There being no further business for consideration by the Riverside County Transportation Commission, Chair Reed adjourned the meeting in Commissioner Neil Winter’s honor at 10:58 a.m. The next Commission meeting is scheduled to be held at 9:30 a.m., Wednesday, September 12, 2018, Board Chambers, First Floor, County Administrative Center, 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside. Respectfully submitted, Lisa Mobley Clerk of the Board AGENDA ITEM 8A BLANK Agenda item 8A RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Matt Wallace, Procurement Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Single Signature Authority Report BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Single Signature Authority report for the fourth quarter ended June 30, 2018. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Certain contracts are executed under single signature authority as permitted in the Commission’s Procurement Policy Manual adopted in June 2018. The Executive Director is authorized to sign services contracts that are less than $150,000 individually and in an aggregate amount not to exceed $1.5 million in any given fiscal year. Additionally, in accordance with Public Utilities Code Section 130323(c), the Executive Director is authorized to sign contracts for supplies, equipment, materials, and construction of all facilities and works under $50,000 individually. The attached report details all contracts that have been executed for the fourth quarter ended June 30, 2018 under the single signature authority granted to the Executive Director. The unused capacity of single signature authority for services at June 30, 2018, is $226,684.83. Attachment: Single Signature Authority Report as of June 30, 2018 1 BLANK CONSULTANT DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES ORIGINAL CONTRACT AMOUNT PAID AMOUNT REMAINING CONTRACT AMOUNT AMOUNT AVAILABLE July 1, 2017 $1,500,000.00 Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates (FM3)Public opinion research services 150,000.00 78,448.96 71,551.04 BNSF Rail/station flagging services 150,000.00 33,528.56 116,471.44 Semilla Landscape Corporation Station and Toll Facilities Janitorial Services 48,000.00 47,876.30 123.70 TRC Solutions I-15 Express Lanes Project Groundbreaking Event 25,000.00 0.00 25,000.00 Joshua Grading Flagging services 100,000.00 16,774.18 83,225.82 Fitch Credit rating 110,000.00 0.00 110,000.00 Exigent IT Support services 150,000.00 150,000.00 0.00 Riverside Risk Advisors LLC Swap advisor regarding termination of BANA swap 42,000.00 0.00 42,000.00 Conrad LLP FTA subrecipient oversight monitoring services for FY 2017/18 29,000.00 0.00 29,000.00 Total Plan Business Interiors Furniture design, layout, and installation services for RCTC/Bechtel expansion area 114,219.17 114,219.17 0.00 Fibertronics CCTV services to complete County's Poarch Road project 55,000.00 16,693.28 38,306.72 California Highway Patrol Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies (SAFE) coordinator 13,200.00 0.00 13,200.00 First Carbon Solutions (FCS)PA&ED for Santa Ana River Trail project 144,953.00 44,722.61 100,230.39 Alpha Vu Digital advertising services 84,900.00 54,393.81 30,506.19 Southern California Association of Governments Inland Empire Comprehensive Corridors Plan 32,500.00 0.00 32,500.00 Sapphos Environmental, Inc.Environmental services 21,048.00 2,029.39 19,018.61 Western Office SR-91 Express Lanes Customer Service Center Relocation - Initial Space Planning Services 3,495.00 0.00 3,495.00 AMOUNT USED 1,273,315.17 1,273,315.17 $226,684.83 None N/A $- $- $- Jose Mendoza Theresia Trevino Prepared by Reviewed by AMOUNT USED SINGLE SIGNATURE AUTHORITY AS OF June 30, 2018 Note: Shaded area represents new contracts listed in the fourth quarter. AMOUNT REMAINING through June 30, 2018 Agreements that fall under Public Utilities Code 130323 (C) 2 BLANK AGENDA ITEM 8B BLANK Agenda Item 8B RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Megan Kavand, Senior Financial Analyst Michele Cisneros, Deputy Finance Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Investment Report BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Investment Report for the quarter ended June 30, 2018. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Prior to Fiscal Year 2013/14, the Commission’s quarterly investment reports reflected investments primarily concentrated in the Riverside County Pooled Investment Fund (RCPIF). Other investments included the state Local Agency Investment Fund and mutual funds. As a result of significant project financings such as the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (91 Project or 91 CIP) and the Interstate 15 Express Lanes Project (I-15 ELP), the Commission determined it would be prudent to engage an investment manager for the bond proceeds and other required funds. Additionally, the Commission desired to engage an investment manager to provide investment advisory and management services related to the Commission’s operating funds. In May 2013, following a competitive procurement, the Commission awarded two investment management services agreements to Logan Circle Partners, L.P. (Logan) for the 91 Project’s proceeds generated from the issuance of sales tax revenue bonds and toll revenue bonds and to Payden & Rygel Investment Management (Payden & Rygel) for Commission operating funds. At its April 2017 meeting and based on a competitive procurement, the Commission awarded an investment management services agreement to Logan related to the issuance of the sales tax revenue bonds for the I-15 ELP. Commencing in July 2013, Logan invested the 91 Project debt proceeds and subsequent 91 Project equity contributions in separate accounts of the Short-Term Actively Managed Program (STAMP). Consistent with financing expectations, the Commission expended substantially all of the 91 Project debt proceeds and equity contributions, except for the toll revenue bonds debt service reserve. The Commission authorized Payden & Rygel to make 3 Agenda Item 8B specific investments for the Commission’s operating funds beginning with the third quarter of FY 2014/15. In July 2017, the I-15 ELP and 91 Project completion financing (2017 Financing) was completed and sales tax bond proceeds approximating $154.6 million were received. Logan invested the 2017 Financing debt proceeds in accounts of a separate STAMP portfolio during the first quarter of FY 2017/18. The quarterly investment report for the fourth quarter of FY 2017/18, as required by state law and Commission policy, reflects the investment activities resulting from the 91 Project, 2017 Financing, and available operating cash. The quarterly investment report includes the following information: • Investment Portfolio Report; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Residual Fund Required Retained Balance Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Account; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Summary of investments by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio I-15 ELP Sales Tax Senior Lien TIFIA Project Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Ramp Up Fund Summary of investment by credit rating, industry group, asset class, security type, and market sector; • Logan Circle Partners, L.P. Short Duration Second Quarter 2018 Review; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report; • Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Second Quarter 2018 Review; and • County of Riverside Investment Report for the Quarter Ended June 30, 2018. The Commission’s investments were in full compliance with the Commission’s investment policy adopted on December 13, 2017, and investments securities permitted under the indenture for 4 Agenda Item 8B the Commission’s sales tax revenue bonds and the master indenture for the Commission’s toll revenue bonds. Additionally, the Commission has adequate cash flows for the next six months. Attachments: 1) Investment Portfolio Report 2) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category 3) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account 4) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account 5) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments 6) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Toll Revenue Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of Investments 7) 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Residual Fund Required Retained Balance Summary of investments 8) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category 9) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Account 10) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account 11) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments 12) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of Investments 13) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio I-15 ELP Sales Tax Senior Lien TIFIA Project Fund Summary of Investments 14) 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Ramp Up Fund Summary of Investments 15) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category 16) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report 17) Logan Circle Partners, L.P. Short Duration Quarterly Review 18) Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Quarterly Review 19) County of Riverside Investment Report 5 BLANK Riverside County Transportation Commission Investment Portfolio Report Period Ended: March 31, 2018 FAIR VALUE RATING MOODYS / S&P COUPON RATE PAR VALUE PURCHASE DATE MATURITY DATE YIELD TO MATURITY PURCHASE COST MARKET VALUE UNREALIZED GAIN (LOSS) OPERATING FUNDS City National Bank Deposits 16,121,938 A3/BBB+N/A N/A County Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund 426,041,173 Aaa-bf/AAA-V1 N/A 1.55% Local Agency Investment Fund (LAIF)3,702,595 N/A N/A N/A Subtotal Operating Funds 445,865,707 FUNDS HELD IN TRUST County Treasurer's Pooled Investment Fund: Local Transportation Fund 82,765,542 Aaa-bf/AAA-V1 N/A 1.55% Subtotal Funds Held in Trust 82,765,542 COMMISSION MANAGED PORTFOLIO US Bank Payden & Rygel Operating 50,839,673 First American Government Obligation Fund 53,324,597 N/A N/A N/A Subtotal Commission Managed Portfolio 104,164,269 STAMP PORTFOLIO for 91 CIP Series A & Series B Reserve Fund 17,732,101 Sales Tax Revenue Capitalized Interest Fund 792,838 Residual Fund Required Retained Balance 3,278,697 Subtotal STAMP Portfolio - 91 CIP 21,803,636 STAMP PORTFOLIO for 2017 Financing Sales Tax I15 ELP Project Revenue Fund 83,948,586 Sales Tax Revenue Fund 25,416,178 Ramp Up Fund 7,820,608 Subtotal STAMP Portfolio - 2017 Financing 117,185,372 TOTAL All Cash and Investments 771,784,527$ See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details See attached report for details 2.29%1.92% 10.88% 3.29% 13.50%10.72% 57.77% $- $50,000,000 $100,000,000 $150,000,000 $200,000,000 $250,000,000 $300,000,000 $350,000,000 $400,000,000 $450,000,000 $500,000,000 STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Reserve STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Capitalized Interest STAMP Portfolio for 91 CIP Residual Fund STAMP Portfolio for 2017 Financing I15 ELP Project Revenue Fund STAMP Portfolio for 2017 Financing Revenue Fund STAMP Portfolio for 2017 Financing Ramp Up Fund Commission Managed Portfolio Trust Funds Operating Funds Nature of Investments 6.91% Mutual Funds 68.01% County Pool/Cash 0.48% LAIF 24.38% Fixed Income 0.121 Money Market Funds ATTACHMENT 1 6 BLANK 7 Page 2 of 32 .Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost Next Call Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Summarized Credit Rating 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/13/2022 ---950,000.00 942,921.50 ---943,245.50 (6,414.89)2.375 2.573 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135G0D75 Agency Federal National Mortgage Association 06/22/2020 05/06/2015 600,000.00 593,490.00 ---588,390.00 (8,712.27)1.500 2.397 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADR7 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 05/01/2020 05/15/2015 475,000.00 471,527.75 ---465,742.25 (7,766.18)1.375 2.337 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 313385VL7 Agency FHLBanks Office of Finance 04/12/2018 03/29/2018 100,000.00 99,933.50 ---99,954.00 6.25 0.000 1.292 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A72D3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2022 07/03/2013 358,757.85 340,819.96 ---353,545.10 2,508.87 2.482 2.974 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 06/25/2022 ---379,000.00 366,344.03 ---371,988.50 (935.39)2.396 2.849 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RSZ9 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 06/16/2039 ---95,157.39 98,144.26 ---97,394.54 (198.38)4.500 2.273 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31395EZP5 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 08/15/2019 07/09/2013 14,244.42 15,070.15 ---14,368.48 (60.55)4.500 2.156 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377JZ89 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 10/20/2039 07/05/2013 64,550.98 66,525.33 ---65,234.57 (571.34)3.500 2.886 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376GB33 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 10/16/2044 01/23/2015 174,842.41 179,469.67 ---175,129.15 (953.01)3.500 2.969 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376T5Z1 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 01/16/2039 01/26/2015 96,706.36 101,033.97 ---96,653.17 (3,351.34)3.000 2.993 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378TAF7 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 07/20/2041 07/05/2013 151,768.55 151,791.43 ---150,176.49 (1,464.02)2.500 2.825 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38380AZ34 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 04/20/2046 11/28/2016 159,204.10 163,663.06 ---158,041.91 (5,184.06)3.000 3.123 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CRT6 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 10/20/2040 05/22/2014 61,917.97 59,789.54 ---59,761.37 (186.90)2.000 3.227 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376WA62 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 10/20/2039 ---96,355.10 100,307.76 ---100,609.17 (490.63)4.000 2.368 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 04/20/2039 ---111,233.66 114,370.79 ---111,288.16 (1,943.16)3.000 2.931 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ASNH3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 09/25/2021 07/03/2013 210,041.80 205,258.42 ---206,177.03 (1,814.99)1.459 2.606 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AXHP1 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 09/25/2022 09/29/2017 140,000.00 142,089.06 ---138,119.80 (3,743.65)2.573 2.875 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AJMF8 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 10/25/2021 08/05/2015 30,000.00 31,038.28 ---30,131.70 (438.53)2.968 2.784 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ATRW4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 05/25/2022 12/21/2016 125,000.00 124,804.69 ---122,681.25 (2,118.79)2.373 2.837 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2042 ---450,000.00 427,324.22 ---424,314.00 (10,436.24)2.273 3.523 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/15/2021 ---137,077.58 137,093.08 ---136,945.98 (134.06)2.500 2.512 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CDK0 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 03/20/2035 03/16/2018 37,091.96 37,265.83 ---37,268.89 (0.83)3.000 2.401 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377LQT8 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 12/20/2037 03/08/2018 13,655.47 13,655.47 ---13,680.59 25.28 3.000 2.458 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A1LC5 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 08/15/2020 01/17/2018 27,212.25 27,122.96 ---27,109.11 (15.03)2.000 2.395 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/15/2021 01/30/2018 49,002.55 49,125.05 ---48,955.51 (163.61)2.500 2.512 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378CDK0 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 03/20/2035 01/30/2018 66,765.54 67,381.02 ---67,084.01 (248.99)3.000 2.401 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378AWX5 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 01/20/2036 01/30/2018 43,761.85 44,185.79 ---43,971.47 (194.45)3.000 2.524 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36290WH47 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/15/2018 07/18/2013 0.00 0.00 ---0.00 (0.00)4.500 2.066 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31401MWC1 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/01/2018 07/12/2013 0.00 0.00 ---0.00 (0.00)4.500 -3.625 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128MBTH0 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 03/01/2019 07/26/2013 0.01 0.01 ---0.01 (0.00)5.000 -1.675 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38379KDN5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/16/2055 08/05/2015 168,839.03 164,525.71 ---159,590.03 (6,816.39)2.112 3.701 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202F2H8 Agency MBS Ginnie Mae II 01/20/2027 11/14/2016 175,385.29 182,017.05 ---176,483.20 (5,163.97)3.000 2.766 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378XP62 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 05/16/2055 05/14/2015 328,790.11 332,848.61 ---314,757.34 (17,429.56)2.500 3.486 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381PEB0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 11/01/2020 09/26/2014 254,516.25 267,997.66 ---258,272.91 (1,982.14)3.370 2.847 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 11/16/2041 ---73,766.34 72,034.11 ---69,602.23 (3,188.10)1.400 4.151 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EJPZ5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/01/2022 08/29/2016 278,000.62 295,277.92 ---277,405.70 (13,875.73)2.973 3.015 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381T4E7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2022 10/25/2016 266,308.66 278,240.54 ---264,380.58 (10,635.16)2.670 3.084 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A4M48 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 01/25/2022 07/05/2013 235,782.50 236,445.64 ---232,505.12 (3,671.88)2.098 4.398 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A7MN9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 05/25/2022 08/29/2016 300,000.00 308,578.13 ---293,502.00 (12,308.41)2.349 3.073 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31417YKF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 01/01/2030 07/10/2013 82,268.04 86,792.79 ---86,439.86 (191.45)4.500 2.972 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KRS0 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 07/16/2043 05/08/2015 450,000.00 434,460.94 ---422,793.00 (16,858.18)2.389 3.731 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KXW4 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 02/16/2037 12/11/2014 177,510.56 176,650.75 ---172,659.20 (4,425.42)1.705 3.335 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EKXL4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2023 ---293,119.60 289,390.18 ---286,832.18 (2,952.81)2.356 2.952 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138L33G8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/01/2020 11/12/2015 100,000.00 99,875.00 ---98,455.00 (1,380.79)2.010 2.675 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KSL4 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 12/16/2046 ---425,000.00 415,829.11 ---392,615.00 (25,388.18)2.811 3.942 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138L76A9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 11/01/2021 10/04/2016 124,240.90 128,725.23 ---123,388.61 (3,651.07)2.590 2.856 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AHAE0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 10/28/2016 195,981.53 200,207.38 ---192,518.53 (6,816.99)2.522 3.445 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B6A2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2052 01/22/2015 117,501.25 113,797.20 ---112,029.21 (3,146.92)1.826 3.395 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B1U75 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2023 08/29/2016 380,000.00 394,917.97 ---373,961.80 (16,818.18)2.522 2.901 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381Q6B7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/01/2021 07/15/2016 186,228.65 206,539.21 ---193,806.29 (5,790.20)4.295 2.849 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AC7J4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2023 02/21/2018 74,236.49 73,015.65 ---73,139.27 100.93 2.493 3.069 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31416BVR6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2020 01/17/2018 73,982.63 75,647.23 ---75,512.59 (50.51)5.000 2.432 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AXHN6 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 02/25/2022 01/25/2018 38,452.77 37,924.05 ---37,739.47 (193.28)1.749 2.670 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137B1UF7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 09/25/2022 01/25/2018 21,363.22 21,049.45 ---20,942.15 (111.94)1.785 2.676 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31294KUP8 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 11/01/2018 02/01/2018 8,213.04 8,295.17 ---8,330.57 44.83 5.000 -0.702 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136AC7J4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2023 02/21/2018 20,621.24 20,282.12 ---20,316.46 28.03 2.493 3.069 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AWQG3 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 04/25/2022 01/30/2018 44,510.16 43,571.27 ---43,559.87 (41.32)1.583 2.598 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 58769DAD2 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Lease Trust 2017-A 03/16/2020 ---52,000.00 51,710.12 ---51,654.20 (99.07)1.790 2.556 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 02582JGN4 Asset Backed American Express Credit Account Master Trust 05/15/2019 01/16/2018 100,000.00 100,351.56 ---100,274.00 (49.89)2.147 2.014 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 89236WAD0 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2015-A Owner Trust 06/15/2020 01/19/2018 50,000.00 49,865.23 ---49,815.50 (91.87)1.520 2.429 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 161571FK5 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 08/15/2019 01/25/2018 115,000.00 113,827.54 ---113,403.80 (553.45)1.580 2.623 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65479AAD4 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2017-A 04/15/2020 01/25/2018 50,000.00 49,771.48 ---49,545.50 (255.06)1.910 2.711 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 055657AC4 Asset Backed Bmw Vehicle Lease Trust 2017-1 05/20/2020 01/29/2018 100,000.00 99,703.13 ---99,361.00 (389.14)1.980 2.712 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14912L6M8 Corporate Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation 11/13/2018 01/19/2018 100,000.00 99,809.00 ---99,639.00 (214.98)1.800 2.389 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 13607RAB6 Corporate Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce 09/06/2019 01/19/2018 100,000.00 98,888.00 ---98,325.00 (692.38)1.600 2.800 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 89114QBF4 Corporate Toronto Dominion Bank 01/22/2019 01/19/2018 50,000.00 50,366.50 ---50,277.50 (20.53)2.585 2.460 AA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38141EA58 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.03/15/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 105,718.00 ---104,270.00 (994.48)5.375 3.110 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 037833BD1 Corporate Apple Inc.05/06/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,354.00 ---98,740.00 (662.66)2.000 2.620 AA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06406HCU1 Corporate The Bank of New York Mellon 05/15/2019 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,974.00 04/15/2019 99,612.00 (366.09)2.200 2.551 A 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended March 31, 2018 ATTACHMENT 2 8 Page 3 of 32 .Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost Next Call Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Summarized Credit Rating 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended March 31, 2018 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 86787EAS6 Corporate SunTrust Bank 01/31/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 100,644.00 12/31/2019 100,619.00 31.96 2.302 2.476 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 0258M0DZ9 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 11/05/2018 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,905.00 10/05/2018 99,587.00 (339.72)1.875 2.575 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 46625HKA7 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co.01/23/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,577.00 12/23/2019 98,785.00 (827.91)2.250 2.942 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 91159HHE3 Corporate U.S. Bancorp 11/15/2018 01/25/2018 100,000.00 100,035.00 10/15/2018 99,699.00 (327.73)1.950 2.436 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 780082AC7 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 10/14/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 98,862.00 ---98,248.00 (685.34)2.100 2.820 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 24422ESF7 Corporate John Deere Capital Corporation 12/13/2018 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,980.00 ---99,729.00 (255.14)1.950 2.339 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06051GFN4 Corporate Bank of America Corporation 04/21/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,537.00 ---98,545.00 (1,028.09)2.250 2.984 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06416CAC2 Corporate The Bank of Nova Scotia 04/26/2021 01/29/2018 100,000.00 97,511.00 ---96,954.00 (681.15)1.875 2.919 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 61747WAF6 Corporate Morgan Stanley 01/25/2021 01/29/2018 100,000.00 108,369.00 ---106,572.00 (1,348.35)5.750 3.288 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 136069XZ9 Corporate Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce 02/02/2021 01/26/2018 45,000.00 45,000.00 ---45,028.80 28.80 2.093 2.596 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 05531FAQ6 Corporate BB&T Corporation 02/01/2019 01/25/2018 100,000.00 100,106.00 01/02/2019 99,553.00 (533.73)2.250 2.793 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 254010AC5 Corporate Dignity Health 11/01/2019 03/15/2018 24,000.00 23,897.52 ---23,897.76 (2.06)2.637 2.913 A 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 03/31/2018 ---0.00 792,837.56 ---792,837.56 0.00 0.200 0.000 --- 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 03/31/2018 ---0.00 171,587.89 ---171,587.89 0.00 0.200 0.000 --- 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 03/31/2018 03/28/2018 0.00 13,733.06 ---13,733.06 0.00 0.200 0.000 NA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828V49 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2027 ---287,260.40 285,917.55 ---279,955.37 (6,082.49)0.375 0.673 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828SA9 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2022 ---454,400.10 456,702.75 ---449,569.83 (6,791.34)0.125 0.408 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828UH1 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2023 02/05/2018 187,890.50 185,392.42 ---184,762.12 (703.73)0.125 0.477 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UH1 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2023 02/05/2018 32,209.80 31,781.56 ---31,673.51 (120.64)0.125 0.477 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L99 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 10/31/2020 ---1,250,000.00 1,239,802.73 ---1,219,037.50 (23,310.98)1.375 2.368 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L57 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 09/30/2022 ---1,400,000.00 1,386,564.45 ---1,353,240.00 (35,347.09)1.750 2.540 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828G38 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/15/2024 04/18/2017 1,350,000.00 1,369,037.11 ---1,314,724.50 (52,088.75)2.250 2.683 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 01/31/2021 ---1,440,000.00 1,472,525.40 ---1,429,531.20 (28,625.25)2.125 2.391 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VV9 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 08/31/2020 ---585,000.00 597,363.67 ---581,893.65 (11,113.82)2.125 2.352 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828XB1 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/15/2025 05/24/2016 1,200,000.00 1,228,546.88 ---1,155,612.00 (67,423.25)2.125 2.699 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VA5 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/30/2020 02/28/2017 160,000.00 158,131.25 ---156,163.20 (2,599.58)1.125 2.309 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UF5 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 12/31/2019 01/17/2018 115,000.00 113,000.98 ---112,780.50 (424.14)1.125 2.253 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828VK3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 06/30/2018 01/17/2018 130,000.00 129,888.28 ---129,859.60 (78.71)1.375 1.796 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828QQ6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/31/2018 01/30/2018 100,000.00 100,289.06 ---100,105.00 (38.34)2.375 1.743 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828K25 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/15/2018 ---215,000.00 214,781.64 ---214,935.50 2.30 0.750 1.428 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 97689P2K3 VRDN Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority 09/01/2037 01/30/2018 100,000.00 100,000.00 05/02/2018 100,000.00 0.00 1.750 1.750 AA 21,205,727.44 22,277,128.97 21,803,636.96 (462,819.57) 9 Page 4 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost Next Call Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Summarized Credit Rating 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36290WH47 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/15/2018 07/18/2013 0.00 0.00 ---0.00 (0.00) 4.500 2.066 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31401MWC1 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/01/2018 07/12/2013 0.00 0.00 ---0.00 (0.00) 4.500 -3.625 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128MBTH0 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 03/01/2019 07/26/2013 0.01 0.01 ---0.01 (0.00) 5.000 -1.675 AAA 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 03/31/2018 ---- 792,837.56 ---792,837.56 - 0.200 0.000 --- 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 313385VL7 Agency FHLBanks Office of Finance 04/12/2018 03/29/2018 100,000.00 99,933.50 ---99,954.00 6.25 0.000 1.292 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A1LC5 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 08/15/2020 01/17/2018 27,212.25 27,122.96 ---27,109.11 (15.03) 2.000 2.395 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/15/2021 01/30/2018 49,002.55 49,125.05 ---48,955.51 (163.61) 2.500 2.512 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378CDK0 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 03/20/2035 01/30/2018 66,765.54 67,381.02 ---67,084.01 (248.99) 3.000 2.401 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378AWX5 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 01/20/2036 01/30/2018 43,761.85 44,185.79 ---43,971.47 (194.45) 3.000 2.524 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31416BVR6 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2020 01/17/2018 73,982.63 75,647.23 ---75,512.59 (50.51) 5.000 2.432 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AXHN6 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 02/25/2022 01/25/2018 38,452.77 37,924.05 ---37,739.47 (193.28) 1.749 2.670 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137B1UF7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 09/25/2022 01/25/2018 21,363.22 21,049.45 ---20,942.15 (111.94) 1.785 2.676 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31294KUP8 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 11/01/2018 02/01/2018 8,213.04 8,295.17 ---8,330.57 44.83 5.000 -0.702 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136AC7J4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2023 02/21/2018 20,621.24 20,282.12 ---20,316.46 28.03 2.493 3.069 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AWQG3 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 04/25/2022 01/30/2018 44,510.16 43,571.27 ---43,559.87 (41.32) 1.583 2.598 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 58769DAD2 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Lease Trust 2017-A 03/16/2020 ---52,000.00 51,710.12 ---51,654.20 (99.07) 1.790 2.556 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 02582JGN4 Asset Backed American Express Credit Account Master Trust 05/15/2019 01/16/2018 100,000.00 100,351.56 ---100,274.00 (49.89) 2.147 2.014 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 89236WAD0 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2015-A Owner Trust 06/15/2020 01/19/2018 50,000.00 49,865.23 ---49,815.50 (91.87) 1.520 2.429 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 161571FK5 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 08/15/2019 01/25/2018 115,000.00 113,827.54 ---113,403.80 (553.45) 1.580 2.623 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65479AAD4 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2017-A 04/15/2020 01/25/2018 50,000.00 49,771.48 ---49,545.50 (255.06) 1.910 2.711 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 055657AC4 Asset Backed Bmw Vehicle Lease Trust 2017-1 05/20/2020 01/29/2018 100,000.00 99,703.13 ---99,361.00 (389.14) 1.980 2.712 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14912L6M8 Corporate Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation 11/13/2018 01/19/2018 100,000.00 99,809.00 ---99,639.00 (214.98) 1.800 2.389 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 13607RAB6 Corporate Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce 09/06/2019 01/19/2018 100,000.00 98,888.00 ---98,325.00 (692.38) 1.600 2.800 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 89114QBF4 Corporate Toronto Dominion Bank 01/22/2019 01/19/2018 50,000.00 50,366.50 ---50,277.50 (20.53) 2.585 2.460 AA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38141EA58 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.03/15/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 105,718.00 ---104,270.00 (994.48) 5.375 3.110 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 037833BD1 Corporate Apple Inc.05/06/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,354.00 ---98,740.00 (662.66) 2.000 2.620 AA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06406HCU1 Corporate The Bank of New York Mellon 05/15/2019 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,974.00 04/15/2019 99,612.00 (366.09) 2.200 2.551 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 86787EAS6 Corporate SunTrust Bank 01/31/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 100,644.00 12/31/2019 100,619.00 31.96 2.302 2.476 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 0258M0DZ9 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 11/05/2018 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,905.00 10/05/2018 99,587.00 (339.72) 1.875 2.575 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 46625HKA7 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co.01/23/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,577.00 12/23/2019 98,785.00 (827.91) 2.250 2.942 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 91159HHE3 Corporate U.S. Bancorp 11/15/2018 01/25/2018 100,000.00 100,035.00 10/15/2018 99,699.00 (327.73) 1.950 2.436 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 780082AC7 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 10/14/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 98,862.00 ---98,248.00 (685.34) 2.100 2.820 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 24422ESF7 Corporate John Deere Capital Corporation 12/13/2018 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,980.00 ---99,729.00 (255.14) 1.950 2.339 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06051GFN4 Corporate Bank of America Corporation 04/21/2020 01/25/2018 100,000.00 99,537.00 ---98,545.00 (1,028.09) 2.250 2.984 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06416CAC2 Corporate The Bank of Nova Scotia 04/26/2021 01/29/2018 100,000.00 97,511.00 ---96,954.00 (681.15) 1.875 2.919 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 61747WAF6 Corporate Morgan Stanley 01/25/2021 01/29/2018 100,000.00 108,369.00 ---106,572.00 (1,348.35) 5.750 3.288 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 136069XZ9 Corporate Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce 02/02/2021 01/26/2018 45,000.00 45,000.00 ---45,028.80 28.80 2.093 2.596 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 05531FAQ6 Corporate BB&T Corporation 02/01/2019 01/25/2018 100,000.00 100,106.00 01/02/2019 99,553.00 (533.73) 2.250 2.793 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 254010AC5 Corporate Dignity Health 11/01/2019 03/15/2018 24,000.00 23,897.52 ---23,897.76 (2.06) 2.637 2.913 A 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 03/31/2018 03/28/2018 - 13,733.06 ---13,733.06 - 0.200 0.000 NA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UH1 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2023 02/05/2018 32,209.80 31,781.56 ---31,673.51 (120.64) 0.125 0.477 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UF5 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 12/31/2019 01/17/2018 115,000.00 113,000.98 ---112,780.50 (424.14) 1.125 2.253 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828VK3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 06/30/2018 01/17/2018 130,000.00 129,888.28 ---129,859.60 (78.71) 1.375 1.796 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828QQ6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/31/2018 01/30/2018 100,000.00 100,289.06 ---100,105.00 (38.34) 2.375 1.743 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828K25 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/15/2018 ---215,000.00 214,781.64 ---214,935.50 2.30 0.750 1.428 AAA 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 97689P2K3 VRDN Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority 09/01/2037 01/30/2018 100,000.00 100,000.00 05/02/2018 100,000.00 - 1.750 1.750 AA 3,272,095.06 4,083,591.86 4,071,535.01 (11,957.63) 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/13/2022 ---950,000.00 942,921.50 ---943,245.50 (6,414.89) 2.375 2.573 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135G0D75 Agency Federal National Mortgage Association 06/22/2020 05/06/2015 600,000.00 593,490.00 ---588,390.00 (8,712.27) 1.500 2.397 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADR7 Agency Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 05/01/2020 05/15/2015 475,000.00 471,527.75 ---465,742.25 (7,766.18) 1.375 2.337 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A72D3 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2022 07/03/2013 358,757.85 340,819.96 ---353,545.10 2,508.87 2.482 2.974 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 06/25/2022 ---379,000.00 366,344.03 ---371,988.50 (935.39) 2.396 2.849 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RSZ9 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 06/16/2039 ---95,157.39 98,144.26 ---97,394.54 (198.38) 4.500 2.273 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31395EZP5 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 08/15/2019 07/09/2013 14,244.42 15,070.15 ---14,368.48 (60.55) 4.500 2.156 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377JZ89 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 10/20/2039 07/05/2013 64,550.98 66,525.33 ---65,234.57 (571.34) 3.500 2.886 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376GB33 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 10/16/2044 01/23/2015 174,842.41 179,469.67 ---175,129.15 (953.01) 3.500 2.969 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376T5Z1 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 01/16/2039 01/26/2015 96,706.36 101,033.97 ---96,653.17 (3,351.34) 3.000 2.993 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378TAF7 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 07/20/2041 07/05/2013 151,768.55 151,791.43 ---150,176.49 (1,464.02) 2.500 2.825 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38380AZ34 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 04/20/2046 11/28/2016 159,204.10 163,663.06 ---158,041.91 (5,184.06) 3.000 3.123 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CRT6 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 10/20/2040 05/22/2014 61,917.97 59,789.54 ---59,761.37 (186.90) 2.000 3.227 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376WA62 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 10/20/2039 ---96,355.10 100,307.76 ---100,609.17 (490.63) 4.000 2.368 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 04/20/2039 ---111,233.66 114,370.79 ---111,288.16 (1,943.16) 3.000 2.931 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ASNH3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 09/25/2021 07/03/2013 210,041.80 205,258.42 ---206,177.03 (1,814.99) 1.459 2.606 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AXHP1 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 09/25/2022 09/29/2017 140,000.00 142,089.06 ---138,119.80 (3,743.65) 2.573 2.875 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AJMF8 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 10/25/2021 08/05/2015 30,000.00 31,038.28 ---30,131.70 (438.53) 2.968 2.784 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ATRW4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 05/25/2022 12/21/2016 125,000.00 124,804.69 ---122,681.25 (2,118.79) 2.373 2.837 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2042 ---450,000.00 427,324.22 ---424,314.00 (10,436.24) 2.273 3.523 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/15/2021 ---137,077.58 137,093.08 ---136,945.98 (134.06) 2.500 2.512 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CDK0 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 03/20/2035 03/16/2018 37,091.96 37,265.83 ---37,268.89 (0.83) 3.000 2.401 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377LQT8 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 12/20/2037 03/08/2018 13,655.47 13,655.47 ---13,680.59 25.28 3.000 2.458 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38379KDN5 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 09/16/2055 08/05/2015 168,839.03 164,525.71 ---159,590.03 (6,816.39) 2.112 3.701 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202F2H8 Agency MBS Ginnie Mae II 01/20/2027 11/14/2016 175,385.29 182,017.05 ---176,483.20 (5,163.97) 3.000 2.766 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378XP62 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 05/16/2055 05/14/2015 328,790.11 332,848.61 ---314,757.34 (17,429.56) 2.500 3.486 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381PEB0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 11/01/2020 09/26/2014 254,516.25 267,997.66 ---258,272.91 (1,982.14) 3.370 2.847 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 11/16/2041 ---73,766.34 72,034.11 ---69,602.23 (3,188.10) 1.400 4.151 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EJPZ5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 07/01/2022 08/29/2016 278,000.62 295,277.92 ---277,405.70 (13,875.73) 2.973 3.015 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381T4E7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2022 10/25/2016 266,308.66 278,240.54 ---264,380.58 (10,635.16) 2.670 3.084 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A4M48 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 01/25/2022 07/05/2013 235,782.50 236,445.64 ---232,505.12 (3,671.88) 2.098 4.398 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A7MN9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 05/25/2022 08/29/2016 300,000.00 308,578.13 ---293,502.00 (12,308.41) 2.349 3.073 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31417YKF3 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 01/01/2030 07/10/2013 82,268.04 86,792.79 ---86,439.86 (191.45) 4.500 2.972 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KRS0 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 07/16/2043 05/08/2015 450,000.00 434,460.94 ---422,793.00 (16,858.18) 2.389 3.731 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KXW4 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 02/16/2037 12/11/2014 177,510.56 176,650.75 ---172,659.20 (4,425.42) 1.705 3.335 AAA 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended March 31, 2018 ATTACHMENT 3 10 Page 5 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost Next Call Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Summarized Credit Rating 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended March 31, 2018 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EKXL4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/01/2023 ---293,119.60 289,390.18 ---286,832.18 (2,952.81) 2.356 2.952 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138L33G8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/01/2020 11/12/2015 100,000.00 99,875.00 ---98,455.00 (1,380.79) 2.010 2.675 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KSL4 Agency MBS The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 12/16/2046 ---425,000.00 415,829.11 ---392,615.00 (25,388.18) 2.811 3.942 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138L76A9 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 11/01/2021 10/04/2016 124,240.90 128,725.23 ---123,388.61 (3,651.07) 2.590 2.856 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AHAE0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 10/28/2016 195,981.53 200,207.38 ---192,518.53 (6,816.99) 2.522 3.445 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B6A2 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 11/16/2052 01/22/2015 117,501.25 113,797.20 ---112,029.21 (3,146.92) 1.826 3.395 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B1U75 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2023 08/29/2016 380,000.00 394,917.97 ---373,961.80 (16,818.18) 2.522 2.901 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381Q6B7 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/01/2021 07/15/2016 186,228.65 206,539.21 ---193,806.29 (5,790.20) 4.295 2.849 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AC7J4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2023 02/21/2018 74,236.49 73,015.65 ---73,139.27 100.93 2.493 3.069 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 03/31/2018 ---- 171,587.89 ---171,587.89 - 0.200 0.000 --- 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828V49 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2027 ---287,260.40 285,917.55 ---279,955.37 (6,082.49) 0.375 0.673 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828SA9 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2022 ---454,400.10 456,702.75 ---449,569.83 (6,791.34) 0.125 0.408 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828UH1 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2023 02/05/2018 187,890.50 185,392.42 ---184,762.12 (703.73) 0.125 0.477 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L99 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 10/31/2020 ---1,250,000.00 1,239,802.73 ---1,219,037.50 (23,310.98) 1.375 2.368 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L57 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 09/30/2022 ---1,400,000.00 1,386,564.45 ---1,353,240.00 (35,347.09) 1.750 2.540 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828G38 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 11/15/2024 04/18/2017 1,350,000.00 1,369,037.11 ---1,314,724.50 (52,088.75) 2.250 2.683 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 01/31/2021 ---1,440,000.00 1,472,525.40 ---1,429,531.20 (28,625.25) 2.125 2.391 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VV9 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 08/31/2020 ---585,000.00 597,363.67 ---581,893.65 (11,113.82) 2.125 2.352 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828XB1 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/15/2025 05/24/2016 1,200,000.00 1,228,546.88 ---1,155,612.00 (67,423.25) 2.125 2.699 AAA 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VA5 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/30/2020 02/28/2017 160,000.00 158,131.25 ---156,163.20 (2,599.58) 1.125 2.309 AAA 17,933,632.38 18,193,537.10 17,732,101.95 (450,861.94) 11 Page 6 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Description Beginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base Sales Base Maturities and Redemptions Base Paydowns Net Total Realized Gain/Loss Base Amortization/A ccretion Base Change In Net Unrealized Gain/Loss Ending Base Market Value Ending Accrued Income Balance 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 9AMMF05B2 U.S. BANK MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT FUND 792,702.97 134.59 - - - - - - 792,837.56 - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 3128MBTH0 FH G13052 0.02 - - - - (0.01) - (0.00) 0.01 - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 31401MWC1 FN 712643 0.00 - - - - (0.00) - - 0.00 - 205091001 LC-2013 A Capitalized Interest 36290WH47 GN 619551 0.00 - - - - (0.00) - (0.00) 0.00 - 792,703.00 134.59 - - - (0.01) - (0.00) 792,837.58 - 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38141EA58 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC - 105,718.00 - - - - (453.52) (994.48) 104,270.00 238.89 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 61747WAF6 MORGAN STANLEY - 108,369.00 - - - - (448.65) (1,348.35) 106,572.00 1,054.17 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828QQ6 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 100,289.06 - - - - (145.72) (38.34) 100,105.00 796.02 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31416BVR6 FN 995324 - 85,538.33 - - (9,673.44) (217.65) (84.15) (50.51) 75,512.59 308.26 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 89114QBF4 TORONTO-DOMINION BANK - 50,366.50 - - - - (68.47) (20.53) 50,277.50 247.70 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 86787EAS6 SUNTRUST BANK - 100,644.00 - - - - (56.96) 31.96 100,619.00 383.71 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378CDK0 GNR 11169G AK - 70,214.15 - - (2,807.25) (25.00) (48.91) (248.99) 67,084.01 166.91 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 02582JGN4 AMXCA 141 A - 100,351.56 - - - - (27.67) (49.89) 100,274.00 101.37 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 38378AWX5 GNR 11157E QA - 45,699.91 - - (1,499.59) (14.14) (20.25) (194.45) 43,971.47 109.40 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 05531FAQ6 BB&T CORP - 100,106.00 - - - - (19.27) (533.73) 99,553.00 375.00 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 31294KUP8 FH E01490 - 9,887.67 - - (1,576.73) (15.76) (9.45) 44.83 8,330.57 34.22 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 91159HHE3 U.S. BANCORP - 100,035.00 - - - - (8.27) (327.73) 99,699.00 736.67 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A5FP4 FHR 3791E DA - 51,520.10 - - (2,389.07) (6.26) (5.66) (163.61) 48,955.51 102.09 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 05581QAE8 BMWLT 152 A4 - 38,738.54 - - (38,749.13) 10.88 (0.29) - - - 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 9AMMF05B2 U.S. BANK MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT FUND - 429,900.65 (3,708,950.30) - - - - - 13,733.06 - 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 97689P2K3 WISCONSIN HSG & ECONOMIC DEV AUTH HOME OWNERSHIP R - 100,000.00 - - - - - - 100,000.00 134.17 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 196479JL4 COLORADO HSG & FIN AUTH - 100,000.00 - (100,000.00) - - - - - - 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 136069XZ9 CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE - 45,000.00 - - - - - 28.80 45,028.80 151.73 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137A1LC5 FHR 3710F AB - 30,301.87 - - (3,189.37) 10.53 1.12 (15.03) 27,109.11 45.35 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 254010AC5 DIGNITY HEALTH - 23,897.52 - - - - 2.30 (2.06) 23,897.76 263.70 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06406HCU1 BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON CORP - 99,974.00 - - - - 4.09 (366.09) 99,612.00 831.11 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 24422ESF7 JOHN DEERE CAPITAL CORP - 99,980.00 - - - - 4.14 (255.14) 99,729.00 585.00 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137B1UF7 FHMS K027 A1 - 21,844.99 - - (807.40) 11.93 4.57 (111.94) 20,942.15 31.78 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3136AC7J4 FNA 13M6 2A - 21,510.51 - - (1,248.93) 20.51 6.34 28.03 20,316.46 42.84 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AXHN6 FHMS K024 A1 - 39,502.26 - - (1,600.21) 22.14 8.56 (193.28) 37,739.47 56.04 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 58769DAD2 MBALT 17A A3 - 14,895.12 - - - - 9.01 (3.87) 14,900.25 11.93 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 313385VL7 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 99,933.50 - - - - 14.25 6.25 99,954.00 - 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 0258M0DZ9 AMERICAN EXPRESS CREDIT CORP - 99,905.00 - - - - 21.72 (339.72) 99,587.00 760.42 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 65479AAD4 NALT 17A A3 - 49,771.48 - - - - 29.08 (255.06) 49,545.50 42.44 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 3137AWQG3 FHMS K023 A1 - 44,513.09 - - (962.11) 19.99 30.22 (41.32) 43,559.87 58.72 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 58769DAD2 MBALT 17A A3 - 36,815.00 - - - - 34.15 (95.20) 36,753.95 29.44 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828K25 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 49,949.22 - - - - 34.98 0.80 49,985.00 173.08 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 46625HKA7 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO - 99,577.00 - - - - 35.91 (827.91) 98,785.00 425.00 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06051GFN4 BANK OF AMERICA CORP - 99,537.00 - - - - 36.09 (1,028.09) 98,545.00 1,000.00 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 89236WAD0 TAOT 15A A4 - 49,865.23 - - - - 42.14 (91.87) 49,815.50 33.78 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 14912L6M8 CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP - 99,809.00 - - - - 44.98 (214.98) 99,639.00 690.00 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 055657AC4 BMWLT 171 A3 - 99,703.13 - - - - 47.01 (389.14) 99,361.00 60.50 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 037833BD1 APPLE INC - 99,354.00 - - - - 48.66 (662.66) 98,740.00 766.67 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 129,888.28 - - - - 50.03 (78.71) 129,859.60 449.34 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UR9 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 64,949.22 - (65,000.00) - - 50.78 - - - 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 97684HBD2 Wisconsin Public Service Corporation - 99,936.61 - (100,000.00) - - 63.39 - - - 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 780082AC7 ROYAL BANK OF CANADA - 98,862.00 - - - - 71.34 (685.34) 98,248.00 974.17 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828K25 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 164,832.42 - - - - 116.58 1.50 164,950.50 571.15 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 06416CAC2 BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA - 97,511.00 - - - - 124.15 (681.15) 96,954.00 807.29 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 13607RAB6 CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE - 98,888.00 - - - - 129.38 (692.38) 98,325.00 111.11 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 161571FK5 CHAIT 124 A - 113,827.54 - - - - 129.71 (553.45) 113,403.80 80.76 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UH1 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 31,627.36 - - - - 166.79 (120.64) 31,673.51 8.45 256350021 LC-RCTC 2013 Residual Fund 912828UF5 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 196,523.44 (83,470.70) - - (105.38) 257.28 (424.14) 112,780.50 325.22 - 4,119,863.26 (3,792,421.00) (265,000.00) (64,503.23) (288.20) 221.53 (11,957.63) 3,278,697.43 14,175.59 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381Q6B7 FN 468066 198,121.22 - - - (851.12) (64.09) (1,030.63) (2,369.09) 193,806.29 688.76 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381PEB0 FN 466430 262,278.57 - - - (1,208.10) (30.17) (859.36) (1,908.03) 258,272.91 738.59 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828XB1 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,181,676.00 - - - - - (751.25) (25,312.75) 1,155,612.00 9,650.55 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31381T4E7 FN 470721 270,159.40 - - - (1,629.53) (56.17) (671.59) (3,421.53) 264,380.58 612.29 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137B1U75 FHMS KS01 A2 380,877.80 - - - - - (664.82) (6,251.18) 373,961.80 798.63 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 732,569.60 - - - - - (656.47) (7,220.23) 724,692.90 2,571.13 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828G38 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,343,034.00 - - - - - (588.16) (27,721.34) 1,314,724.50 11,495.51 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VV9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 351,613.50 - - - - - (455.04) (3,016.96) 348,141.50 646.74 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A7MN9 FNA 12M8 A2 298,494.00 - - - - - (432.64) (4,559.36) 293,502.00 587.35 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 501,760.00 - (199,453.13) - - (3,238.46) (412.89) (836.52) 297,819.00 1,056.63 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 FREDDIE MAC 201,798.00 - - - - - (340.99) (2,879.01) 198,578.00 1,029.17 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138L76A9 FN AM7164 125,347.75 - - - (570.16) (13.72) (287.34) (1,087.92) 123,388.61 277.09 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AHAE0 FNA 13M14 APT 197,267.08 - - - (846.63) (15.25) (271.00) (3,615.66) 192,518.53 411.89 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VV9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 150,691.50 - - - - - (265.56) (1,222.44) 149,203.50 277.17 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 FREDDIE MAC 201,798.00 - - - - - (260.39) (2,959.61) 198,578.00 1,029.17 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 100,352.00 - - - - - (241.80) (837.20) 99,273.00 352.21 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CRT6 GNR 1213E EG 63,903.37 - - - (3,595.73) 101.89 (199.87) (448.28) 59,761.37 103.20 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 145,510.40 - - - - - (173.06) (1,391.49) 143,945.85 510.70 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376GB33 GNR 116 BA 187,917.05 - - - (11,983.57) (91.81) (139.79) (572.72) 175,129.15 509.96 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RSZ9 GNR 10162D PQ - 85,080.32 - - (7,167.92) (168.61) (125.14) 69.59 77,688.25 284.64 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378XP62 GNR 14166 PL 326,331.10 - - - (5,754.06) (61.54) (118.56) (5,639.58) 314,757.34 684.98 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AXHP1 FHMS K024 A2 140,798.00 - - - - - (115.18) (2,563.02) 138,119.80 300.18 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 36202F2H8 G2 005276 190,443.22 - - - (10,262.65) (370.00) (110.95) (3,216.42) 176,483.20 438.46 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 115,404.80 - - - - - (105.76) (1,135.09) 114,163.95 405.04 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 FHMS K021 A2 143,896.32 - - - - - (99.06) (2,461.26) 141,336.00 287.52 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A4M48 FNA 12M3A 1A1 248,870.00 - - - (14,282.81) (29.94) (91.95) (1,960.18) 232,505.12 412.23 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376T5Z1 GNR 104A PD 103,739.97 - - - (5,860.25) (203.25) (84.12) (939.17) 96,653.17 241.77 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VV9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 85,391.85 - - - - - (82.82) (760.38) 84,548.65 157.07 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38380AZ34 GNR 16147C DA 164,475.53 - - - (3,831.82) (98.19) (75.89) (2,427.71) 158,041.91 398.01 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31417YKF3 FN MA0293 92,784.14 - - - (4,676.87) (250.88) (67.50) (1,349.03) 86,439.86 308.51 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended March 31, 2018 ATTACHMENT 4 12 Page 7 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Description Beginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base Sales Base Maturities and Redemptions Base Paydowns Net Total Realized Gain/Loss Base Amortization/A ccretion Base Change In Net Unrealized Gain/Loss Ending Base Market Value Ending Accrued Income Balance 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended March 31, 2018 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AJMF8 FHMS K016 A2 30,595.80 - - - - - (45.52) (418.58) 30,131.70 74.19 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 GNR 10166F GP 44,263.60 - - - (2,121.84) (55.48) (44.17) (309.05) 41,733.06 104.28 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828B58 UNITED STATES TREASURY 50,176.00 - - - - - (42.60) (496.90) 49,636.50 176.11 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EJPZ5 FN AL2239 311,242.67 - - - (29,105.32) (1,392.57) (39.19) (3,299.89) 277,405.70 711.70 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RVK8 GNR 10166F GP 73,772.67 - - - (3,536.41) (49.05) (38.60) (593.51) 69,555.10 173.80 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31395EZP5 FHR 2835G MD 19,732.36 - - - (5,334.46) (73.06) (25.75) 69.40 14,368.48 53.42 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377RSZ9 GNR 10162D PQ 22,851.38 - - - (3,006.95) (111.51) (15.54) (11.08) 19,706.29 72.20 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378TAF7 GNR 1371A GA 161,122.47 - - - (8,998.63) 7.01 (10.42) (1,943.93) 150,176.49 316.18 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A5FP4 FHR 3791E DA - 86,182.35 - - (3,996.42) (10.46) (9.46) (273.69) 81,892.32 170.77 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138L33G8 FN AM3498 99,388.00 - - - - - (4.46) (928.54) 98,455.00 173.08 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137A5FP4 FHR 3791E DA - 54,917.14 - - - - (3.11) 139.63 55,053.66 114.81 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ATRW4 FHMS K020 A2 124,708.75 - - - - - (0.78) (2,026.72) 122,681.25 247.19 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EKXL4 FN AL3382 - 20,269.74 - - - - (0.77) 219.04 20,488.01 42.48 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31392JJ83 FNR 0317D HC 402.42 - - - (402.48) (0.44) (0.19) 0.69 - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377LQT8 GNR 10128D KE - 13,655.47 - - - - (0.15) 25.28 13,680.59 34.14 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 9AMMF05B2 U.S. BANK MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT FUND 107,572.21 664,530.12 (600,514.44) - - - - - 171,587.89 - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 31385XBG1 FN 555439 0.02 - - - (0.02) (0.00) - - - - 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378CDK0 GNR 11169G AK - 37,265.83 - - - - 3.89 (0.83) 37,268.89 92.73 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38377JZ89 GNR 10117A GK 71,195.64 - - - (5,107.30) (97.22) 5.55 (762.09) 65,234.57 188.27 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 GNR 1396 A 14,923.50 - - - (126.79) 1.54 10.55 (155.71) 14,653.10 18.12 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KXW4 GNR 13105 A 176,014.22 - - - (1,963.93) 4.80 12.67 (1,408.56) 172,659.20 252.21 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136AC7J4 FNA 13M6 2A - 77,437.85 - - (4,496.14) 73.82 22.82 100.93 73,139.27 154.23 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KSL4 GNR 1374 AL 213,754.50 - - - - - 33.48 (5,932.98) 207,855.00 527.01 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KWU9 GNR 1396 A 55,963.13 - - - (475.44) 6.71 33.93 (579.19) 54,949.13 67.94 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L99 UNITED STATES TREASURY 147,580.50 - - - - - 37.47 (1,333.47) 146,284.50 866.02 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B6A2 GNR 1312A AB 112,621.21 - - - (694.05) 14.07 78.51 9.48 112,029.21 178.80 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376WA62 GNR 1015C PD - 52,924.04 - - (3,649.09) (121.36) 84.10 501.68 49,739.36 158.79 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3138EKXL4 FN AL3382 273,007.91 - - - (2,045.74) 20.57 95.59 (4,734.16) 266,344.17 552.20 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KSL4 GNR 1374 AL 190,004.00 - - - - - 98.44 (5,342.44) 184,760.00 468.46 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 GNR 1333 B 192,544.00 - - - - - 126.39 (4,086.39) 188,584.00 378.83 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38379KDN5 GNR 1529 AD 166,536.93 - - - (4,033.68) 59.68 128.97 (3,101.87) 159,590.03 297.16 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137ASNH3 FHMS K019 A1 223,860.54 - - - (16,537.70) 168.15 140.31 (1,454.27) 206,177.03 255.38 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828VA5 UNITED STATES TREASURY 157,144.00 - - - - - 145.23 (1,126.03) 156,163.20 755.80 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38376WA62 GNR 1015C PD 57,415.51 - - - (5,890.80) (366.44) 147.88 (436.34) 50,869.81 162.40 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADR7 FREDDIE MAC 467,898.75 - - - - - 174.81 (2,331.31) 465,742.25 2,721.35 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 538,978.00 - - - - - 200.52 (7,548.52) 531,630.00 26.30 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828V49 UNITED STATES TREASURY 55,758.31 - - - - - 249.18 (1,016.26) 54,991.23 44.42 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3135G0D75 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION 592,884.00 - - - - - 315.81 (4,809.81) 588,390.00 2,475.00 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378B7F0 GNR 1333 B 240,680.00 - - - - - 374.40 (5,324.40) 235,730.00 473.54 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L57 UNITED STATES TREASURY 832,966.00 - - - - - 397.17 (11,753.17) 821,610.00 40.64 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137AUPE3 FHMS K021 A2 234,830.80 - - - - - 407.25 (4,585.55) 230,652.50 469.22 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 38378KRS0 GNR 1378 AG 431,235.00 - - - - - 463.69 (8,905.69) 422,793.00 895.72 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3136A72D3 FNA 12M9 A2 360,947.95 - - - (1,970.05) 44.18 503.81 (5,980.79) 353,545.10 742.03 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 3137EADB2 FREDDIE MAC 554,944.50 - - - - - 609.18 (9,464.18) 546,089.50 2,830.21 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828L99 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,082,257.00 - - - - - 682.59 (10,186.59) 1,072,753.00 6,350.83 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828SA9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 179,098.91 - - - - - 781.96 (1,136.24) 178,744.63 47.41 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828UH1 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 184,492.92 - - - - 972.93 (703.73) 184,762.12 49.31 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828V49 UNITED STATES TREASURY 228,102.19 - - - - - 1,122.89 (4,260.95) 224,964.14 181.73 256350023 LC-Sr Lien Reserve Fund-1 912828SA9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 271,361.99 - - - - - 1,206.67 (1,743.46) 270,825.20 71.84 17,677,641.47 1,276,755.78 (799,967.57) - (176,014.46) (6,467.26) (391.69) (239,454.32) 17,732,101.95 62,523.40 18,470,344.47 5,396,753.63 (4,592,388.57) (265,000.00) (240,517.69) (6,755.47) (170.16) (251,411.96) 21,803,636.96 76,698.99 13 *Negative cash reflects securities in transit at month end 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2018 Market SectorSecurity TypeAsset Class Industry GroupCredit Rating ATTACHMENT 5 14 BLANK 15 *Negative cash reflects securities in transit at month end 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Series A & Series B Reserve Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2018 Credit Rating Industry Group Asset Class Security Type Market Sector ATTACHMENT 6 16 BLANK 17 91 CIP STAMP Portfolio Residual Fund Required Retained Balance Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2018 Credit Rating Industry Group Asset Class Security Type Market Sector ATTACHMENT 7 18 BLANK 19 Page 11 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost Next Call Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Summarized Credit Rating 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385VE3 Agency FHLBanks Office of Finance 04/06/2018 03/26/2018 900,000.00 899,546.25 ---899,838.00 44.28 0.000 0.939 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385VE3 Agency FHLBanks Office of Finance 04/06/2018 03/26/2018 5,100,000.00 5,097,428.75 ---5,099,082.00 250.91 0.000 0.939 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV313385VJ2 Agency FHLBanks Office of Finance 04/10/2018 03/28/2018 200,000.00 199,881.56 ---199,926.00 8.00 0.000 1.228 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 3137ASR97 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2022 02/27/2018 117,178.82 114,542.30 ---114,338.41 (252.89)1.573 2.765 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137A7NT3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 08/25/2020 12/20/2017 83,254.99 83,833.87 ---83,433.16 (316.79)2.917 2.468 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137AKKC4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 09/25/2018 12/04/2017 175,000.00 175,410.16 ---174,604.50 (524.22)2.303 2.478 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137AL6V6 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 10/25/2018 12/01/2017 678,680.04 680,323.73 ---677,594.16 (1,723.57)2.323 2.344 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137ANMN2 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 12/25/2018 12/01/2017 315,000.00 315,529.10 ---314,165.25 (1,030.49)2.220 2.418 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137ASR97 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2022 02/27/2018 535,294.18 523,250.06 ---522,318.64 (1,155.26)1.573 2.765 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31398E2E3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2019 01/03/2018 90,618.66 92,431.03 ---91,550.22 (429.94)5.053 2.806 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137FBUW4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 10/25/2019 01/23/2018 830,000.00 830,389.06 ---830,000.00 (714.05)1.780 2.126 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV3137ANMN2 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 12/25/2018 12/05/2017 1,800,000.00 1,803,697.20 ---1,795,230.00 (6,337.22)2.220 2.418 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV3137ASR97 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2022 02/27/2018 39,947.33 39,048.51 ---38,979.00 (86.21)1.573 2.765 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV3137B84S3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 02/15/2029 01/31/2018 172,760.64 170,601.13 ---169,932.55 (684.36)2.000 2.822 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/15/2021 01/30/2018 84,037.51 84,247.61 ---83,956.83 (280.59)2.500 2.512 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 31398NG99 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 10/25/2025 03/21/2018 95,854.26 95,434.90 ---95,362.53 (56.68)2.000 2.594 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31397Q4Q8 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2035 01/10/2018 382,264.07 385,489.43 ---384,614.99 (201.25)4.000 1.696 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31398NG99 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 10/25/2025 03/21/2018 316,530.29 315,145.47 ---314,906.49 (187.20)2.000 2.594 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV31392J6N4 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 12/05/2017 673,422.40 732,603.34 ---704,911.63 (24,676.87)5.500 2.840 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV31397SE83 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 02/25/2039 01/30/2018 75,816.45 76,242.91 ---75,949.89 (195.59)4.000 3.018 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV31398N2K9 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 11/25/2025 01/31/2018 67,337.64 67,590.16 ---67,357.17 (178.22)3.500 2.725 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV383742C76 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 08/16/2037 01/31/2018 101,079.71 103,606.69 ---103,553.13 16.17 4.000 2.842 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV38375JCJ2 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2037 01/31/2018 39,258.99 39,381.68 ---39,517.71 154.72 5.305 3.185 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV38378CDK0 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 03/20/2035 01/30/2018 155,786.25 157,222.40 ---156,529.35 (580.99)3.000 2.401 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV38378AWX5 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 01/20/2036 01/30/2018 218,809.26 220,928.98 ---219,857.36 (972.27)3.000 2.524 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV38376THB1 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guarante 10/20/2037 01/30/2018 8,922.74 8,939.47 ---8,935.77 11.75 4.000 0.149 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137A6AZ5 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 07/25/2020 01/10/2018 77,934.54 78,567.76 ---78,209.65 (263.31)3.320 2.436 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137B6ZL8 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 12/25/2019 12/20/2017 114,230.11 114,176.57 ---113,847.44 (289.89)2.075 2.434 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV31283K5N4 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 08/01/2020 12/05/2017 898,416.90 918,652.84 ---916,322.35 (38,639.84)5.000 2.677 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV3137B1U75 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2023 02/27/2018 120,000.00 117,965.63 ---118,093.20 94.84 2.522 2.901 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV3137AXHN6 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 02/25/2022 01/25/2018 91,695.08 90,434.27 ---89,994.13 (460.89)1.749 2.670 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV3137B1UF7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 09/25/2022 01/25/2018 45,778.34 45,105.97 ---44,876.05 (239.87)1.785 2.676 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 3136A7MK5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/25/2019 03/21/2018 74,894.90 74,450.22 ---74,361.65 (77.74)1.801 2.901 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3136AK2A0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 09/25/2019 01/08/2018 224,079.86 223,738.76 ---222,522.50 (1,234.77)2.171 2.726 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3136ASPX8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/25/2019 02/14/2018 355,129.74 354,151.41 ---353,410.91 (669.71)1.785 2.621 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31381S5E8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2018 12/01/2017 443,934.67 445,668.79 ---443,677.19 (1,165.03)2.640 2.468 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV3136AC7J4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2023 02/21/2018 61,863.74 60,846.37 ---60,949.39 84.11 2.493 3.069 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV31418ASD1 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 04/01/2023 01/31/2018 99,997.04 99,025.88 ---98,690.08 (340.22)2.000 2.593 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV3136A96F0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 11/25/2022 02/27/2018 75,000.00 72,694.34 ---72,645.00 (99.61)2.184 3.422 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 36225B5Y0 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/15/2019 12/21/2017 66,544.68 67,293.31 ---66,923.32 (180.05)5.500 2.748 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 02582JGN4 Asset Backed American Express Credit Account Master Trust 05/15/2019 01/16/2018 252,000.00 252,885.94 ---252,690.48 (125.74)2.147 2.014 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 05522RCQ9 Asset Backed BA Credit Card Trust 01/15/2019 03/21/2018 325,000.00 325,710.94 ---325,744.25 59.94 2.157 1.979 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05522RCQ9 Asset Backed BA Credit Card Trust 01/15/2019 03/21/2018 1,100,000.00 1,102,406.25 ---1,102,519.00 202.89 2.157 1.979 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05581RAD8 Asset Backed Bmw Vehicle Lease Trust 2016-1 01/22/2019 12/22/2017 688,815.12 687,846.48 ---687,644.13 (672.96)1.340 2.693 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05582XAB8 Asset Backed Bmw Vehicle Lease Trust 2016-2 01/22/2019 12/22/2017 162,453.54 162,225.10 ---162,279.72 (78.85)1.230 2.808 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05582XAD4 Asset Backed Bmw Vehicle Lease Trust 2016-2 09/20/2019 07/27/2017 965,000.00 963,002.14 ---959,287.20 (4,924.68)1.430 2.717 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 161571HA5 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 07/16/2018 12/19/2017 360,000.00 359,690.63 ---359,168.40 (673.47)1.620 2.420 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571FW9 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 04/16/2018 ---1,325,000.00 1,325,765.62 ---1,325,079.50 (45.79)2.057 1.936 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571GY4 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 04/16/2018 ---360,000.00 359,524.92 ---359,866.80 (53.90)1.360 2.203 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571HA5 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 07/16/2018 01/02/2018 1,500,000.00 1,498,710.94 ---1,496,535.00 (2,761.77)1.620 2.420 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571HC1 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 06/17/2019 ---763,000.00 758,373.05 ---752,188.29 (7,723.18)1.370 2.570 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571HJ6 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 01/15/2020 03/23/2018 500,000.00 501,347.66 ---501,345.00 11.63 2.077 2.038 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 41284AAE8 Asset Backed Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Trust 2014-1 10/15/2021 11/27/2017 355,045.52 354,879.09 ---354,662.07 (268.05)1.550 1.813 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 41284CAD6 Asset Backed Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Trust 2015-2 03/16/2020 01/31/2018 31,910.84 31,873.45 ---31,866.17 (17.71)1.300 2.382 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43814KAD3 Asset Backed Honda Auto Receivables 2015-1 Owner Trust 11/16/2020 07/24/2017 656,898.60 656,154.45 ---657,286.17 645.02 1.320 1.115 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 43814LAC3 Asset Backed Honda Auto Receivables 2015-4 Owner Trust 09/23/2019 11/09/2017 82,381.29 82,178.55 ---81,974.33 (252.07)1.230 2.425 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43814LAC3 Asset Backed Honda Auto Receivables 2015-4 Owner Trust 09/23/2019 07/24/2017 812,973.25 811,258.38 ---808,957.16 (3,042.41)1.230 2.425 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43813FAA1 Asset Backed Honda Auto Receivables 2017-4 Owner Trust 12/21/2018 11/22/2017 725,772.75 725,772.75 ---725,772.75 0.00 1.430 1.500 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 47787UAE3 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2015 12/15/2021 07/24/2017 747,000.00 747,350.16 ---745,252.02 (1,841.15)1.650 2.262 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 47787UAD5 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2015 06/17/2019 12/21/2017 38,878.40 38,817.65 ---38,834.85 (15.99)1.320 2.713 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 47788CAA0 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2018 03/15/2019 02/21/2018 750,000.00 750,000.00 ---750,015.00 15.00 1.950 2.010 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 47788CAA0 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2018 03/15/2019 02/21/2018 2,250,000.00 2,250,000.00 ---2,250,045.00 45.00 1.950 2.010 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 58768MAC5 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Lease Trust 2016-B 08/15/2019 03/20/2018 272,000.00 270,650.63 ---270,713.44 (24.17)1.350 2.587 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 58768MAC5 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Lease Trust 2016-B 08/15/2019 ---1,594,000.00 1,589,467.81 ---1,586,460.38 (5,376.98)1.350 2.587 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 58769DAD2 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Lease Trust 2017-A 03/16/2020 07/27/2017 965,000.00 965,942.38 ---958,582.75 (6,954.49)1.790 2.556 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 65478QAD0 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2016-A 03/15/2019 07/19/2017 1,175,965.10 438.05 ---1,173,801.32 1,057,576.07 1.490 2.530 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65479AAD4 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2017-A 04/15/2020 01/25/2018 850,000.00 846,115.23 ---842,273.50 (4,336.06)1.910 2.711 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 65477UAC4 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 10/15/2019 11/07/2017 48,543.18 48,459.76 ---48,416.48 (74.56)1.050 2.436 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65477UAC4 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 10/15/2019 11/07/2017 145,629.54 145,379.24 ---145,249.44 (223.65)1.050 2.436 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65477PAD3 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 2014-A Owner Trust 08/17/2020 07/25/2017 245,070.03 244,964.73 ---244,717.13 (300.56)1.340 2.233 AAA 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended March 31, 2018 ATTACHMENT 8 20 Page 12 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost Next Call Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Summarized Credit Rating 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended March 31, 2018 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65478AAD5 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 2015-C Owner Trust 05/15/2020 12/21/2017 675,244.18 673,002.16 ---671,138.70 (2,166.17)1.370 2.506 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 89190AAD2 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2014-C Owner Trust 04/15/2020 07/19/2017 873,215.93 873,079.49 ---871,984.69 (1,176.71)1.440 2.704 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89236WAC2 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2015-A Owner Trust 02/15/2019 11/07/2017 12,279.45 12,269.38 ---12,276.87 1.42 1.120 1.527 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89236WAD0 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2015-A Owner Trust 06/15/2020 01/19/2018 548,000.00 546,522.97 ---545,977.88 (1,006.89)1.520 2.429 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 90290XAD9 Asset Backed USAA Auto Owner Trust 2005-1 11/16/2020 03/22/2018 223,108.83 222,376.76 ---222,361.42 (16.03)1.540 2.076 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 90290XAD9 Asset Backed USAA Auto Owner Trust 2005-1 11/16/2020 03/22/2018 758,570.03 756,080.98 ---756,028.83 (54.48)1.540 2.076 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2011-R1 10/07/2020 01/30/2018 53,772.69 53,940.74 ---53,968.96 38.38 2.030 2.181 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 00287YAN9 Corporate AbbVie Inc.05/14/2018 12/21/2017 1,000,000.00 999,780.00 ---999,270.00 (661.94)1.800 2.383 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 0258M0EJ4 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 05/03/2019 07/19/2017 2,000,000.00 2,006,000.00 04/02/2019 2,002,340.00 (1,341.61)2.117 2.510 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 0258M0DK2 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 03/18/2019 07/25/2017 1,000,000.00 1,006,560.00 ---994,760.00 (9,189.16)2.125 2.677 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 0258M0EE5 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 03/03/2020 07/25/2017 500,000.00 503,990.00 02/01/2020 493,000.00 (9,970.91)2.200 2.953 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 03523TAN8 Corporate Anheuser-Busch InBev Worldwide Inc.01/15/2020 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,084,440.00 ---1,046,140.00 (16,327.90)5.375 2.717 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 94973VBE6 Corporate Anthem, Inc.07/15/2018 07/26/2017 1,500,000.00 1,509,105.00 ---1,498,710.00 (4,132.15)2.300 2.585 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 06051GEY1 Corporate Bank of America Corporation 01/15/2019 07/19/2017 1,500,000.00 1,518,015.00 ---1,510,200.00 558.64 2.762 2.490 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06051GFN4 Corporate Bank of America Corporation 04/21/2020 12/04/2017 1,000,000.00 997,850.00 ---985,450.00 (12,691.70)2.250 2.984 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 06367TPX2 Corporate Bank of Montreal 12/12/2019 07/19/2017 1,630,000.00 1,637,318.70 ---1,608,793.70 (26,468.51)2.100 2.889 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06367TPX2 Corporate Bank of Montreal 12/12/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,005,160.00 ---986,990.00 (16,780.09)2.100 2.889 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 07330NAL9 Corporate Branch Banking and Trust Company 05/10/2019 07/27/2017 1,000,000.00 995,340.00 04/10/2019 985,610.00 (11,434.57)1.450 2.773 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 14912L6Y2 Corporate Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation 01/10/2020 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,008,020.00 ---988,650.00 (17,273.78)2.100 2.758 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 172967JQ5 Corporate Citigroup Inc.04/27/2018 07/20/2017 1,950,000.00 1,957,117.50 ---1,950,429.00 (243.93)2.450 2.158 BBB 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 172967HM6 Corporate Citigroup Inc.04/08/2019 07/25/2017 1,000,000.00 1,010,110.00 ---999,000.00 (7,239.02)2.550 2.649 BBB 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 172967JJ1 Corporate Citigroup Inc.02/18/2020 07/25/2017 500,000.00 503,600.00 ---494,555.00 (8,149.49)2.400 2.998 BBB 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 17401QAB7 Corporate Citizens Bank, National Association 12/04/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,008,450.00 11/04/2019 989,040.00 (17,028.08)2.450 3.124 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 20030NAW1 Corporate Comcast Corporation 05/15/2018 12/21/2017 1,500,000.00 1,522,245.00 ---1,505,715.00 (1,276.29)5.700 2.587 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 21688AAD4 Corporate Cooperatieve Rabobank U.A.01/14/2020 07/20/2017 2,000,000.00 2,016,800.00 ---1,974,280.00 (37,971.74)2.250 2.992 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 22546QAN7 Corporate Credit Suisse AG 05/28/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,009,340.00 ---993,630.00 (12,406.09)2.300 2.860 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 375558BQ5 Corporate Gilead Sciences, Inc.09/20/2019 09/14/2017 340,000.00 340,000.00 ---340,207.40 207.40 2.452 2.512 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 375558BQ5 Corporate Gilead Sciences, Inc.09/20/2019 09/14/2017 595,000.00 595,000.00 ---595,362.95 362.95 2.452 2.512 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 40428HPN6 Corporate HSBC USA Inc.11/13/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,010,720.00 ---990,910.00 (16,805.94)2.375 2.953 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 24422ETJ8 Corporate John Deere Capital Corporation 10/09/2019 07/26/2017 1,125,000.00 1,114,650.00 ---1,099,822.50 (17,872.97)1.250 2.759 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 46625HHL7 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co.04/23/2019 07/25/2017 1,000,000.00 1,075,520.00 ---1,037,580.00 (9,654.28)6.300 2.691 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 46625HKA7 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co.01/23/2020 07/25/2017 500,000.00 503,005.00 12/23/2019 493,925.00 (8,280.83)2.250 2.942 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 49327M2P8 Corporate KeyBank National Association 08/22/2019 07/24/2017 1,000,000.00 995,550.00 ---984,360.00 (12,575.91)1.600 2.750 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 61746BDY9 Corporate Morgan Stanley 02/01/2019 07/20/2017 1,950,000.00 1,981,200.00 ---1,965,931.50 (1,270.66)3.148 2.694 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 61746BDM5 Corporate Morgan Stanley 01/24/2019 07/25/2017 1,000,000.00 1,009,060.00 ---998,220.00 (6,872.11)2.500 2.719 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 61747YDW2 Corporate Morgan Stanley 01/27/2020 07/25/2017 500,000.00 506,130.00 ---496,920.00 (7,641.90)2.650 2.998 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 718172BF5 Corporate Philip Morris International Inc.01/15/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,003,040.00 ---994,150.00 (7,535.96)1.875 2.625 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 69353REV6 Corporate PNC Bank, National Association 03/04/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,003,210.00 02/02/2019 993,680.00 (8,144.56)1.950 2.643 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 74432QBW4 Corporate Prudential Financial, Inc.08/15/2018 07/26/2017 1,500,000.00 1,510,920.00 ---1,498,770.00 (5,282.45)2.300 2.514 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 780082AA1 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 02/05/2020 07/26/2017 1,500,000.00 1,497,390.00 ---1,476,690.00 (21,361.66)1.875 2.743 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 064159HC3 Corporate The Bank of Nova Scotia 01/15/2019 01/23/2018 400,000.00 399,504.00 ---397,828.00 (1,768.71)1.950 2.646 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38141GFM1 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.04/01/2018 10/16/2017 1,000,000.00 1,020,020.00 ---1,000,000.00 0.00 6.150 5.968 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38141EA25 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.02/15/2019 07/25/2017 1,000,000.00 1,084,540.00 ---1,040,230.00 (8,844.81)7.500 2.808 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38141EA58 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.03/15/2020 07/26/2017 500,000.00 540,800.00 ---521,350.00 (9,523.90)5.375 3.110 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 446438RN5 Corporate The Huntington National Bank 06/30/2018 07/27/2017 1,500,000.00 1,505,700.00 ---1,498,440.00 (3,138.46)2.000 2.406 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 89114QAV0 Corporate Toronto Dominion Bank 11/05/2019 07/20/2017 2,000,000.00 2,019,800.00 ---1,983,540.00 (30,431.62)2.250 2.780 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89114QAS7 Corporate Toronto Dominion Bank 07/02/2019 07/27/2017 1,000,000.00 1,007,670.00 ---993,180.00 (11,920.70)2.125 2.680 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89114QBE7 Corporate Toronto Dominion Bank 01/22/2019 01/23/2018 370,000.00 369,463.50 ---368,124.10 (1,437.57)1.950 2.584 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 90261XHE5 Corporate UBS AG 08/14/2019 07/25/2017 850,000.00 857,505.50 ---843,786.50 (11,360.79)2.375 2.921 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 94988J5G8 Corporate Wells Fargo Bank, National Association 12/06/2019 07/19/2017 2,000,000.00 2,014,280.00 ---1,978,460.00 (31,770.72)2.150 2.808 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 02360SD47 CP Ameren Corporation 04/04/2018 03/27/2018 1,495,000.00 1,494,235.89 ---1,494,835.55 122.09 0.000 0.993 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43357MD56 CP Hitachi Capital America Corp.04/05/2018 03/27/2018 700,000.00 699,615.00 ---699,888.00 59.11 0.000 1.155 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31846V203 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc.03/31/2018 03/26/2018 0.00 412,243.66 ---412,243.66 0.00 1.250 1.250 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV31846V203 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc.03/31/2018 03/29/2018 0.00 20,993.45 ---20,993.45 0.00 1.250 1.250 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 03/31/2018 ---0.00 144,201.68 ---144,201.68 0.00 0.200 0.000 --- 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 392274A89 Muni Greater Orlando Aviation Authority.10/01/2019 07/26/2017 700,000.00 724,094.00 ---708,414.00 (8,546.47)3.483 2.662 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 419792XC5 Muni Hawaii, State of 04/01/2018 01/31/2018 495,000.00 495,000.00 ---495,000.00 0.00 1.750 1.735 AA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 54438CWT5 Muni Los Angeles Community College District 08/01/2018 11/09/2017 275,000.00 275,000.00 ---274,747.00 (253.00)1.620 1.890 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 54438CWT5 Muni Los Angeles Community College District 08/01/2018 11/09/2017 545,000.00 545,000.00 ---544,498.60 (501.40)1.620 1.890 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 569203LT7 Muni Salem-Keizer School District #24J 06/15/2018 11/15/2017 400,000.00 399,684.00 ---399,744.00 (143.82)1.513 1.813 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 73358WT46 Muni The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey 09/15/2018 01/24/2018 220,000.00 220,000.00 ---219,786.60 (213.40)2.114 2.326 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 92419RAA0 Muni Vermont Housing Finance Agency 05/01/2018 01/09/2018 420,000.00 420,000.00 ---419,916.00 (84.00)1.840 2.057 AA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV912828SA9 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2022 ---317,532.60 315,171.58 ---314,157.23 (1,124.42)0.125 0.408 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV912828UH1 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2023 02/05/2018 80,524.50 79,453.89 ---79,183.77 (301.59)0.125 0.477 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828UZ1 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/30/2018 03/14/2018 1,000,000.00 998,554.69 ---999,250.00 141.79 0.625 1.498 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828VK3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 06/30/2018 03/22/2018 765,000.00 764,103.52 ---764,173.80 (11.22)1.375 1.796 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828K25 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/15/2018 ---1,075,000.00 1,073,991.21 ---1,074,677.50 1.26 0.750 1.428 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828UZ1 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/30/2018 01/31/2018 3,000,000.00 2,994,257.81 ---2,997,750.00 (378.95)0.625 1.498 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828VK3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 06/30/2018 03/22/2018 5,000,000.00 4,994,140.63 ---4,994,600.00 (73.30)1.375 1.796 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828K25 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/15/2018 02/27/2018 2,500,000.00 2,497,558.59 ---2,499,250.00 (6.96)0.750 1.428 AAA21 Page 13 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost Next Call Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Summarized Credit Rating 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Investment Category for quarter ended March 31, 2018 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV912828QQ6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/31/2018 01/30/2018 700,000.00 701,968.75 ---700,735.00 (249.38)2.375 1.743 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV912828UF5 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 12/31/2019 01/30/2018 190,000.00 186,519.14 ---186,333.00 (483.05)1.125 2.253 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV912828VK3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 06/30/2018 01/30/2018 705,000.00 704,476.76 ---704,238.60 (447.46)1.375 1.796 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828QB9 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2018 03/14/2018 1,000,000.00 1,000,507.81 ---1,000,000.00 0.00 2.875 2.834 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828QB9 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2018 01/16/2018 5,365,000.00 5,380,089.06 ---5,365,000.00 0.00 2.875 2.834 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828UU2 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2018 03/20/2018 525,000.00 524,815.43 ---525,000.00 0.00 0.750 0.747 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828UU2 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2018 03/20/2018 1,700,000.00 1,699,402.34 ---1,700,000.00 0.00 0.750 0.747 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERV912828K25 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/15/2018 02/27/2018 695,000.00 694,298.44 ---694,791.50 5.02 0.750 1.428 AAA 116,776,939.19 116,793,278.85 117,185,372.26 475,362.44 22 BLANK 23 Page 14 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost Next Call Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Summarized Credit Rating 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385VE3 Agency FHLBanks Office of Finance 04/06/2018 03/26/2018 5,100,000.00 5,097,428.75 ---5,099,082.00 250.91 0.000 0.939 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137A7NT3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 08/25/2020 12/20/2017 83,254.99 83,833.87 ---83,433.16 (316.79) 2.917 2.468 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137AKKC4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 09/25/2018 12/04/2017 175,000.00 175,410.16 ---174,604.50 (524.22) 2.303 2.478 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137AL6V6 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 10/25/2018 12/01/2017 678,680.04 680,323.73 ---677,594.16 (1,723.57) 2.323 2.344 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137ANMN2 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 12/25/2018 12/01/2017 315,000.00 315,529.10 ---314,165.25 (1,030.49) 2.220 2.418 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137ASR97 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2022 02/27/2018 535,294.18 523,250.06 ---522,318.64 (1,155.26) 1.573 2.765 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31398E2E3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2019 01/03/2018 90,618.66 92,431.03 ---91,550.22 (429.94) 5.053 2.806 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31397Q4Q8 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2035 01/10/2018 382,264.07 385,489.43 ---384,614.99 (201.25) 4.000 1.696 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31398NG99 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 10/25/2025 03/21/2018 316,530.29 315,145.47 ---314,906.49 (187.20) 2.000 2.594 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137FBUW4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 10/25/2019 01/23/2018 830,000.00 830,389.06 ---830,000.00 (714.05) 1.780 2.126 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137A6AZ5 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 07/25/2020 01/10/2018 77,934.54 78,567.76 ---78,209.65 (263.31) 3.320 2.436 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137B6ZL8 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 12/25/2019 12/20/2017 114,230.11 114,176.57 ---113,847.44 (289.89) 2.075 2.434 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3136AK2A0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 09/25/2019 01/08/2018 224,079.86 223,738.76 ---222,522.50 (1,234.77) 2.171 2.726 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3136ASPX8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 06/25/2019 02/14/2018 355,129.74 354,151.41 ---353,410.91 (669.71) 1.785 2.621 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31381S5E8 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/01/2018 12/01/2017 443,934.67 445,668.79 ---443,677.19 (1,165.03) 2.640 2.468 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 36225B5Y0 Agency MBS Government National Mortgage Association 06/15/2019 12/21/2017 66,544.68 67,293.31 ---66,923.32 (180.05) 5.500 2.748 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571FW9 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 04/16/2018 ---1,325,000.00 1,325,765.62 ---1,325,079.50 (45.79) 2.057 1.936 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05522RCQ9 Asset Backed BA Credit Card Trust 01/15/2019 03/21/2018 1,100,000.00 1,102,406.25 ---1,102,519.00 202.89 2.157 1.979 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65477PAD3 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 2014-A Owner Trust 08/17/2020 07/25/2017 245,070.03 244,964.73 ---244,717.13 (300.56) 1.340 2.233 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 02582JGN4 Asset Backed American Express Credit Account Master Trust 05/15/2019 01/16/2018 252,000.00 252,885.94 ---252,690.48 (125.74) 2.147 2.014 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43814KAD3 Asset Backed Honda Auto Receivables 2015-1 Owner Trust 11/16/2020 07/24/2017 656,898.60 656,154.45 ---657,286.17 645.02 1.320 1.115 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89236WAC2 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2015-A Owner Trust 02/15/2019 11/07/2017 12,279.45 12,269.38 ---12,276.87 1.42 1.120 1.527 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89236WAD0 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2015-A Owner Trust 06/15/2020 01/19/2018 548,000.00 546,522.97 ---545,977.88 (1,006.89) 1.520 2.429 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 47787UAE3 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2015 12/15/2021 07/24/2017 747,000.00 747,350.16 ---745,252.02 (1,841.15) 1.650 2.262 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 47787UAD5 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2015 06/17/2019 12/21/2017 38,878.40 38,817.65 ---38,834.85 (15.99) 1.320 2.713 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65477UAC4 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 10/15/2019 11/07/2017 145,629.54 145,379.24 ---145,249.44 (223.65) 1.050 2.436 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571GY4 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 04/16/2018 ---360,000.00 359,524.92 ---359,866.80 (53.90) 1.360 2.203 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571HA5 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 07/16/2018 01/02/2018 1,500,000.00 1,498,710.94 ---1,496,535.00 (2,761.77) 1.620 2.420 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65478AAD5 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 2015-C Owner Trust 05/15/2020 12/21/2017 675,244.18 673,002.16 ---671,138.70 (2,166.17) 1.370 2.506 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43814LAC3 Asset Backed Honda Auto Receivables 2015-4 Owner Trust 09/23/2019 07/24/2017 812,973.25 811,258.38 ---808,957.16 (3,042.41) 1.230 2.425 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05581RAD8 Asset Backed Bmw Vehicle Lease Trust 2016-1 01/22/2019 12/22/2017 688,815.12 687,846.48 ---687,644.13 (672.96) 1.340 2.693 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571HC1 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 06/17/2019 ---763,000.00 758,373.05 ---752,188.29 (7,723.18) 1.370 2.570 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 41284AAE8 Asset Backed Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Trust 2014-1 10/15/2021 11/27/2017 355,045.52 354,879.09 ---354,662.07 (268.05) 1.550 1.813 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05582XAB8 Asset Backed Bmw Vehicle Lease Trust 2016-2 01/22/2019 12/22/2017 162,453.54 162,225.10 ---162,279.72 (78.85) 1.230 2.808 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05582XAD4 Asset Backed Bmw Vehicle Lease Trust 2016-2 09/20/2019 07/27/2017 965,000.00 963,002.14 ---959,287.20 (4,924.68) 1.430 2.717 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 58768MAC5 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Lease Trust 2016-B 08/15/2019 ---1,594,000.00 1,589,467.81 ---1,586,460.38 (5,376.98) 1.350 2.587 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 90290XAD9 Asset Backed USAA Auto Owner Trust 2005-1 11/16/2020 03/22/2018 758,570.03 756,080.98 ---756,028.83 (54.48) 1.540 2.076 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571HJ6 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 01/15/2020 03/23/2018 500,000.00 501,347.66 ---501,345.00 11.63 2.077 2.038 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 58769DAD2 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Lease Trust 2017-A 03/16/2020 07/27/2017 965,000.00 965,942.38 ---958,582.75 (6,954.49) 1.790 2.556 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65479AAD4 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2017-A 04/15/2020 01/25/2018 850,000.00 846,115.23 ---842,273.50 (4,336.06) 1.910 2.711 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43813FAA1 Asset Backed Honda Auto Receivables 2017-4 Owner Trust 12/21/2018 11/22/2017 725,772.75 725,772.75 ---725,772.75 - 1.430 1.500 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 47788CAA0 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2018 03/15/2019 02/21/2018 2,250,000.00 2,250,000.00 ---2,250,045.00 45.00 1.950 2.010 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38141GFM1 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.04/01/2018 10/16/2017 1,000,000.00 1,020,020.00 ---1,000,000.00 - 6.150 5.968 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 20030NAW1 Corporate Comcast Corporation 05/15/2018 12/21/2017 1,500,000.00 1,522,245.00 ---1,505,715.00 (1,276.29) 5.700 2.587 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38141EA25 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.02/15/2019 07/25/2017 1,000,000.00 1,084,540.00 ---1,040,230.00 (8,844.81) 7.500 2.808 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 46625HHL7 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co.04/23/2019 07/25/2017 1,000,000.00 1,075,520.00 ---1,037,580.00 (9,654.28) 6.300 2.691 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 03523TAN8 Corporate Anheuser-Busch InBev Worldwide Inc.01/15/2020 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,084,440.00 ---1,046,140.00 (16,327.90) 5.375 2.717 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38141EA58 Corporate The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc.03/15/2020 07/26/2017 500,000.00 540,800.00 ---521,350.00 (9,523.90) 5.375 3.110 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 94973VBE6 Corporate Anthem, Inc.07/15/2018 07/26/2017 1,500,000.00 1,509,105.00 ---1,498,710.00 (4,132.15) 2.300 2.585 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 74432QBW4 Corporate Prudential Financial, Inc.08/15/2018 07/26/2017 1,500,000.00 1,510,920.00 ---1,498,770.00 (5,282.45) 2.300 2.514 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 718172BF5 Corporate Philip Morris International Inc.01/15/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,003,040.00 ---994,150.00 (7,535.96) 1.875 2.625 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 61746BDM5 Corporate Morgan Stanley 01/24/2019 07/25/2017 1,000,000.00 1,009,060.00 ---998,220.00 (6,872.11) 2.500 2.719 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 0258M0DK2 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 03/18/2019 07/25/2017 1,000,000.00 1,006,560.00 ---994,760.00 (9,189.16) 2.125 2.677 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 172967HM6 Corporate Citigroup Inc.04/08/2019 07/25/2017 1,000,000.00 1,010,110.00 ---999,000.00 (7,239.02) 2.550 2.649 BBB 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 22546QAN7 Corporate Credit Suisse AG 05/28/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,009,340.00 ---993,630.00 (12,406.09) 2.300 2.860 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89114QAS7 Corporate Toronto Dominion Bank 07/02/2019 07/27/2017 1,000,000.00 1,007,670.00 ---993,180.00 (11,920.70) 2.125 2.680 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 90261XHE5 Corporate UBS AG 08/14/2019 07/25/2017 850,000.00 857,505.50 ---843,786.50 (11,360.79) 2.375 2.921 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 40428HPN6 Corporate HSBC USA Inc.11/13/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,010,720.00 ---990,910.00 (16,805.94) 2.375 2.953 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 17401QAB7 Corporate Citizens Bank, National Association 12/04/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,008,450.00 11/04/2019 989,040.00 (17,028.08) 2.450 3.124 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 46625HKA7 Corporate JPMorgan Chase & Co.01/23/2020 07/25/2017 500,000.00 503,005.00 12/23/2019 493,925.00 (8,280.83) 2.250 2.942 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 61747YDW2 Corporate Morgan Stanley 01/27/2020 07/25/2017 500,000.00 506,130.00 ---496,920.00 (7,641.90) 2.650 2.998 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 780082AA1 Corporate Royal Bank of Canada 02/05/2020 07/26/2017 1,500,000.00 1,497,390.00 ---1,476,690.00 (21,361.66) 1.875 2.743 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 172967JJ1 Corporate Citigroup Inc.02/18/2020 07/25/2017 500,000.00 503,600.00 ---494,555.00 (8,149.49) 2.400 2.998 BBB 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06051GFN4 Corporate Bank of America Corporation 04/21/2020 12/04/2017 1,000,000.00 997,850.00 ---985,450.00 (12,691.70) 2.250 2.984 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 00287YAN9 Corporate AbbVie Inc.05/14/2018 12/21/2017 1,000,000.00 999,780.00 ---999,270.00 (661.94) 1.800 2.383 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 446438RN5 Corporate The Huntington National Bank 06/30/2018 07/27/2017 1,500,000.00 1,505,700.00 ---1,498,440.00 (3,138.46) 2.000 2.406 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 064159HC3 Corporate The Bank of Nova Scotia 01/15/2019 01/23/2018 400,000.00 399,504.00 ---397,828.00 (1,768.71) 1.950 2.646 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89114QBE7 Corporate Toronto Dominion Bank 01/22/2019 01/23/2018 370,000.00 369,463.50 ---368,124.10 (1,437.57) 1.950 2.584 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 69353REV6 Corporate PNC Bank, National Association 03/04/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,003,210.00 02/02/2019 993,680.00 (8,144.56) 1.950 2.643 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 07330NAL9 Corporate Branch Banking and Trust Company 05/10/2019 07/27/2017 1,000,000.00 995,340.00 04/10/2019 985,610.00 (11,434.57) 1.450 2.773 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 49327M2P8 Corporate KeyBank National Association 08/22/2019 07/24/2017 1,000,000.00 995,550.00 ---984,360.00 (12,575.91) 1.600 2.750 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 24422ETJ8 Corporate John Deere Capital Corporation 10/09/2019 07/26/2017 1,125,000.00 1,114,650.00 ---1,099,822.50 (17,872.97) 1.250 2.759 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06367TPX2 Corporate Bank of Montreal 12/12/2019 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,005,160.00 ---986,990.00 (16,780.09) 2.100 2.889 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 14912L6Y2 Corporate Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation 01/10/2020 07/26/2017 1,000,000.00 1,008,020.00 ---988,650.00 (17,273.78) 2.100 2.758 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 0258M0EE5 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 03/03/2020 07/25/2017 500,000.00 503,990.00 02/01/2020 493,000.00 (9,970.91) 2.200 2.953 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 375558BQ5 Corporate Gilead Sciences, Inc.09/20/2019 09/14/2017 595,000.00 595,000.00 ---595,362.95 362.95 2.452 2.512 A 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43357MD56 CP Hitachi Capital America Corp.04/05/2018 03/27/2018 700,000.00 699,615.00 ---699,888.00 59.11 0.000 1.155 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 02360SD47 CP Ameren Corporation 04/04/2018 03/27/2018 1,495,000.00 1,494,235.89 ---1,494,835.55 122.09 0.000 0.993 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31846V203 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc.03/31/2018 03/26/2018 - 412,243.66 ---412,243.66 - 1.250 1.250 AAA 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended March 31, 2018 ATTACHMENT 9 24 Page 15 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Current Face Value Original Cost Next Call Date Base Market Value Base Net Total Unrealized Gain/Loss Coupon Yield Summarized Credit Rating 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio by Account for quarter ended March 31, 2018 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 569203LT7 Muni Salem-Keizer School District #24J 06/15/2018 11/15/2017 400,000.00 399,684.00 ---399,744.00 (143.82) 1.513 1.813 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 392274A89 Muni Greater Orlando Aviation Authority.10/01/2019 07/26/2017 700,000.00 724,094.00 ---708,414.00 (8,546.47) 3.483 2.662 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 54438CWT5 Muni Los Angeles Community College District 08/01/2018 11/09/2017 545,000.00 545,000.00 ---544,498.60 (501.40) 1.620 1.890 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 92419RAA0 Muni Vermont Housing Finance Agency 05/01/2018 01/09/2018 420,000.00 420,000.00 ---419,916.00 (84.00) 1.840 2.057 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 73358WT46 Muni The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey 09/15/2018 01/24/2018 220,000.00 220,000.00 ---219,786.60 (213.40) 2.114 2.326 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 419792XC5 Muni Hawaii, State of 04/01/2018 01/31/2018 495,000.00 495,000.00 ---495,000.00 - 1.750 1.735 AA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828UZ1 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/30/2018 01/31/2018 3,000,000.00 2,994,257.81 ---2,997,750.00 (378.95) 0.625 1.498 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828VK3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 06/30/2018 03/22/2018 5,000,000.00 4,994,140.63 ---4,994,600.00 (73.30) 1.375 1.796 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828K25 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/15/2018 02/27/2018 2,500,000.00 2,497,558.59 ---2,499,250.00 (6.96) 0.750 1.428 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828QB9 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2018 01/16/2018 5,365,000.00 5,380,089.06 ---5,365,000.00 - 2.875 2.834 AAA 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828UU2 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2018 03/20/2018 1,700,000.00 1,699,402.34 ---1,700,000.00 - 0.750 0.747 AAA 83,665,126.22 84,507,601.69 83,948,586.49 (374,891.27) 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 313385VJ2 Agency FHLBanks Office of Finance 04/10/2018 03/28/2018 200,000.00 199,881.56 ---199,926.00 8.00 0.000 1.228 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ANMN2 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 12/25/2018 12/05/2017 1,800,000.00 1,803,697.20 ---1,795,230.00 (6,337.22) 2.220 2.418 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 383742C76 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 08/16/2037 01/31/2018 101,079.71 103,606.69 ---103,553.13 16.17 4.000 2.842 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38375JCJ2 Agency CMO Government National Mortgage Association 12/16/2037 01/31/2018 39,258.99 39,381.68 ---39,517.71 154.72 5.305 3.185 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ASR97 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2022 02/27/2018 39,947.33 39,048.51 ---38,979.00 (86.21) 1.573 2.765 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31392J6N4 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 04/25/2023 12/05/2017 673,422.40 732,603.34 ---704,911.63 (24,676.87) 5.500 2.840 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B84S3 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 02/15/2029 01/31/2018 172,760.64 170,601.13 ---169,932.55 (684.36) 2.000 2.822 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31397SE83 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 02/25/2039 01/30/2018 75,816.45 76,242.91 ---75,949.89 (195.59) 4.000 3.018 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137A5FP4 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/15/2021 01/30/2018 84,037.51 84,247.61 ---83,956.83 (280.59) 2.500 2.512 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31398N2K9 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 11/25/2025 01/31/2018 67,337.64 67,590.16 ---67,357.17 (178.22) 3.500 2.725 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378CDK0 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 03/20/2035 01/30/2018 155,786.25 157,222.40 ---156,529.35 (580.99) 3.000 2.401 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378AWX5 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 01/20/2036 01/30/2018 218,809.26 220,928.98 ---219,857.36 (972.27) 3.000 2.524 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376THB1 Agency CMO The Government National Mortgage Association Guaranteed REMIC Pass-T 10/20/2037 01/30/2018 8,922.74 8,939.47 ---8,935.77 11.75 4.000 0.149 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31283K5N4 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 08/01/2020 12/05/2017 898,416.90 918,652.84 ---916,322.35 (38,639.84) 5.000 2.677 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136AC7J4 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 03/25/2023 02/21/2018 61,863.74 60,846.37 ---60,949.39 84.11 2.493 3.069 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B1U75 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2023 02/27/2018 120,000.00 117,965.63 ---118,093.20 94.84 2.522 2.901 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AXHN6 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 02/25/2022 01/25/2018 91,695.08 90,434.27 ---89,994.13 (460.89) 1.749 2.670 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31418ASD1 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 04/01/2023 01/31/2018 99,997.04 99,025.88 ---98,690.08 (340.22) 2.000 2.593 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B1UF7 Agency MBS Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 09/25/2022 01/25/2018 45,778.34 45,105.97 ---44,876.05 (239.87) 1.785 2.676 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136A96F0 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 11/25/2022 02/27/2018 75,000.00 72,694.34 ---72,645.00 (99.61) 2.184 3.422 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 62888VAA6 CMO NCUA Guaranteed Notes Trust 2011-R1 10/07/2020 01/30/2018 53,772.69 53,940.74 ---53,968.96 38.38 2.030 2.181 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31846V203 MM Fund First American Funds, Inc.03/31/2018 03/29/2018 - 20,993.45 ---20,993.45 - 1.250 1.250 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828SA9 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2022 ---317,532.60 315,171.58 ---314,157.23 (1,124.42) 0.125 0.408 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828UH1 TIPS Treasury, United States Department of 01/15/2023 02/05/2018 80,524.50 79,453.89 ---79,183.77 (301.59) 0.125 0.477 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828QQ6 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 05/31/2018 01/30/2018 700,000.00 701,968.75 ---700,735.00 (249.38) 2.375 1.743 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828UF5 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 12/31/2019 01/30/2018 190,000.00 186,519.14 ---186,333.00 (483.05) 1.125 2.253 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828VK3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 06/30/2018 01/30/2018 705,000.00 704,476.76 ---704,238.60 (447.46) 1.375 1.796 AAA 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828K25 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/15/2018 02/27/2018 695,000.00 694,298.44 ---694,791.50 5.02 0.750 1.428 AAA 7,771,759.81 7,865,539.70 7,820,608.10 (75,965.64) 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385VE3 Agency FHLBanks Office of Finance 04/06/2018 03/26/2018 900,000.00 899,546.25 ---899,838.00 44.28 0.000 0.939 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 3137ASR97 Agency CMO Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation 01/25/2022 02/27/2018 117,178.82 114,542.30 ---114,338.41 (252.89) 1.573 2.765 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 31398NG99 Agency CMO Federal National Mortgage Association 10/25/2025 03/21/2018 95,854.26 95,434.90 ---95,362.53 (56.68) 2.000 2.594 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 3136A7MK5 Agency MBS Federal National Mortgage Association 12/25/2019 03/21/2018 74,894.90 74,450.22 ---74,361.65 (77.74) 1.801 2.901 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 05522RCQ9 Asset Backed BA Credit Card Trust 01/15/2019 03/21/2018 325,000.00 325,710.94 ---325,744.25 59.94 2.157 1.979 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 89190AAD2 Asset Backed Toyota Auto Receivables 2014-C Owner Trust 04/15/2020 07/19/2017 873,215.93 873,079.49 ---871,984.69 (1,176.71) 1.440 2.704 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 65477UAC4 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Receivables 10/15/2019 11/07/2017 48,543.18 48,459.76 ---48,416.48 (74.56) 1.050 2.436 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 41284CAD6 Asset Backed Harley-Davidson Motorcycle Trust 2015-2 03/16/2020 01/31/2018 31,910.84 31,873.45 ---31,866.17 (17.71) 1.300 2.382 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 161571HA5 Asset Backed Chase Issuance Trust 07/16/2018 12/19/2017 360,000.00 359,690.63 ---359,168.40 (673.47) 1.620 2.420 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 43814LAC3 Asset Backed Honda Auto Receivables 2015-4 Owner Trust 09/23/2019 11/09/2017 82,381.29 82,178.55 ---81,974.33 (252.07) 1.230 2.425 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 65478QAD0 Asset Backed Nissan Auto Lease Trust 2016-A 03/15/2019 07/19/2017 1,175,965.10 438.05 ---1,173,801.32 1,057,576.07 1.490 2.530 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 58768MAC5 Asset Backed Mercedes-Benz Auto Lease Trust 2016-B 08/15/2019 03/20/2018 272,000.00 270,650.63 ---270,713.44 (24.17) 1.350 2.587 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 90290XAD9 Asset Backed USAA Auto Owner Trust 2005-1 11/16/2020 03/22/2018 223,108.83 222,376.76 ---222,361.42 (16.03) 1.540 2.076 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 47788CAA0 Asset Backed John Deere Owner Trust 2018 03/15/2019 02/21/2018 750,000.00 750,000.00 ---750,015.00 15.00 1.950 2.010 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 06051GEY1 Corporate Bank of America Corporation 01/15/2019 07/19/2017 1,500,000.00 1,518,015.00 ---1,510,200.00 558.64 2.762 2.490 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 89114QAV0 Corporate Toronto Dominion Bank 11/05/2019 07/20/2017 2,000,000.00 2,019,800.00 ---1,983,540.00 (30,431.62) 2.250 2.780 AA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 21688AAD4 Corporate Cooperatieve Rabobank U.A.01/14/2020 07/20/2017 2,000,000.00 2,016,800.00 ---1,974,280.00 (37,971.74) 2.250 2.992 AA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 172967JQ5 Corporate Citigroup Inc.04/27/2018 07/20/2017 1,950,000.00 1,957,117.50 ---1,950,429.00 (243.93) 2.450 2.158 BBB 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 61746BDY9 Corporate Morgan Stanley 02/01/2019 07/20/2017 1,950,000.00 1,981,200.00 ---1,965,931.50 (1,270.66) 3.148 2.694 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 94988J5G8 Corporate Wells Fargo Bank, National Association 12/06/2019 07/19/2017 2,000,000.00 2,014,280.00 ---1,978,460.00 (31,770.72) 2.150 2.808 AA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 06367TPX2 Corporate Bank of Montreal 12/12/2019 07/19/2017 1,630,000.00 1,637,318.70 ---1,608,793.70 (26,468.51) 2.100 2.889 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 0258M0EJ4 Corporate American Express Credit Corporation 05/03/2019 07/19/2017 2,000,000.00 2,006,000.00 04/02/2019 2,002,340.00 (1,341.61) 2.117 2.510 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 375558BQ5 Corporate Gilead Sciences, Inc.09/20/2019 09/14/2017 340,000.00 340,000.00 ---340,207.40 207.40 2.452 2.512 A 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 9AMMF05B2 MM Fund U.S. Bank Money Market Account Fund 03/31/2018 ---- 144,201.68 ---144,201.68 - 0.200 0.000 --- 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 54438CWT5 Muni Los Angeles Community College District 08/01/2018 11/09/2017 275,000.00 275,000.00 ---274,747.00 (253.00) 1.620 1.890 AA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828UZ1 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/30/2018 03/14/2018 1,000,000.00 998,554.69 ---999,250.00 141.79 0.625 1.498 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828VK3 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 06/30/2018 03/22/2018 765,000.00 764,103.52 ---764,173.80 (11.22) 1.375 1.796 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828K25 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 04/15/2018 ---1,075,000.00 1,073,991.21 ---1,074,677.50 1.26 0.750 1.428 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828QB9 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2018 03/14/2018 1,000,000.00 1,000,507.81 ---1,000,000.00 - 2.875 2.834 AAA 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828UU2 US Gov Treasury, United States Department of 03/31/2018 03/20/2018 525,000.00 524,815.43 ---525,000.00 - 0.750 0.747 AAA 25,340,053.16 24,420,137.46 25,416,177.67 926,219.35 25 Page 16 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Description Beginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base Sales Base Maturities and Redemptions Base Paydowns Net Total Realized Gain/Loss Base Amortization/A ccretion Base Change In Net Unrealized Gain/Loss Ending Base Market Value Ending Accrued Income Balance 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828QB9 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 5,380,089.06 - - - - (15,089.06) - 5,365,000.00 - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 20030NAW1 COMCAST CORP 1,521,285.00 - - - - - (14,300.36) (1,269.64) 1,505,715.00 32,300.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38141EA25 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC 1,056,840.00 - - - - - (13,686.21) (2,923.79) 1,040,230.00 9,583.33 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38141GFM1 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC 1,010,520.00 - - - - - (10,920.00) 400.00 1,000,000.00 30,750.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 46625HHL7 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO 1,052,800.00 - - - - - (10,875.64) (4,344.36) 1,037,580.00 27,650.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 03523TAN8 ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV NV 1,060,810.00 - - - - - (8,515.53) (6,154.47) 1,046,140.00 11,347.22 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 38141EA58 GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC 530,165.00 - - - - - (3,820.01) (4,994.99) 521,350.00 1,194.44 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 392274A89 GREATER ORLANDO AVIATION AUTH ORLANDO FLA ARPT FAC 713,797.00 - - - - - (2,744.92) (2,638.08) 708,414.00 12,190.50 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 74432QBW4 PRUDENTIAL FINANCIAL INC 1,502,520.00 - - - - - (2,649.60) (1,100.40) 1,498,770.00 4,408.33 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 94973VBE6 ANTHEM INC 1,503,270.00 - - - - - (2,427.49) (2,132.51) 1,498,710.00 7,283.33 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 446438RN5 HUNTINGTON NATIONAL BANK 1,500,570.00 - - - - - (1,578.46) (551.54) 1,498,440.00 7,583.33 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 61746BDM5 MORGAN STANLEY 1,002,550.00 - - - - - (1,535.72) (2,794.28) 998,220.00 4,652.78 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 172967HM6 CITIGROUP INC 1,003,530.00 - - - - - (1,492.26) (3,037.74) 999,000.00 12,254.17 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 22546QAN7 CREDIT SUISSE AG (NEW YORK BRANCH)1,000,970.00 - - - - - (1,281.79) (6,058.22) 993,630.00 7,858.33 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 40428HPN6 HSBC USA INC (NEW)1,001,160.00 - - - - - (1,166.50) (9,083.50) 990,910.00 9,104.17 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 0258M0DK2 AMERICAN EXPRESS CREDIT CORP 1,000,000.00 - - - - - (1,006.30) (4,233.70) 994,760.00 767.36 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89114QAS7 TORONTO-DOMINION BANK 999,890.00 - - - - - (1,000.57) (5,709.43) 993,180.00 5,253.47 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 17401QAB7 CITIZENS BANK NA 1,000,670.00 - - - - - (924.44) (10,705.56) 989,040.00 7,962.50 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 90261XHE5 UBS AG (STAMFORD BRANCH)850,697.00 - - - - - (910.79) (5,999.71) 843,786.50 2,635.59 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31381S5E8 FN 469845 - 448,298.51 - - (2,619.49) (7.89) (828.91) (1,165.03) 443,677.19 1,009.21 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 14912L6Y2 CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP 997,930.00 - - - - - (814.78) (8,465.22) 988,650.00 4,725.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137AL6V6 FHMS K706 A2 683,745.68 - - - (4,164.28) (7.05) (792.22) (1,187.98) 677,594.16 1,313.81 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31397Q4Q8 FNR 10155B JA - 476,156.57 - - (89,908.55) (715.14) (716.63) (201.25) 384,614.99 1,274.21 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 61747YDW2 MORGAN STANLEY 502,260.00 - - - - - (607.00) (4,733.00) 496,920.00 2,355.56 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06367TPX2 BANK OF MONTREAL 997,230.00 - - - - - (540.05) (9,699.95) 986,990.00 6,358.33 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 69353REV6 PNC BANK NA 998,250.00 - - - - - (534.47) (4,035.53) 993,680.00 1,462.50 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 718172BF5 PHILIP MORRIS INTERNATIONAL INC 998,130.00 - - - - - (525.66) (3,454.34) 994,150.00 3,958.33 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31398E2E3 FHMS K003 A4 - 102,000.00 - - (9,381.34) (170.29) (468.21) (429.94) 91,550.22 381.58 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 0258M0EE5 AMERICAN EXPRESS CREDIT CORP 498,485.00 - - - - - (392.53) (5,092.47) 493,000.00 855.56 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571FW9 CHAIT 133 A - 850,431.64 - - - - (348.86) (31.78) 850,051.00 825.50 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 172967JJ1 CITIGROUP INC 499,415.00 - - - - - (346.00) (4,514.00) 494,555.00 1,433.33 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 46625HKA7 JPMORGAN CHASE & CO 499,665.00 - - - - - (309.80) (5,430.20) 493,925.00 2,125.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06738EAF2 BARCLAYS PLC 1,000,010.00 - - (1,000,000.00) - - (296.00) 286.00 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 36225B5Y0 GN 781763 107,282.80 - - - (39,670.67) (426.16) (283.95) 21.30 66,923.32 305.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571FW9 CHAIT 133 A 475,323.00 - - - - - (273.26) (21.24) 475,028.50 461.31 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137ANMN2 FHMS K707 A2 315,352.80 - - - - - (261.57) (925.99) 314,165.25 582.75 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137AKKC4 FHMS K705 A2 175,232.75 - - - - - (222.57) (405.68) 174,604.50 335.85 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06050TLY6 BANK OF AMERICA NA 500,025.00 - - (500,000.00) - - (202.32) 177.32 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 58769DAD2 MBALT 17A A3 963,050.70 - - - - - (157.46) (4,310.49) 958,582.75 767.71 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137A7NT3 FHMS K011 A1 95,945.66 - - - (11,965.09) (81.25) (106.51) (359.65) 83,433.16 202.38 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 45950VKP0 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORP - 1,500,105.00 - (1,500,000.00) - - (105.00) - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137A6AZ5 FHMS K010 A1 - 89,683.09 - - (11,025.74) (83.96) (100.42) (263.31) 78,209.65 215.62 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 49327M2A1 KEYBANK NA 749,805.00 - - (750,000.00) - - (94.26) 289.26 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05522RCQ9 BACCT 141 A - 1,102,406.25 - - - - (90.14) 202.89 1,102,519.00 1,120.23 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 47787UAE3 JDOT 15 A4 745,931.79 - - - - - (85.49) (594.28) 745,252.02 547.80 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 02582JGN4 AMXCA 141 A - 252,885.94 - - - - (69.72) (125.74) 252,690.48 255.45 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65602UML9 The Norinchukin Bank - 2,050,068.51 - (2,050,000.00) - - (68.51) - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3136ASPX8 FNA 16M06A AS2 - 328,603.42 - - (39,922.58) 119.12 (64.01) (530.01) 288,205.94 430.79 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31398NG99 FNR 10112H AE - 315,145.47 - - - - (51.78) (187.20) 314,906.49 527.55 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137B6ZL8 FHMS K714 A1 140,709.45 - - - (26,504.67) 13.00 (44.73) (325.61) 113,847.44 197.52 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05581QAE8 BMWLT 152 A4 964,536.80 - - - (965,000.00) (82.78) (44.08) 590.05 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3136ASPX8 FNA 16M06A AS2 - 74,367.96 - - (9,032.26) 23.89 (14.92) (139.70) 65,204.97 97.46 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571HJ6 CHAIT 171 A - 501,347.66 - - - - (14.29) 11.63 501,345.00 490.31 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05581QAE8 BMWLT 152 A4 - 464,862.44 - - (464,989.58) 130.67 (3.53) - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 22549LGU3 Credit Suisse AG 1,999,320.00 - - (2,000,000.00) - - (0.36) 680.36 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31846V203 FIRST AMER:GVT OBLG;Y 274,118.57 175,024,008.63 (174,885,883.54) - - - - - 412,243.66 - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 47770VAS9 JOBSOHIO BEVERAGE SYS OHIO STATEWIDE LIQUOR PROFIT 550,000.00 - - (550,000.00) - - - - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 375558BQ5 GILEAD SCIENCES INC 595,749.70 - - - - - - (386.75) 595,362.95 486.26 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06371ETS6 Bank of Montreal 1,999,540.00 - - (2,000,000.00) - - - 460.00 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 54438CWT5 LOS ANGELES CALIF CMNTY COLLEGE DIST 544,782.00 - - - - - - (283.40) 544,498.60 1,471.50 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06539RLL9 The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd 1,599,840.00 - - (1,600,000.00) - - - 160.00 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65602UYN2 The Norinchukin Bank 1,099,879.00 - - (1,100,000.00) - - - 121.00 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 60700AMC5 Mizuho Bank, Ltd.1,799,730.00 - - (1,800,000.00) - - - 270.00 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89113XNF7 Toronto Dominion Bank 1,799,802.00 - - (1,800,000.00) - - - 198.00 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 60683BCS0 Mitsubishi UFJ Trust & Banking Corp 1,399,776.00 - - (1,400,000.00) - - - 224.00 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43813FAA1 HAROT 174 A1 1,601,703.46 - - - (875,914.70) (0.00) - (16.02) 725,772.75 317.12 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 92419RAA0 VERMONT HSG FIN AGY PPTY TRANSFER TAX REV - 420,000.00 - - - - - (84.00) 419,916.00 1,416.80 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 73358WT46 PORT AUTH N Y & N J - 220,000.00 - - - - - (213.40) 219,786.60 206.70 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 419792XC5 HAWAII ST - 495,000.00 - - - - - - 495,000.00 1,130.94 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 47788CAA0 JDOT 2018 A1 - 2,250,000.00 - - - - - 45.00 2,250,045.00 3,778.13 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 90290XAD9 USAOT 151 A4 - 756,080.98 - - - - 2.33 (54.48) 756,028.83 519.20 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571GY4 CHAIT 155 A - 12,985.78 - - - - 11.13 (1.72) 12,995.19 7.86 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89236WAC2 TAOT 15A A3 51,913.84 - - - (39,673.36) 19.87 12.52 4.00 12,276.87 6.11 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571HC1 CHAIT 162 A - 12,796.88 - - - - 14.66 4.25 12,815.79 7.92 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3136AK2A0 FNA 14M10 AS2 - 224,668.64 - - (931.31) 1.40 18.55 (1,234.77) 222,522.50 405.46 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 53944VAC3 LLOYDS BANK PLC 999,970.00 - - (1,000,000.00) - - 27.75 2.25 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 41284AAE8 HDMOT 141 A4 449,649.00 - - - (94,954.49) 36.16 37.25 (105.85) 354,662.07 244.59 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65477PAD3 NAROT 14A A4 501,318.75 - - - (256,926.41) 69.27 39.45 216.07 244,717.13 145.95 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 47787UAD5 JDOT 15 A3 90,321.30 - - - (51,527.89) 65.27 49.50 (73.32) 38,834.85 22.81 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 064159HC3 BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA - 399,504.00 - - - - 92.71 (1,768.71) 397,828.00 1,646.67 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89114QBE7 TORONTO-DOMINION BANK - 369,463.50 - - - - 98.17 (1,437.57) 368,124.10 1,382.88 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313313TS7 FEDERAL FARM CREDIT BANKS - 3,099,900.97 - (3,100,000.00) - - 99.03 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65477UAC4 NAROT 15A A3 243,368.91 - - - (98,217.32) 132.76 101.72 (136.63) 145,249.44 67.96 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385UH7 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 2,999,883.33 - (3,000,000.00) - - 116.67 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31315LTS7 FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL MORTGAGE CORP - 3,749,879.17 - (3,750,000.00) - - 120.83 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 569203LT7 MARION & POLK CNTYS ORE SCH DIST NO 24J SALEM-KEIZ 399,788.00 - - - - - 134.61 (178.61) 399,744.00 1,781.98 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended March 31, 2018 ATTACHMENT 10 26 Page 17 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Description Beginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base Sales Base Maturities and Redemptions Base Paydowns Net Total Realized Gain/Loss Base Amortization/A ccretion Base Change In Net Unrealized Gain/Loss Ending Base Market Value Ending Accrued Income Balance 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended March 31, 2018 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 00287YAN9 ABBVIE INC 999,510.00 - - - - - 142.45 (382.45) 999,270.00 6,850.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 31381S5E8 FN 469845 449,327.34 (449,169.06) - - - - 165.21 (323.49) - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43814KAD3 HAROT 151 A4 886,325.88 - - - (230,101.40) 102.41 191.43 767.85 657,286.17 385.38 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 02360SA32 Ameren Corporation 1,849,926.00 - - (1,850,000.00) - - 200.42 (126.42) - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05582XAB8 BMWLT 162 A2 359,906.34 0.00 - - (197,910.47) 188.88 212.28 (117.30) 162,279.72 61.06 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43357MD56 Hitachi Capital America Corp.- 699,615.00 - - - - 213.89 59.11 699,888.00 - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137ASR97 FHMS K020 A1 - 523,250.06 - - - - 223.84 (1,155.26) 522,318.64 701.68 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06051GFN4 BANK OF AMERICA CORP 1,000,700.00 - - - - - 226.32 (15,476.32) 985,450.00 10,000.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 650035S82 NEW YORK ST URBAN DEV CORP REV 944,508.60 - - (945,000.00) - - 239.45 251.95 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 780082AA1 ROYAL BANK OF CANADA 1,487,565.00 - - - - - 255.67 (11,130.67) 1,476,690.00 4,375.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43814LAC3 HAROT 154 A3 1,117,103.25 - - - (308,121.11) 411.68 296.54 (733.20) 808,957.16 277.77 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385UG9 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 7,999,700.00 - (8,000,000.00) - - 300.00 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 04056BCS7 ARIZONA PUBLIC SERVICE CO - 1,684,695.30 - (1,685,000.00) - - 304.70 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 22533UAP8 Credit Agricole Corporate and Investment Bank - 1,599,684.45 - (1,600,000.00) - - 315.55 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 3137FBUW4 FHMS KP04 AG2 - 830,389.06 - - - - 324.99 (714.05) 830,000.00 287.22 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65478AAD5 NAROT 15C A3 849,437.91 - - - (176,912.11) 562.30 332.78 (2,282.19) 671,138.70 411.15 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385TH9 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 2,499,647.23 - (2,500,000.00) - - 352.77 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 67021KAN9 NSTAR Electric Company - 1,599,618.67 - (1,600,000.00) - - 381.33 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571GY4 CHAIT 155 A - 346,539.14 - - - - 384.65 (52.18) 346,871.61 209.74 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 97684HA50 Wisconsin Public Service Corporation 1,999,740.00 - - (2,000,000.00) - - 422.22 (162.22) - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 459515RN4 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORP 1,847,558.00 - - (1,850,000.00) - - 437.73 2,004.27 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05582XAD4 BMWLT 162 A3 960,908.40 - - - - - 445.69 (2,066.89) 959,287.20 421.65 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 89236WAD0 TAOT 15A A4 - 546,522.97 - - - - 461.80 (1,006.89) 545,977.88 370.20 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 02360SD47 Ameren Corporation - 1,494,235.89 - - - - 477.57 122.09 1,494,835.55 - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 58768MAC5 MBALT 16B A3 996,600.00 - - - - - 482.80 (1,812.80) 995,270.00 600.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385UA2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 13,899,513.50 - (13,900,000.00) - - 486.50 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 65479AAD4 NALT 17A A3 - 846,115.23 - - - - 494.33 (4,336.06) 842,273.50 721.56 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 97684HAW1 Wisconsin Public Service Corporation - 1,599,502.22 - (1,600,000.00) - - 497.78 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 66522UBC6 Northern Illinois Gas Company - 1,599,502.22 - (1,600,000.00) - - 497.78 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 4,994,140.63 - - - - 532.67 (73.30) 4,994,600.00 17,282.46 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 49327M2P8 KEYBANK NA 989,070.00 - - - - - 532.89 (5,242.89) 984,360.00 1,733.33 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385TJ5 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 2,999,466.66 - (3,000,000.00) - - 533.34 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385UE4 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 15,999,422.22 - (16,000,000.00) - - 577.78 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571HA5 CHAIT 157 A - 1,498,710.94 - - - - 585.83 (2,761.77) 1,496,535.00 1,080.00 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 161571HC1 CHAIT 162 A 742,800.00 - - - - - 591.89 (4,019.39) 739,372.50 456.67 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828UU2 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 1,699,402.34 - - - - 597.66 - 1,700,000.00 - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385UF1 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 15,999,400.00 - (16,000,000.00) - - 600.00 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385UL8 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 5,499,381.25 - (5,500,000.00) - - 618.75 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828H37 UNITED STATES TREASURY 4,999,400.00 - - (5,000,000.00) - - 621.45 (21.45) - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 05581RAD8 BMWLT 161 A3 1,229,408.11 - - - (542,217.96) 582.50 625.69 (754.20) 687,644.13 282.03 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 07330NAL9 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST CO 990,530.00 - - - - - 655.65 (5,575.65) 985,610.00 5,679.17 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385TW6 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 6,699,302.06 - (6,700,000.00) - - 697.94 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 71112KA84 The Peoples Gas Light And Coke Company 1,999,480.00 - - (2,000,000.00) - - 700.00 (180.00) - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 58768MAC5 MBALT 16B A3 591,980.40 - - - - - 845.81 (1,635.83) 591,190.38 356.40 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 92780KC55 Virginia Electric and Power Company - 1,799,130.01 - (1,800,000.00) - - 869.99 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 06538CB59 The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd - 1,599,091.55 - (1,600,000.00) - - 908.45 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43357MAA8 Hitachi Capital America Corp.1,999,300.00 - - (2,000,000.00) - - 925.00 (225.00) - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 63743DBD2 National Rural Utilities Cooperative Finance Corpo - 1,599,066.67 - (1,600,000.00) - - 933.33 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 69511KAP7 PacifiCorp - 1,598,985.78 - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,014.22 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828UR9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,128,937.80 - - (1,130,000.00) - - 1,040.07 22.13 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 93884FB92 Washington Gas Light Company - 1,598,933.33 - (1,600,000.00) - - 1,066.67 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 92780KAG3 Virginia Electric and Power Company 1,848,871.50 - - (1,850,000.00) - - 1,102.29 26.21 - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 24422ETJ8 JOHN DEERE CAPITAL CORP 1,108,136.25 - - - - - 1,167.18 (9,480.93) 1,099,822.50 6,718.75 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385VE3 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 5,097,428.75 - - - - 1,402.34 250.91 5,099,082.00 - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385UD6 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 13,898,528.92 - (13,900,000.00) - - 1,471.08 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828K25 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 2,497,558.59 - - - - 1,698.37 (6.96) 2,499,250.00 8,653.85 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 02360SB80 Ameren Corporation - 1,597,760.00 - (1,600,000.00) - - 2,240.00 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385UM6 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 9,997,733.30 - (10,000,000.00) - - 2,266.70 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 26055BBN3 The Dow Chemical Company - 1,597,699.10 - (1,600,000.00) - - 2,300.90 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 43357MB90 Hitachi Capital America Corp.- 1,597,680.00 - (1,600,000.00) - - 2,320.00 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 313385RX6 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS 4,497,570.00 - - (4,500,000.00) - - 2,530.14 (100.14) - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 459053SZ8 INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPM - 2,597,445.50 - (2,600,000.00) - - 2,554.50 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 54866HCE0 Lowe`s Companies, Inc.- 1,997,400.00 - (2,000,000.00) - - 2,600.00 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828UR9 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 3,382,355.47 - (3,385,000.00) - - 2,644.53 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 23337UAV1 DTE Gas Company 1,997,640.00 - - (2,000,000.00) - - 3,033.33 (673.33) - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 78355BCC4 Ryder System, Inc.- 2,596,845.34 - (2,600,000.00) - - 3,154.66 - - - 240907004 LC-RCTC Toll Revenue: - I-15 912828UZ1 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 2,994,257.81 - - - - 3,871.14 (378.95) 2,997,750.00 7,872.93 90,093,171.73 354,727,111.51 (174,885,883.54) (181,195,000.00) (4,547,592.78) 884.65 (42,628.04) (201,477.03) 83,948,586.49 320,229.34 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31283K5N4 FH G11753 1,104,474.22 - - - (182,726.24) (12,388.06) (7,490.26) 14,452.69 916,322.35 3,743.40 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31392J6N4 FNR 0323B EQ 771,014.16 - - - (57,784.84) (4,948.77) (2,535.82) (833.10) 704,911.63 3,086.52 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ANMN2 FHMS K707 A2 1,802,016.00 - - - - - (1,670.85) (5,115.15) 1,795,230.00 3,330.00 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828QQ6 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 701,968.75 - - - - (984.38) (249.38) 700,735.00 5,572.12 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378CDK0 GNR 11169G AK - 163,833.04 - - (6,550.26) (58.32) (114.12) (580.99) 156,529.35 389.47 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38378AWX5 GNR 11157E QA - 228,499.55 - - (7,497.94) (70.73) (101.26) (972.27) 219,857.36 547.02 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31397SE83 FNR 1136C PA - 78,218.97 - - (1,965.00) (9.77) (98.73) (195.59) 75,949.89 252.72 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 383742C76 GNR 0832B PA - 105,466.40 - - (1,814.35) (44.88) (70.22) 16.17 103,553.13 336.93 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31398N2K9 FNR 10123B DL - 82,412.05 - - (14,766.52) (51.28) (58.86) (178.22) 67,357.17 196.40 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137A6TB8 FHR 3812F LV - 25,470.19 - - (25,446.33) - (23.86) - - - 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38375JCJ2 GNR 0668 D - 40,705.20 - - (1,319.39) (3.80) (19.02) 154.72 39,517.71 173.56 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 38376THB1 GNR 102H WP - 13,606.85 - - (4,658.64) (5.53) (18.67) 11.75 8,935.77 29.74 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 62888VAA6 NGN 10R1 1A - 56,477.21 - - (2,528.57) (7.75) (10.31) 38.38 53,968.96 75.79 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137A5FP4 FHR 3791E DA - 88,355.02 - - (4,097.16) (10.73) (9.70) (280.59) 83,956.83 175.08 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31846V203 FIRST AMER:GVT OBLG;Y 109,995.80 3,781,309.52 (3,870,311.87) - - - - - 20,993.45 - 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31418ASD1 FN MA1415 - 1,585.28 - - (40.86) 0.46 0.09 (2.94) 1,542.03 2.60 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 31418ASD1 FN MA1415 - 100,030.24 - - (2,574.17) 24.98 4.28 (337.28) 97,148.05 164.06 27 Page 18 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Description Beginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base Sales Base Maturities and Redemptions Base Paydowns Net Total Realized Gain/Loss Base Amortization/A ccretion Base Change In Net Unrealized Gain/Loss Ending Base Market Value Ending Accrued Income Balance 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended March 31, 2018 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 313313TS7 FEDERAL FARM CREDIT BANKS - 199,993.61 - (200,000.00) - - 6.39 - - - 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B1UF7 FHMS K027 A1 - 46,810.70 - - (1,730.14) 25.56 9.80 (239.87) 44,876.05 68.10 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B84S3 FHR 4305A CT - 176,335.04 - - (5,806.49) 72.39 15.97 (684.36) 169,932.55 287.93 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137ASR97 FHMS K020 A1 - 39,048.51 - - - - 16.70 (86.21) 38,979.00 52.36 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136AC7J4 FNA 13M6 2A - 64,531.54 - - (3,746.78) 61.51 19.01 84.11 60,949.39 128.53 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137AXHN6 FHMS K024 A1 - 94,197.69 - - (3,815.89) 52.80 20.42 (460.89) 89,994.13 133.65 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3137B1U75 FHMS KS01 A2 - 117,965.63 - - - - 32.73 94.84 118,093.20 252.20 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 313385VJ2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 199,881.56 - - - - 36.44 8.00 199,926.00 - 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 3136A96F0 FNA 12M17 A2 - 72,694.34 - - - - 50.27 (99.61) 72,645.00 136.50 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828UR9 UNITED STATES TREASURY 74,929.50 - - (75,000.00) - - 64.45 6.05 - - 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828K25 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 109,892.58 - - - - 74.73 (0.31) 109,967.00 380.77 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 704,476.76 - - - - 209.30 (447.46) 704,238.60 2,436.83 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828UR9 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 624,682.62 - (625,000.00) - - 317.38 - - - 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828H37 UNITED STATES TREASURY 2,499,700.00 - (149,994.14) (2,350,000.00) - 4.92 348.67 (59.45) - - 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828UF5 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 392,671.88 (206,210.16) - - (15.24) 369.57 (483.05) 186,333.00 537.33 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828SA9 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 75,564.65 - - - - 387.15 (120.74) 75,831.06 20.11 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828SA9 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 75,469.29 - - - - 390.55 (28.79) 75,831.06 20.11 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828K25 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 584,405.86 - - - - 413.31 5.33 584,824.50 2,025.00 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828UH1 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 79,068.39 - - - - 416.97 (301.59) 79,183.77 21.13 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828UJ7 UNITED STATES TREASURY 1,499,580.00 - - (1,500,000.00) - - 476.08 (56.08) - - 240907020 RCTC I-15 Prj RAMP UP RESERVE 912828SA9 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 162,655.64 - - - - 814.36 (974.88) 162,495.12 43.10 7,861,709.68 9,288,284.57 (4,226,516.17) (4,750,000.00) (328,869.57) (17,372.22) (8,711.44) 2,083.25 7,820,608.10 24,619.06 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 61746BDY9 MORGAN STANLEY 1,972,093.50 - - - - - (5,059.46) (1,102.54) 1,965,931.50 10,061.76 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 06051GEY1 BANK OF AMERICA CORP 1,512,450.00 - - - - - (3,002.50) 752.50 1,510,200.00 8,629.75 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 172967JQ5 CITIGROUP INC 1,952,593.50 - - - - - (2,329.36) 164.86 1,950,429.00 8,228.96 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 89114QAV0 TORONTO-DOMINION BANK 2,001,200.00 - - - - - (2,142.70) (15,517.30) 1,983,540.00 18,250.00 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 21688AAD4 COOPERATIEVE RABOBANK UA (NEW YORK BRANCH)1,997,980.00 - - - - - (1,670.36) (22,029.64) 1,974,280.00 9,625.00 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 94988J5G8 WELLS FARGO BANK NA 1,996,920.00 - - - - - (1,480.08) (16,979.92) 1,978,460.00 13,736.11 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 0258M0EJ4 AMERICAN EXPRESS CREDIT CORP 2,003,860.00 - - - - - (834.62) (685.38) 2,002,340.00 6,468.55 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 06367TPX2 BANK OF MONTREAL 1,625,484.90 - - - - - (753.57) (15,937.63) 1,608,793.70 10,364.08 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828QB9 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 1,000,507.81 - - - - (507.81) - 1,000,000.00 - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 05581QAE8 BMWLT 152 A4 1,999,040.00 - - - (2,000,000.00) (174.83) (93.09) 1,227.92 - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 43814JAD6 HAROT 144 A4 2,354,175.75 - - - (2,355,000.00) (140.51) (44.64) 1,009.41 - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 05522RCQ9 BACCT 141 A - 325,710.94 - - - - (26.63) 59.94 325,744.25 330.98 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 31398NG99 FNR 10112H AE - 95,434.90 - - - - (15.68) (56.68) 95,362.53 159.76 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 3136A7MK5 FNA 12M8 AQ3 - 74,450.22 - - - - (10.83) (77.74) 74,361.65 112.38 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 9AMMF05B2 U.S. BANK MONEY MARKET ACCOUNT FUND 84,991.61 65,556,419.11 (65,497,209.04) - - - - - 144,201.68 - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 47770VAS9 JOBSOHIO BEVERAGE SYS OHIO STATEWIDE LIQUOR PROFIT 275,000.00 - - (275,000.00) - - - - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 375558BQ5 GILEAD SCIENCES INC 340,428.40 - - - - - - (221.00) 340,207.40 277.87 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 54438CWT5 LOS ANGELES CALIF CMNTY COLLEGE DIST 274,890.00 - - - - - - (143.00) 274,747.00 742.50 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 60700AMC5 Mizuho Bank, Ltd.799,880.00 - - (800,000.00) - - - 120.00 - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 47788CAA0 JDOT 2018 A1 - 750,000.00 - - - - - 15.00 750,015.00 1,259.38 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 43814JAC8 HAROT 144 A3 2,500.72 - - - (2,501.11) (0.01) 0.42 (0.02) - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 90290XAD9 USAOT 151 A4 - 222,376.76 - - - - 0.68 (16.03) 222,361.42 152.71 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828K25 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 74,967.77 - - - - 5.69 4.04 74,977.50 259.62 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 41284CAD6 HDMOT 152 A3 - 51,691.44 - - (19,841.24) 21.38 12.30 (17.71) 31,866.17 18.44 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 89190AAD2 TAOT 14C A4 1,460,210.52 - - - (588,880.68) 42.66 24.58 587.62 871,984.69 558.86 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 02361LAS1 Ameren Illinois Company - 573,974.49 - (574,000.00) - - 25.51 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 65477UAC4 NAROT 15A A3 81,122.97 - - - (32,739.11) 44.25 33.91 (45.54) 48,416.48 22.65 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385UH7 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 999,961.11 - (1,000,000.00) - - 38.89 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 31315LTS7 FEDERAL AGRICULTURAL MORTGAGE CORP - 1,249,959.72 - (1,250,000.00) - - 40.28 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 43814LAC3 HAROT 154 A3 113,199.80 - - - (31,222.94) 65.44 46.76 (114.73) 81,974.33 28.15 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 3137ASR97 FHMS K020 A1 - 114,542.30 - - - - 49.00 (252.89) 114,338.41 153.60 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 66522UB51 Northern Illinois Gas Company - 524,930.00 - (525,000.00) - - 70.00 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 02361LB50 Ameren Illinois Company - 524,930.00 - (525,000.00) - - 70.00 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828VK3 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 764,103.52 - - - - 81.50 (11.22) 764,173.80 2,644.22 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 58768MAC5 MBALT 16B A3 - 270,650.63 - - - - 86.98 (24.17) 270,713.44 163.20 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 04056BCS7 ARIZONA PUBLIC SERVICE CO - 509,907.78 - (510,000.00) - - 92.22 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 71112KA43 The Peoples Gas Light And Coke Company 599,946.00 - - (600,000.00) - - 92.50 (38.50) - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 31392J6N4 FNR 0323B EQ - - - - 20,777.06 1,395.22 98.13 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 00280PAX3 Abbey National Treasury Services PLC - 499,877.50 - (500,000.00) - - 122.50 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313313TS7 FEDERAL FARM CREDIT BANKS - 3,899,875.42 - (3,900,000.00) - - 124.58 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 161571HA5 CHAIT 157 A 359,712.00 - - - - - 135.34 (678.94) 359,168.40 259.20 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 650035S82 NEW YORK ST URBAN DEV CORP REV 539,719.20 - - (540,000.00) - - 136.83 143.97 - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 31283K5N4 FH G11753 - - - - 53,291.82 1,717.12 137.63 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385UA2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 4,999,825.00 - (5,000,000.00) - - 175.00 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828UU2 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 524,815.43 - - - - 184.57 - 525,000.00 - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 74433HB29 Prudential Funding LLC - 599,813.33 - (600,000.00) - - 186.67 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385UG9 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 4,999,812.50 - (5,000,000.00) - - 187.50 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 06538CB26 The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, Ltd - 599,809.33 - (600,000.00) - - 190.67 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385SU1 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 799,800.89 - (800,000.00) - - 199.11 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385SM9 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 999,786.67 - (1,000,000.00) - - 213.33 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313589TW3 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION - 2,085,786.19 - (2,086,000.00) - - 213.81 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 97684HA84 Wisconsin Public Service Corporation 599,844.00 - - (600,000.00) - - 215.84 (59.84) - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385UE4 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 5,999,783.33 - (6,000,000.00) - - 216.67 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385UF1 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 5,999,775.00 - (6,000,000.00) - - 225.00 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385VE3 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 899,546.25 - - - - 247.47 44.28 899,838.00 - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 161571HG2 CHAIT 166 A 1,999,200.00 - - - (2,000,000.00) 17.75 248.53 533.72 - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 92780KC55 Virginia Electric and Power Company - 524,746.25 - (525,000.00) - - 253.75 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385TH9 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 1,999,717.78 - (2,000,000.00) - - 282.22 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385TW6 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 2,999,687.49 - (3,000,000.00) - - 312.51 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385SW7 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 1,299,678.98 - (1,300,000.00) - - 321.02 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385UL8 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 2,999,662.50 - (3,000,000.00) - - 337.50 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385TJ5 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 1,999,644.44 - (2,000,000.00) - - 355.56 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 78355BCC4 Ryder System, Inc.- 399,514.67 - (400,000.00) - - 485.33 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385SP2 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 1,999,500.28 - (2,000,000.00) - - 499.72 - - - 28 Page 19 of 32 Source Account Account Identifier Description Beginning Base Market Value Base Purchases Base Sales Base Maturities and Redemptions Base Paydowns Net Total Realized Gain/Loss Base Amortization/A ccretion Base Change In Net Unrealized Gain/Loss Ending Base Market Value Ending Accrued Income Balance 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Transaction Report by Account Quarter ended March 31, 2018 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 313385UD6 FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS - 4,999,470.83 - (5,000,000.00) - - 529.17 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828UZ1 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 998,554.69 - - - - 553.52 141.79 999,250.00 2,624.31 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 02360SAK4 Ameren Corporation 599,556.00 - - (600,000.00) - - 555.00 (111.00) - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 23337UAS8 DTE Gas Company 499,475.00 - - (500,000.00) - - 659.72 (134.72) - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828K25 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 999,023.44 - - - - 679.35 (2.79) 999,700.00 3,461.54 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 912828UR9 UNITED STATES TREASURY - 1,999,062.50 - (2,000,000.00) - - 937.50 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 43357MB25 Hitachi Capital America Corp.- 649,031.32 - (650,000.00) - - 968.68 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 54866HCE0 Lowe`s Companies, Inc.- 998,700.00 - (1,000,000.00) - - 1,300.00 - - - 245490001 LC-RCTC 2017 PRJ: Sales Tax 65478QAD0 NALT 16A A3 1,997,820.00 - - - (824,034.90) 764,181.12 86,505.14 (850,670.03) 1,173,801.32 778.75 30,043,293.86 131,458,820.51 (65,497,209.04) (62,660,000.00) (7,780,151.10) 767,169.59 81,794.74 (920,123.91) 25,416,177.67 99,372.30 127,998,175.26 495,474,216.58 (244,609,608.75)(248,605,000.00)(12,656,613.45)750,682.02 30,455.25 (1,119,517.68)117,185,372.26 444,220.70 29 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2018 Credit Rating Industry Group Asset Class Security Type Market Sector ATTACHMENT 11 30 BLANK 31 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax Revenue Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2018 Credit Rating Industry Group Asset Class Security Type Market Sector ATTACHMENT 12 32 BLANK 33 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Sales Tax I15 ELP Project Revenue Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2018 Credit Rating Industry Group Asset Class Security Type Market Sector ATTACHMENT 13 34 BLANK 35 2017 Financing STAMP Portfolio Ramp Up Fund Summary of Investments for quarter ended March 31, 2018 Credit Rating Industry Group Asset Class Security Type Market Sector ATTACHMENT 14 36 BLANK 37 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM CUSIP Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Next Call Date Original Cost Base Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss Accrued Income Coupon Yield Credit Rating 02582JHG8 Asset-Backed AMERICAN EXPRESS 1.640% 12/15/21 12/15/2021 05/30/2017 419,932.72 415,913.40 -4,019.32 306.13 1.64 1.656247791 AAA 037833BS8 Credit APPLE INC 2.250% 2/23/21 02/23/2021 02/23/2016 01/23/2021 495,675.00 492,480.00 -3,195.00 1,187.50 2.25 2.288259702 AA+ 037833CS7 Credit APPLE INC 1.800% 5/11/20 05/11/2020 05/11/2017 484,505.30 477,196.35 -7,308.95 3,395.00 1.8 1.833535362 AA+ 053015AD5 Credit AUTOMATIC DATA 2.250% 9/15/20 09/15/2020 09/15/2015 08/15/2020 455,017.27 444,577.50 -10,439.77 450.00 2.25 2.275048282 AA 05582QAD9 Asset-Backed BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.160% 11/25/20 11/25/2020 07/20/2016 454,997.95 450,609.25 -4,388.70 87.97 1.16 1.170334050 N/A 05584PAD9 Asset-Backed BMW VEHICLE LEASE 2.070% 10/20/20 10/20/2020 10/25/2017 99,999.92 98,971.00 -1,028.92 63.25 2.07 2.093277243 N/A 06406FAA1 Credit BANK OF NY MTN 2.500% 4/15/21 04/15/2021 02/19/2016 03/15/2021 759,301.27 735,390.00 -23,911.27 8,645.83 2.5 2.545487868 A 06406HBM0 Credit BANK NY MELLON MTN 5.450% 5/15/19 05/15/2019 05/12/2009 253,819.61 249,223.70 -4,595.91 4,982.51 5.45 5.297073488 A 084664CK5 Credit BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 1.300% 8/15/19 08/15/2019 08/15/2016 159,844.80 157,100.80 -2,744.00 265.78 1.3 1.322414933 AA 084670BQ0 Credit BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 2.200% 3/15/21 03/15/2021 03/15/2016 02/15/2021 466,436.01 464,947.65 -1,488.36 460.53 2.2 2.235658757 AA 13063BFS6 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST BUILD 6.650% 3/01/22 03/01/2022 04/01/2010 489,585.68 473,441.50 -16,144.18 2,355.21 6.65 5.994555321 AA- 13063C4V9 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST 1.050% 11/01/18 11/01/2018 11/03/2016 149,887.50 149,050.50 -837.00 656.25 1.05 1.056008689 AA- 13063DAB4 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST HIGH 1.593% 4/01/19 04/01/2019 04/27/2017 350,024.49 347,767.00 -2,257.49 2,787.75 1.59 1.604779078 AA- 13066YTY5 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST DEPT 1.713% 5/01/21 05/01/2021 09/28/2016 107,199.40 105,675.76 -1,523.64 772.92 1.71 1.764505928 AA 13077CT38 Taxable Muni CALIFORNIA ST 1.982% 11/01/19 11/01/2019 08/05/2015 130,399.67 128,856.00 -1,543.67 1,073.58 1.98 1.995549783 AA- 161571HC1 Asset-Backed CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 06/15/2021 06/17/2016 750,040.12 739,372.50 -10,667.62 456.67 1.37 1.390030337 AAA 166764AN0 Credit CHEVRON CORP 2.193% 11/15/19 11/15/2019 11/18/2014 503,581.05 496,960.00 -6,621.05 4,142.33 2.19 2.211733382 AA- 166764AU4 Credit CHEVRON CORP 2.0398% 3/03/22 03/03/2022 03/03/2015 504,977.39 505,575.00 597.61 821.58 2.55 2.020279302 AA- 17275RAE2 Credit CISCO SYSTEMS INC 4.950% 2/15/19 02/15/2019 02/17/2009 371,815.84 367,725.60 -4,090.24 2,277.00 4.95 4.857560621 AA- 17275RAX0 Credit CISCO SYSTEMS INC 2.450% 6/15/20 06/15/2020 06/17/2015 599,952.00 596,358.00 -3,594.00 4,328.33 2.45 2.467072139 AA- 17275RBG6 Credit CISCO SYSTEMS INC 1.400% 9/20/19 09/20/2019 09/20/2016 39,955.60 39,360.80 -594.80 17.11 1.4 1.422099425 AA- 17305EGA7 Asset-Backed CITIBANK CREDIT CARD 1.740% 1/19/21 01/19/2021 01/26/2017 379,927.23 377,837.80 -2,089.43 1,359.13 1.74 1.749482193 AAA 17305EGB5 Asset-Backed CITIBANK CREDIT 1.920% 4/07/22 04/07/2022 04/11/2017 229,933.74 226,506.30 -3,427.44 2,134.40 1.92 1.953264087 AAA 191216BT6 Credit COCA COLA CO THE 1.875% 10/27/20 10/27/2020 10/27/2015 500,187.99 490,330.00 -9,857.99 4,010.42 1.88 1.918335192 A+ 191216BV1 Credit COCA COLA CO 1.375% 5/30/19 05/30/2019 05/31/2016 249,825.00 246,920.00 -2,905.00 1,155.38 1.38 1.391799014 A+ 30231GAV4 Credit EXXON MOBIL 2.222% 3/01/21 03/01/2021 03/03/2016 02/01/2021 495,685.00 492,555.00 -3,130.00 925.83 2.22 2.258428451 AA+ 3130AAXX1 Agencies F H L B DEB 1.375% 3/18/19 03/18/2019 03/10/2017 518,793.60 516,016.80 -2,776.80 258.19 1.38 1.385488145 AA+ 3130ABMP8 Agencies F H L B DEB 1.515% 6/27/19 06/27/2019 06/27/2017 769,912.61 770,130.90 218.29 162.02 2.13 1.512685591 AA+ 3130ACE26 Agencies F H L B 1.375% 9/28/20 09/28/2020 09/08/2017 358,844.40 351,172.80 -7,671.60 41.25 1.38 1.416007580 AA+ 3130ADN32 Agencies F H L B DEB 2.125% 2/11/20 02/11/2020 02/09/2018 798,536.00 796,688.00 -1,848.00 2,455.56 2.13 2.139592018 AA+ 3130ADUJ9 Agencies F H L B DEB 2.375% 3/30/20 03/30/2020 03/16/2018 929,832.60 930,120.90 288.30 920.31 2.38 2.381382104 AA+ 3133EH2J1 Agencies F F C B 1.74957% 12/11/20 12/11/2020 12/11/2017 510,000.00 510,096.90 96.90 473.25 1.75 1.749535009 AA+ 3133EHRD7 Agencies F F C B DEB 1.83032% 7/13/22 07/13/2022 07/13/2017 310,000.00 309,748.90 -251.10 272.12 1.83 1.829387013 AA+ 3133EHRZ8 Agencies F F C B DEB 1.8715% 6/25/20 06/25/2020 07/25/2017 510,000.00 510,086.70 86.70 160.72 1.87 1.871294058 AA+ 3133EHTJ2 Agencies F F C B DEB 1.95688% 8/01/22 08/01/2022 08/01/2017 230,000.00 229,825.20 -174.80 332.38 1.73 1.958348762 AA+ 3133EHVR1 Agencies F F C B DEB 1.8815% 8/24/20 08/24/2020 08/24/2017 130,000.00 129,977.90 -22.10 47.11 1.88 1.881067454 AA+ 3133EHXH1 Agencies F F C B 1.7705% 9/06/22 09/06/2022 09/06/2017 260,000.00 260,062.40 62.40 299.64 1.77 1.770075182 AA+ 3135G0J53 Agencies F N M A DEB 1.000% 2/26/19 02/26/2019 02/23/2016 498,820.00 494,760.00 -4,060.00 486.11 1 1.010080604 AA+ 3135G0K77 Agencies F N M A DEB 1.250% 6/13/19 06/13/2019 06/13/2016 06/13/2018 490,000.00 484,335.60 -5,664.40 1,837.50 1.25 1.265758696 AA+ 3135G0N33 Agencies F N M A 0.875% 8/02/19 08/02/2019 08/02/2016 529,109.60 520,470.60 -8,639.00 760.03 0.88 0.891801541 AA+ 3135G0P49 Agencies F N M A 1.000% 8/28/19 08/28/2019 09/02/2016 509,204.40 501,539.10 -7,665.30 439.17 1 1.018599629 AA+ 3135G0T29 Agencies F N M A DEB 1.500% 2/28/20 02/28/2020 02/28/2017 299,808.00 295,473.00 -4,335.00 387.50 1.5 1.527339375 AA+ 3136AMTM1 Mortgage-Backed F N M A GTD REMIC 1.858% 9/25/18 09/25/2018 03/01/2015 60,563.06 60,522.24 -40.82 19.43 1.8 1.860101915 N/A 3137BNN26 Mortgage-Backed F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 07/25/2019 04/01/2016 55,062.34 54,360.06 -702.28 81.34 1.78 1.796945193 N/A 3137BPCF4 Mortgage-Backed F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 10/25/2020 05/01/2016 189,629.86 188,049.83 -1,580.03 43.49 1.38 1.386999103 N/A 3137EAEB1 Agencies F H L M C M T N 0.875% 7/19/19 07/19/2019 07/20/2016 350,150.58 344,973.33 -5,177.25 614.25 0.88 0.890938897 AA+ 3137EAEH8 Agencies F H L M C 1.375% 8/15/19 08/15/2019 07/19/2017 509,250.30 504,063.60 -5,186.70 896.04 1.38 1.393279831 AA+ 3137EAEK1 Agencies F H L M C M T N 1.875% 11/17/20 11/17/2020 11/15/2017 549,472.00 541,904.00 -7,568.00 3,895.83 1.88 1.911919159 AA+ 3137EAEL9 Agencies F H L M C M T N 2.375% 2/16/21 02/16/2021 02/16/2018 508,653.60 508,556.70 -96.90 1,514.06 2.38 2.394636015 AA+ 31846V203 FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 209,648.12 209,648.12 0.00 483.65 1.266842000 43814PAC4 Asset-Backed HONDA AUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 09/20/2021 09/29/2017 149,983.76 147,768.00 -2,215.76 96.96 1.79 1.819549484 AAA 47787XAC1 Asset-Backed JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.780% 4/15/21 04/15/2021 03/02/2017 309,955.86 306,673.70 -3,282.16 245.24 1.78 1.800052586 N/A 478160CH5 Credit JOHNSON JOHNSON 1.950% 11/10/20 11/10/2020 11/10/2017 249,732.50 245,927.50 -3,805.00 1,909.38 1.95 1.990384910 AAA 48125LRJ3 Credit JP MORGAN MTN 2.26464% 9/23/19 09/23/2019 09/23/2016 850,393.53 849,216.55 -1,176.98 478.41 2.86 2.250708017 A+ 544445AY5 Taxable Muni LOS ANGELES CA DEPT 1.750% 5/15/19 05/15/2019 12/06/2016 100,000.00 99,364.00 -636.00 661.11 1.75 1.762886702 AA 54465AGK2 Taxable Muni LOS ANGELES CA 1.125% 9/01/19 09/01/2019 08/25/2016 266,868.00 264,918.60 -1,949.40 253.13 1.13 1.144653704 AA 54473ERQ9 Taxable Muni LOS ANGELES CNTY CA 2.036% 12/01/18 12/01/2018 09/02/2015 50,000.00 49,896.00 -104.00 339.33 2.04 2.039079009 AA 58769DAD2 Asset-Backed MERCEDES BENZ AUTO 1.790% 4/15/20 04/15/2020 04/26/2017 369,991.56 367,539.50 -2,452.06 294.36 1.79 1.802999627 AAA 589331AN7 Credit MERCK CO INC 5.000% 6/30/19 06/30/2019 06/25/2009 524,337.47 514,675.00 -9,662.47 6,319.44 5 4.865564454 AA 594918BV5 Credit MICROSOFT CORP 1.850% 2/06/20 02/06/2020 02/06/2017 499,665.00 495,015.00 -4,650.00 1,413.19 1.85 1.874746656 AAA 6055806F1 Taxable Muni MISSISSIPPI ST SER D 3.381% 11/01/18 11/01/2018 11/10/2010 101,565.62 100,749.00 -816.62 1,408.75 3.38 3.363576673 AA Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category for Quarter ended March 31, 2018 ATTACHMENT 15 38 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM CUSIP Security Type Category Issuer Final Maturity Trade Date Next Call Date Original Cost Base Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss Accrued Income Coupon Yield Credit Rating Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio by Investment Category for Quarter ended March 31, 2018 649791EJ5 Taxable Muni NEW YORK ST REF SER 3.600% 9/01/19 09/01/2019 03/30/2011 514,535.14 507,430.00 -7,105.14 1,500.00 3.6 3.557769279 AA+ 649791EV8 Taxable Muni NEW YORK ST SER B 3.600% 2/15/19 02/15/2019 03/30/2011 254,765.48 252,700.00 -2,065.48 1,150.00 3.6 3.567959722 AA+ 65479BAD2 Asset-Backed NISSAN AUTO LEASE 2.050% 9/15/20 09/15/2020 10/10/2017 219,961.57 217,973.80 -1,987.77 200.44 2.05 2.071690601 N/A 68389XAQ8 Credit ORACLE CORP 2.375% 1/15/19 01/15/2019 07/16/2013 504,103.17 500,000.00 -4,103.17 2,506.94 2.38 2.372722187 AA- 702282ND2 Taxable Muni PASADENA CA UNIF 1.861% 11/01/18 11/01/2018 03/20/2014 250,505.37 249,690.00 -815.37 1,938.54 1.86 1.863441108 A+ 717081DL4 Credit PFIZER INC 2.100% 5/15/19 05/15/2019 05/15/2014 251,501.53 249,077.50 -2,424.03 1,983.33 2.1 2.109704641 AA 717081DU4 Credit PFIZER INC 1.450% 6/03/19 06/03/2019 06/03/2016 249,715.00 247,167.50 -2,547.50 1,188.19 1.45 1.467700468 AA 742718EZ8 Credit PROCTER GAMBLE CO 1.750% 10/25/19 10/25/2019 10/25/2017 149,947.50 148,341.00 -1,606.50 1,137.50 1.75 1.770054720 AA- 797669XT0 Taxable Muni SAN FRANCISCO CA 21.690% 7/01/20 07/01/2020 12/28/2017 100,000.00 99,536.00 -464.00 5,603.25 2.17 21.878814166 AA+ 79770GGM2 Taxable Muni SAN FRANCISCO CITY 2.000% 8/01/20 08/01/2020 11/30/2017 299,607.00 296,880.00 -2,727.00 1,000.00 2 2.029241368 AA- 798170AB2 Taxable Muni SAN JOSE CA 2.098% 8/01/19 08/01/2019 12/21/2017 320,000.00 319,104.00 -896.00 1,118.93 2.1 2.108140154 AA 798170AC0 Taxable Muni SAN JOSE CA REDEV 2.259% 8/01/20 08/01/2020 12/21/2017 190,000.00 189,129.80 -870.20 715.35 2.26 2.280044814 AA 79876CBQ0 Taxable Muni SAN MARCOS CA REDEV 2.000% 10/01/20 10/01/2020 12/14/2017 109,256.40 108,182.80 -1,073.60 653.89 2 2.044404465 AA- 80284TAF2 Asset-Backed SANTANDER DRIVE 1.770% 9/15/20 09/15/2020 02/28/2017 109,999.24 109,654.60 -344.64 86.53 1.77 1.774845328 AAA 857477AS2 Credit STATE STREET CORP 2.550% 8/18/20 08/18/2020 08/18/2015 795,442.43 783,405.96 -12,036.47 2,400.12 2.55 2.569890956 A 882723UC1 Taxable Muni TEXAS ST REF WTR 2.036% 8/01/20 08/01/2020 02/05/2015 251,436.00 248,330.00 -3,106.00 848.33 2.04 2.058291295 AAA 89190BAD0 Asset-Backed TOYOTA AUTO 1.760% 7/15/21 07/15/2021 05/17/2017 519,960.12 513,463.60 -6,496.52 406.76 1.76 1.784555483 AAA 89238MAD0 Asset-Backed TOYOTA AUTO 1.730% 2/16/21 02/16/2021 03/15/2017 375,955.74 372,055.76 -3,899.98 289.10 1.73 1.749135543 AAA 90290AAC1 Asset-Backed USAA AUTO OWNER 1.700% 5/17/21 05/17/2021 09/20/2017 139,985.24 138,479.60 -1,505.64 105.78 1.7 1.719986240 AAA 90331HNG4 Credit US BANK NA MTN 2.050% 10/23/20 10/23/2020 10/24/2017 09/23/2020 249,950.00 244,642.50 -5,307.50 2,235.07 2.05 2.097594417 AA- 90331HNJ8 Credit US BANK NA MTN 2.350% 1/23/20 01/23/2020 01/23/2018 12/23/2019 254,885.25 252,934.50 -1,950.75 1,131.92 2.35 2.371222441 AA- 91159HHQ6 Credit US BANCORP MTN 2.3813% 1/24/22 01/24/2022 01/24/2017 12/23/2021 504,695.00 503,870.00 -825.00 2,215.93 2.38 2.360878402 A+ 9128282Q2 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 8/15/20 08/15/2020 08/15/2017 1,457,105.41 1,430,035.56 -27,069.85 2,718.65 1.5 1.535265038 N/A 9128282T6 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.250% 8/31/19 08/31/2019 08/31/2017 2,674,565.71 2,642,779.92 -31,785.79 2,911.96 1.25 1.268932472 N/A 9128282X7 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 9/30/19 09/30/2019 09/30/2017 3,454,671.27 3,415,539.00 -39,161.32 23,917.49 1.38 1.395046823 N/A 9128283H1 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.750% 11/30/19 11/30/2019 11/30/2017 2,516,554.69 2,499,235.20 -17,319.49 14,780.77 1.75 1.768856005 N/A 9128283N8 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.875% 12/31/19 12/31/2019 01/02/2018 1,535,802.35 1,529,712.80 -6,089.55 7,060.10 1.88 1.892448374 N/A 9128283S7 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 2.000% 1/31/20 01/31/2020 01/31/2018 2,823,588.28 2,816,500.90 -7,087.38 9,381.22 2 2.015580437 N/A 9128283T5 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.67343% 1/31/20 01/31/2020 01/31/2018 499,585.26 499,415.00 -170.26 1,195.83 1.77 1.673678952 N/A 9128283X6 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 2.250% 2/15/21 02/15/2021 02/15/2018 119,446.88 119,540.40 93.52 335.64 2.25 2.271648813 N/A 9128283Y4 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 2.250% 2/29/20 02/29/2020 02/28/2018 265,020.70 264,875.45 -145.25 518.48 2.25 2.258990783 N/A 912828F62 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 10/31/19 10/31/2019 10/31/2014 2,215,353.72 2,194,070.40 -21,283.32 13,996.98 1.5 1.520604187 N/A 912828P95 Treasuries U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 3/15/19 03/15/2019 03/15/2016 1,500,960.71 1,484,070.00 -17,132.89 692.93 1 1.010979234 N/A 91412G2R5 Taxable Muni UNIV OF CALIFORNIA 1.877% 5/15/20 05/15/2020 09/28/2017 90,000.00 88,492.50 -1,507.50 858.73 1.88 1.909033584 AA- 91412G2S3 Taxable Muni UNIV OF CALIFORNIA 2.112% 5/15/21 05/15/2021 09/28/2017 140,000.00 136,388.00 -3,612.00 1,503.04 2.11 2.163757069 AA- 91412GD36 Taxable Muni UNIV OF CA 1.169% 5/15/19 05/15/2019 04/20/2016 140,000.00 138,493.60 -1,506.40 618.27 1.17 1.182480275 AA 91412GWU5 Taxable Muni UNIV CALIFORNIA CA 1.418% 5/15/18 05/15/2018 03/25/2015 250,000.00 249,847.50 -152.50 1,339.22 1.42 1.418269471 AA 91412GWV3 Taxable Muni UNIV OF CA 2.003% 5/15/19 05/15/2019 03/25/2015 250,000.00 249,597.50 -402.50 1,891.72 2 2.008845741 AA 931142DY6 Credit WALMART STORES INC 1.750% 10/09/19 10/09/2019 10/20/2017 294,994.10 291,828.75 -3,165.35 2,308.78 1.75 1.767480381 AA 94988J5D5 Credit WELLS FARGO BANK MTN 1.750% 5/24/19 05/24/2019 06/02/2016 503,793.05 499,273.30 -4,519.75 3,117.67 1.75 1.766766615 A+ 94988J5J2 Credit WELLS FARGO MTN 2.15849% 12/06/19 12/06/2019 12/08/2016 504,128.57 502,900.00 -1,228.57 779.45 2.68 2.142889763 A+ 51,312,069.80 50,839,672.54 (472,668.49) 199,761.47 39 Page 26 of 32 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Transaction Date Trade Date Settlement Date CUSIP Description Units Price Commissions SEC Fees Miscellaneous Fees Net Cash Amount Federal Tax Cost Amount Short Term Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount 1/2/2018 3133EHTJ2 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.43069% 8/01/22 $1 PV ON 230000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 283.36 - - - 1/2/2018 1/2/2018 1/2/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 15,592.8600 1.000000 - - - (15,592.86) 15,592.86 - - 1/2/2018 31846V203 INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 SHARES DUE 12/31/2017 INTEREST FROM 12/1/17 TO 12/31/17 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 276.54 - - - 1/2/2018 589331AN7 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCK CO INC 5.000% 6/30/19 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 12/30/2017 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 12,500.00 - - - 1/2/2018 650119AE0 INTEREST EARNED ON NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 1.315% 7/01/18 $1 PV ON 120000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 789.00 - - - 1/2/2018 91412GSB2 INTEREST EARNED ON UNIV CALIFORNIA CA 1.796% 7/01/19 $1 PV ON 225000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,020.50 - - - 1/3/2018 1/3/2018 1/3/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 276.5400 1.000000 - - - (276.54) 276.54 - - 1/8/2018 3133EHXH1 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B 1.47181% 9/06/22 $1 PV ON 260000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/6/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 329.52 - - - 1/8/2018 1/8/2018 1/8/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 329.5200 1.000000 - - - (329.52) 329.52 - - 1/11/2018 3133EH2J1 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B 1.44185% 12/11/20 $1 PV ON 510000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/11/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 633.21 - - - 1/11/2018 1/11/2018 1/11/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 3,389.2400 1.000000 - - - (3,389.24) 3,389.24 - - 1/11/2018 1/11/2018 1/11/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 788,778.8900 1.000000 - - - (788,778.89) 788,778.89 - - 1/11/2018 1/9/2018 1/11/2018 89236TDQ5 SOLD PAR VALUE OF TOYOTA MOTOR MTN 0.00001% 1/11/22 /MIZUHO SECURITIES USA INC./527,000 PAR VALUE AT 101.346801 %-527,000.0000 1.013468 - - - 534,097.64 (533,584.67) 512.97 - 1/11/2018 89236TDQ5 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON TOYOTA MOTOR MTN 0.00001% 1/11/22 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (48.16) - - 1/11/2018 89236TDQ5 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA MOTOR MTN 0.00001% 1/11/22 $1 PV ON 527000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/11/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,756.03 - - - 1/11/2018 1/11/2018 89236TDU6 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF TOYOTA MOTOR MTN 1.950% 4/17/20 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 1,160.25 - - - 1/11/2018 1/9/2018 1/11/2018 89236TDU6 SOLD PAR VALUE OF TOYOTA MOTOR MTN 1.950% 4/17/20 /CREDIT AGRICOLE SECURITIES (US/XOTC 255,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.42 %-255,000.0000 0.994200 - - - 253,521.00 (254,882.70) (1,361.70) - 1/12/2018 1/12/2018 3130ACM92 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF F H L B 1.500% 10/21/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,002.50 - - - 1/12/2018 1/11/2018 1/12/2018 3130ACM92 SOLD PAR VALUE OF F H L B 1.500% 10/21/19 /MORGAN STANLEY & CO. LLC/540,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.153 %-540,000.0000 0.991530 - - - 535,426.20 (539,044.20) (3,618.00) - 1/12/2018 1/12/2018 1/12/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -1,873.3500 1.000000 - - - 1,873.35 (1,873.35) - - 1/12/2018 1/12/2018 9128283N8 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.875% 12/31/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (335.64) - - - 1/12/2018 1/11/2018 1/12/2018 9128283N8 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.875% 12/31/19 /NOMURA SECURITIES/FIX INCOME/540,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.80859444 %540,000.0000 0.998086 - - - (538,966.41) 538,966.41 - - 1/16/2018 02582JHG8 INTEREST EARNED ON AMERICAN EXPRESS 1.640% 12/15/21 $1 PV ON 420000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 574.00 - - - 1/16/2018 161571HC1 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (4.85) - - 1/16/2018 161571HC1 INTEREST EARNED ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 856.25 - - - 1/16/2018 3133EHRD7 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.53951% 7/13/22 $1 PV ON 310000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/13/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 410.96 - - - 1/16/2018 1/16/2018 1/16/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 2,817.8300 1.000000 - - - (2,817.83) 2,817.83 - - 1/16/2018 1/16/2018 1/16/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 8,013.7800 1.000000 - - - (8,013.78) 8,013.78 - - 1/16/2018 47787XAC1 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.780% 4/15/21 $1 PV ON 310000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 459.83 - - - 1/16/2018 58769DAD2 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCEDES BENZ AUTO 1.790% 4/15/20 $1 PV ON 551.9200 SHARES DUE 1/15/2018 $0.00149/PV ON 370,000.00 PV DUE 1/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 551.92 - - - 1/16/2018 65479BAD2 INTEREST EARNED ON NISSAN AUTO LEASE 2.050% 9/15/20 $1 PV ON 375.8300 SHARES DUE 1/15/2018 $0.00171/PV ON 220,000.00 PV DUE 1/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 375.83 - - - 1/16/2018 68389XAQ8 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON ORACLE CORP 2.375% 1/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (156.40) - - 1/16/2018 68389XAQ8 INTEREST EARNED ON ORACLE CORP 2.375% 1/15/19 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 5,937.50 - - - 1/16/2018 80284TAF2 INTEREST EARNED ON SANTANDER DRIVE 1.770% 9/15/20 $1 PV ON 162.2500 SHARES DUE 1/15/2018 $0.00148/PV ON 110,000.00 PV DUE 1/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 162.25 - - - 1/16/2018 89190BAD0 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.760% 7/15/21 $1 PV ON 762.6700 SHARES DUE 1/15/2018 $0.00147/PV ON 520,000.00 PV DUE 1/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 762.67 - - - 1/16/2018 89238MAD0 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.730% 2/16/21 $1 PV ON 542.0700 SHARES DUE 1/15/2018 $0.00144/PV ON 376,000.00 PV DUE 1/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 542.07 - - - 1/16/2018 90290AAC1 INTEREST EARNED ON USAA AUTO OWNER 1.700% 5/17/21 $1 PV ON 198.3300 SHARES DUE 1/15/2018 $0.00142/PV ON 140,000.00 PV DUE 1/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 198.33 - - - 1/17/2018 17305EGA7 INTEREST EARNED ON CITIBANK CREDIT CARD 1.740% 1/19/21 $1 PV ON 380000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/17/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 3,306.00 - - - 1/17/2018 1/17/2018 1/17/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 3,306.0000 1.000000 - - - (3,306.00) 3,306.00 - - 1/17/2018 1/17/2018 1/17/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 882,960.6100 1.000000 - - - (882,960.61) 882,960.61 - - 1/17/2018 1/17/2018 66989HAD0 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF NOVARTIS CAPITAL 4.400% 4/24/20 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 4,818.61 - - - 1/17/2018 1/12/2018 1/17/2018 66989HAD0 SOLD PAR VALUE OF NOVARTIS CAPITAL 4.400% 4/24/20 /GOLDMAN SACHS & CO. LLC/XOTC 475,000 PAR VALUE AT 104.846 %-475,000.0000 1.048460 - - - 498,018.50 (501,840.87) (3,822.37) - 1/17/2018 66989HAD0 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON NOVARTIS CAPITAL 4.400% 4/24/20 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (515.50) - - Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended March 31, 2018 ATTACHMENT 16 40 Page 27 of 32 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Transaction Date Trade Date Settlement Date CUSIP Description Units Price Commissions SEC Fees Miscellaneous Fees Net Cash Amount Federal Tax Cost Amount Short Term Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended March 31, 2018 1/17/2018 1/17/2018 66989HAL2 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF NOVARTIS CAPITAL 1.800% 2/14/20 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 994.50 - - - 1/17/2018 1/12/2018 1/17/2018 66989HAL2 SOLD PAR VALUE OF NOVARTIS CAPITAL 1.800% 2/14/20 /MILLENNIUM ADVISORS, LLC/130,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.17 %-130,000.0000 0.991700 - - - 128,921.00 (129,491.70) (570.70) - 1/17/2018 1/17/2018 91412GPZ2 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF UNIV OF CA 1.296% 5/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 558.00 - - - 1/17/2018 1/12/2018 1/17/2018 91412GPZ2 SOLD PAR VALUE OF UNIV OF CA 1.296% 5/15/18 /MORGAN STANLEY & CO. LLC/250,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.86 %-250,000.0000 0.998600 - - - 249,650.00 (250,215.03) - (565.03) 1/17/2018 91412GPZ2 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON UNIV OF CA 1.296% 5/15/18 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (29.51) - - 1/18/2018 1/18/2018 1/18/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -997,768.2600 1.000000 - - - 997,768.26 (997,768.26) - - 1/18/2018 1/18/2018 1/18/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 223.7500 1.000000 - - - (223.75) 223.75 - - 1/18/2018 43814PAC4 INTEREST EARNED ON HONDA AUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 $1 PV ON 223.7500 SHARES DUE 1/18/2018 $0.00149/PV ON 150,000.00 PV DUE 1/18/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 223.75 - - - 1/18/2018 1/18/2018 9128283N8 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.875% 12/31/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (932.32) - - - 1/18/2018 1/17/2018 1/18/2018 9128283N8 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.875% 12/31/19 /BMO CAPITAL MARKETS CORP/BONDS/1,000,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.683594 %1,000,000.0000 0.996836 - - - (996,835.94) 996,835.94 - - 1/19/2018 1/19/2018 3130ABF92 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF F H L B 1.375% 5/28/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 1,421.98 - - - 1/19/2018 1/18/2018 1/19/2018 3130ABF92 SOLD PAR VALUE OF F H L B 1.375% 5/28/19 /MLPFS INC/FIXED INCOME/730,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.182 %-730,000.0000 0.991820 - - - 724,028.60 (728,620.30) (4,591.70) - 1/19/2018 3137EAEB1 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C M T N 0.875% 7/19/19 $1 PV ON 351000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/19/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 1,535.63 - - - 1/19/2018 1/19/2018 1/19/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -40.9600 1.000000 - - - 40.96 (40.96) - - 1/19/2018 1/19/2018 912828WL0 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 5/31/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (1,504.12) - - - 1/19/2018 1/18/2018 1/19/2018 912828WL0 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 5/31/19 /BONY/TORONTO DOMINION SECURITI/730,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.38671918 %730,000.0000 0.993867 - - - (725,523.05) 725,523.05 - - 1/22/2018 05584PAD9 INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE LEASE 2.070% 10/20/20 $1 PV ON 172.5000 SHARES DUE 1/20/2018 $0.00173/PV ON 100,000.00 PV DUE 1/20/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 172.50 - - - 1/22/2018 1/22/2018 1/22/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 750,548.8600 1.000000 - - - (750,548.86) 750,548.86 - - 1/22/2018 1/22/2018 1/22/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 172.5000 1.000000 - - - (172.50) 172.50 - - 1/22/2018 1/22/2018 90331HMY6 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF US BANK NA MTN 1.400% 4/26/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,525.06 - - - 1/22/2018 1/18/2018 1/22/2018 90331HMY6 SOLD PAR VALUE OF US BANK NA MTN 1.400% 4/26/19 /WELLS FARGO SECURITIES, LLC/XOTC 755,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.076 %-755,000.0000 0.990760 - - - 748,023.80 (750,413.40) (2,389.60) - 1/23/2018 1/23/2018 1/23/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -254,885.2500 1.000000 - - - 254,885.25 (254,885.25) - - 1/23/2018 1/18/2018 1/23/2018 90331HNJ8 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF US BANK NA 2.350% 1/23/20 /US BANCORP INVESTMENTS INC./255,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.955 %255,000.0000 0.999550 - - - (254,885.25) 254,885.25 - - 1/24/2018 3133EHVR1 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.56213% 8/24/20 $1 PV ON 130000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/24/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 174.87 - - - 1/24/2018 1/24/2018 1/24/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 174.8700 1.000000 - - - (174.87) 174.87 - - 1/25/2018 TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 12/01/2017 THRU 12/31/2017 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (529.97) - - - 1/25/2018 05582QAD9 INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.160% 11/25/20 $1 PV ON 439.8300 SHARES DUE 1/25/2018 $0.00097/PV ON 455,000.00 PV DUE 1/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 439.83 - - - 1/25/2018 3133EHRZ8 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B 1.55213% 6/25/20 $1 PV ON 510000.0000 SHARES DUE 1/25/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 681.64 - - - 1/25/2018 1/25/2018 1/25/2018 3136AMTM1 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 1.186% 9/25/18 -10,624.9100 0.000000 - - - 10,624.91 (10,622.19) - 2.72 1/25/2018 3136AMTM1 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 1.186% 9/25/18 $1 PV ON 169.9200 SHARES DUE 1/25/2018 $0.00129/PV ON 132,197.73 PV DUE 1/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 169.92 - - - 1/25/2018 1/25/2018 1/25/2018 3137BNN26 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 -95.9100 0.010426 - - - 95.91 (96.35) - (0.44) 1/25/2018 3137BNN26 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (11.55) - - 1/25/2018 3137BNN26 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 $1 PV ON 84.6700 SHARES DUE 1/25/2018 $0.00148/PV ON 57,082.15 PV DUE 1/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 84.67 - - - 1/25/2018 3137BPCF4 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 $1 PV ON 250.6300 SHARES DUE 1/25/2018 $0.00115/PV ON 218,572.01 PV DUE 1/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 250.63 - - - 1/25/2018 1/25/2018 1/25/2018 3137BPCF4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 -27,241.5000 0.000000 - - - 27,241.50 (27,241.28) - 0.22 1/25/2018 1/25/2018 1/25/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 11,386.3300 1.000000 - - - (11,386.33) 11,386.33 - - 1/25/2018 1/25/2018 1/25/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 27,672.7100 1.000000 - - - (27,672.71) 27,672.71 - - 1/29/2018 1/29/2018 1/29/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -329,694.3500 1.000000 - - - 329,694.35 (329,694.35) - - 1/29/2018 1/29/2018 857477AS2 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF STATE STREET CORP 2.550% 8/18/20 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (3,706.35) - - - 1/29/2018 1/25/2018 1/29/2018 857477AS2 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF STATE STREET CORP 2.550% 8/18/20 /SUNTRUST ROBINSON HUMPHREY, IN/325,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.304 %325,000.0000 1.003040 - - - (325,988.00) 325,988.00 - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 037833BQ2 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF APPLE INC 1.700% 2/22/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 296.56 - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 037833BQ2 SOLD PAR VALUE OF APPLE INC 1.700% 2/22/19 /WELLS FARGO SECURITIES, LLC/XOTC 40,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.557 %-40,000.0000 0.995570 - - - 39,822.80 (39,993.20) - (170.40) 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 037833BS8 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF APPLE INC 2.250% 2/23/21 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (4,906.25) - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 037833BS8 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF APPLE INC 2.250% 2/23/21 /GOLDMAN SACHS & CO. LLC/500,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.135 %500,000.0000 0.991350 - - - (495,675.00) 495,675.00 - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 037833CB4 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF APPLE INC 1.100% 8/02/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 322.67 - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 037833CB4 SOLD PAR VALUE OF APPLE INC 1.100% 8/02/19 /TORONTO DOMINION SECURITIES (U/60,000 PAR VALUE AT 98.346883 %-60,000.0000 0.983469 - - - 59,008.13 (59,940.00) - (931.87) 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 037833CE8 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF APPLE INC 1.550% 2/08/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 1,036.78 - - - 41 Page 28 of 32 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Transaction Date Trade Date Settlement Date CUSIP Description Units Price Commissions SEC Fees Miscellaneous Fees Net Cash Amount Federal Tax Cost Amount Short Term Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended March 31, 2018 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 037833CE8 SOLD PAR VALUE OF APPLE INC 1.550% 2/08/19 /GOLDMAN SACHS & CO. LLC/XOTC 140,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.538 %-140,000.0000 0.995380 - - - 139,353.20 (139,893.60) (540.40) - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 084670BQ0 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 2.200% 3/15/21 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (3,885.75) - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 084670BQ0 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 2.200% 3/15/21 /JEFFERIES LLC/471,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.031 %471,000.0000 0.990310 - - - (466,436.01) 466,436.01 - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 17275RAX0 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF CISCO SYSTEMS INC 2.450% 6/15/20 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (1,837.50) - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 17275RAX0 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF CISCO SYSTEMS INC 2.450% 6/15/20 /J.P. MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/600,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.992 %600,000.0000 0.999920 - - - (599,952.00) 599,952.00 - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 30231GAD4 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF EXXON MOBIL CORP 1.819% 3/15/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 682.13 - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 30231GAD4 SOLD PAR VALUE OF EXXON MOBIL CORP 1.819% 3/15/19 /J.P. MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/XOTC 100,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.635 %-100,000.0000 0.996350 - - - 99,635.00 (100,229.28) (594.28) - 1/30/2018 30231GAD4 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON EXXON MOBIL CORP 1.819% 3/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (17.28) - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 30231GAP7 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF EXXON MOBIL 1.708% 3/01/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 282.77 - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 30231GAP7 SOLD PAR VALUE OF EXXON MOBIL 1.708% 3/01/19 /J.P. MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/XOTC 40,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.691 %-40,000.0000 0.996910 - - - 39,876.40 (40,000.00) - (123.60) 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 30231GAV4 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF EXXON MOBIL 2.222% 3/01/21 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (4,598.31) - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 30231GAV4 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF EXXON MOBIL 2.222% 3/01/21 /MLPFS INC/FIXED INCOME/500,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.137 %500,000.0000 0.991370 - - - (495,685.00) 495,685.00 - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 171,418.0600 1.000000 - - - (171,418.06) 171,418.06 - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -1,076,489.0700 1.000000 - - - 1,076,489.07 (1,076,489.07) - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 48125LRJ3 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF JP MORGAN MTN 1.91833% 9/23/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (203.19) - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 48125LRJ3 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF JP MORGAN MTN 1.91833% 9/23/19 /J.P. MORGAN SECURITIES LLC/95,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.686 %95,000.0000 1.006860 - - - (95,651.70) 95,651.70 - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 48125LRJ3 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF JP MORGAN MTN 1.91833% 9/23/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (534.71) - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 48125LRJ3 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF JP MORGAN MTN 1.91833% 9/23/19 /PERSHING LLC/250,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.686 %250,000.0000 1.006860 - - - (251,715.00) 251,715.00 - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 532457BF4 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF ELI LILLY CO 1.950% 3/15/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 3,839.06 - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 532457BF4 SOLD PAR VALUE OF ELI LILLY CO 1.950% 3/15/19 /GOLDMAN SACHS & CO. LLC/XOTC 525,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.758 %-525,000.0000 0.997580 - - - 523,729.50 (526,909.50) (3,180.00) - 1/30/2018 532457BF4 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON ELI LILLY CO 1.950% 3/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (133.93) - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 650119AE0 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 1.315% 7/01/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 127.12 - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 650119AE0 SOLD PAR VALUE OF NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 1.315% 7/01/18 /BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC. FIXED IN/120,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.776 %-120,000.0000 0.997760 - - - 119,731.20 (120,000.00) - (268.80) 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 91159HHQ6 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF US BANCORP MTN 2.0048% 1/24/22 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (198.44) - - - 1/30/2018 1/26/2018 1/30/2018 91159HHQ6 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF US BANCORP MTN 2.0048% 1/24/22 /US BANCORP INVESTMENTS INC./500,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.939 %500,000.0000 1.009390 - - - (504,695.00) 504,695.00 - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 912828P95 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 3/15/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 3,784.53 - - - 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 1/30/2018 912828P95 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 3/15/19 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./XOTC 1,000,000 PAR VALUE AT 98.9375 %-1,000,000.0000 0.989375 - - - 989,375.00 (1,000,773.81) - (11,398.81) 1/30/2018 912828P95 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 3/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (149.29) - - 1/31/2018 1/31/2018 1/31/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -16,719.5700 1.000000 - - - 16,719.57 (16,719.57) - - 1/31/2018 1/31/2018 9128282X7 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 9/30/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 17,470.05 - - - 1/31/2018 1/30/2018 1/31/2018 9128282X7 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 9/30/19 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./XOTC 3,760,000 PAR VALUE AT 98.864139 %-3,760,000.0000 0.988641 - - - 3,717,291.63 (3,754,252.91) (36,961.28) - 1/31/2018 1/30/2018 1/31/2018 9128283S7 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.000% 1/31/20 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./3,760,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.7734375 %3,760,000.0000 0.997734 - - - (3,751,481.25) 3,751,481.25 - - 2/1/2018 3133EHTJ2 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.63775% 8/01/22 $1 PV ON 230000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 324.37 - - - 2/1/2018 2/1/2018 2/1/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 5,108.9000 1.000000 - - - (5,108.90) 5,108.90 - - 2/1/2018 31846V203 INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 SHARES DUE 1/31/2018 INTEREST FROM 1/1/18 TO 1/31/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 616.41 - - - 2/1/2018 79770GGM2 INTEREST EARNED ON SAN FRANCISCO CITY 2.000% 8/01/20 $1 PV ON 300000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 1,016.67 - - - 2/1/2018 798170AB2 INTEREST EARNED ON SAN JOSE CA 2.098% 8/01/19 $1 PV ON 320000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 745.96 - - - 2/1/2018 798170AC0 INTEREST EARNED ON SAN JOSE CA REDEV 2.259% 8/01/20 $1 PV ON 190000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 476.90 - - - 2/1/2018 882723UC1 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON TEXAS ST REF WTR 2.036% 8/01/20 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (44.55) - - 2/1/2018 882723UC1 INTEREST EARNED ON TEXAS ST REF WTR 2.036% 8/01/20 $1 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,545.00 - - - 2/2/2018 3135G0N33 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A 0.875% 8/02/19 $1 PV ON 530000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/2/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,318.75 - - - 42 Page 29 of 32 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Transaction Date Trade Date Settlement Date CUSIP Description Units Price Commissions SEC Fees Miscellaneous Fees Net Cash Amount Federal Tax Cost Amount Short Term Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended March 31, 2018 2/2/2018 2/2/2018 2/2/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 2,935.1600 1.000000 - - - (2,935.16) 2,935.16 - - 2/6/2018 3133EHXH1 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B 1.635% 9/06/22 $1 PV ON 260000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/6/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 366.06 - - - 2/6/2018 2/6/2018 2/6/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 4,991.0600 1.000000 - - - (4,991.06) 4,991.06 - - 2/6/2018 594918BV5 INTEREST EARNED ON MICROSOFT CORP 1.850% 2/06/20 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/6/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 4,625.00 - - - 2/9/2018 2/8/2018 2/9/2018 3130ADN32 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L B DEB 2.125% 2/11/20 /WELLS FARGO SECURITIES, LLC/800,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.817 %800,000.0000 0.998170 - - - (798,536.00) 798,536.00 - - 2/9/2018 2/9/2018 2/9/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 226,391.8900 1.000000 - - - (226,391.89) 226,391.89 - - 2/9/2018 2/9/2018 9128282X7 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 9/30/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 1,495.88 - - - 2/9/2018 2/8/2018 2/9/2018 9128282X7 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 9/30/19 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./XOTC 300,000 PAR VALUE AT 98.819978 %-300,000.0000 0.988200 - - - 296,459.93 (299,541.46) (3,081.53) - 2/9/2018 2/9/2018 912828WL0 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 5/31/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,135.85 - - - 2/9/2018 2/8/2018 2/9/2018 912828WL0 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 5/31/19 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./XOTC 730,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.292634 %-730,000.0000 0.992926 - - - 724,836.23 (725,523.05) (686.82) - 2/12/2018 3133EH2J1 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B 1.56375% 12/11/20 $1 PV ON 510000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/11/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 686.75 - - - 2/12/2018 2/12/2018 2/12/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 686.7500 1.000000 - - - (686.75) 686.75 - - 2/13/2018 3133EHRD7 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.63945% 7/13/22 $1 PV ON 310000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/13/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 437.64 - - - 2/13/2018 2/13/2018 2/13/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 437.6400 1.000000 - - - (437.64) 437.64 - - 2/15/2018 02582JHG8 INTEREST EARNED ON AMERICAN EXPRESS 1.640% 12/15/21 $1 PV ON 420000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 574.00 - - - 2/15/2018 084664CK5 INTEREST EARNED ON BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 1.300% 8/15/19 $1 PV ON 160000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 1,040.00 - - - 2/15/2018 161571HC1 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (9.07) - - 2/15/2018 161571HC1 INTEREST EARNED ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 856.25 - - - 2/15/2018 17275RAE2 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CISCO SYSTEMS INC 4.950% 2/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (1,424.39) - - 2/15/2018 17275RAE2 INTEREST EARNED ON CISCO SYSTEMS INC 4.950% 2/15/19 $1 PV ON 360000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 8,910.00 - - - 2/15/2018 3137EAEH8 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C 1.375% 8/15/19 $1 PV ON 510000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 4,012.71 - - - 2/15/2018 2/15/2018 2/15/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 2,817.8300 1.000000 - - - (2,817.83) 2,817.83 - - 2/15/2018 2/15/2018 2/15/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 31,063.0300 1.000000 - - - (31,063.03) 31,063.03 - - 2/15/2018 47787XAC1 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.780% 4/15/21 $1 PV ON 459.8300 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 $0.00148/PV ON 310,000.00 PV DUE 2/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 459.83 - - - 2/15/2018 58769DAD2 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCEDES BENZ AUTO 1.790% 4/15/20 $1 PV ON 551.9200 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 $0.00149/PV ON 370,000.00 PV DUE 2/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 551.92 - - - 2/15/2018 649791EV8 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON NEW YORK ST SER B 3.600% 2/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (573.30) - - 2/15/2018 649791EV8 INTEREST EARNED ON NEW YORK ST SER B 3.600% 2/15/19 $1 PV ON 250000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 4,500.00 - - - 2/15/2018 65479BAD2 INTEREST EARNED ON NISSAN AUTO LEASE 2.050% 9/15/20 $1 PV ON 375.8300 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 $0.00171/PV ON 220,000.00 PV DUE 2/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 375.83 - - - 2/15/2018 80284TAF2 INTEREST EARNED ON SANTANDER DRIVE 1.770% 9/15/20 $1 PV ON 162.2500 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 $0.00148/PV ON 110,000.00 PV DUE 2/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 162.25 - - - 2/15/2018 89190BAD0 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.760% 7/15/21 $1 PV ON 762.6700 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 $0.00147/PV ON 520,000.00 PV DUE 2/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 762.67 - - - 2/15/2018 89238MAD0 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.730% 2/16/21 $1 PV ON 542.0700 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 $0.00144/PV ON 376,000.00 PV DUE 2/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 542.07 - - - 2/15/2018 90290AAC1 INTEREST EARNED ON USAA AUTO OWNER 1.700% 5/17/21 $1 PV ON 198.3300 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 $0.00142/PV ON 140,000.00 PV DUE 2/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 198.33 - - - 2/15/2018 9128282Q2 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 1.500% 8/15/20 $1 PV ON 1458000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 10,935.00 - - - 2/16/2018 2/15/2018 2/16/2018 3137EAEL9 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L M C M T N 2.375% 2/16/21 /WELLS FARGO SECURITIES, LLC/510,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.736 %510,000.0000 0.997360 - - - (508,653.60) 508,653.60 - - 2/16/2018 2/16/2018 2/16/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -115,813.8200 1.000000 - - - 115,813.82 (115,813.82) - - 2/16/2018 2/16/2018 9128282V1 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 9/15/20 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,339.78 - - - 2/16/2018 2/15/2018 2/16/2018 9128282V1 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.375% 9/15/20 /RBS SECURITIES INC./400,000 PAR VALUE AT 97.625 %-400,000.0000 0.976250 - - - 390,500.00 (397,610.50) (7,110.50) - 2/20/2018 05584PAD9 INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE LEASE 2.070% 10/20/20 $1 PV ON 172.5000 SHARES DUE 2/20/2018 $0.00173/PV ON 100,000.00 PV DUE 2/20/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 172.50 - - - 2/20/2018 2/20/2018 2/20/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 9,798.7500 1.000000 - - - (9,798.75) 9,798.75 - - 2/20/2018 2/20/2018 2/20/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 223.7500 1.000000 - - - (223.75) 223.75 - - 2/20/2018 43814PAC4 INTEREST EARNED ON HONDA AUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 $1 PV ON 223.7500 SHARES DUE 2/18/2018 $0.00149/PV ON 150,000.00 PV DUE 2/18/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 223.75 - - - 2/20/2018 857477AS2 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON STATE STREET CORP 2.550% 8/18/20 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (351.91) - - 2/20/2018 857477AS2 INTEREST EARNED ON STATE STREET CORP 2.550% 8/18/20 $1 PV ON 755000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/18/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 9,626.25 - - - 43 Page 30 of 32 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Transaction Date Trade Date Settlement Date CUSIP Description Units Price Commissions SEC Fees Miscellaneous Fees Net Cash Amount Federal Tax Cost Amount Short Term Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended March 31, 2018 2/23/2018 037833BS8 INTEREST EARNED ON APPLE INC 2.250% 2/23/21 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/23/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 5,625.00 - - - 2/23/2018 2/23/2018 2/23/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 5,625.0000 1.000000 - - - (5,625.00) 5,625.00 - - 2/26/2018 TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 01/01/2018 THRU 01/31/2018 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (528.81) - - - 2/26/2018 05582QAD9 INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.160% 11/25/20 $1 PV ON 439.8300 SHARES DUE 2/25/2018 $0.00097/PV ON 455,000.00 PV DUE 2/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 439.83 - - - 2/26/2018 3133EHRZ8 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B 1.56135% 6/25/20 $1 PV ON 510000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/25/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 685.69 - - - 2/26/2018 3133EHVR1 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.57014% 8/24/20 $1 PV ON 130000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/24/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 175.77 - - - 2/26/2018 3135G0J53 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A DEB 1.000% 2/26/19 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/26/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,500.00 - - - 2/26/2018 2/25/2018 2/26/2018 3136AMTM1 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 1.186% 9/25/18 -14,380.0400 0.000000 - - - 14,380.04 (14,376.36) - 3.68 2/26/2018 3136AMTM1 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 1.186% 9/25/18 $1 PV ON 178.4900 SHARES DUE 2/25/2018 $0.00147/PV ON 121,572.82 PV DUE 2/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 178.49 - - - 2/26/2018 2/25/2018 2/26/2018 3137BNN26 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 -96.3900 0.010375 - - - 96.39 (96.81) - (0.42) 2/26/2018 3137BNN26 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (14.90) - - 2/26/2018 3137BNN26 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 $1 PV ON 84.5300 SHARES DUE 2/25/2018 $0.00148/PV ON 56,986.24 PV DUE 2/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 84.53 - - - 2/26/2018 2/25/2018 2/26/2018 3137BPCF4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 -743.7900 0.000000 - - - 743.79 (743.78) - 0.01 2/26/2018 3137BPCF4 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 $1 PV ON 219.3900 SHARES DUE 2/25/2018 $0.00115/PV ON 191,330.51 PV DUE 2/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 219.39 - - - 2/26/2018 2/26/2018 2/26/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 17,831.0100 1.000000 - - - (17,831.01) 17,831.01 - - 2/26/2018 2/26/2018 2/26/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 1,144.1000 1.000000 - - - (1,144.10) 1,144.10 - - 2/28/2018 3135G0P49 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A 1.000% 8/28/19 $1 PV ON 510000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/28/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,550.00 - - - 2/28/2018 3135G0T29 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A DEB 1.500% 2/28/20 $1 PV ON 300000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/28/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,250.00 - - - 2/28/2018 2/28/2018 2/28/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 21,543.7500 1.000000 - - - (21,543.75) 21,543.75 - - 2/28/2018 9128282T6 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 1.250% 8/31/19 $1 PV ON 2679000.0000 SHARES DUE 2/28/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 16,743.75 - - - 3/1/2018 13063BFS6 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CALIFORNIA ST BUILD 6.650% 3/01/22 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (2,527.23) - - 3/1/2018 13063BFS6 INTEREST EARNED ON CALIFORNIA ST BUILD 6.650% 3/01/22 $1 PV ON 425000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 14,131.25 - - - 3/1/2018 30231GAV4 INTEREST EARNED ON EXXON MOBIL 2.222% 3/01/21 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 5,555.00 - - - 3/1/2018 3133EHTJ2 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.6447% 8/01/22 $1 PV ON 230000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 294.22 - - - 3/1/2018 31846V203 INTEREST EARNED ON FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y UNIT ON 0.0000 SHARES DUE 2/28/2018 INTEREST FROM 2/1/18 TO 2/28/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 218.45 - - - 3/1/2018 3/1/2018 3/1/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 30,499.2200 1.000000 - - - (30,499.22) 30,499.22 - - 3/1/2018 54465AGK2 INTEREST EARNED ON LOS ANGELES CA 1.125% 9/01/19 $1 PV ON 270000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 1,518.75 - - - 3/1/2018 649791EJ5 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON NEW YORK ST REF SER 3.600% 9/01/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (1,585.15) - - 3/1/2018 649791EJ5 INTEREST EARNED ON NEW YORK ST REF SER 3.600% 9/01/19 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/1/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 9,000.00 - - - 3/2/2018 3/2/2018 3/2/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 218.4500 1.000000 - - - (218.45) 218.45 - - 3/5/2018 166764AU4 INTEREST EARNED ON CHEVRON CORP 2.0398% 3/03/22 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/3/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,549.74 - - - 3/5/2018 166764AU4 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHEVRON CORP 2.0398% 3/03/22 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (201.25) - - 3/5/2018 3/5/2018 3/5/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 2,549.7400 1.000000 - - - (2,549.74) 2,549.74 - - 3/6/2018 3/6/2018 13063DDD7 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF CALIFORNIA ST 2.250% 10/01/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,153.13 - - - 3/6/2018 3/2/2018 3/6/2018 13063DDD7 SOLD PAR VALUE OF CALIFORNIA ST 2.250% 10/01/19 /RAYMOND JAMES/FI/265,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.92 %-265,000.0000 0.999200 - - - 264,788.00 (266,127.99) (1,339.99) - 3/6/2018 13063DDD7 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CALIFORNIA ST 2.250% 10/01/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (125.84) - - 3/6/2018 3133EHXH1 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B 1.65957% 9/06/22 $1 PV ON 260000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/6/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 335.60 - - - 3/6/2018 3/6/2018 3/6/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 4,856.9300 1.000000 - - - (4,856.93) 4,856.93 - - 3/6/2018 3/6/2018 9128283Y4 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.250% 2/29/20 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (97.21) - - - 3/6/2018 3/2/2018 3/6/2018 9128283Y4 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.250% 2/29/20 /BMO CAPITAL MARKETS CORP/BONDS/265,000 PAR VALUE AT 100.00781132 %265,000.0000 1.000078 - - - (265,020.70) 265,020.70 - - 3/6/2018 94988J5J2 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON WELLS FARGO MTN 2.15849% 12/06/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (410.71) - - 3/6/2018 94988J5J2 INTEREST EARNED ON WELLS FARGO MTN 2.15849% 12/06/19 $1 PV ON 500000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/6/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,698.11 - - - 3/7/2018 3/7/2018 3/7/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -32,675.0700 1.000000 - - - 32,675.07 (32,675.07) - - 3/7/2018 3/7/2018 797669XU7 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF SAN FRANCISCO CA 2.387% 7/01/21 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 549.01 - - - 44 Page 31 of 32 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Transaction Date Trade Date Settlement Date CUSIP Description Units Price Commissions SEC Fees Miscellaneous Fees Net Cash Amount Federal Tax Cost Amount Short Term Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended March 31, 2018 3/7/2018 3/5/2018 3/7/2018 797669XU7 SOLD PAR VALUE OF SAN FRANCISCO CA 2.387% 7/01/21 /MESIROW FINANCIAL INC/120,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.325 %-120,000.0000 0.993250 - - - 119,190.00 (120,000.00) (810.00) - 3/7/2018 3/7/2018 857477AS2 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF STATE STREET CORP 2.550% 8/18/20 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (44.41) - - - 3/7/2018 3/5/2018 3/7/2018 857477AS2 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF STATE STREET CORP 2.550% 8/18/20 /UBS SECURITIES LLC/33,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.314 %33,000.0000 0.993140 - - - (32,773.62) 32,773.62 - - 3/7/2018 3/7/2018 9128283X6 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.250% 2/15/21 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (149.17) - - - 3/7/2018 3/5/2018 3/7/2018 9128283X6 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.250% 2/15/21 /RBS SECURITIES INC./120,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.53906667 %120,000.0000 0.995391 - - - (119,446.88) 119,446.88 - - 3/12/2018 3133EH2J1 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B 1.59077% 12/11/20 $1 PV ON 510000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/11/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 631.01 - - - 3/12/2018 3/12/2018 3/12/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 249,432.7900 1.000000 - - - (249,432.79) 249,432.79 - - 3/12/2018 3/12/2018 3/12/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 631.0100 1.000000 - - - (631.01) 631.01 - - 3/12/2018 3/12/2018 91412GS71 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF UNIVERSITY OF CA 1.610% 5/15/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 130.81 - - - 3/12/2018 3/8/2018 3/12/2018 91412GS71 SOLD PAR VALUE OF UNIVERSITY OF CA 1.610% 5/15/19 /UBS FINANCIAL SERVICES INC./25,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.285 %-25,000.0000 0.992850 - - - 24,821.25 (25,000.00) (178.75) - 3/12/2018 3/12/2018 91412GSB2 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF UNIV CALIFORNIA CA 1.796% 7/01/19 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 796.98 - - - 3/12/2018 3/8/2018 3/12/2018 91412GSB2 SOLD PAR VALUE OF UNIV CALIFORNIA CA 1.796% 7/01/19 /UBS FINANCIAL SERVICES INC./225,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.415 %-225,000.0000 0.994150 - - - 223,683.75 (225,621.47) (1,937.72) - 3/12/2018 91412GSB2 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON UNIV CALIFORNIA CA 1.796% 7/01/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (94.83) - - 3/13/2018 3133EHRD7 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.6632% 7/13/22 $1 PV ON 310000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/13/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 401.02 - - - 3/13/2018 3/13/2018 3/13/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 401.0200 1.000000 - - - (401.02) 401.02 - - 3/14/2018 3137BNN26 PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 ADJUSTED BY 96.3900 NOTIONAL 96.3900 0.000000 - - - - - - - 3/14/2018 3137BNN26 BOOK VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 ADJUSTED BY 96.81 NOTIONAL 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - - - - 3/14/2018 3137BNN26 FED BASIS OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 ADJUSTED BY 96.81 NOTIONAL 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - 96.81 - - 3/14/2018 3137BNN26 STATE COST OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 ADJUSTED BY 96.81 NOTIONAL 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - - - - 3/15/2018 02582JHG8 INTEREST EARNED ON AMERICAN EXPRESS 1.640% 12/15/21 $1 PV ON 420000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 574.00 - - - 3/15/2018 053015AD5 INTEREST EARNED ON AUTOMATIC DATA 2.250% 9/15/20 $1 PV ON 450000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 5,062.50 - - - 3/15/2018 053015AD5 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON AUTOMATIC DATA 2.250% 9/15/20 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (411.26) - - 3/15/2018 084670BQ0 INTEREST EARNED ON BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY 2.200% 3/15/21 $1 PV ON 471000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 5,181.00 - - - 3/15/2018 161571HC1 INTEREST EARNED ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 $1 PV ON 750000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 856.25 - - - 3/15/2018 161571HC1 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST 1.370% 6/15/21 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (6.98) - - 3/15/2018 3/15/2018 3/15/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 1,890.0800 1.000000 - - - (1,890.08) 1,890.08 - - 3/15/2018 3/15/2018 3/15/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 20,138.2400 1.000000 - - - (20,138.24) 20,138.24 - - 3/15/2018 47787XAC1 INTEREST EARNED ON JOHN DEERE OWNER 1.780% 4/15/21 $1 PV ON 310000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 459.83 - - - 3/15/2018 58769DAD2 INTEREST EARNED ON MERCEDES BENZ AUTO 1.790% 4/15/20 $1 PV ON 551.9200 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 $0.00149/PV ON 370,000.00 PV DUE 3/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 551.92 - - - 3/15/2018 65479BAD2 INTEREST EARNED ON NISSAN AUTO LEASE 2.050% 9/15/20 $1 PV ON 375.8300 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 $0.00171/PV ON 220,000.00 PV DUE 3/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 375.83 - - - 3/15/2018 80284TAF2 INTEREST EARNED ON SANTANDER DRIVE 1.770% 9/15/20 $1 PV ON 162.2500 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 $0.00148/PV ON 110,000.00 PV DUE 3/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 162.25 - - - 3/15/2018 89190BAD0 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.760% 7/15/21 $1 PV ON 762.6700 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 $0.00147/PV ON 520,000.00 PV DUE 3/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 762.67 - - - 3/15/2018 89238MAD0 INTEREST EARNED ON TOYOTA AUTO 1.730% 2/16/21 $1 PV ON 542.0700 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 $0.00144/PV ON 376,000.00 PV DUE 3/15/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 542.07 - - - 3/15/2018 90290AAC1 INTEREST EARNED ON USAA AUTO OWNER 1.700% 5/17/21 $1 PV ON 140000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 198.33 - - - 3/15/2018 912828P95 INTEREST EARNED ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 3/15/19 $1 PV ON 1500000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/15/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 7,500.00 - - - 3/15/2018 912828P95 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON U S TREASURY NT 1.000% 3/15/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (142.31) - - 3/16/2018 3/15/2018 3/16/2018 3130ADUJ9 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF F H L B DEB 2.375% 3/30/20 /CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS INC./930,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.982 %930,000.0000 0.999820 - - - (929,832.60) 929,832.60 - - 3/16/2018 3/16/2018 3/16/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -1,914.5200 1.000000 - - - 1,914.52 (1,914.52) - - 3/16/2018 3/15/2018 3/16/2018 9128283S7 SOLD PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.000% 1/31/20 /RBS SECURITIES INC./930,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.511718 %-930,000.0000 0.995117 - - - 925,458.98 (927,892.97) (2,433.99) - 3/16/2018 3/16/2018 9128283S7 RECEIVED ACCRUED INTEREST ON SALE OF U S TREASURY NT 2.000% 1/31/20 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,260.77 - - - 3/19/2018 3130AAXX1 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L B DEB 1.375% 3/18/19 $1 PV ON 520000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/18/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 3,575.00 - - - 45 Page 32 of 32 Account Number: 001050990415 Name: RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANS COMM Transaction Date Trade Date Settlement Date CUSIP Description Units Price Commissions SEC Fees Miscellaneous Fees Net Cash Amount Federal Tax Cost Amount Short Term Gain/Loss Amount Long Term Gain/Loss Amount Payden & Rygel Operating Portfolio Transaction Report Quarter ended March 31, 2018 3/19/2018 3/19/2018 3/19/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 3,575.0000 1.000000 - - - (3,575.00) 3,575.00 - - 3/19/2018 3/19/2018 3/19/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 223.7500 1.000000 - - - (223.75) 223.75 - - 3/19/2018 43814PAC4 INTEREST EARNED ON HONDA AUTO 1.790% 9/20/21 $1 PV ON 223.7500 SHARES DUE 3/18/2018 $0.00149/PV ON 150,000.00 PV DUE 3/18/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 223.75 - - - 3/20/2018 05584PAD9 INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE LEASE 2.070% 10/20/20 $1 PV ON 172.5000 SHARES DUE 3/20/2018 $0.00173/PV ON 100,000.00 PV DUE 3/20/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 172.50 - - - 3/20/2018 17275RBG6 INTEREST EARNED ON CISCO SYSTEMS INC 1.400% 9/20/19 $1 PV ON 40000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/20/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 280.00 - - - 3/20/2018 3/20/2018 3/20/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 452.5000 1.000000 - - - (452.50) 452.50 - - 3/22/2018 3137BNN26 PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 ADJUSTED BY -96.3900 ADJUSTMENT TO BRING INTO BALANCE -96.3900 0.000000 - - - - - - - 3/22/2018 3137BNN26 BOOK VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 ADJUSTED BY -96.81 ADJUSTMENT TO BRING INTO BALANCE 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - - - - 3/22/2018 3137BNN26 FED BASIS OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 ADJUSTED BY -96.81 ADJUSTMENT TO BRING INTO BALANCE 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (96.81) - - 3/22/2018 3137BNN26 STATE COST OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 ADJUSTED BY -96.81 ADJUSTMENT TO BRING INTO BALANCE 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - - - - 3/23/2018 3/23/2018 3/23/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 4,571.4300 1.000000 - - - (4,571.43) 4,571.43 - - 3/23/2018 48125LRJ3 INTEREST EARNED ON JP MORGAN MTN 2.26464% 9/23/19 $1 PV ON 845000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/23/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 4,571.43 - - - 3/23/2018 48125LRJ3 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON JP MORGAN MTN 2.26464% 9/23/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (679.93) - - 3/26/2018 TRUST FEES COLLECTED CHARGED FOR PERIOD 02/01/2018 THRU 02/28/2018 COLLECTED BY DISBURSEMENT 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (528.70) - - - 3/26/2018 05582QAD9 INTEREST EARNED ON BMW VEHICLE OWNER 1.160% 11/25/20 $1 PV ON 439.8300 SHARES DUE 3/25/2018 $0.00097/PV ON 455,000.00 PV DUE 3/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 439.83 - - - 3/26/2018 3133EHRZ8 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.6207% 6/25/20 $1 PV ON 510000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/25/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 642.88 - - - 3/26/2018 3133EHVR1 INTEREST EARNED ON F F C B DEB 1.6307% 8/24/20 $1 PV ON 130000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/24/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 164.88 - - - 3/26/2018 3136AMTM1 INTEREST EARNED ON F N M A GTD REMIC 1.186% 9/25/18 $1 PV ON 147.3600 SHARES DUE 3/25/2018 $0.00137/PV ON 107,192.78 PV DUE 3/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 147.36 - - - 3/26/2018 3/25/2018 3/26/2018 3136AMTM1 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F N M A GTD REMIC 1.186% 9/25/18 -46,614.2000 0.000000 - - - 46,614.20 (46,602.25) - 11.95 3/26/2018 3137BNN26 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 $1 PV ON 84.3900 SHARES DUE 3/25/2018 $0.00148/PV ON 56,889.85 PV DUE 3/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 84.39 - - - 3/26/2018 3137BNN26 AMORTIZED PREMIUM ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 CURRENT YEAR AMORTIZATION 0.0000 0.000000 - - - - (13.43) - - 3/26/2018 3/25/2018 3/26/2018 3137BNN26 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.780% 7/25/19 -2,052.7100 0.000000 - - - 2,052.71 (2,061.14) - (8.43) 3/26/2018 3137BPCF4 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 $1 PV ON 218.5400 SHARES DUE 3/25/2018 $0.00115/PV ON 190,586.72 PV DUE 3/25/18 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 218.54 - - - 3/26/2018 3/25/2018 3/26/2018 3137BPCF4 PAID DOWN PAR VALUE OF F H L M C MLTCL MTG 1.376% 10/25/20 -955.3600 0.000000 - - - 955.36 (955.35) - 0.01 3/26/2018 3/26/2018 3/26/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 50,791.4500 1.000000 - - - (50,791.45) 50,791.45 - - 3/27/2018 3130ABMP8 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L B DEB 1.515% 6/27/19 $1 PV ON 770000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/27/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,916.38 - - - 3/27/2018 3/27/2018 3/27/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 2,916.3800 1.000000 - - - (2,916.38) 2,916.38 - - 3/28/2018 3130ACE26 INTEREST EARNED ON F H L B 1.375% 9/28/20 $1 PV ON 360000.0000 SHARES DUE 3/28/2018 0.0000 0.000000 - - - 2,475.00 - - - 3/28/2018 3/28/2018 3/28/2018 31846V203 PURCHASED UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y 2,475.0000 1.000000 - - - (2,475.00) 2,475.00 - - 3/29/2018 3/29/2018 3/29/2018 31846V203 SOLD UNITS OF FIRST AM GOVT OB FD CL Y -500,868.5700 1.000000 - - - 500,868.57 (500,868.57) - - 3/29/2018 3/28/2018 3/29/2018 9128283T5 PURCHASED PAR VALUE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.435% 1/31/20 /BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC. FIXED IN/500,000 PAR VALUE AT 99.917052 %500,000.0000 0.999171 - - - (499,585.26) 499,585.26 - - 3/29/2018 3/29/2018 9128283T5 PAID ACCRUED INTEREST ON PURCHASE OF U S TREASURY NT 1.435% 1/31/20 0.0000 0.000000 - - - (1,283.31) - - - Total - - - (0.00) 131,997.81 (74,696.36) (13,449.21) 46 BLANK Logan Circle Partners, L.P. n 25 Deforest Avenue Summit, NJ 07901 n 908-376-0550 SHORT DURATION FIXED INCOME April 23, 2018 Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTACHMENT 17 47 BLANK LCP Employees LCP Institutional Clients 1 Based on unaudited estimates and are subject to change. Fee paying assets under management as of 12/31/17. FIRM HIGHLIGHTS 81 Employees (as of 3/31/2018) Portfolio Management 10 Research 20 Trading 13 Risk Management / Portfolio Analytics 4 Client Services 13 Legal / Compliance 5 Administration / Operations 16 Logan Circle Partners, L.P. (“Logan Circle” or “LCP”) is a MetLife, Inc. company and is part of MetLife Investment Management, MetLife Inc.’s Institutional Investment Management Business. We are dedicated solely to the institutional marketplace and have $38.5 billion1 in total assets under management. The senior members of our Investment team have worked together on fixed income portfolios for 20 years. Suite of fixed income investment strategies includes broad coverage of both the risk spectrum (Enhanced Cash to High Yield) and the term structure (Short- Term to Long Duration). Business Structure MetLife Insurance Investment Management (MIM) Logan Circle Partners Assets by Client Type1 (Millions as of 12/31/2017) Corporate $15,718 Sub-Advisory $14,769 Public $3,339 Insurance $1,408 Other $3,222 TOTAL: $38,456 48 GDP - The tax reform package’s tangible benefits will raise the pace of economic growth. However, based on recent weakness in retail sales, Q1 GDP is on track to be below our expected 2 ½ to 3% real growth rate for 2018. Government contribution to GDP will rise due to the significant increase in federal spending slated for 2018 and beyond. Incentives such as accelerated depreciation and repatriated cash built into tax reform package portend a meaningful increase in business fixed investment. A pickup in wage growth will help sustain the strength in consumer spending, a key driver of growth. Business - Solid corporate fundamentals further supported by tax reform and regulatory rollback. Specifically, interest coverage as well as revenue and earnings growth are near cycle highs, although non-financial issuers’ debt and leverage metrics remain elevated at this late stage of the credit cycle. Imposition of tariffs could spark a trade war which would have negative implications for multinationals, supporting our bias towards U.S.-centric sectors such as financials, telecom, energy and utilities. Tax-driven repatriation-related flows have disproportionately impacted corporate bond valuations at the front end of the maturity spectrum. Consumer - Consumer spending continues to be supported by a strong labor market and positive wealth effects. Benefits of higher take-home pay from tax cuts and rising wages will boost consumption in coming quarters. Recent weakness in retail sales at odds with consumer confidence measures but should prove transitory. Low savings rate and elevated household debt bear watching over the medium term, as a continuation of these trends would create headwinds to future growth. Employment - Further increase in labor force participation could limit decline in unemployment rate. Tight labor markets expected to translate into higher wages given the shallow pool of qualified workers. Average hourly earnings growth has been tempered recently by newer labor force entrants at the lower end of the wage scale. The seasonally-adjusted U.S. Quits Rate remains near post-recession highs, indicative of employee confidence in finding another job, a further sign of labor market strength. Inflation - Inflation readings to move higher as baseline effects such as wireless plan and prescription drug costs normalize. Healthcare service costs, the second-largest category in Core CPI, expected to trend higher from current levels as physician services and health insurance expenses rise. Tight labor market and increased corporate optimism are expected to put upward pressure on wages, which will feed into service inflation measures. Extension of OPEC agreement to limit oil supply through year-end 2018 should support energy prices and, in turn, higher headline inflation. Recently imposed tariffs and prospects for more aggressive stance on trade have the potential to lift inflation over the short run. U.S. Monetary & Fiscal Policy - FOMC’s voter composition tilts more hawkish as expectations for the federal funds rate in 2019 and 2020 are set higher at Federal Reserve Chair Powell’s first meeting. Uncertainty remains regarding appointments to fill the Fed’s open seats while talk of making each Fed meeting “live”, if carried out, could raise interest rate volatility. Accommodative fiscal policy and growing federal deficits with an uncapped borrowing authority until March 2019 is a cause for concern. In addition, the impact of the Federal Reserve’s plan to shrink its balance sheet by scaling back its reinvestment of Treasury and mortgage-backed maturities will intensify, putting additional technical pressure on markets. Central Banks / International - Draghi and ECB continue to put off plans for definitively ending their QE program and historic level of monetary policy accommodation. Upcoming changes to ECB and EU leadership could add to an already unsettled political environment. BOJ remains accommodative as efforts to spur growth and achieve inflation target have fallen short of expectations. Escalating U.S./China trade tensions could have far-reaching implications for various asset classes and financial markets. In addition, upcoming elections in Mexico and the U.S. may impact negotiations over the reworking of NAFTA. Residential / Commercial Real Estate - With single family housing starts below long-term averages, home prices will continue to be supported by a lack of supply and steady demand from rising household formations. Higher interest rates and tax law changes, however, reduce affordability and become a headwind for higher priced homes in particular. Rising vacancy trends for hotels and weakness in retail properties present challenges for commercial real estate as the market enters the later stage of the credit cycle. The views presented above are Logan Circle's and are subject to change over time. There can be no assurance that the views expressed above will prove accurate and should not be relied upon as a reliable indicator of future events. MARKET REVIEW Outlook and Current Themes 49 PORTFOLIO REVIEW – Debt Reserve Fund Portfolio Performance1 1Q 2018 Since Inception (8/1/2013) Total Debt Service Fund (Gross of Fees) -0.86% 1.84% Total Debt Service Fund (Net of Fees) -0.88% 1.75% ICE BofAML U.S. Treasury Index 3-7 Year -0.91% 1.36% Excess Return +5 +48 Past Performance is not indicative of future results. Performance returns for periods greater than one year are annualized. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County Debt Reserve Fund is the ICE BofAML US Treasury 3-7 Year, which is a broad-based index consisting of U.S. Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater or equal to $25 million and a maturity range from three to seven years, inclusive, reflecting total return. Asset Allocation Portfolio Characteristics 4 As of March 31, 2018 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 2.75% Duration 3.69 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aaa Agency 11% RMBS 6% CMBS 35% Treasury 47% Money Markets 1% As of December 31, 2017 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 2.35% Duration 4.13 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aaa Agency 11% RMBS 8% CMBS 35% Treasury 46% 50 PORTFOLIO REVIEW – 2017 Toll Revenue I-15 Project Fund 1Past performance is not indicative of future results. The Since Inception performance returns of the portfolio is as of the first full month following the funding date. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County I15 Express Lanes 2017 Toll Revenue Project Portfolio is the ICE BofAML 0-2 Year U.S. Treasury Index, which is a broad-based index consisting of U.S. Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater than or equal to $250 million and a maturity range from zero to two years, reflecting total return. Portfolio Performance1 1Q 2018 Since Inception (8/1/2017) 2017 Toll Revenue I-15 Project Fund (Gross of Fees) 0.19% 0.63% 2017 Toll Revenue I-15 Project Fund (Net of Fees) 0.17% 0.56% ICE BofAML U.S. Treasury Index 0-2 Year 0.18% 0.32% Excess Return +1 +31 Asset Allocation Portfolio Characteristics 5 As of December 31, 2017 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 1.71% Duration 0.61 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aa3 Corporate 39% Municipal 3% RMBS 1% CMBS 5% ABS 22% Treasury 21% CP 3% Discount Notes 6% As of March 31, 2018 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 2.30% Duration 0.57 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aa3 Corporate 39% Municipal 4% CMBS 2% ABS 15% Treasury 7% CP 13% CD 13% Discount Notes 7% 51 PORTFOLIO REVIEW – I-15 Express Lanes Sales Tax Revenue Fund 1Past performance is not indicative of future results. The Since Inception performance return is as of the first full month following the funding date. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County I15 Express Lanes Project Sales Tax Revenue Portfolio is the ICE BofAML 0-2 Year U.S. Treasury Index, which is a broad-based index consisting of U.S. Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater than or equal to $250 million and a maturity range from zero to two years, reflecting total return. Portfolio Performance1 1Q 2018 Since Inception (8/1/2017) I-15 Express Lanes Sales Tax Revenue Fund (Gross of Fees) 0.17% 0.67% I-15 Express Lanes Sales Tax Revenue Fund (Net of Fees) 0.15% 0.60% ICE BofAML U.S. Treasury Index 0-2 Year 0.18% 0.32% Excess Return -1 +35 Asset Allocation Portfolio Characteristics 6 As of December 31, 2017 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 1.92% Duration 0.59 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aa3 Corporate 60% Municipal 1% RMBS 1% CMBS 1% ABS 16% Treasuries 17% Discount Notes 4% As of March 31, 2018 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 2.38% Duration 0.59 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aa3 Corporate 51% Municipal 4% ABS 34% CP 8% CD 3% 52 PORTFOLIO REVIEW – 2017 Toll Revenue I-15 Ramp Up Reserve 1Past performance is not indicative of future results. Inception date 12/5/17. Performance returns are calculated as of the first full month following the funding date. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County I15 Express Lanes Toll Revenue Reserve Portfolio is the ICE BofAML 1-3 Year U.S. Treasury Index, which is a broad-based index consisting of U.S. Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater than or equal to $250 million and a maturity range from one to three years, reflecting total return. Asset Allocation Portfolio Characteristics 7 As of December 31, 2017 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 1.64% Duration 0.54 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aaa RMBS 24% CMBS 23% Treasury 53% As of March 31, 2018 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 2.28% Duration 0.98 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aaa RMBS 34% CMBS 29% Treasury 34% Discount Notes 3% Portfolio Performance1 Since Inception (1/1/2018) 2017 Toll Revenue I-15 Ramp Up Reserve (Gross of Fees) 0.29% 2017 Toll Revenue I-15 Ramp Up Reserve (Net of Fees) 0.27% ICE BofAML U.S. Treasury Index 1-3 Year -0.13% Excess Return +42 53 PORTFOLIO REVIEW – 2013 SR-91 Project Residual 1Past performance is not indicative of future results. Inception date 1/4/18. Performance returns are calculated as of the first full month following the funding date. The performance benchmark shown for the Riverside County 2013 Residual Fund Portfolio is the ICE BofAML 1-3 Year U.S. Treasury Index, which is a broad-based index consisting of U.S. Treasury securities with an outstanding par greater than or equal to $250 million and a maturity range from one to three years, reflecting total return. Asset Allocation Portfolio Characteristics 8 As of March 31, 2018 Actual Portfolio Yield to Maturity 2.42% Duration 1.09 Years Average Quality (Moody’s) Aa2 Corporate 49% Municipal 3% RMBS 8% CMBS 4% ABS 14% Treasury 18% Discount Notes 4% Portfolio Performance1 Since Inception (2/1/2018) Riverside County 2013 SR-91 Project Residual Fund (Gross of Fees) 0.06% Riverside County 2013 SR-91 Project Residual Fund (Net of Fees) 0.04% ICE BofAML U.S. Treasury Index 1-3 Year 0.16% Excess Return -10 54 RCTC PORTFOLIOS 2013 SR 91 Project Funds Portfolio Market Value (7/3/2013) Net Flows Market Value (12/31/2017) Change in Market Value Construction (Sales Tax) $332,687,595 ($334,894,805) - +$2,207,210 Construction (Toll Revenue) $122,120,571 ($122,810,850) - +$690,279 Total Construction Funds $454,808,167 ($457,705,654) - +$2,897,489 Portfolio Market Value (7/3/2013) Net Flows Market Value (12/31/2017) Change in Market Value Capitalized Interest (Sales Tax) $103,683,353 ($106,840,463) - +$3,157,110 Capitalized Interest (Toll Revenue) $31,416,498 ($32,491,024) - +$1,074,526 Total Capitalized Interest Funds $135,099,851 ($139,331,487) - +$4,231,636 Portfolio Market Value (7/3/2013) Net Flows Market Value (3/31/2018) Change in Market Value Debt Service Reserve Fund $17,667,869 ($1,442,408) $17,806,819 +$1,581,358 9 Portfolio Market Value (6/10/2015) Net Flows Market Value (12/31/2017) Change in Market Value Equity Contribution $32,793,399 ($34,123,338) - +$1,329,939 55 RCTC PORTFOLIOS 10 Portfolio Beginning Market Value (7/24/2017) Net Flows Market Value (3/31/2018) Change in Market Value 2017 Toll Revenue I-15 Project Fund $98,562,718 ($14,823,299) $84,352,583 +$613,163 I-15 Express 2017 Project Sales Tax Revenue $56,043,134 ($30,830,907) $25,532,645 +$320,418 Beginning Market Value (12/5/2017) 2017 Toll Revenue I-15 Ramp Up Reserve $7,723,487 +32,882 $7,845,229 +$30,842 Total Project $154,605,852 ($45,621,324) $117,730,457 +$964,424 2017 I-15 Project and 91 Residual Funds Portfolio Beginning Market Value (1/16/2018) Net Flows Market Value (3/31/2018) Change in Market Value 2013 SR-91 Project Residual Fund $3,292,782 0 $3,292,869 +86 56 DISCLAIMERS 11 In general. This disclaimer applies to this document and the verbal or written comments of any person presenting it. This document, taken together with any such verbal or written comments, is referred to herein as the “Presentation.” Logan Circle Partners, L.P., a MetLife, Inc. company, is referred to herein as “Logan Circle” and is part of MetLife, Inc.’s institutional investment management business. No offer to purchase or sell securities. This Presentation is being provided to you, at your specific request. This Presentation does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any security and may not be relied upon in connection with the purchase or sale of any security. Projections. Projections contained in this Presentation are based on a variety of estimates and assumptions by Logan Circle, including, among others, estimates of future operating results, the value of assets and market conditions at the time of disposition, and the timing and manner of disposition or other realization events. These estimates and assumptions are inherently uncertain and are subject to numerous business, industry, market, regulatory, competitive and financial risks that are outside of Logan Circle’s control. There can be no assurance that the assumptions made in connection with the projections will prove accurate, and actual results may differ materially, including the possibility that an investor may lose some or all of its invested capital. The inclusion of the projections herein should not be regarded as an indication that Logan Circle or any of its affiliates considers the projections to be a reliable prediction of future events and the projections should not be relied upon as such. Neither Logan Circle nor any of its affiliates or representatives has made or makes any representation to any person regarding the projections and none of them intends to update or otherwise revise the projections to reflect circumstances existing after the date when made or to reflect the occurrence of future events, if any or all of the assumptions underlying the projections are later shown to be in error. For purposes of this paragraph, the term “projections” includes “targeted returns”. Past performance. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future results and should not be relied upon as the basis for making an investment decision. The information presented is only available for institutional client use. No reliance, no update and use of information. You may not rely on this Presentation as the basis upon which to make an investment decision. To the extent that you rely on this Presentation in connection with any investment decision, you do so at your own risk. This Presentation is being provided in summary fashion and does not purport to be complete. The information in the Presentation is provided to you as of the dates indicated and Logan Circle does not intend to update the information after its distribution, even in the event that the information becomes materially inaccurate. Certain information contained in this Presentation includes performance and characteristics of Logan Circle’s strategies and any represented benchmarks, which may derive from calculations or figures that have been provided by independent third parties, or have been prepared internally and have not been audited or verified. Use of different methods for preparing, calculating or presenting information may lead to different results for the information presented, compared to publicly quoted information, and such differences may be material. Knowledge and experience. You acknowledge that you are knowledgeable and experienced with respect to the financial, tax and business aspects of this Presentation and that you will conduct your own independent financial, business, regulatory, accounting, legal and tax investigations with respect to the accuracy, completeness and suitability of this Presentation should you choose to use or rely on this Presentation, at your own risk, for any purpose. Risk of loss. An investment in the strategy will be highly speculative and there can be no assurance that the strategy’s investment objectives will be achieved. Investors must be prepared to bear the risk of a total loss of their investment. Distribution of this Presentation. Logan Circle expressly prohibits any reproduction, in hard-copy, electronic or any other form, or any redistribution to any third party of this Presentation without the prior written consent of Logan Circle. This Presentation is not intended for distribution to, or use by, any person or entity in any jurisdiction or country where such distribution or use is contrary to local law or regulation. No tax, legal or accounting advice. This Presentation is not intended to provide, and should not be relied upon for (and you shall not construe it as) accounting, legal, regulatory, financial or tax advice or investment recommendations. Any statements of U.S. federal tax consequences contained in this Presentation were not intended to be used and cannot be used to avoid penalties under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code or to promote, market or recommend to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein. Confidentiality. By accepting receipt or reading any portion of this Presentation, you agree that you will treat the Presentation confidentially. This reminder should not be read to limit, in any way, the terms of any confidentiality agreement you or your organization may have in place with Logan Circle. ERISA Plan Independent Fiduciary Exception. If you are considering this presentation for an ERISA Plan, you acknowledge and agree that you are the Plan sponsor or are a fiduciary to the Plan and that the Plan has under management or control at least $50 million or you are a (i) Bank, Broker Dealer, Registered Investment Adviser, or Insurance Company, (ii) are independent of Logan Circle Partners and affiliates of MetLife, Inc., and (iii) are capable of evaluating the engagement of Logan Circle Partners as an investment adviser. During the sales process and pursuant to the negotiation of the investment advisory agreement, Logan Circle Partners will not undertake to provide impartial investment advice, or to give advice in a fiduciary capacity. 57 QUARTERLY PORTFOLIO REVIEWQUARTERLY PORTFOLIO REVIEW PAYDEN.COM LOS ANGELES | BOSTON | LONDON | MILAN 1st Quarter 2018 ATTACHMENT 18 58 BLANK April 2018 The first quarter was a tale of two forces. On the one hand, the U.S. and global economic data continued to impress. The International Monetary Fund revised up its forecast for 2018 global growth by 0.2% to 3.9%, which would be the best global growth rate in nearly a decade. The U.S. added over 600,000 jobs during the first quarter—the best first quarter tally for job growth since Q1 2014. On the other hand, financial markets stumbled. The S&P 500 fell ~0.8% and spreads on investment-grade debt widened 16 basis points. How do we make sense of a world where markets diverge from fundamentals? Consider three things: First, the two forces described above are not mutually exclusive. A surprisingly good economic backdrop has forced investors to rethink their views on interest rates. However, in a complex global financial system, you cannot recalibrate one market without ripple effects across others. The rates market repositioning cascaded through other markets. U.S. equities dipped, followed by global equities. Measures of volatility also jumped. Second, the stock market is not the economy, so divergences between the two are not that unusual. We will become more concerned about financial market wobbles if/when the economic backdrop deteriorates. We will be watching the economic data carefully in Q2 for any hints that the wobbles we have seen in markets are feeding back into the underlying fundamentals. Third, we ask: what could derail the global expansion? Political risks are always present but nearly impossible for investors to consistently handicap. If financial conditions tighten more significantly, credit markets may be less forgiving to issuers, and the dollar could rise and impair global USD creditors’ ability to repay dollar loans. As investors, we cannot know the future, but must nevertheless prepare. Come what will, we remain keenly focused on diversification and liquidity. Our client portfolios are built to perform in good markets and bad, and we expect 2018 to be no different in that respect. Sincerely, Joan A. Payden President & CEO LETTER FROM THE CEO 59 BLANK Riverside County Transportation Commission 2812 Portfolio Review and Market Update - 1st Quarter 2018 PORTFOLIO CHARACTERISTICS (As of 3/31/2018) $51.1 millionPortfolio Market Value AA+Weighted Average Credit Quality 1.51 yearsWeighted Average Duration 2.38%Weighted Average Yield to Maturity DURATION DISTRIBUTION 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 0 - 1 1 - 2 2 - 3 3+ Years SECTOR ALLOCATION 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40%TreasuriesCreditAgenciesAsset-BackedRevenueGOPORTFOLIO RETURNS - Periods Ending 3/31/2018 Trailing 1 Yr Since Inception (3/1/15) 1st Quarter RCTC Operating Portfolio -0.04% 0.42% 0.68% ICE BofAML 1-3 Year US Treasury Index -0.13% 0.03% 0.46% Periods over one year annualized Payden & Rygel • 333 South Grand Avenue • Los Angeles, California 90071 • (213) 625-1900 • www.payden.com60 Portfolio Review and Market Update - 1st Quarter 2018 2812 MARKET THEMES The first quarter was accentuated by sustained positive economic support, yet volatility increased across capital markets. Strong global growth, which pushed risk assets higher in January, led to concerns by mid-quarter that inflationary pressures could resurface more quickly than expected. This caused market volatility, as equities fell from their highs and corporate spreads widened off of their tights. Jerome Powell took over as Fed chair and shifted to a more optimistic and hawkish policy tone, hiking at the March meeting, forecasting two more 25 basis point hikes in 2018, and increasing expectations for hikes in 2019 and beyond. Consequently, U.S. interest rates rose, driving front-end yields to levels not seen since 2008. As the U.S. moves away from a zero interest rate policy and companies adjust to tax reform, money markets have normalized. The passing of debt ceiling legislation allowed the U.S. Treasury to increase issuance to the largest net supply since 2010 with a front-end concentration. As a result, Treasury bill yields moved higher and short credit spreads widened, providing attractive yields and increased opportunities in short fixed income. STRATEGY The portfolio holds a diversified mix of credit sectors for income generation.n Corporate bond yield premiums widened over the quarter making shorter dated securities more attractive than they have been in years. We expect to be more active in secondary markets while participating in new issues when pricing is supportive. n We continue to utilize floating-rate coupon bonds and maintain an underweight duration position in anticipation of higher front-end rates. n INTEREST RATES U.S. Treasury yields moved higher by 30 to 40 basis points across the front-end of the curve, with the two-year maturity rising 0.39% to 2.27%. The slope between two- and five-year maturities finished the quarter roughly unchanged after steepening by 0.15% through mid-February. n Our underweight duration position was the main driver of performance over the quarter, as Treasury yields increased. n Floating-rate positions contributed positively to performance as three-month LIBOR rose 0.62% to end the quarter at 2.31%. n SECTORS Corporate securities underperformed Treasuries as spreads widened, which detracted from performance.n High-quality asset-backed securities outperformed corporates over the quarter while providing flexible reinvestment opportunities. n Payden & Rygel • 333 South Grand Avenue • Los Angeles, California 90071 • (213) 625-1900 • www.payden.com61 MARKET PERSPECTIVE The first quarter looked poised to be a good one. The S&P 500 Index started 2018 on its hottest win streak since the late 1990s. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) revised up its forecast for 2018 global growth by 0.2% to 3.9%. The January U.S. labor market report showed stellar job and wage growth. And then the markets turned south and volatility spiked as the strong wage data sparked inflation fears. From there, the stock market and 10-year U.S. Treasury bounced up and down for the remainder of the quarter. In the United States despite some financial market volatility, economic forecasts have generally improved for 2018. The quarter came to an end with Fed Chair Jerome Powell announcing the Federal Open Market Committee’s (FOMC) decision to raise the Fed Funds rate to 1.50-1.75%—a move that was widely expected. The fact that the March move may have been the first of many this year is still underappreciated, at least by the bond market. Interest rates are rising, though more slowly at longer tenors, even as stocks hold their ground. If growth persists above trend, the unemployment rate falls further, and inflation heads higher over the next couple of years, the path of interest rates will be “steeper” than the market has in mind. What will next quarter’s chart look like? Key Macroeconomic Events and the Market Reaction for the First Quarter of 2018 Source: Standard and Poor’s, Bank for International Settlements, Bloomberg S&P 500 rises more than 6%, recording the best start of the year since the1990s. The VIX, Wall Street’s “fear gauge,” sees the largest single day increase since 1987. Trump announces tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum. Italian elections held. FOMC raises the Fed Funds target rate to 1.50-1.75%. Trump announces protectionist measures against China leading to fears of a“trade war.” 2.4% 2.5% 2.6% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 2500 2600 2700 2800 2900 01/02 01/05 01/10 01/16 01/19 01/24 01/29 02/01 02/06 02/09 02/14 02/20 02/23 02/28 03/05 03/08 03/13 03/16 03/21 03/26 03/29 % YieldIndexS&P 500 Index (Left Axis) U.S. Treasury 10-Year Yield (Right Axis) U.S. non-farm payroll report shows wage growth of 2.9% year-over-year,sparking inflation fears. 62 LOS ANGELES 333 South Grand Avenue Los Angeles, California 90071 213 625-1900 BOSTON 265 Franklin Street Boston, Massachusetts 02110 617 807-1990 LONDON 1 Bartholmew Lane London EC2N 2AX United Kingdom + 44 (0) 20-7621-3000 MILAN Corso Matteotti, 1 20121 Milan, Italy PAYDEN.COM LOS ANGELES |BOSTON |LONDON |MILAN OVER 30 YEARS OF INSPIRING CONFIDENCE WITH AN UNWAVERING COMMITMENT TO OUR CLIENTS’ NEEDS. US DOMICILED MUTUAL FUNDS DUBLIN DOMICILED UCITS FUNDS CASH BALANCE Payden/Kravitz Cash Balance Plan Fund EQUITY Equity Income Fund GLOBAL FIXED INCOME Emerging Markets Bond Fund Emerging Markets Corporate Bond Fund Emerging Markets Local Bond Fund Global Fixed Income Fund Global Low Duration Fund TAX-EXEMPT FIXED INCOME California Municipal Income Fund U.S. FIXED INCOME Absolute Return Bond Fund Cash Reserves Money Market Fund Core Bond Fund Corporate Bond Fund Floating Rate Fund GNMA Fund High Income Fund Limited Maturity Fund Low Duration Fund Strategic Income Fund U.S. Government Fund EQUITY Global Equity Income Fund US Equity Income Fund LIQUIDITY FUNDS Euro Liquidity Fund Sterling Reserve Fund U.S. Dollar Liquidity Fund FIXED INCOME Absolute Return Bond Fund Global Bond Fund Global Emerging Markets Bond Fund Global Emerging Markets Corporate Bond Fund Global Government Bond Index Fund Global High Yield Bond Fund Global Inflation-Linked Bond Fund Global Short Bond Fund Sterling Corporate Bond Fund U.S. Core Bond Fund USD Low Duration Credit Fund For more information about Payden & Rygel’s funds, contact us at a location listed below. 63 County of Riverside Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund March 2018 ATTACHMENT 19 64 Contents COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 1 2| Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund 3| Economy 4| Market Data 6| Portfolio Data 8| Compliance Report 9| Month End Holdings Hot air balloons over Lake Skinner in Temecula, Southwest Riverside County, CA. Digital Image. NBC San Diego. http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/local/temecula-valley-2014-balloon-wine-festival-north-san-diego-261142951.html 65 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 2 The Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund is comprised of contributions from the county, schools, special districts, and other discretionary depositors throughout the County of Riverside. The primary objective of the treasurer shall be to safeguard the principal of the funds under the treasurer's control, meet the liquidity needs of the depositor, and to maximize a return on the funds within the given parameters. The Treasurer-Tax Collector and the Capital Markets team are committed to maintaining the highest credit ratings. The Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund is currently rated AAA-bf by Moody’s Investor Service and AAAf/S1 by Fitch Ratings, two of the nation’s most trusted bond credit rating services. Since its inception, the Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund has been in full compliance with the Treasurer’s Statement of Investment Policy, which is more restrictive than California Government Code 53646. Treasurer’s Statement Capital Markets Team Jon Christensen Treasurer-Tax Collector Giovane Pizano Chief Investment Manager Steve Faeth Sr. Investment Manager Isela Licea Assistant Investment Manager Jake Nieto Intern Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund 6-Month Pool Performance After the FED completed three 25-basis- point increases to the FED funds target interest rate in 2017, the big question for 2018 is, “How many this year?” The Fed has raised rates twice so far this year, first on January 31st and most recently on March 21st, taking the rate up to 1.75 percent. Many economic forecasts expect at least one more hike to happen this year in either June or August. Why does this matter you may ask? Well, actively managing a fixed income portfolio in a rising interest rate environment can be challenging at best and downright impossible without showing any unrealized losses. We have navigated these market conditions in the past, most namely the rise in rates before the great recession between 2002 and 2008, all without losing a penny. Furthermore, we didn’t show any loss- es during the entire financial collapse or Great Recession. The upside to a rising rate environ- ment is more interest earnings to the pool and its participants when it is needed most to shore up a beleaguered County budget. We are on target to more than double last year’s earnings as interest rates continue to rise. How does the most recent rise in interest rates (particularly market rates) affect the TPIF? It is important to mention to our readers about the difference between realized vs. un- realized gains or losses. On the bottom of this report, you will see two columns labeled “Paper Gain or Loss,” expressed in dollars, and as a percentage of the total. In the world of fixed income, there is an inverse relationship that exists in that when interest rates decline, there is a gain in the underlying market value of the securities; the reverse is also true with rising rates and a loss in underlying market value. Unrealized losses are expected to con- tinue in a rising rate environment. The difference between having to realize a loss vs. not having to is a function of under- standing the cash flows of the County Treas- ury and having ample liquidity on hand to meet the needs of our depositors. Our Capi- tal Markets team utilizes a historical cash flow model and makes adjustments throughout the year to revenues and disbursements if they come in higher or lower than expected. Our major cash outflows are pre-funded months and years in advance to negate the need to ever sell a security before maturity, especially under adverse market conditions. We have taken the appropriate steps to im- munize our portfolio from this and other eco- nomic hazards and to be observant of volatile economic conditions. Moreover, we will con- tinue to adhere to our investment objectives of safety, liquidity, and return. The FED remains data dependent and their course of action depends on how economic conditions develop in real time. Currently, overall economic growth and the labor mar- ket displayed enough positive momentum for the FED to continue its rate hike trajectory, despite the core inflation rate remaining be- low the FED’s 2 percent target rate. On their March 21 press release, the FED noted, “…economic activity will expand at a moder- ate pace in the medium term and labor mar- ket conditions will remain strong.” The unem- ployment rate remains at 4.1 percent, the labor force participation rate improved, and GDP (Q4 Revised) growth of 2.9 percent was strong. The markets were turbulent this quarter with FED activity, the implementation of trade tariffs on U.S. imports of steel and aluminum, the raising global concerns of a possible trade war, the two-day government shutdown that started on January 20th, and the suspension of the debt ceiling until March 1, 2019. In Q1 2018, the 2yr Treasury yield increased 35 bps from 1.95 to 2.27, while the 3-month bill in- creased 29 bps from 1.44 to 1.73. The portfolio is well positioned to capitalize on the rising rate environment. Jon Christensen Treasurer-Tax Collector Quarterly Commentary A Rising Rate Environment Month End Market Value ($)* Month End Book Value ($) Paper Gain or Loss ($) Paper Gain or Loss (%) Book Yield (%) WAM (Yrs) 18-Mar 6,690,407,405.09 6,723,896,582.30 (33,489,177.21) -0.50% 1.63 1.14 18-Feb 6,498,908,307.13 6,535,413,566.05 (36,505,258.92) -0.56% 1.53 1.17 18-Jan 6,605,413,937.61 6,637,299,033.46 (31,885,095.85) -0.48% 1.47 1.14 17-Dec 7,694,737,199.78 7,714,635,653.16 (19,898,453.38) -0.26% 1.39 1.01 17-Nov 6,308,195,449.12 6,327,879,337.38 (19,683,888.26) -0.31% 1.32 1.20 17-Oct 6,255,513,634.27 6,269,409,129.71 (13,895,495.44) -0.22% 1.27 1.22 *Market values do not include accrued interest. 66 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 3 Key Economic Indicators Nonfarm payrolls posted the largest gains since July 2016, according to the Employment Situation news release.  Construction and retail trade industries contributed greatest to nonfarm payrolls. Information sector payrolls fell by twelve thousand, the largest loss of any industry.  The prime-age labor force participation rate (25- to 54- years-old) is the highest since September 2010.  Average hourly earnings, weekly earnings, and weekly hours worked all increased last month. [BLS; 03/10/2018] National Economy Economy Key indexes show that California’s economy continues to grow at a moderate pace.  California Economic Activity Index has risen for fifth straight month. [Comerica Bank; 03/30/2018]  Y/Y growth for CA housing price index has accelerated for four out of five most recent quarters. [FRED; 03/30/2018]  California and Inland Empire could be disproportionately affected by disruptions in trade via logistics and manufac- turing industries. [Inland Valley Daily Bulletin; 04/02/2018]. State Economy Real GDP Source: Federal Reserve Economic Data and County of Riverside Office of the Treasurer-Tax Collector. Housing Price Index: All Transactions (Y/Y) Inflation Rate (Y/Y) Labor Force Participation Rate 1.2% 3.1%3.2% 2.9% 2.0%2.2%2.3% 2.6% 0.0% 0.5% 1.0% 1.5% 2.0% 2.5% 3.0% 3.5% Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q/Q Change Y/Y Change on Quarter 80.0% 80.5% 81.0% 81.5% 82.0% 82.5% 83.0% 83.5% 60.0% 61.0% 62.0% 63.0% 64.0% 65.0% 66.0% 67.0% Whole labor force (left)Ages 25 to 54 (right) 0.0% 2.0% 4.0% 6.0% 8.0% 10.0% Q1 2016 Q2 2016 Q3 2016 Q4 2016 Q1 2017 Q2 2017 Q3 2017 Q4 2017 California United States 0.0% 0.5% 1.0% 1.5% 2.0% 2.5% 3.0% CPI CPI Ex Food and Energy Release Date Indicator Actual Consensus Difference 03/28/2018 Real Gross Domestic Product - Q/Q Change 2.90% 2.70% 0.20% 03/09/2018 Unemployment Rate - Seasonally Adjusted 4.10% 4.00% 0.10% 03/09/2018 Non-Farm Payrolls - M/M Change 313,000 205,000 108,000 03/13/2018 CPI - Y/Y Change 2.20% 2.20% 0.00% 03/13/2018 CPI Ex Food and Energy - Y/Y Change 1.80% 1.90% -0.10% 03/05/2018 Non-Manufacturing Index 59.5 58.8 0.70 03/21/2018 Existing Home Sales - Y/Y Change 3.00% - - 03/06/2018 Factory Orders - M/M Change -1.40% -1.30% -0.10% 03/23/2018 Durable Goods Orders - M/M Change 3.10% 1.70% 1.40% 67 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 4 US Treasury Curve FOMC Meeting 03/21/2018  The FOMC stated, “Near-term risks to the economic outlook appear roughly balanced”.  The Federal Reserve increased the Fed Funds Target Rate to 1.50—1.75 from 1.25—1.50%.  Inflation has “increased in recent months, but [remains low]”. The FOMC expects inflation “to move up in coming months and stabilize around [2 percent] over the medium term.”  The next FOMC meeting is scheduled for May 1, 2018. The US Treasury Curve and its values are subject to frequent change and will be updated monthly with each issued TPIF report. Market Data Fed Funds Target Rate (Upper Limit) 0.50% 0.75% 1.00% 1.25% 1.50% 1.75% 2.00% 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 02/28/2018 03/29/2018 Treasury Curve Differentials 3 Mo 6 Mo 1 Yr 2 Yr 3 Yr 5 Yr 10 Yr 30 Yr 03/29/2018 - 02/28/2018 0.08 0.07 0.02 0.02 -0.03 -0.09 -0.13 -0.16 03/29/2018 1.73 1.93 2.09 2.27 2.39 2.56 2.74 2.97 02/28/2018 1.65 1.86 2.07 2.25 2.42 2.65 2.87 3.13 68 * Values listed on this page are in US dollars and are based on the final business day of the month. COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 5 Market Data cont’d Commodities Stocks 19,000.00 20,000.00 21,000.00 22,000.00 23,000.00 24,000.00 25,000.00 26,000.00 27,000.00 Dow Jones 2,000.00 2,200.00 2,400.00 2,600.00 2,800.00 3,000.00 5,000.00 5,500.00 6,000.00 6,500.00 7,000.00 7,500.00 NASDAQ 100 (Left)S&P 500 (right) 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 44.00 49.00 54.00 59.00 64.00 69.00 Nymex Crude (left)Nymex Nat Gas (right) 50.00 55.00 60.00 65.00 70.00 75.00 80.00 85.00 90.00 95.00 70.00 90.00 110.00 130.00 150.00 170.00 190.00 210.00 Industrial Metals (left)Precious Metals (left) Iron Ore (right) 69 The County of Riverside’s Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund is currently rated Aaa-bf by Moody’s Investor Service and AAAf/S1 by Fitch Ratings. Moody’s Asset Rating (000’s) S&P Asset Rating (000’s) COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 6 Portfolio Data 12-Month Projected Cash Flow Based on historic and current financial conditions within the County, the Pool is expected to maintain sufficient liquidity o f funds to cover County expenses for at least the next twelve months. * Values listed in Cash Flow Table are in millions of USD. Book MKT/Book % Book Yield Aaa 3,892,516.49 99.10% 57.89% 1.61% Aa1 324,748.86 100.14% 4.83% 1.54% Aa2 386,884.87 100.09% 5.75% 1.65% Aa3 1,230,982.06 100.09% 18.31% 1.72% NR 888,764.30 99.95% 13.22% 1.63% Totals: 6,723,896.58 99.50% 100.00% 1.63% Book MKT/Book % Book Yield AAA 424,577.75 100.06% 6.31% 1.79% AA+ 3,857,214.84 99.10% 57.37% 1.59% AA 256,921.14 100.27% 3.82% 1.63% AA- 1,296,418.55 100.06% 19.28% 1.70% NR 888,764.30 99.95% 13.22% 1.63% Totals: 6,723,896.58 99.50% 100.00% 1.63% Month Monthly Receipts Monthly Disbursements Difference Required Matured Investments Balance Actual Investments Maturing Available to Invest > 1 Year 04/2018 170.36 04/2018 1,946.22 1,100.00 846.22 1,016.58 1,022.06 05/2018 912.13 1,500.00 (587.87) 428.71 1,013.47 06/2018 1,153.32 1,900.00 (746.68) 317.97 - 447.38 07/2018 1,006.35 1,300.00 (293.65) 293.65 - 295.75 08/2018 740.88 635.84 105.04 105.04 290.13 09/2018 1,100.00 1,250.00 (150.00) 44.96 - 270.00 10/2018 1,051.06 1,100.00 (48.94) 48.94 - 254.87 11/2018 1,125.00 1,100.00 25.00 25.00 239.50 12/2018 2,350.00 1,100.00 1,250.00 1,275.00 - 01/2019 1,000.00 2,100.00 (1,100.00) 175.00 110.66 02/2019 850.00 1,050.00 (200.00) 25.00 - 100.34 03/2019 1,350.00 1,200.00 150.00 150.00 68.31 TOTALS 14,584.96 15,335.84 (750.88) 730.52 3,345.69 4,112.47 5,993.37 10.86% 61.16% 89.14% AAA 6%AA+ 58% AA 4%AA- 19% NR 13% Aaa 58% Aa1 5% Aa2 6% Aa3 18% NR 13% 70 Asset Maturity Distribution (Par Value) Portfolio Data cont’d TIMMI The Treasurer’s Institutional Money Market Index (TIMMI) is a composite index of four AAA rated prime institutional money market funds. Their average yield is compared to the yield of the Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund in the above graph. Asset Allocation COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 7 *Cash values are in thousands of dollars. 15.17% 1,022,060.01 21.60% 1,455,000.72 24.28% 1,635,400.00 13.07% 880,519.00 12.72% 856,760.00 13.15% 886,080.00 - 500,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 0-1 Mos 1-3 Mos 3-12 Mos 1-2 Yr 2-3 Yr 3-5 Yr Assets Scheduled Book Scheduled Market Mkt/ Sch Book Yield WAL (Yr) Mat (Yr) TREAS 293,761.19 293,397.41 99.88% 1.45% 0.561 0.561 AGENCIES 3,237,681.62 3,201,976.71 98.90% 1.57% 2.019 2.041 MMKT 141,994.51 141,994.51 100.00% 1.55% 0.003 0.003 CASH 535,000.00 535,000.00 100.00% 1.67% 0.003 0.003 CALTRUST FND 54,000.00 54,021.60 100.04% 1.60% 0.003 0.003 COMM PAPER 1,011,867.70 1,014,323.15 100.24% 1.79% 0.255 0.255 NCDS 870,000.00 870,000.00 100.00% 1.76% 0.262 0.262 MEDIUM TERM NOTES 251,877.09 251,979.55 100.04% 1.87% 0.951 0.955 MUNI 327,519.48 327,519.48 100.00% 1.32% 0.729 0.729 LOCAL AGCY OBLIG 195.00 195.00 100.00% 2.03% 2.211 2.211 Totals: 6,723,896.58 6,690,407.41 99.50% 1.63% 1.141 1.143 * For details on the Pool’s composition see Month End Portfolio Holdings, pages 9 to 13. 0.95%0.99%1.03% 1.12%1.18%1.23%1.25%1.27%1.32% 1.39%1.47%1.53% 1.63% 0.98%0.99%1.00% 1.19%1.21%1.22%1.22%1.23%1.25% 1.45%1.51%1.54% 1.80% 0.75% 1.00% 1.25% 1.50% 1.75% 2.00% Pool Yield TIMMI 71 Compliance Status: Full Compliance The Treasurer’s Pooled Investment Fund was in full compliance with the County of Riverside’s Treasurer’s State- ment of Investment Policy. The County’s Statement of Investment Policy is more restrictive than California Gov- ernment Code 53646. The County’s Investment Policy is reviewed annually by the County of Riverside’s Over- sight Committee and approved by the Board of Supervisors. 1 Money Market Mutual Funds maturity may be interpreted as a weighted average maturity not exceeding 60 days. 2 Or must have an investment advisor with no fewer than 5 years experience and with assets under management of $500,000,000 USD. THIS COMPLETES THE REPORT REQUIREMENTS OF CALIFORNIA GOVERNMENT CODE 53646. COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 8 Compliance Report GOVERNMENT CODE COUNTY INVESTMENT POLICY Investment Category Maximum Maturity Authorized % Limit S&P/ Moody's Maximum Maturity Authorized % Limit S&P/ Moody's Actual % MUNICIPAL BONDS (MUNI) 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 4 YEARS 15% AA-/Aa3/AA- 4.87% U.S. TREASURIES 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 5 YEARS 100% NA 4.37% LOCAL AGENCY OBLIGATIONS (LAO) 5 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 3 YEARS 2.50% INVESTMENT GRADE 0.00% FEDERAL AGENCIES 5 YEARS NO LIMIT AAA 5 YEARS 100% NA 48.15% COMMERCIAL PAPER (CP) 270 DAYS 40% A1/P1 270 DAYS 40% A1/P1/F1 15.05% CERTIFICATE & TIME DEPOSITS (NCD & TCD) 5 YEARS 30% NA 1 YEAR 25% Combined A1/P1/F1 12.94% REPURCHASE AGREEMENTS (REPO) 1 YEARS NO LIMIT NA 45 DAYS 40% max, 25% in term repo over 7 days A1/P1/F1 0.00% REVERSE REPOS 92 DAYS 20% NA 60 DAYS 10% NA 0.00% MEDIUM TERM NOTES (MTNO) 5 YEARS 30% A 3 YEARS 20% AA/Aa2/AA 3.75% CALTRUST SHORT TERM FUND NA NA NA DAILY LIQUIDITY 1.00% NA 0.80% MONEY MARKET MUTUAL FUNDS (MMF) 60 DAYS (1) 20% AAA/Aaa (2) DAILY LIQUIDITY 20% AAA by 2 Of 3 RATINGS AGC. 2.11% LOCAL AGENCY INVESTMENT FUND (LAIF) NA NA NA DAILY LIQUIDITY Max $50 million NA 0.00% CASH/DEPOSIT ACCOUNT NA NA NA NA NA NA 7.96% 72 Description Maturity Date Coupon Par Value Book Value Market Price Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss FIDELITY GOV 04/01/2018 1.438 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.000000 50,000,000.00 0.00 FEDERATED GOV 04/01/2018 1.417 1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00 100.000000 1,000,000.00 0.00 GOLDMAN SACHS GOV 04/01/2018 1.434 1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00 100.000000 1,000,000.00 0.00 WELLS FARGO GOV 04/01/2018 1.416 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.000000 5,000,000.00 0.00 HERITAGE PRIME MMF 04/01/2018 1.679 4,998,000.80 5,000,000.00 100.040000 5,000,000.00 0.00 FIDELITY PRIME MMF 04/01/2018 1.632 29,988,005.30 29,997,501.25 100.031666 29,997,501.25 0.00 BLACKROCK PRIME MMF 04/01/2018 1.625 24,990,003.50 24,995,001.50 100.020000 24,995,001.50 0.00 JP MORGAN PRIME MMF 04/01/2018 1.622 24,997,003.50 25,002,002.90 100.020000 25,002,002.90 0.00 BLACKROCK PRIME MMF 04/01/2018 1.225 0.00 0.00 .000000 0.00 0.00 1.552 141,973,013.10 141,994,505.65 100.015139 141,994,505.65 0.00 CALTRUST SHT TERM FUND 04/01/2018 1.596 54,000,000.00 54,000,000.00 100.040000 54,021,600.00 21,600.00 1.596 54,000,000.00 54,000,000.00 100.040000 54,021,600.00 21,600.00 BANK OF THE WEST 04/01/2018 1.670 350,000,000.00 350,000,000.00 100.000000 350,000,000.00 0.00 1.670 350,000,000.00 350,000,000.00 100.000000 350,000,000.00 0.00 UB MANAGED RATE 04/01/2018 1.670 185,000,000.00 185,000,000.00 100.000000 185,000,000.00 0.00 1.670 185,000,000.00 185,000,000.00 100.000000 185,000,000.00 0.00 US DIST COURTHOUSE 06/15/2020 2.031 195,000.00 195,000.00 100.000000 195,000.00 0.00 2.031 195,000.00 195,000.00 100.000000 195,000.00 0.00 U.S. TREASURY 08/16/2018 1.508 50,000,000.00 49,482,672.22 99.314014 49,657,007.19 174,334.97 1.508 50,000,000.00 49,482,672.22 99.314014 49,657,007.19 174,334.97 U.S. TREASURY BOND 11/30/2018 1.000 25,000,000.00 24,943,359.38 99.328000 24,832,000.00 -111,359.38 U.S. TREASURY BOND 05/15/2018 1.000 25,000,000.00 24,958,984.38 99.920000 24,980,000.00 21,015.62 U.S. TREASURY BOND 07/31/2019 1.375 25,000,000.00 24,975,585.94 98.910000 24,727,500.00 -248,085.94 U.S. TREASURY BOND 07/31/2019 1.375 25,000,000.00 24,980,468.75 98.910000 24,727,500.00 -252,968.75 U.S. TREASURY BOND 06/15/2018 1.125 50,000,000.00 49,953,125.00 99.868000 49,934,000.00 -19,125.00 U.S. TREASURY BOND 07/31/2018 .750 50,000,000.00 49,757,812.50 99.645000 49,822,500.00 64,687.50 U.S. TREASURY BOND 10/31/2018 1.250 25,000,000.00 24,897,460.94 99.574000 24,893,500.00 -3,960.94 U.S. TREASURY BOND 02/28/2019 1.125 20,000,000.00 19,811,718.75 99.117000 19,823,400.00 11,681.25 1.087 245,000,000.00 244,278,515.64 99.485878 243,740,400.00 -538,115.64 FHLMC 3YrNc1.5YrE 06/22/2018 1.200 15,000,000.00 14,986,800.00 99.854000 14,978,100.00 -8,700.00 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoE 06/22/2018 1.250 25,000,000.00 24,993,750.00 99.865000 24,966,250.00 -27,500.00 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 10/29/2018 1.050 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 99.454000 4,972,700.00 -27,300.00 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 10/29/2018 1.050 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.454000 9,945,400.00 -54,600.00 FHLMC 2.5YrNc1YrE 08/24/2018 1.000 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 99.646000 4,982,300.00 -17,700.00FHLMC 3YrNc1YrE 03/29/2019 1.300 9,000,000.00 9,000,000.00 99.158000 8,924,220.00 -75,780.00 FHLMC 3YrNc1YrE 03/29/2019 1.270 4,000,000.00 4,000,000.00 99.127000 3,965,080.00 -34,920.00 FHLMC 3.5YrNc6MoE 10/11/2019 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 98.845000 14,826,750.00 -173,250.00 FHLMC 2.25YrNc6MoB 06/29/2018 1.125 5,850,000.00 5,850,000.00 99.823000 5,839,645.50 -10,354.50 FHLMC 2YrNc6MoE 07/20/2018 1.000 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.738000 24,934,500.00 -65,500.00 FHLMC 2YrNc6MoE 07/20/2018 .820 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.684000 9,968,400.00 -31,600.00 FHLMC 3YrNc3MoB 07/26/2019 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.735000 9,873,500.00 -126,500.00 FHLMC 2YrNc3MoB 07/27/2018 1.050 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.754000 9,975,400.00 -24,600.00 FHLMC 3.5YrNc1YrE 02/25/2020 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.026000 9,802,600.00 -197,400.00 FHLMC 3.5YrNc1YrE 05/08/2020 1.200 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.666000 14,649,900.00 -350,100.00 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoE 11/25/2020 1.370 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 96.858000 24,214,500.00 -785,500.00 FHLMC 4YrNc1YrE 11/30/2020 1.440 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.444000 9,744,400.00 -255,600.00 FHLMC 1Yr 07/20/2018 1.000 9,400,000.00 9,371,800.00 99.738000 9,375,372.00 3,572.00 FHLMC 1YrNc1MoB 05/11/2018 1.000 25,000,000.00 24,953,500.00 99.913000 24,978,250.00 24,750.00 FHLMC 1.25Yr 09/28/2018 1.050 5,000,000.00 4,982,950.00 99.533000 4,976,650.00 -6,300.00 FHLMC 1YrNc1MoB 06/22/2018 1.060 10,000,000.00 9,978,000.00 99.823000 9,982,300.00 4,300.00 FHLMC 1.5YrNc1MoB 01/25/2019 1.350 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.372000 9,937,200.00 -62,800.00 FHLMC 2.25YrNc6MoB 09/27/2019 1.500 6,250,000.00 6,248,750.00 98.658000 6,166,125.00 -82,625.00 FHLMC 2YrNc3MoB 07/26/2019 1.600 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 99.147000 4,957,350.00 -42,650.00 FHLMC 3YrNc3MoB 09/29/2020 1.800 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 98.505000 14,775,750.00 -224,250.00 FHLMC 2.75Yr 01/17/2020 1.500 25,000,000.00 24,942,750.00 98.574000 24,643,500.00 -299,250.00 FHLMC 2.75YrNc2MoB 06/29/2020 1.750 20,000,000.00 19,983,860.00 98.465000 19,693,000.00 -290,860.00 FHLMC 2YrNc5MoB 09/27/2019 1.500 20,000,000.00 19,953,600.00 98.822000 19,764,400.00 -189,200.00 FHLMC 2YrNc6MoB 09/27/2019 1.500 25,000,000.00 24,942,500.00 98.822000 24,705,500.00 -237,000.00 FHLMC 2YrNc8MoE 01/30/2019 .950 20,000,000.00 19,820,000.00 98.996000 19,799,200.00 -20,800.00 FHLMC 1.5YrNc5MoE 05/24/2019 1.080 10,000,000.00 9,895,000.00 98.740000 9,874,000.00 -21,000.00 FHLMC 2.5YrNc3MoB 08/10/2020 1.450 10,000,000.00 9,769,000.00 97.729000 9,772,900.00 3,900.00 1.281 424,500,000.00 423,672,260.00 98.931718 419,965,142.50 -3,707,117.50 FHLMC 2YrNc1MoB 10/24/2019 1.375 15,000,000.00 14,973,750.00 99.421000 14,913,150.00 -60,600.00 1.375 15,000,000.00 14,973,750.00 99.421000 14,913,150.00 -60,600.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 10/29/2020 1.250 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 98.359000 14,753,850.00 -246,150.00FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 02/26/2021 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.174000 9,817,400.00 -182,600.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 02/26/2021 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.757000 9,875,700.00 -124,300.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 06/09/2021 1.600 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.307000 14,596,050.00 -403,950.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 05/25/2021 1.500 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 97.314000 19,462,800.00 -537,200.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 06/16/2021 1.625 15,000,000.00 14,997,000.00 97.966000 14,694,900.00 -302,100.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 06/30/2021 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.275000 14,591,250.00 -408,750.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 06/30/2021 1.300 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.709000 14,656,350.00 -343,650.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 06/30/2021 1.500 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.034000 9,703,400.00 -296,600.00 FHLMC 3.5YrNc3MoB 12/30/2019 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.637000 14,945,550.00 -54,450.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 07/13/2021 1.250 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 98.565000 14,784,750.00 -215,250.00 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 07/27/2020 1.150 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.532000 14,629,800.00 -370,200.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 08/10/2021 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 96.928000 14,539,200.00 -460,800.00 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 08/10/2020 1.150 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.464000 14,619,600.00 -380,400.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 08/10/2021 1.350 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.308000 9,730,800.00 -269,200.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 08/25/2021 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.006000 14,550,900.00 -449,100.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 08/25/2021 1.500 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 96.308000 9,630,800.00 -369,200.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 08/25/2021 1.375 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 96.851000 14,527,650.00 -472,350.00 FHLMC 4.25YrNc3MoB 12/08/2020 1.250 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 97.448000 19,489,600.00 -510,400.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 08/24/2021 1.250 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 97.655000 19,531,000.00 -469,000.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 09/13/2021 1.500 16,500,000.00 16,500,000.00 97.249000 16,046,085.00 -453,915.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 09/30/2021 1.500 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 97.156000 19,431,200.00 -568,800.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 09/30/2021 1.450 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.297000 14,594,550.00 -405,450.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 09/30/2021 1.350 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 96.936000 14,540,400.00 -459,600.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 10/25/2021 1.375 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.013000 9,701,300.00 -298,700.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 10/25/2021 1.375 6,705,000.00 6,705,000.00 97.013000 6,504,721.65 -200,278.35 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 10/27/2020 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.958000 9,795,800.00 -204,200.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 10/27/2021 1.400 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 96.459000 14,468,850.00 -531,150.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 10/27/2021 1.400 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 96.459000 14,468,850.00 -531,150.00 3134G9U47 3134G95W3 3134G9R66 3134G72T7 3134G8QE2 3134G8QB8 3134G9XZ5 3134GAYK4 3134G9UM7 CLTR 1080: MGD RATE-A/366 CASH 1170: MGD RATE-A/360 CASH 1175: LAO-SINKING FND-A/360 3134G9NU7 1.225 1.670 1.670 CUSIP WFFXX WFJXX 3134G9JD0 3134G66M0 3134G7AE1 FIPXX 3134GAXZ2 TMPXX CJPXX Month End Portfolio Holdings Fund: 1 POOL FUND Yield To Mat Modified Duration Years To Maturity FRGXX 1.438 .003 .003 1060: MMKT ACCTS-A/366 1.417 .003 .003 FGTXX 1.434 .003 .003 GOFXX 1.416 .003 .003 1.665 .003 .003 .003 .003 1.621 .003 .003 .003 .0031.619 1.620 .000 .003 1.596 .003 .003 1.547 .003 .003 1.596 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 .003 1.670 .003 1.670 .003 .003 2.031 .972 2.211 2.031 .972 2.211 1.524 .372 .378 1.524 .372 .378 1.115 .660 .668 1.165 .122 .123 1.428 1.314 1.334 1.418 1.314 1.334 1.256 .207 .208 1.515 .332 .334 912828XF2 1.803 .575 .586 912828S68 912828WD8 2.048 .905 .915 1.439 .589 .596 1.230 .226 .227 1.259 .226 .227 1.050 .572 .581 1.050 .572 .581 1.000 .398 .4001.300 .985 .995 1.270 .985 .995 1.500 1.494 1.532 1.125 .245 .247 1.000 .302 .304 .820 .303 .304 1.250 1.302 1.321 1.050 .321 .323 1.250 1.870 1.907 1.200 2.061 2.107 1.370 2.582 2.658 2.671 1.238 .302 .304 1.181 .112 .112 1.440 2.595 1.300 .492 .496 1.267 .226 .227 3134GAK78 1.350 .808 .822 3134G9VF1 1.509 1.467 1.4933134GBWH1 1.600 1.297 1.3213134GBYS5 1.800 2.428 2.501 3137EAEE5 1.602 1.758 1.800 3134GBK35 1.780 2.182 2.249 3134GBG30 1.620 1.466 1.493 3134GBTX0 1.621 1.466 1.493 3134G92B2 1.734 .821 .836 3134GBG30 1.809 1.129 1.148 3134G9W37 2.421 2.294 2.364 3134G9NH6 1.476 1.548 1.567 3134GAPS7 1.402 1.166 1.193 1.250 2.839 2.912 1.476 1.548 1.567 1.250 2.520 2.584 1.250 2.839 2.912 1.500 3.050 3.153 1.600 3.082 3.195 1.630 3.106 3.214 1.500 3.149 3.252 1.300 3.162 3.252 1.500 3.149 3.252 1.500 1.722 1.751 1.250 3.199 3.288 1.150 2.281 2.326 1.500 3.269 3.364 1.150 2.317 2.364 3134G9T23 1.350 3.272 3.364 3134G9S57 1.500 3.298 3.405 1.500 3.298 3.405 1.375 3.306 3.405 3134GAEB6 1.250 2.624 2.693 3134G96A0 1.250 3.312 3.403 3134GADP6 1.500 3.348 3.458 3134GAEG5 1.500 3.397 3.504 3134GAKY9 1.450 3.401 3.504 3134GAET7 1.350 3.407 3.504 3134GAPM0 1.375 3.449 3.573 3134GANB6 1.375 3.449 3.573 3134GAPA6 1.250 2.510 2.578 3134GAPM0 1.400 3.452 3.578 3134GAQV9 1.400 3.452 3.578 3134GAQV9 3134G9UH8 3134G9B55 3134G9Q67 3134G9C70 TMPXX 3134G9Q75 3134G7S77 3134G8TG4 3130A9C90 3134G9VA2 3134G8V97 3134GABZ6 3134GAVF8 1465: FHLMC-STEP%-S30/360 912828U40 912828W30 1460: FHLMC-STEP%-Q30/360 912828XA3 3134G72T7 3134G8L64 1065: CLTR-A/366 9128282K5 9128282K5 1425: FHLMC-Fxd-S 30/360 LAO 1300: U.S. TREASURY BILL 912796NQ8 1310: U.S. TREASURY BOND 3134G8KU2 3134G9JX6 3134G9JW8 3134G9UX3 3134G9XA0 3134G9S40 3134G8L31 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 9 73 Description Maturity Date Coupon Par Value Book Value Market Price Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss CUSIP Month End Portfolio Holdings Yield To Mat Modified Duration Years To Maturity FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 10/28/2021 1.250 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.361000 9,836,100.00 -163,900.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 10/27/2021 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 96.659000 14,498,850.00 -501,150.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 10/27/2021 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 96.659000 14,498,850.00 -501,150.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 10/27/2021 1.400 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 96.600000 9,660,000.00 -340,000.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 11/10/2021 1.550 17,000,000.00 17,000,000.00 96.778000 16,452,260.00 -547,740.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 10/27/2021 1.400 14,000,000.00 14,000,000.00 96.600000 13,524,000.00 -476,000.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 11/30/2021 1.500 4,500,000.00 4,500,000.00 96.699000 4,351,455.00 -148,545.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 11/26/2021 1.550 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 96.724000 19,344,800.00 -655,200.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 12/09/2021 1.500 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.593000 9,759,300.00 -240,700.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 12/09/2021 1.650 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 98.156000 19,631,200.00 -368,800.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 12/30/2021 1.900 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.747000 9,774,700.00 -225,300.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 12/30/2021 1.900 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.747000 9,774,700.00 -225,300.00 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 02/24/2020 1.750 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.013000 20,002,600.00 2,600.00 FHLMC 3.5Yr 10/29/2020 1.250 7,125,000.00 7,108,968.75 98.359000 7,008,078.75 -100,890.00 FHLMC 3.5YrNc6MoB 10/27/2020 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.664000 14,949,600.00 -50,400.00 FHLMC 3YrNc3MoB 04/27/2020 1.500 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.143000 9,914,300.00 -85,700.00 FHLMC 3YrNc3MoB 04/27/2020 1.500 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 98.230000 19,646,000.00 -354,000.00 FHLMC 3YrNc3MoB 05/22/2020 1.500 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.839000 9,883,900.00 -116,100.00 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 05/22/2020 1.600 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 98.779000 19,755,800.00 -244,200.00 FHLMC 4YrNc6MoB 02/24/2021 1.650 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 98.572000 14,785,800.00 -214,200.00 FHLMC 3YrNc6MoB 11/24/2020 1.600 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 98.579000 14,786,850.00 -213,150.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 06/29/2022 2.050 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 98.223000 19,644,600.00 -355,400.00 FHLMC 5YrNc6MoB 06/22/2022 2.000 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.620000 14,643,000.00 -357,000.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 07/05/2022 2.000 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 98.236000 19,647,200.00 -352,800.00 FHLMC 3.5YrNc3MoB 01/20/2021 1.500 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.716000 9,871,600.00 -128,400.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 07/27/2022 2.050 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 97.928000 19,585,600.00 -414,400.00 FHLMC 5YrNc3MoB 07/27/2022 2.100 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 98.376000 19,675,200.00 -324,800.00 1.527 805,830,000.00 805,810,968.75 97.736427 787,589,450.40 -18,221,518.35 FNMA 3.5YrNc6MoB 12/16/2019 1.500 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 98.691000 4,934,550.00 -65,450.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoE 07/13/2020 1.350 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.740000 9,774,000.00 -226,000.00 FNMA 3.25YrNc6MoB 09/30/2019 1.250 7,500,000.00 7,500,000.00 98.508000 7,388,100.00 -111,900.00 FNMA 2YrNc6MoE 07/27/2018 .800 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.657000 14,948,550.00 -51,450.00 FNMA 3YrNc6MoE 07/26/2019 1.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.413000 9,841,300.00 -158,700.00 FNMA 3YrNc6MoE 07/26/2019 1.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.413000 9,841,300.00 -158,700.00 FNMA 2.5YrNc6MoE 01/25/2019 .875 7,500,000.00 7,495,350.00 99.034000 7,427,550.00 -67,800.00 FNMA 3YrNc1YrE 07/26/2019 1.050 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 98.477000 14,771,550.00 -228,450.00 FNMA 3.5YrNc1YrE 07/26/2019 1.125 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 98.574000 24,643,500.00 -356,500.00 FNMA 3Yr 10/24/2019 1.000 10,000,000.00 9,973,200.00 98.027000 9,802,700.00 -170,500.00 FNMA 3YrNc6MoB 11/25/2019 1.400 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.591000 9,859,100.00 -140,900.00 FNMA 1Yr 05/21/2018 .875 10,000,000.00 9,968,300.00 99.884000 9,988,400.00 20,100.00 FNMA 3Yr 07/30/2020 1.500 10,000,000.00 9,969,700.00 97.995000 9,799,500.00 -170,200.00 FNMA 2Yr 08/28/2019 1.500 10,000,000.00 10,019,600.00 98.977000 9,897,700.00 -121,900.00 FNMA 2.16Yr2MoB 01/27/2020 1.650 5,000,000.00 4,983,850.00 98.594000 4,929,700.00 -54,150.00 FNMA 1.4YrNC5MoB 05/29/2019 1.300 10,000,000.00 9,922,200.00 98.989000 9,898,900.00 -23,300.00 FNMA 1.25Yr 02/26/2019 1.000 25,000,000.00 24,770,250.00 98.952000 24,738,000.00 -32,250.00 FNMA 2Yr 01/21/2020 1.625 15,000,000.00 14,910,900.00 98.838000 14,825,700.00 -85,200.00 FNMA 2.25Yr 03/06/2020 1.750 11,082,000.00 11,042,326.44 98.701000 10,938,044.82 -104,281.62 FNMA 4.83Yr 10/05/2022 2.000 15,000,000.00 14,782,200.00 97.218000 14,582,700.00 -199,500.00 FNMA 5Yr 01/19/2023 2.375 10,000,000.00 9,944,100.00 98.743000 9,874,300.00 -69,800.00 1.298 246,082,000.00 245,281,976.44 98.627752 242,705,144.82 -2,576,831.62 FNMA 4.25YrNc6MoB 09/09/2020 1.400 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.380000 14,607,000.00 -393,000.00 1.400 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.380000 14,607,000.00 -393,000.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoB 03/09/2020 1.500 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.128000 14,869,200.00 -130,800.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoB 03/30/2020 2.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.725000 9,972,500.00 -27,500.00 FNMA 5YrNc6MoB 03/30/2021 1.750 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.283000 14,592,450.00 -407,550.00 FNMA 5YrNc6MoB 06/09/2021 1.550 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.483000 14,622,450.00 -377,550.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoB 06/30/2020 1.150 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 98.094000 19,618,800.00 -381,200.00 FNMA 5YrNc6MoB 07/27/2021 1.250 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 96.330000 14,449,500.00 -550,500.00 FNMA 5YrNc6MoB 07/27/2021 1.250 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 96.558000 19,311,600.00 -688,400.00 FNMA 4YrNc6MoB 11/24/2020 1.125 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.125000 14,568,750.00 -431,250.00 1.405 125,000,000.00 125,000,000.00 97.604200 122,005,250.00 -2,994,750.00 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 06/20/2018 1.250 3,719,720.08 3,719,720.08 99.878000 3,715,182.02 -4,538.06 FHLB 2.5YrNc1YrE 09/28/2018 1.100 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 99.557000 4,977,850.00 -22,150.00 FHLB 5Yr 04/05/2021 1.375 5,000,000.00 4,996,350.00 96.913000 4,845,650.00 -150,700.00 FHLB 4Yr 04/06/2020 1.200 10,000,000.00 9,996,000.00 97.718000 9,771,800.00 -224,200.00 FHLB 2Yr 08/07/2018 .625 5,000,000.00 4,989,600.00 99.534000 4,976,700.00 -12,900.00 FHLB 2Yr 08/07/2018 .625 25,000,000.00 24,948,000.00 99.534000 24,883,500.00 -64,500.00 FHLB 2Yr 08/07/2018 .625 10,000,000.00 9,979,200.00 99.534000 9,953,400.00 -25,800.00 FHLB 2YrNc1YrE 11/23/2018 1.000 9,500,000.00 9,500,000.00 99.331000 9,436,445.00 -63,555.00 FHLB 3Yr 08/05/2019 .875 15,000,000.00 14,971,200.00 98.203000 14,730,450.00 -240,750.00 FHLB 2Yr 10/01/2018 .875 10,000,000.00 9,993,200.00 99.440000 9,944,000.00 -49,200.00 FHLB 1.25YrNc6MoB 05/10/2018 1.000 9,500,000.00 9,483,850.00 99.918000 9,492,210.00 8,360.00 FHLB 2.25YrNc2YrE 07/26/2019 1.375 10,000,000.00 9,986,000.00 98.797000 9,879,700.00 -106,300.00 FHLB 2Yr 07/12/2019 1.460 10,000,000.00 9,995,400.00 99.064000 9,906,400.00 -89,000.00 FHLB 2.75YrNc9MoE 05/22/2020 1.600 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 98.404000 4,920,200.00 -79,800.00 FHLB 3YrNc1YrE 08/28/2020 2.000 10,000,000.00 10,061,000.00 99.315000 9,931,500.00 -129,500.00 FHLB 3YrNc1YrE 08/28/2020 1.650 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 98.273000 4,913,650.00 -86,350.00 FHLB 2YrNc3MoB 08/28/2019 1.550 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 99.138000 4,956,900.00 -43,100.00 FHLB 2Yr 03/08/2019 1.500 10,000,000.00 10,022,300.00 99.404000 9,940,400.00 -81,900.00 FHLB 2.5Yr 03/29/2019 1.360 10,000,000.00 10,001,500.00 99.193000 9,919,300.00 -82,200.00 FHLB 1.5Yr 02/08/2019 1.350 12,500,000.00 12,491,375.00 99.336000 12,417,000.00 -74,375.00 FHLB 1Yr 10/01/2018 .875 50,000,000.00 49,730,692.00 99.440000 49,720,000.00 -10,692.00 FHLB 2.5Yr 05/29/2020 1.613 10,000,000.00 9,950,500.00 98.401000 9,840,100.00 -110,400.00 FHLB 2.58YrNc1MoB 06/29/2020 1.650 5,350,000.00 5,321,270.50 98.407000 5,264,774.50 -56,496.00 FHLB 1.25Yr 03/08/2019 1.500 15,000,000.00 14,950,500.00 99.404000 14,910,600.00 -39,900.00 FHLB 8Mo 08/08/2018 .950 15,000,000.00 14,938,650.00 99.647000 14,947,050.00 8,400.00 FHLB 4.5 Yr 06/10/2022 2.125 7,975,000.00 7,955,620.75 97.848000 7,803,378.00 -152,242.75 FHLB 9Mo 09/28/2018 1.250 40,000,000.00 39,862,400.00 99.630000 39,852,000.00 -10,400.00 FHLB 3Yr 01/25/2021 2.200 15,000,000.00 14,994,900.00 99.458000 14,918,700.00 -76,200.00 FHLB 1.33Yr 05/28/2019 1.375 10,000,000.00 9,921,300.00 99.080000 9,908,000.00 -13,300.00 FHLB 3Yr 03/12/2021 2.375 10,000,000.00 9,968,000.00 99.865000 9,986,500.00 18,500.00 FHLB 3Yr 03/12/2021 2.375 10,000,000.00 9,966,500.00 99.865000 9,986,500.00 20,000.00 FHLB 2.5YrNc3MoB 09/15/2020 2.500 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 99.918000 4,995,900.00 -4,100.00 FHLB 4.08Yr 03/11/2022 2.500 10,000,000.00 9,954,700.00 99.500000 9,950,000.00 -4,700.00 FHLB 2YrNc3MoB 03/20/2020 2.350 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.860000 9,986,000.00 -14,000.00 FHLB 10Mo 01/16/2019 1.250 23,155,000.00 22,988,052.45 99.326000 22,998,935.30 10,882.85 FHLB 2.83YrNc1.33YrE 01/29/2021 2.250 20,000,000.00 19,833,600.00 99.204000 19,840,800.00 7,200.00 1.391 441,699,720.08 440,471,380.78 99.257811 438,421,474.82 -2,049,905.96 FHLB 3YrNcMoB 08/15/2019 1.500 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.674000 24,918,500.00 -81,500.00 1.500 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.674000 24,918,500.00 -81,500.00 3130A8PK3 3130A8PK3 313383EP2 3130A8PK3 1765: FHLB-STEP%-S 30/360 3136G3A62 3136G3XT7 3136G3ZW8 3130A8XH1 3130ABB21 3130ABRS7 3133782M2 3130A8Y72 3130AAE46 3130ADG48 3134GBWS7 3134GBSD5 3136G3Y74 3135G0J53 3135G0A78 3136G3WC5 3130A9AE1 3130ABZE9 3130AC3J1 3135G0UU5 3136G3SY2 3134GAYG3 1.250 3.467 3.581 3134GASF2 1.500 3.444 3.578 3134GARL0 1.500 3.444 3.5783134GASF2 3134GATA2 1.400 3.452 3.578 1.550 3.475 3.616 3134GATA2 1.400 3.452 3.578 1.500 3.537 3.671 3134GAYF5 1.550 3.519 3.660 3134GAUA0 1.500 3.560 3.696 1.650 3.547 3.696 1.900 3.587 3.753 1.900 3.587 3.753 1.750 1.862 1.904 3134GAA87 3134GAZ49 1.327 2.519 2.5843134G7S77 1.500 2.503 2.578 3134GBHN5 1.500 2.020 2.077 3134GBGB2 1.500 2.020 2.077 1.500 2.089 2.145 1.600 2.086 2.145 3134GBMP4 3134GBPJ5 3134GBSE3 1.650 2.813 2.907 1.600 2.568 2.655 2.050 4.025 4.249 2.000 4.011 4.230 3134GBYK2 2.000 4.046 4.266 3134GBTE2 2.727 2.811 2.050 4.102 4.326 2.100 4.097 4.326 1.500 1.528 3.119 3.231 3134GBYN6 1.000 1.500 1.674 1.712 2.288 1.250 1.481 1.501 .800 .322 .323 1.350 2.235 1.000 1.305 1.321 1.305 1.321 .900 .811 .822 1.541 1.567 1.305 1.3211.050 1.400 1.618 1.655 1.125 1.304 1.321 1.091 1.181 .139 .140 3135G0T60 1.604 2.275 2.334 1.400 1.387 1.411 1.800 1.782 1.827 1.833 1.141 1.162 1.761 .892 .910 4.808 1.911 1.765 1.811 1.913 1.887 1.934 2.392 2.447 2.322 4.244 4.518 2.447 2.495 4.488 3136G3SG1 1.905 1.942 2.000 1.962 2.000 1.500 1.400 1.465 1.618 1.670 1.400 2.392 3.237 1.750 2.923 2.741 1.150 2.209 2.252 3.326 3.237 3.326 1.250 1.125 2.591 3.000 1.550 3.085 3.195 1.390 2.920 3.016 1.407 1.250 2.672 1.100 .493 .496 .222.220 2.655 .726 .352 .353 1.210 1.972 2.019 1.250 .726 .352 .353 .726 .352 .353 1.000 .639 .649 .908 .498 .504 .940 1.332 1.348 1.154 .109 .110 1.300 1.321 1.483 1.260 1.282 1.444 1.600 2.093 2.145 1.790 2.339 2.414 1.650 2.348 2.414 1.550 1.386 1.411 1.351 .926 .937 1.350 .984 .995 1.400 .844 .860 1.446 .497 .504 1.813 2.107 2.164 1.861 2.191 2.249 1.766 .924 .937 1.568 .353 .356 2.182 3.963 4.197 1.711 .491 .496 2.212 2.706 2.825 1.972 1.137 1.159 2.484 2.825 2.951 2.489 2.825 2.951 2.500 2.365 2.463 3.948 2.350 1.912 1.973 2.619 3.727 .797 2.553 2.711 2.836 2.121 .780 1.3261.628 1.285 1.375 1.500 1.360 1.375 1.500 1.360 3134GATB0 3130A7H57 3130A7PV1 3130ADR53 3134GBKC5 3130ABQ25 313378WG2 3130ADFW7 3130A0XD7 3130ACJX3 3130ADPR7 3134GBWD0 3135G0WJ8 3135G0T78 3134GAA87 3130ABF92 3136G3RL1 3130ACBD5 3130A9AE1 3135G0S46 3136G1MG1 3134GBTD4 3134GAYR9 3135G0T94 3130AC3D4 3130A0XD7 3136G0YK1 3133782M2 313379Q69 3136G4GU1 3130A8WS8 1760: FHLB-STEP%-Q 30/360 3130AC2C7 3130ABY34 3130A8WT6 3136G3DV4 3130ABYZ3 1525: FNMA-Fxd-S 30/360 3136G3XE0 3135G0M26 1560: FNMA-STEP%-Q 30/360 1565: FNMA-STEP%-S 30/360 3136G3BX2 3136G3P25 3135G0R39 3135G0M26 3136G3XS9 3136G3EH4 3136G3PB5 3136G3TG0 1725: FHLB-Fxd-S 30/360 3130A7PU3 3130A8UH4 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 10 74 Description Maturity Date Coupon Par Value Book Value Market Price Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss CUSIP Month End Portfolio Holdings Yield To Mat Modified Duration Years To Maturity FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 09/30/2021 1.350 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.580000 14,637,000.00 -363,000.00 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 09/30/2021 1.350 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.543000 14,631,450.00 -368,550.00 FHLB 5YrNc6MoB 12/09/2021 1.600 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.291000 9,729,100.00 -270,900.00 FHLB 5YrNc6MoB 12/09/2021 1.600 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.291000 9,729,100.00 -270,900.00 FHLB 5YrNc1YrB 12/08/2021 1.700 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 98.205000 14,730,750.00 -269,250.00 FHLB 5YrNc6MoB 07/26/2022 2.000 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 98.304000 14,745,600.00 -254,400.00 FHLB 5YrNc6MoB 02/09/2022 1.750 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 98.480000 19,696,000.00 -304,000.00 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 08/24/2022 2.000 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.582000 9,758,200.00 -241,800.00 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 08/24/2022 2.000 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 97.478000 14,621,700.00 -378,300.00 FHLB 5YrNc3MoB 05/24/2022 1.800 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 98.473000 19,694,600.00 -305,400.00 1.717 145,000,000.00 145,000,000.00 97.912759 141,973,500.00 -3,026,500.00 FHLB 4Yr 09/22/2020 2.004 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.412000 10,041,200.00 41,200.00 FHLB 4Yr 09/22/2020 2.004 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.412000 15,061,800.00 61,800.00 FHLB 4Yr 09/28/2020 2.027 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.413000 10,041,300.00 41,300.00 FHLB 4Yr 09/28/2020 2.027 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.413000 15,061,950.00 61,950.00 2.016 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.412500 50,206,250.00 206,250.00 FHLB 3Yr 07/01/2020 1.820 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.493000 25,123,250.00 123,250.00 1.820 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.493000 25,123,250.00 123,250.00 FFCB DISC NOTE 10/24/2018 1.620 20,000,000.00 19,705,700.00 98.890000 19,778,000.00 72,300.00 FFCB DISC NOTE 09/05/2018 1.600 25,000,000.00 24,704,444.44 99.168000 24,792,000.00 87,555.56 1.609 45,000,000.00 44,410,144.44 99.044444 44,570,000.00 159,855.56 FFCB 3YrNc3MoA 10/15/2018 1.110 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 99.591000 4,979,550.00 -20,450.00 FFCB 3YrNc1YrA 03/29/2019 1.250 10,310,000.00 10,310,000.00 99.125000 10,219,787.50 -90,212.50 FFCB 4YrNc1YrA 04/27/2020 1.420 7,700,000.00 7,700,000.00 97.791000 7,529,907.00 -170,093.00 FFCB 2.5YrNc3MoA 01/28/2019 1.110 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.288000 24,822,000.00 -178,000.00 FFCB 4YrNc1YrA 08/24/2020 1.320 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.478000 9,747,800.00 -252,200.00 FFCB 4YrNc1YrA 09/21/2020 1.350 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.435000 9,743,500.00 -256,500.00 FFCB 4YrNc1YrA 10/13/2020 1.340 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 96.954000 14,543,100.00 -456,900.00 FFCB 4YrNc3MoA 11/02/2020 1.380 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 97.266000 9,726,600.00 -273,400.00 FFCB 4YrNc1YrA 12/07/2020 1.770 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.232000 9,823,200.00 -176,800.00 FFCB 3YrNc1YrE 02/27/2020 1.710 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.589000 9,858,900.00 -141,100.00 FFCB 1.5Yr 11/21/2018 1.250 10,000,000.00 9,987,200.00 99.518000 9,951,800.00 -35,400.00 FFCB 1.5Yr 11/21/2018 1.250 10,000,000.00 9,990,000.00 99.518000 9,951,800.00 -38,200.00 FFCB 2.5Yr 01/17/2020 1.520 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.649000 9,864,900.00 -135,100.00 FFCB 3Yr 08/10/2020 1.550 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 97.986000 4,899,300.00 -100,700.00 FFCB 2Yr 08/28/2019 1.400 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 98.844000 4,942,200.00 -57,800.00 FFCB 2Yr 06/24/2019 1.520 5,000,000.00 5,010,640.00 99.207000 4,960,350.00 -50,290.00 FFCB 2Yr 08/28/2019 1.400 10,000,000.00 9,998,000.00 98.844000 9,884,400.00 -113,600.00 FFCB 3Yr 03/20/2020 1.450 20,000,000.00 19,970,400.00 98.283000 19,656,600.00 -313,800.00 FFCB 3Yr 10/26/2020 1.750 20,000,000.00 19,994,000.00 98.292000 19,658,400.00 -335,600.00 FFCB 2Yr 11/06/2019 1.600 25,000,000.00 24,967,247.50 98.979000 24,744,750.00 -222,497.50 FFCB 4Yr 01/12/2022 2.200 10,000,000.00 9,938,000.00 98.589000 9,858,900.00 -79,100.00 FFCB 3Yr 03/01/2021 2.500 10,000,000.00 9,999,700.00 100.028000 10,002,800.00 3,100.00 1.502 253,010,000.00 252,865,187.50 98.561537 249,370,544.50 -3,494,643.00 FFCB 5Yr 10/10/2019 1.810 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.168000 15,025,200.00 25,200.00 FFCB 5Yr 10/10/2019 1.810 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.168000 25,042,000.00 42,000.00 FFCB 5Yr 10/10/2019 1.810 10,000,000.00 9,997,560.00 100.168000 10,016,800.00 19,240.00 FFCB 3Yr 02/25/2019 2.142 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.258000 15,038,700.00 38,700.00 FFCB 3Yr 02/25/2019 2.142 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.258000 5,012,900.00 12,900.00 FFCB 2.5Yr 09/17/2018 2.028 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.160000 5,008,000.00 8,000.00 FFCB 3 Yr 04/04/2019 1.886 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.231000 25,057,750.00 57,750.00 FFCB 4Yr 04/01/2020 1.899 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.486000 25,121,500.00 121,500.00 FFCB 4Yr 04/13/2020 1.995 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.509000 50,254,500.00 254,500.00 FFCB 5Yr 05/25/2021 2.142 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.682000 10,068,200.00 68,200.00 FFCB 5Yr 05/25/2021 2.142 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.682000 10,068,200.00 68,200.00 FFCB 3Yr 07/15/2019 1.967 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.312000 5,015,600.00 15,600.00 FFCB 3Yr 10/11/2019 1.920 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.328000 15,049,200.00 49,200.00 FFCB 3Yr 10/24/2019 2.052 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.282000 15,042,300.00 42,300.00 FFCB 3Yr 11/14/2019 1.935 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.328000 15,049,200.00 49,200.00 FFCB 3Yr 11/14/2019 1.935 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.328000 15,049,200.00 49,200.00 FFCB 3.9Yr 01/18/2022 2.048 15,000,000.00 15,139,095.00 100.518000 15,077,700.00 -61,395.00 FFCB 5Yr 02/21/2023 1.911 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.860000 14,979,000.00 -21,000.00 FFCB 3Yr 03/12/2021 1.750 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.927000 14,989,050.00 -10,950.00 1.947 305,000,000.00 305,136,655.00 100.316393 305,965,000.00 828,345.00 FAMCA 1 Yr 05/15/2018 1.250 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.979000 24,994,750.00 -5,250.00 FAMCA 1Yr 05/10/2018 1.150 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.957000 24,989,250.00 -10,750.00 FAMCA 1YrNc6MoB 04/19/2018 1.250 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.984000 24,996,000.00 -4,000.00 FAMCA 1YrNc6MoB 04/19/2018 1.250 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.984000 24,996,000.00 -4,000.00 FAMCA 1YrNc6MoB 04/19/2018 1.250 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.984000 14,997,600.00 -2,400.00 FAMCA 2Yr 08/15/2018 1.250 5,000,000.00 4,996,000.00 99.817000 4,990,850.00 -5,150.00 FAMCA 1.25Yr 09/14/2018 1.320 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.754000 14,963,100.00 -36,900.00 FAMCA 2Yr 08/20/2019 1.440 5,000,000.00 4,999,800.00 98.899000 4,944,950.00 -54,850.00 FAMCA 2Yr 09/26/2019 1.420 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 98.754000 9,875,400.00 -124,600.00 FAMCA 1.4Yr 05/15/2019 1.810 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 99.590000 9,959,000.00 -41,000.00 FAMCA 1.5Yr 06/24/2019 1.860 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 99.576000 19,915,200.00 -84,800.00 FAMCA 2.08Yr 02/03/2020 1.970 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 99.301000 14,895,150.00 -104,850.00 FAMCA 1Yr 01/29/2019 1.900 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 99.814000 24,953,500.00 -46,500.00 1.459 220,000,000.00 219,995,800.00 99.759432 219,470,750.00 -525,050.00 FAMCA 1 Yr 04/03/2018 1.616 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.001000 50,000,500.00 500.00 FAMCA 2.5 Yr 06/02/2020 1.810 25,000,000.00 25,063,500.00 100.332000 25,083,000.00 19,500.00 1.681 75,000,000.00 75,063,500.00 100.111333 75,083,500.00 20,000.00 FAMCA 3Yr 03/19/2019 2.248 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.267000 10,026,700.00 26,700.00 FAMCA 3Yr 07/26/2019 1.892 15,000,000.00 15,000,000.00 100.414000 15,062,100.00 62,100.00 2.034 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.355200 25,088,800.00 88,800.00 CONNECTICUT STATE 08/01/2018 2.250 25,000,000.00 25,613,250.00 102.453000 25,613,250.00 0.00 TEXAS STATE 10/01/2019 1.497 5,000,000.00 5,000,000.00 100.000000 5,000,000.00 0.00 OHIO STATE 05/01/2018 1.250 9,535,000.00 9,597,549.60 100.656000 9,597,549.60 0.00 HAWAII STATE 04/01/2019 1.380 4,990,000.00 4,990,000.00 100.000000 4,990,000.00 0.00 HAWAII STATE 04/01/2020 1.660 5,055,000.00 5,055,000.00 100.000000 5,055,000.00 0.00 HAWAII STATE 04/01/2018 1.250 4,925,000.00 4,933,569.50 100.174000 4,933,569.50 0.00 RHODE ISLAND STATE 05/01/2018 1.250 2,595,000.00 2,607,144.60 100.468000 2,607,144.60 0.00 RHODE ISLAND STATE 05/01/2020 1.625 2,660,000.00 2,670,719.80 100.403000 2,670,719.80 0.00 3133EGF67 3132X0ED9 1900: FFCB-DISC NOTE 1770: FHLB-Var-Q A/360 3130A8NF6 3133EFE52 3133EFE52 3130A9DA6 3133EGCE3 3132X0SB8 3132X0SB8 3133EF2Z9 3133EFM61 3133EHUL5 3133EHWN9 1930: FFCB-Var-M A/360 3133EHRK1 3133EHJ95 3133EHNY5 3130AA2T4 3130AA5A2 3130ABQV1 1925: FFCB-Fxd-S 30/360 3133EFV38 677522HW7 3133EGC94 3133EHNY5 3133EG4C6 3133EEZ60 3133EGZS7 3133EHP98 1.420 1.465 1.970 3130ABVZ6 1.750 3.704 2.450 2.016 1.350 3.407 3.504 3.407 3.504 1.600 3.551 3.696 1.350 1.600 3.551 3.696 4.403 1.700 3.540 3.693 2.000 4.104 4.323 3.866 2.000 4.181 1.800 2.000 4.181 4.403 2.482 3.973 4.151 1.718 2.004 3.766 3.929 2.467 2.004 2.450 2.482 2.027 2.467 2.499 2.499 1.820 2.467 2.255 2.459 2.491 2.027 1.820 2.467 2.255 1.644 .558 .567 1.619 .426 .433 1.630 .485 .492 .533 .542 1.250 .985 .995 1.110 2.023 2.077 1.110 .818 .830 3133EF5D5 1.420 2.349 2.403 1.350 2.423 2.479 1.340 2.467 2.540 1.320 2.595 1.770 2.595 2.690 1.710 1.864 1.912 1.380 2.518 .644 1.322 .632 .644 1.520 1.759 1.800 1.342 .632 2.364 1.400 1.388 1.411 1.400 1.211 1.233 1.550 2.302 1.388 1.411 3133EHZN6 1.511 1.933 1.973 3133EHWN9 1.410 1.760 2.483 2.575 1.667 1.561 1.603 2.365 3.588 3.789 2.501 2.791 2.921 1.526 1.827 1.881 1.810 1.520 1.529 3133EDXQ0 1.810 1.520 1.529 3133EDXQ0 1.825 1.520 1.529 2.142 .896 .907 2.142 .896 1.899 2.066 2.005 .907 2.028 .460 .466 2.142 3.109 3.153 1.886 1.003 1.011 1.995 2.015 2.038 2.142 3.109 3.153 1.967 1.281 1.290 2.052 1.553 1.567 1.920 1.517 1.532 1.935 1.607 1.625 1.935 1.607 1.625 1.798 3.662 3.805 1.911 4.683 4.899 1.750 2.865 2.951 .052 1.935 1.983 2.012 1.250 .122 .123 .110 1.250 .052 1.250 .052 .052 1.150 .109 .052 1.250 .052 1.442 1.366 1.389 1.320 .373 .375 1.490 1.320 1.810 1.099 1.123 1.860 1.206 1.233 .454 .458 1.792 1.847 1.900 .815 .833 1.616 .008 .008 1.460 .551 .563 1.695 2.133 2.175 1.643 .718 .732 2.248 .959 .967 1.892 1.306 1.321 2.034 1.167 1.180 .084 .085 1.398 .334 .337 .986 1.003 1.660 1.946 2.005 1.497 1.470 1.504 .940 .084 .085 1.520 2.028 2.088 1.160 .003 .003 1.010 1.380419792JG2 419792JH0 3132X0C41 76222RUK6 76222RUM2 3132X0SU6 3133EDXQ0 3130A9FR7 3130A9FR7 3132X0RB9 3132X0SB8 3132X0C74 3130AA2T4 3132X0RW3 3130AC4T8 3133EGNY7 3130ABZW9 3130AC6H2 3130A9FM8 3133EHAJ2 3133EGSA4 3133EGVK8 3132X0WY3 3132X0A50 3132X0WK3 3133EH6X6 3133EJEM7 3133EJDG1 3133EGXX8 3132X0UT6 3133EGCE3 3133EGYA7 3133EGLV5 3133EGF67 882723A33 419792JF4 20772JL34 3130A9DH1 3130A9FU0 1767: FHLB-Var-M A/360 313313L71 3133EFHH3 3133EJFS3 1950: FMAC-Fxd-S 30/360 313313E61 3133EFP84 3133EFT56 3133EGR49 3132X0F97 1965: FMAC-Var-M A/360 3132X0AT8 1975: FMAC-Var-Q A/360 3132X0EV9 2350: MUNIS-S 30/360 3132X0QY0 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 11 75 Description Maturity Date Coupon Par Value Book Value Market Price Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss CUSIP Month End Portfolio Holdings Yield To Mat Modified Duration Years To Maturity RHODE ISLAND STATE 05/01/2019 1.375 2,625,000.00 2,636,838.75 100.451000 2,636,838.75 0.00 CALIFORNIA STATE 04/01/2018 .900 41,290,000.00 41,120,711.00 99.590000 41,120,711.00 0.00 GEORGIA STATE 07/01/2020 3.000 6,825,000.00 7,254,770.25 106.297000 7,254,770.25 0.00 GEORGIA STATE 07/01/2018 3.000 6,345,000.00 6,602,480.10 104.058000 6,602,480.10 0.00 GEORGIA STATE 07/01/2019 3.000 6,580,000.00 6,943,874.00 105.530000 6,943,874.00 0.00 ARKANSAS STATE 06/01/2018 2.250 12,810,000.00 13,139,473.20 102.572000 13,139,473.20 0.00 ARKANSAS STATE 06/01/2019 2.000 13,470,000.00 13,837,192.20 102.726000 13,837,192.20 0.00 HAWAII STATE 10/01/2018 1.000 4,870,000.00 4,878,473.80 100.174000 4,878,473.80 0.00 HAWAII STATE 10/01/2019 1.151 2,250,000.00 2,253,262.50 100.145000 2,253,262.50 0.00 HAWAII STATE 10/01/2020 1.370 2,250,000.00 2,254,320.00 100.192000 2,254,320.00 0.00 CALIFORNIA STATE 11/01/2018 1.050 50,000,000.00 50,098,500.00 100.197000 50,098,500.00 0.00 OREGON STATE 05/01/2019 1.450 1,830,000.00 1,829,981.70 99.999000 1,829,981.70 0.00 OREGON STATE 04/01/2019 1.440 1,750,000.00 1,749,982.50 99.999000 1,749,982.50 0.00 OREGON STATE 04/01/2018 1.020 1,735,000.00 1,734,982.65 99.999000 1,734,982.65 0.00 OREGON STATE 05/01/2018 1.030 1,560,000.00 1,559,984.40 99.999000 1,559,984.40 0.00 CALIFORNIA STATE 04/01/2018 1.248 33,000,000.00 33,000,000.00 100.000000 33,000,000.00 0.00 WASHINGTON STATE 08/01/2018 1.350 1,620,000.00 1,620,000.00 100.000000 1,620,000.00 0.00 WASHINGTON STATE 08/01/2019 1.500 8,745,000.00 8,738,703.60 99.928000 8,738,703.60 0.00 SANTA CLARA COUNTY G.O.08/01/2018 1.650 33,510,000.00 33,510,000.00 100.000000 33,510,000.00 0.00 STATE OF CALIFORNIA 04/01/2021 2.625 14,400,000.00 14,688,720.00 102.005000 14,688,720.00 0.00 ALAMEDA COUNTY G.O.08/01/2020 2.562 17,600,000.00 17,600,000.00 100.000000 17,600,000.00 0.00 1.621 324,825,000.00 327,519,484.15 100.829519 327,519,484.15 0.00 NESTLE 04/25/2018 1.220 15,000,000.00 14,879,525.00 99.871333 14,980,700.00 101,175.00 DEXIA (GUARANTEE)05/07/2018 1.400 30,000,000.00 29,718,833.33 99.807000 29,942,100.00 223,266.67 APPLE 05/09/2018 1.350 35,000,000.00 34,695,500.00 99.796278 34,928,697.22 233,197.22 DEXIA (GUARANTEE)06/11/2018 1.500 35,000,000.00 34,617,916.67 99.601611 34,860,563.89 242,647.22 DEXIA (GUARANTEE)07/10/2018 1.520 25,000,000.00 24,719,222.22 99.400000 24,850,000.00 130,777.78 NATL SEC CLEARING CORP 05/29/2018 1.400 50,000,000.00 49,593,611.11 99.689056 49,844,527.78 250,916.67 MICROSOFT CORP 05/22/2018 1.450 50,000,000.00 49,605,277.78 99.726583 49,863,291.67 258,013.89 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 05/29/2018 1.550 25,000,000.00 24,787,951.39 99.689056 24,922,263.89 134,312.50 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 07/02/2018 1.660 25,000,000.00 24,761,375.00 99.448000 24,862,000.00 100,625.00 APPLE 05/22/2018 1.480 30,000,000.00 29,800,200.00 99.726583 29,917,975.00 117,775.00 NESTLE 07/18/2018 1.660 50,000,000.00 49,550,416.67 99.352000 49,676,000.00 125,583.33 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 09/25/2018 1.900 40,000,000.00 39,487,000.00 98.903583 39,561,433.33 74,433.33 DEXIA (GUARANTEE)05/14/2018 1.690 10,000,000.00 9,949,300.00 99.769472 9,976,947.22 27,647.22 NATL SEC CLEARING CORP 06/26/2018 1.700 25,000,000.00 24,825,277.78 99.517444 24,879,361.11 54,083.33 NESTLE 08/22/2018 1.690 35,000,000.00 34,663,173.61 99.114194 34,689,968.06 26,794.45 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 05/14/2018 1.750 10,000,000.00 9,948,958.33 99.769472 9,976,947.22 27,988.89 NATL SEC CLEARING CORP 06/06/2018 1.650 25,000,000.00 24,863,645.83 99.629667 24,907,416.67 43,770.84 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 05/15/2018 1.800 45,000,000.00 44,797,500.00 99.764111 44,893,850.00 96,350.00 NATL SEC CLEARING CORP 06/06/2018 1.730 25,000,000.00 24,882,263.89 99.629667 24,907,416.67 25,152.78 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 08/24/2018 2.150 25,000,000.00 24,737,222.22 99.101806 24,775,451.39 38,229.17 DEXIA (GUARANTEE)10/10/2018 2.140 30,000,000.00 29,611,233.33 98.746667 29,624,000.00 12,766.67 TOYOTA MOTOR CORP 06/04/2018 2.050 20,000,000.00 19,897,500.00 99.640889 19,928,177.78 30,677.78 WAL-MART STORES INC 05/21/2018 1.910 50,000,000.00 49,801,041.67 99.731944 49,865,972.22 64,930.55 DEXIA (GUARANTEE)11/28/2018 2.320 30,000,000.00 29,510,866.67 98.313000 29,493,900.00 -16,966.67 NATL SEC CLEARING CORP 06/18/2018 2.100 50,000,000.00 49,737,500.00 99.562333 49,781,166.67 43,666.67 APPLE 10/24/2018 2.110 45,000,000.00 44,430,300.00 98.655278 44,394,875.00 -35,425.00 CHEVRON 11/07/2018 2.290 45,000,000.00 44,341,625.00 98.563889 44,353,750.00 12,125.00 DEXIA (GUARANTEE)05/14/2018 1.800 35,000,000.00 34,916,000.00 99.769472 34,919,315.28 3,315.28 APPLE 05/22/2018 1.860 30,000,000.00 29,914,750.00 99.726583 29,917,975.00 3,225.00 EXXON MOBIL 05/14/2018 1.850 75,000,000.00 74,822,708.33 99.769472 74,827,104.17 4,395.84 1.775 1,020,000,000.00 1,011,867,695.83 99.443446 1,014,323,147.24 2,455,451.41 APPLE 05/03/2018 1.000 20,000,000.00 19,940,200.00 99.900000 19,980,000.00 39,800.00 WAL-MART 04/11/2018 1.125 21,875,000.00 21,846,781.25 99.973000 21,869,093.75 22,312.50 APPLE 05/03/2018 1.000 6,000,000.00 5,983,560.00 99.900000 5,994,000.00 10,440.00 WAL-MART 04/11/2018 1.125 6,000,000.00 5,991,780.00 99.973000 5,998,380.00 6,600.00 APPLE 05/03/2018 1.000 10,000,000.00 9,970,000.00 99.900000 9,990,000.00 20,000.00 APPLE 05/03/2018 1.000 5,000,000.00 4,983,750.00 99.900000 4,995,000.00 11,250.00 WAL-MART 04/11/2018 1.125 2,262,000.00 2,258,878.44 99.973000 2,261,389.26 2,510.82 APPLE 05/03/2018 1.000 27,920,000.00 27,858,296.80 99.900000 27,892,080.00 33,783.20 APPLE 05/03/2018 1.000 5,113,000.00 5,100,984.45 99.900000 5,107,887.00 6,902.55 APPLE 05/03/2018 1.000 5,038,000.00 5,026,966.78 99.900000 5,032,962.00 5,995.22 APPLE 05/03/2018 1.000 5,000,000.00 4,989,150.00 99.900000 4,995,000.00 5,850.00 APPLE 05/03/2018 1.000 10,000,000.00 9,979,400.00 99.900000 9,990,000.00 10,600.00 APPLE 05/03/2018 1.000 6,210,000.00 6,197,207.40 99.900000 6,203,790.00 6,582.60 MICROSOFT CORP 02/06/2020 1.850 6,350,000.00 6,297,739.50 99.003000 6,286,690.50 -11,049.00 MICROSOFT CORP 02/06/2020 1.850 6,000,000.00 5,951,100.00 99.003000 5,940,180.00 -10,920.00 MICROSOFT CORP 11/03/2020 2.000 25,000,000.00 24,649,750.00 98.336000 24,584,000.00 -65,750.00 MICROSOFT CORP 02/06/2020 1.850 3,000,000.00 2,971,440.00 99.003000 2,970,090.00 -1,350.00 APPLE 02/08/2019 1.550 22,840,000.00 22,684,688.00 99.226000 22,663,218.40 -21,469.60 MICROSOFT CORP 02/06/2020 1.850 4,097,000.00 4,057,013.28 99.003000 4,056,152.91 -860.37 MICROSOFT CORP 02/06/2020 1.850 8,000,000.00 7,920,160.00 99.003000 7,920,240.00 80.00 MICROSOFT CORP 08/08/2019 1.100 10,000,000.00 9,835,600.00 98.331000 9,833,100.00 -2,500.00 MICROSOFT CORP 02/06/2020 1.850 16,000,000.00 15,832,480.00 99.003000 15,840,480.00 8,000.00 JOHNSON & JOHNSON 03/01/2021 1.650 12,000,000.00 11,663,160.00 97.296000 11,675,520.00 12,360.00 MICROSOFT CORP 02/06/2020 1.850 10,000,000.00 9,887,000.00 99.003000 9,900,300.00 13,300.00 1.377 253,705,000.00 251,877,085.90 99.319901 251,979,553.82 102,467.92 TORONTO DOMINION 05/29/2018 1.450 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.000000 50,000,000.00 0.00 AUSTRALIA NZ BK GRP 05/18/2018 1.370 35,000,000.00 35,000,000.00 100.000000 35,000,000.00 0.00 AUSTRALIA NZ BK GRP 04/05/2018 1.350 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.000000 50,000,000.00 0.00 NORDEA BK 05/07/2018 1.480 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 NORDEA BK 07/18/2018 1.520 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 NATIONAL AUSTRALIAN BANK 08/02/2018 1.610 35,000,000.00 35,000,000.00 100.000000 35,000,000.00 0.00 SWEDBANK AB 06/04/2018 1.600 40,000,000.00 40,000,000.00 100.000000 40,000,000.00 0.00 SWEDBANK AB 06/05/2018 1.620 40,000,000.00 40,000,000.00 100.000000 40,000,000.00 0.00 TORONTO DOMINION 07/05/2018 1.700 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 NORDEA BK 07/10/2018 1.700 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.000000 20,000,000.00 0.00 SWEDBANK AB 06/20/2018 1.620 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 NORDEA BK 09/11/2018 1.740 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.000000 20,000,000.00 0.00 TORONTO DOMINION 09/18/2018 1.900 30,000,000.00 30,000,000.00 100.000000 30,000,000.00 0.00 NORDEA BK 05/23/2018 1.740 10,000,000.00 10,000,000.00 100.000000 10,000,000.00 0.00 TORONTO DOMINION 05/01/2018 1.720 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.000000 50,000,000.00 0.00 SWEDBANK AB 05/01/2018 1.700 45,000,000.00 45,000,000.00 100.000000 45,000,000.00 0.00 WESTPAC 11/02/2018 2.080 35,000,000.00 35,000,000.00 100.000000 35,000,000.00 0.00 NORDEA BK 05/07/2018 1.720 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 NORDEA BK 08/23/2018 2.000 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.000000 20,000,000.00 0.00 AUSTRALIA NZ BK GRP 09/12/2018 1.950 35,000,000.00 35,000,000.00 100.000000 35,000,000.00 0.00 TORONTO DOMINION 05/14/2018 1.910 30,000,000.00 30,000,000.00 100.000000 30,000,000.00 0.00 AUSTRALIA NZ BK GRP 10/31/2018 2.100 20,000,000.00 20,000,000.00 100.000000 20,000,000.00 0.00 SWEDBANK AB 05/14/2018 1.920 35,000,000.00 35,000,000.00 100.000000 35,000,000.00 0.00 NATIONAL AUSTRALIAN BANK 09/04/2018 2.130 50,000,000.00 50,000,000.00 100.000000 50,000,000.00 0.00 NORDEA BK 06/20/2018 2.150 40,000,000.00 40,000,000.00 100.000000 40,000,000.00 0.00 1.742 815,000,000.00 815,000,000.00 100.000000 815,000,000.00 0.00 16677KL76 931142DF7 89113XFV1 87019U7D5 87019U7M5 89113XVP6 89233HG24 03785EEN0 13063DAA6 419792ND4 041042ZT2 68609BXJ1 13063CP79 3733845L6 419792NE2 63763QFS1 419792NF9 68609BYC5 801546PC0 .100 .101 05252WMN0 1.370 .130 .132 1.350 .014 .014 1.450 .159 .162 1.798 2.921 2.469 1.798 1.855 1.866 .917 .948 2.646 2.818 .839 037833AJ9 037833AJ9 .090 .090 .090 594918BV5 1.396 1.531 2.543 1.255 1.804 2.137 89233HHQ0 2.483 .090 .0901.531 2.597 1.531 .090 .090 2.273 1.799 1.855 2.277 1.799 1.855 .090 1.510 .090 .090 .090 1.530 .090 .090 .090 1.306 .030 .030 1.356 1.264 .030 .030 1.290 .090 .090 .030 .030 1.261 .090 .090 1.280 .090 .090 1.854 .118 .121 1.789 .249 .255 .118 .121 03785EEN0 1.865 .140 .142 25214PF81 .555 .567 2.324 .591 .605 2.358 .647 .663 2.111 .212 .216 2.061 .174 .178 1.918 .137 .140 1.738 .180 .184 2.173 .391 .121 .395 1.759 1.706 .388 2.168 .517 .529 .400 1.808 1.712 .234 .118 .123.121 1.659 .180 .184 .121 .238 64105HHN5 89233HEE0 .478 .140 1.675 .294 1.925 .299 1.490 .142 .488 1.699 .118 1.067 1.085 1.127 .003 .003 1.220 2.255 .930 .251 .252 1.110 1.221 1.252 .840 .169 .170 1.024 1.146 1.170 2.507 .950 .578 .589 .911 .498 .504 1.101 1.478 1.504 .085 1.450 1.065 1.085 1.441 .985 1.003 1.337 1.030 1.021 .003 .003 1.248 .003 .003 .084 1.541 1.350 3733845J1 1.319 1.370 3733845K8 041042ZS4 .337 1.317 .710 .337 2.562 2.242 2.340 1.650 1.315 2.011 .277 .162 1.517 .159 .732 1.676 .250 .255 1.563 .159 .272 1.411 .142 .162 .140 .107 .068 .101.100 .194 .068 1.413 .197 3.005 1.36203785EE91 1.230 93974DV39 1.462 .105 25214PBZ5 1.537 .334 2.843 .334 2.436 2.164 .860 2.373 1.855 594918BV5 037833CE8 2.281 594918BV5 1.799 1.8552.354 76222RUL4 2.414 1.798 2.388 1.798 1.3292.288 25214PEY5 89233HEV2 59515NEN9 25215C3M1 89233HF41 594918BG8 594918BV5 594918BN3 .178 65590AMZ6 63253TM21 87019U7B9 1.855 1.855 1.356 1.620 .178 .181 .294 .299 1.610 .334 .340 1.520 1.600 .175 05252WMM2 65590AMW3 1.480 037833AJ9 68609BYB7 13063C4V9 68609BXK8 931142DF7 25214PEL3 64105HDR0 63763QEV5 25214PBD4 89233HEF7 037833AJ9 93114FEM2 64105HGJ5 63763QF69 63763QF69 478160BS2 594918BV5 30229BEE3 037833AJ9 037833AJ9 594918BV5 1.700 .258 .263 65590APV2 1.700 .272 .277 1.620 .218 .222 65590AQE9 1.740 .441 .449 1.900 .459 .468 1.740 .143 .145 1.720 .083 .085 1.700 .083 .085 2.080 .579 .592 65590ASC1 1.720 .100 .101 05252WNG4 2.000 .389 .397 1.950 .443 .452 65590ASK3 89113XXW9 1.910 .118 .121 2.100 .574 .586 1.920 .118 .121 2.130 .421 .430 2.150 .217 .222 1.742 .237 .242 89233HJR6 25214PDV2 13063DAC2 010878AL0 3020: COMMERCIAL PAPER 93974DV21 63763QFJ1 03785EKQ6 3130: CORP-Fxd-S 30/360 037833AJ9 594918BV5 037833AJ9 037833AJ9 037833AJ9 931142DF7 4500: NCD-Mat A/360 89113XSU9 65590ARU2 87019VCQ8 96121T6K9 89113XQR8 05252WNN9 63253TN95 65590ATX4 87019VDY0 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 12 76 Description Maturity Date Coupon Par Value Book Value Market Price Market Value Unrealized Gain/Loss CUSIP Month End Portfolio Holdings Yield To Mat Modified Duration Years To Maturity AUSTRALIA NZ BK GRP 10/10/2018 2.130 30,000,000.00 30,000,000.00 100.000000 30,000,000.00 0.00 2.130 30,000,000.00 30,000,000.00 100.000000 30,000,000.00 0.00 WESTPAC BANK NY 11/06/2018 1.891 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 1.891 25,000,000.00 25,000,000.00 100.000000 25,000,000.00 0.00 1.583 6,735,819,733.18 6,723,896,582.30 99.325808 6,690,407,405.09 -33,489,177.21 1.583 6,735,819,733.18 6,723,896,582.30 99.325808 6,690,407,405.09 -33,489,177.21 2.130 .517 .529 4540: NCD-A A/360 2.130 .517 .529 4541: NCD-VAR-M A/360 05252WNR0 96121T6P8 1.891 .593 .603 1.891 .593 .603 Grand Total 1.632 1.111 1.143 Total Fund 1.632 1.111 1.143 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 13 77 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR The Mission Inn, Downtown Riverside. Digital Image. The Mission Inn. http://www.missioninn.com/about-en.html. 78 COUNTY OF RIVERSIDE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR CAPITAL MARKETS COUNTY ADMINISTRATIVE CENTER 4080 LEMON STREET, 4TH FLOOR, RIVERSIDE, CA 92502-2205 WWW.COUNTYTREASURER.ORG 79 AGENDA ITEM 8C BLANK Agenda Item 8C RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Audit Ad Hoc Committee Monica Morales, Management Analyst Lorelle Moe-Luna, Planning and Programming Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Federal Transit Administration Triennial Review Results AUDIT AD HOC COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file a report on the 2018 Triennial Review of the Commission performed by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Pursuant to Chapter 53 of Title 49, United States Code Section 5307, the FTA is required to conduct a review at least every three years for recipients of Urbanized Area Formula Grant funds. The last review was completed in September 2015. FTA does not consider this an audit, but rather a review of an agency’s compliance with federal requirements, determined by examining a sample of grant management and program implementation practices. The Triennial Review examined 20 areas, as follows: 1) Legal 2) Financial Management and Capacity 3) Technical Capacity Award Management 4) Technical Capacity Program Management 5) Technical Capacity Project Management 6) Satisfactory Continuing Control 7) Maintenance 8) Procurement 9) Disadvantaged Business Enterprise 10) Title VI 11) Americans with Disabilities Act General 12) ADA Complementary Paratransit 13) Equal Employment Opportunity 14) School Bus 15) Charter Bus 16) Drug Free Workplace Act 17) Drug and Alcohol Program 18) Section 5307 Program Requirements 19) Section 5310 Program Requirements 80 Agenda Item 8C 20) Section 5311 Program Requirements The Triennial Review process for the Commission includes eight basic steps: 1) Pre-review assessment; 2) Review package; 3) Recipient Information Request; 4) Site visit; 5) Findings summary; 6) Draft report; 7) Final report; and 8) Corrective actions, if applicable. As part of the process, FTA provides recipients with a Triennial Review Workbook to be used to reference the specific questions and requirements. While the requirements of FTA recipients such as the Commission did not change, the process in which the FTA reviewers conducted their work was streamlined. The FTA Triennial reviewer used the supporting documentation provided by the Commission prior to the on-site visit to respond to the FTA Triennial Review checklist questions. This process was more efficient and less time-consuming for Commission staff compared to prior years when staff answered the questions during the site visit and the reviewers verified the responses. The FTA Triennial reviewer met with staff on-site for two days in March 2018 and determined there were no deficiencies in the 20 areas reviewed. Attachments: FY 2018 FTA Triennial Review Final Report 81 82 BLANK FINAL REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2018 TRIENNIAL REVIEW of Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Riverside, California Recipient ID: 5807 Performed for: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION REGION IX Prepared By: CDI/DCI Joint Venture Scoping Meeting Date: February 20, 2018 Site Visit Date: March 29-30, 2018 Draft Report Date: April 30, 2018 Final Report Date: June 4, 2018 83 Table of Contents I. Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 1 II. Review Process and Background ........................................................................................................... 2 1. Background.................................................................................................................................................................. 2 2. Process........................................................................................................................................................................... 2 3. Metrics ........................................................................................................................................................................... 3 III. Recipient Description ............................................................................................................................. 4 1. Organization and Services ..................................................................................................................................... 4 2. Award and Project Activity ................................................................................................................................... 5 IV. Results of the Review ............................................................................................................................. 6 1. Legal ............................................................................................................................................................................... 6 2. Financial Management and Capacity ................................................................................................................ 6 3. Technical Capacity – Award Management ...................................................................................................... 6 4. Technical Capacity – Program Management and Subrecipient Oversight ........................................ 6 5. Technical Capacity – Project Management ..................................................................................................... 7 6. Satisfactory Continuing Control .......................................................................................................................... 7 7. Maintenance ................................................................................................................................................................ 7 8. Procurement ............................................................................................................................................................... 7 9. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise .................................................................................................................. 8 10. Title VI ........................................................................................................................................................................... 8 11. Americans With Disabilities Act – General ..................................................................................................... 8 12. Americans With Disabilities Act – Complementary Paratransit ............................................................ 8 13. Equal Employment Opportunity ......................................................................................................................... 9 14. School Bus .................................................................................................................................................................... 9 15. Charter Bus .................................................................................................................................................................. 9 16. Drug-Free Workplace Act ...................................................................................................................................... 9 17. Drug and Alcohol Program .................................................................................................................................. 10 18. Section 5307 Program Requirements ............................................................................................................ 10 19. Section 5310 Program Requirements ............................................................................................................ 10 20. Section 5311 Program Requirements ............................................................................................................ 10 V. Summary of Findings ........................................................................................................................... 12 VI. Attendees ................................................................................................................................................. 13 VII. Appendices .............................................................................................................................................. 14 84 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 1 | 14 I. Executive Summary This report documents the Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA) Triennial Review of the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) of Riverside, California. The review was performed by CDI/DCI Joint Venture. During the site visit, administrative and statutory requirements were discussed, and documents were reviewed. The RCTC’s transit facilities were toured to provide an overview of activities related to FTA-funded projects. The Triennial Review focused on the RCTC’s compliance in 20 areas. No deficiencies were found in the areas reviewed. 85 BLANK 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 2 | 14 II. Review Process and Background 1. Background The United States Code, Chapter 53 of Title 49 (49 US.C. 5307(f) (2)) requires that “At least once every three years, the Secretary shall review and evaluate completely the performance of a grantee in carrying out its program, specifically referring to compliance with statutory and administrative requirements.” The Triennial Review includes a review of the recipient’s compliance in 20 areas. The basic requirements for each of these areas are summarized in Section IV. This report presents the findings from the Triennial Review of RCTC. The review concentrated on procedures and practices employed during the past three years; however, coverage was extended to earlier periods as needed to assess the policies in place and the management of grants. The specific documents reviewed and referenced in this report are available at FTA’s regional office or the recipient’s office. 2. Process The Triennial Review process includes a pre-review assessment, a review scoping meeting with the FTA regional office, and an on-site visit to the recipient’s location. A Recipient Information Request (RIR) package was sent to RCTC advising it of the review and site visit and containing a list of items and questions that the recipient was required to submit to the reviewer. The review scoping meeting was conducted with the Region IX Office on February 20, 2018. Additional files retained by the regional office were sent to the reviewer electronically. A Site Visit Agenda package was sent to the RCTC advising it of the site visit date and indicating information that would be needed and issues that would be discussed. The site visit to RCTC occurred on March 29-30, 2018. The on-site portion of the review began with an entrance conference, at which the purpose of the Triennial Review and the review process were discussed. The remaining time was spent discussing administrative and statutory requirements and reviewing documents. The reviewers visited RCTC’s transit facilities to provide an overview of activities related to FTA-funded projects. The reviewer examined a sample of maintenance records for FTA-funded vehicles and equipment. Upon completion of the review, FTA and the reviewer provided a summary of preliminary findings to RCTC at an exit conference. Section VI of this report lists the individuals participating in the review. 86 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 3 | 14 3. Metrics The metrics used to evaluate whether a recipient is meeting the requirements for each of the areas reviewed are: • Not Deficient: An area is considered not deficient if, during the review, no findings were noted with the grantee’s implementation of the requirements. • Deficient: An area is considered deficient if any of the requirements within the area reviewed were not met. • Not Applicable: An area can be deemed not applicable if, after an initial assessment, the grantee does not conduct activities for which the requirements of the respective area would be applicable. 87 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 4 | 14 III. Recipient Description 1. Organization and Services State of California law created the Riverside County Transportation Commission (Commission or RCTC) in 1976 to oversee the funding and coordination of all public transportation services within Riverside County (County). The RCTC’s mission is to assume a leadership role in improving mobility in the County. The governing body consists of all five members of the County Board of Supervisors, one elected official from each of the County’s 28 cities, and one non-voting member appointed by the Governor of California. The RCTC is responsible for setting policies, establishing priorities, and coordinating activities among the County’s various transit operators and local jurisdictions. The RCTC also programs, nominates projects, and oversees the allocation of federal, state, and local funds for highway, transit, rail, non-motorized travel (bicycle and pedestrian), and other transportation activities. The RCTC serves as the tax authority and implementation agency for the voter approved Measure A Transportation Improvement Program, which was established in 1989 and renewed in 2009. Additionally, the RCTC provides motorist aid services such as Freeway Service Patrol and call box service, which are designed to expedite traffic flow and safety. The RCTC is also legally responsible for allocation of the state Transportation Development Act funds, the major sources of funds for transit in the County. RCTC is also a member of the Southern California Regional Rail Authority (SCRRA), commonly known as “Metrolink”). In 1990, the California legislature required the RCTC and other transportation commissions of the counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, and San Bernardino to join together and jointly develop a plan for regional transit services within the multi-county region. The effort resulted in the formation in August 1991 SCRRA, a Joint Powers Agency (JPA). The SCRRA plans, designs, constructs, and administers the operation of the regional passenger rail lines servicing the counties of Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, and Ventura. The SCRRA operates the regional rail system Metrolink. RCTC is not a service provider, however, owns and maintains nine rail stations throughout the county. The funding that is primarily received by FTA is used for capital projects such as station improvements. 88 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 5 | 14 2. Award and Project Activity Below is a list of the RCTC’s open awards at the time of the review. Award Number Award Amount Year Executed Description CA-03-0812 $73,039,999 2013 Perris Valley Line Section 5309 Small Starts CA-05-0268 $10,366,791 2012 Commuter Rail Five-Year Rehabilitation, Section 5309 CA-95-X202 $32,091,263 2013 Perris Valley Line Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement (CMAQ) Operating Funding Projects Completed The following projects were completed by RCTC during the three-year review period: • Perris Valley Line service, including completion of the Riverside Hunter Park Station, Moreno Valley/March Field Station, and South Perris Station. The Perris Downtown station was also expanded to accommodate passenger rail service. Ongoing Projects The RCTC is currently in the process of implementing the following noteworthy project: • RCTC has one project underway, the Perris Valley Line. This is an FTA Small Starts project that will extend Metrolink service from Riverside to Perris via Moreno Valley, along the Commission-owned San Jacinto Branch Line. Future Projects The RCTC will be coordinating with SCRRA on upcoming projects in the next three to five years. Projects may include but are not limited to: • rehabilitation/renovation/improvements of rail tracks, guideways, signals and rail crossings, rehabilitation/renovation/improvements to rail facilities and stations, improvements/upgrades to communication equipment, implementation of positive train control (PTC), and rehabilitation/expansion of rolling stock. 89 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 6 | 14 IV. Results of the Review 1. Legal Basic Requirement: The recipient must promptly notify the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) of legal matters and additionally notify the U.S. Department of Transportation (US DOT) Office of Inspector General (OIG) of any instances relating to false claims under the False Claims Act or fraud. Recipients must comply with restrictions on lobbying requirements. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Legal. 2. Financial Management and Capacity Basic Requirement: The recipient must have financial policies and procedures; an organizational structure that defines, assigns and delegates authority; and financial management systems in place to match, manage, and charge only allowable cost to the award. The recipient must conduct required single audits and provide financial oversight of subrecipients. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Financial Management and Capacity. 3. Technical Capacity – Award Management Basic Requirement: The recipient must report progress of projects in awards to the FTA timely. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Technical Capacity - Award Management. 4. Technical Capacity – Program Management and Subrecipient Oversight Basic Requirement: The recipient must follow the public involvement process for transportation plans; develop and submit a State Management Plan to the FTA for approval; report in the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act Subaward Reporting System (FSRS) on subawards; and ensure subrecipients comply with the terms of the award. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Technical Capacity – Program Management and Subrecipient Oversight. 90 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 7 | 14 5. Technical Capacity – Project Management Basic Requirement: The recipient must be able to implement FTA-funded projects in accordance with the award application, FTA Master Agreement, and all applicable laws and regulations, using sound management practices; and prepare force account plans. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Technical Capacity – Project Management. 6. Satisfactory Continuing Control Basic Requirement: The recipient must ensure that FTA-funded property will remain available to be used for its originally authorized purpose throughout its useful life until disposition. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Satisfactory Continuing Control. 7. Maintenance Basic Requirement: Recipients must keep federally funded vehicles, equipment, and facilities in good operating condition. Recipients must keep Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility features on all vehicles, equipment, and facilities in good operating order. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Maintenance. 8. Procurement Basic Requirement: States: When procuring property and services under a Federal award, a state must follow the same policies and procedures it uses for procurements from its non-Federal funds. The state will comply with 2 CFR §200.322 (Procurement of Recovered Materials) and ensure that every purchase order or other contract includes any clauses required by section 2 CFR §200.326 (Contract Provisions). All other non-Federal entities, including subrecipients of a state, will follow 2 CFR §§200.318 (General Procurement Standards) through 200.326 (Contract Provisions). Non-state recipients: The non-Federal entity must use its own documented procurement procedures which reflect applicable State, local, and tribal laws and regulations, and conform to applicable Federal law and the standards identified in 2 CFR part 200. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Procurement. 91 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 8 | 14 9. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Basic Requirement: Recipients must comply with 49 CFR Part 26 to ensure nondiscrimination in the award and administration of US DOT-assisted contracts. Recipients also must create a level playing field on which Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs) can compete fairly for US DOT-assisted contracts. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the U.S. Department of Transportation (US DOT) requirements for Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs). 10. Title VI Basic Requirement: The recipient must ensure that no person shall, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participating in, or be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance without regard to whether specific projects or services are federally funded. The recipient must ensure that all transit services and related benefits are distributed in an equitable manner. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Title VI. 11. Americans With Disabilities Act – General Basic Requirement: Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 provide that no entity shall discriminate against an individual with a disability in connection with the provision of transportation service. The law sets forth specific requirements for vehicle and facility accessibility and the provision of service, including complementary paratransit service. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the U.S. Department of Transportation (US DOT) requirements for Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) - General. 12. Americans With Disabilities Act – Complementary Paratransit Basic Requirement: Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 provide that no entity shall discriminate against an individual with a disability in connection with the provision of transportation service. The law sets forth specific requirements for vehicle and facility accessibility and the provision of service, including complementary paratransit service. Finding: During this Triennial of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the U.S. Department of Transportation requirements for Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) - Complementary Paratransit. 92 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 9 | 14 13. Equal Employment Opportunity Basic Requirement: The recipient must ensure that no person in the United States shall on the grounds of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, or disability, be excluded from participating in, or denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination in employment under any project, program, or activity receiving Federal financial assistance under the Federal transit laws. (Note: Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s regulation only identifies/recognizes religion and not creed as one of the protected groups.) This review area only applies to recipients that are required to submit a full or abbreviated EEO Program based on the number of its transit-related employees and whether it reaches a monetary threshold. Therefore, the requirements of this review area are not applicable to the review of RCTC. 14. School Bus Basic Requirement: Recipients are prohibited from providing school bus service in competition with private school bus operators unless the service qualifies and is approved by the FTA Administrator under an allowable exemption. Federally funded equipment or facilities cannot be used to provide exclusive school bus service. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for School Bus. 15. Charter Bus Basic Requirement: Recipients are prohibited from using federally funded equipment and facilities to provide charter service if a registered private charter operator expresses interest in providing the service. Recipients are allowed to operate community-based charter services excepted under the regulations. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Charter Bus. 16. Drug-Free Workplace Act Basic Requirement: Recipients are required to maintain a drug-free workplace for all award-related employees; report any convictions occurring in the workplace timely; and have an ongoing drug- free awareness program. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Drug-Free Workplace Act. 93 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 10 | 14 17. Drug and Alcohol Program Basic Requirement: Recipients receiving Section 5307, 5309, 5311, or 5339 funds that have safety- sensitive employees must have a drug and alcohol testing program in place for such employees. Finding: During this Triennial Review of RCTC, no deficiencies were found with the FTA requirements for Drug and Alcohol Program. 18. Section 5307 Program Requirements Basic Requirements: For fixed-route service supported with Section 5307 assistance, fares charged seniors, persons with disabilities or an individual presenting a Medicare card during off peak hours will not be more than one half the peak hour fares. Recipients are expected to have a written, locally developed process for soliciting and considering public comment before raising a fare or carrying out a major transportation service reduction. Recipients shall develop, publish, afford an opportunity for a public hearing on, and submit for approval, a program of projects (POP). Recipients must annually certify that they are spending at least one percent of such funds for transit security projects or that such expenditures for security systems are not necessary. Recipients must ensure that least one percent of such funds are expended on associated transit enhancement projects. This review area only applies to recipients with fixed-route service supported with Section 5307 funds, therefore, the requirements of this review area are not applicable to the review of RCTC. 19. Section 5310 Program Requirements Basic Requirement: Recipients must expend funds on eligible projects that meet the specific needs of seniors and individuals with disabilities. Projects selected for funding under the Section 5310 program must be included in a locally developed, coordinated public transit-human services transportation plan. Recipients must approve all leases of Section 5310-funded vehicles and ensure that leases include required terms and conditions. Either the recipient or subrecipient must hold title to the leased vehicles. This review area only applies to recipients that receive Section 5310 funds, therefore, the requirements of this review area are not applicable to the review of RCTC. 20. Section 5311 Program Requirements Basic Requirement: Recipients must expend funds on eligible projects to support rural public transportation services and intercity bus transportation. 94 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 11 | 14 This review area only applies to recipients that receive Section 5311 funds, therefore, the requirements of this review area are not applicable to the review of RCTC. 95 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 12 | 14 V. Summary of Findings Review Area Deficiencies Corrective Action Response Due Date Date Closed Code Description 1. Legal ND 2. Financial Management and Capacity ND 3. Technical Capacity – Award Management ND 4. Technical Capacity – Program Management and Subrecipient Oversight ND 5. Technical Capacity – Project Management ND 6. Satisfactory Continuing Control 7. Maintenance ND 8. Procurement ND 9. Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) ND 10. Title VI ND 11. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) - General ND 12. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) – Complementary Paratransit ND 13. Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) NA 14. School Bus ND 15. Charter Bus ND 16. Drug-Free Workplace Act ND 17. Drug and Alcohol Policy ND 18. Section 5307 Program Requirements NA 19. Section 5310 Program Requirements NA 20. Section 5311 Program Requirements NA 96 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 13 | 14 VI. Attendees Name Title Phone Number E-mail Address Riverside County Transportation Commission Anne Mayer Executive Director (951) 787-7141 amayer@rctc.org John Standiford Deputy Executive Director (951) 787-7969 jstandiford@rctc.org Lorelle Moe-Luna Planning and Programming Manager (951) 787-7934 lmoe-luna@rctc.org Monica Morales Analyst (951) 787-7933 mmorales@rctc.org Theresia Trevino Chief Financial Officer (951) 787-7926 ttrevino@rctc.org Michele Cisneros Deputy Director of Finance (951) 787-7141 mcisnero@rctc.org Matthew Wallace Procurement Manager/DBE Liaison Officer (951) 787-7908 mwallace@rctc.org Jose Mendoza Procurement Analyst (951)787-7967 jmendoza@rctc.org Shirley Medina Planning and Programming Director (951) 787-7935 smedina@rctc.org Martha Masters Senior Management Analyst (951) 778-1095 mmasters@rctc.org Sheldon Peterson Rail Manager (951) 787-7928 speterson@rctc.org Fina Clemente Transit Manager fclemente@rctc.org Gary Ratliff Facilities Administrator (951) 787-7141 gratliff@rctc.org Beth Gutierrez Human Resources Administrator (951) 787-7966 bgutierrez@rctc.org Marlin Feenstra Project Delivery Director mfeenstra@rctc.org Patricia Castillo Capital Project Manager (951) 787-7945 pcastiollo@rctc.org Edda Rosso Capital Project Manager (951) 787-7938 erosso@rctc.org Aaron Hake External Affairs Director ahake@rctc.org Jillian Guizado Legislative Affairs Manager (951) 787-7923 jguizado@rctc.org Megan Karand Senior Finance Analyst (951) 787-4012 mkarand@rctc.org FTA Audrey Bredehoft Director, Office of Financial Management and Program Oversight (415) 734-9453 audrey.bredehoft@dot.gov Lynette Little Civil Rights Officer for Region IX (415) 734-9464 lynette.little@dot.gov Marisa Appleton Civil Rights Officer for Oversight (312) 705-1270 marisa.appleton@dot.gov CDI/DCI Joint Venture Linda Barnes Lead Reviewer (703) 919-7884 lmb421@outlook.com 97 2018 Triennial Review – Riverside County Transportation Commission 14 | 14 VII. Appendices No appendices included in this report. 98 BLANK AGENDA ITEM 8D BLANK Agenda Item 8D RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Audit Ad Hoc Committee Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Proposition 1B California Transit Security Grant Program 2018 Site Visit Summary AUDIT AD HOC COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Proposition 1B California Transit Security Grant Program (CTSGP) 2018 Site Visit Summary. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Since the inception of the Proposition 1B CTSGP in November 2006, the Commission received funds totaling approximately $3.5 million from the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (CalOES) for the Commission’s Commuter Rail stations. CalOES performed a site visit review of the Commission’s compliance with the Proposition 1B CTSGP guidelines. The review did not disclose any findings. Attachment: Proposition 1B CTSBP Site Visit Summary 99 BLANK 100 BLANK AGENDA ITEM 8E BLANK Agenda Item 8E RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Audit Ad Hoc Committee Theresia Trevino, Chief Financial Officer THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2016/17 Transportation Development Act and Measure A Audit Results STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Transportation Development Act (TDA) and Measure A audit results report for Fiscal Year 2016/17. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In July 2016, following a competitive procurement, Macias Gini O’Connell LLP (MGO), was selected to perform the financial and compliance audits and agreed-upon procedures (audits) for Western County TDA claimants and Measure A; BCA Watson Rice LLP (BCAWR) was selected to perform the Western County Measure A Specialized Transit recipients audits; and Conrad LLP (Conrad) was selected to perform the Coachella Valley, Palo Verde Valley, and county of Riverside TDA claimants and Measure A recipient audits, except for the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA), SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine), and the city of Beaumont (Beaumont). The RTA and SunLine audits were completed by their respective auditors. Beaumont’s FY 2015/16 audit was completed by Beaumont’s auditor; however, during FY 2017/18, Beaumont requested, and Commission staff agreed, that its required audits be conducted by the Commission’s auditor beginning with FY 2016/17. The FY 2016/17 audits represent the second year of the five-year contract term that MGO, BCAWR, and Conrad performed these audits for the Commission. The firms and the other agencies’ auditors completed the audits and issued the audit reports. The following is a summary of the 57 audits performed: 101 Agenda Item 8E Funding Type Type of Procedure MGO (Western County) BCAWR (Western County) Conrad (Eastern County & Riverside Co.) Other Auditors Total TDA Article 3 (bicycle and pedestrian projects) Financial and compliance audit 6 0 2 0 8 TDA Article 4 (transit) Financial and compliance audit 4 0 1 2 7 Measure A specialized transit Agreed-upon procedures 0 14 0 0 14 Measure A local streets and roads Agreed-upon procedures 17 0 11 0 28 Based on a review of the reports, the following items are highlights of the results of these audits. TDA Article 3 (Bicycle and Pedestrian Projects) • One jurisdiction – the city of Coachella – had a fund balance of $545 as of June 30, 2015, that carried forward through June 30, 2017. There was no current year activity. Staff will continue to monitor this balance work with the jurisdiction to ensure such fund balance is cleared appropriately. TDA Article 4 (Transit) • All transit operators met the fare ratio requirement. • The report on the status of a prior year SunLine finding related to subrecipient monitoring indicated the matter had been resolved. Measure A Specialized Transit • All agencies met or substantially met total match requirements, including requirements that were adjusted based on partial Measure A, except for one agency (U.S. Veterans Initiative). • Four agencies (Blindness Support Services, Community Connect-211, Community Connect-TAP, and Forest Folk) had net assets totaling $47,770 (ranging from $33 to $26,625) as of June 30, 2017. The agencies requested authorization to carryover the Measure A-related funds, as applicable, to FY 2017/18, thereby reducing their FY 2017/18 allocations. The remaining net assets after transfer of carryover to FY 2017/18 totals $28,880. • Three agencies (Friends of Moreno Valley, Independent Living Partnership, and U.S. Veterans Initiative) have deficits aggregating $16,320 as of June 30, 2017. One agency (Independent Living Partnership) had an available grant balance of at least $701 that was used to cover its deficit. The other two agencies had no grant balances and are responsible to cover the remaining deficits totaling $15,619. 102 Agenda Item 8E Measure A Local Streets and Roads • Two jurisdictions – the cities of Blythe and Murrieta – met their maintenance of effort (MOE) requirements using the prior year carryover, as permitted under the MOE Guidelines. • Seven jurisdictions – the cities of Eastvale, Hemet, Murrieta, Norco, Palm Desert, Rancho Mirage, and San Jacinto – have fund balances in excess of three years of revenues. The Commission policy suggests such amounts should not exceed three years. • One jurisdiction – the county of Riverside – recorded overhead costs in excess of 8 percent of revenues. The Commission’s policy states overhead should not exceed 8 percent of revenues; however, the county of Riverside’s overhead allocation is based on an approved indirect cost rate. • Two jurisdictions – the cities of Cathedral City and San Jacinto – expended Measure A funds on indirect costs that were not included on the approved Five-Year Capital Improvement Plans (CIPs). The jurisdictions may be required to amend their CIPs. Attached is the summary of transportation and transit fund operations and related audit results for the various types of TDA (Articles 3 and 4) and Measure A (specialized transit and local streets and roads) funding. Each schedule provides information for each claimant and recipient regarding the revenues, expenditures/expenses, and change in fund balance/net assets for the year ended June 30, 2017, and other financial and compliance information. Attachments: 1) FY 2016/17 Transportation Development Act Article 3 Schedule 2) FY 2016/17 Transportation Development Act Article 4 Schedule 3) FY 2016/17 Measure A Specialized Transit Schedule 4) FY 2016/17 Measure A Local Streets and Roads Schedule 103 BLANK Coachella HemetJurupa ValleyLake Elsinore RiversideSan Jacinto WildomarCounty of Riverside 1Revenues:Intergovernmental allocations:Article 3 -$ 62,500$ 200,000$ 228,435$ -$ 45,000$ -$ 572,500$ Total revenues - 62,500 200,000 228,435 - 45,000 - 572,500 Total expenditures- - 237,166 186,914 297,217 - 30,552 1,093,740 - 62,500 (37,166) 41,521 (297,217) 45,000 (30,552) (521,240)Transfers in (out)- - 18,583 (41,521) - (45,000) (495) 683,740 - 62,500 (18,583) - (297,217) - (31,047) 162,500 Prior period adjustment- - - - - - - (325,000) Fund balances at beginning of year 545 (62,500) - - 11,862 - (52,150) 162,500 Fund balances at end of year545$ -$ (18,583)$ -$ (285,355)$-$ (83,197)$ -$Deferred revenues at end of year-$ -$ -$ -$ 297,217$ -$ 66,223$ -$Due to RCTC-$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ -$ Source: 2017 Financial Statements1Transportation Development Act Article 3 ScheduleYear Ended June 30, 2017Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expendituresExcess (deficiency) ofrevenues andtransfers in over (under) expendituresCounty of Riverside prior period adjustment reflects correction of prior year Audit Results Summary reporting error.Section 992346/26/2018ATTACHMENT 1104 BLANK Banning Beaumont Corona Riverside PVVTARTA1SunLine1Total operating revenues130,112$ 219,522$ 445,568$ 359,596$ 132,959 10,356,851$ 6,787,154$ Operating expenses:Depreciation and amortization185,757 582,719 629,943 530,418 265,521 13,226,966 7,242,077 Other operating expenses1,473,649 2,407,498 2,196,759 3,665,828 993,789 74,089,014 33,220,827 Total operating expenses1,659,406 2,990,217 2,826,702 4,196,246 1,259,310 87,315,980 40,462,904 Operating loss(1,529,294) (2,770,695) (2,381,134) (3,836,650) (1,126,351) (76,959,129) (33,675,750) Nonoperating revenues (expenses):Grants:Local Transportation Funds1,316,491 2,203,702 1,769,936 2,976,160 844,143 46,253,283 18,635,757 State Transit Assistance- 231,823 56,658 258,870 72,906 1,583,126 1,226,297 Federal- - - 522,161 - 28,070,032 4,925,670 Measure A specialized transit- - - - - 2,841,324 5,835,696 Proposition 1B444,334 300,466 90,279 776,162 94,769 1,361,870 2,899,239 Other- - - - 3,552 6,443,891 1,944,270 Interest income(1,310) 4,475 (430) - 40 196,332 4,069 Interest expense- - - (26,298) - (6,366) - Gain (loss) on sale of property-- 5,310 -- 4,034451Other28,357 - - 81,609 - 1,204,181 - Total nonoperating revenue (expense)1,787,872 2,740,466 1,921,753 4,588,664 1,015,410 87,951,707 35,471,449 Net increase (decrease)258,578 (30,229) (459,381) 752,014 (110,941) 10,992,578 1,795,699 Net assets at beginning of year(1,133,189) 1,852,021 4,928,920 (467,840) 2,478,357 77,641,169 50,858,134 Net assets at end of year(874,611)$ 1,821,792$ 4,469,539$ 284,174$ 2,367,416$ 88,633,747$ 52,653,833$ Deferred revenue at end of year:Operating248,115$ 133,512$ 408,771$ 628,836$ 69,829$ 1,915,019$ 596,376$ Capital612,931 9,195 - 565,908 52,496 32,561,291 4,415,075 Total deferred revenue at end of year861,046$ 142,707$ 408,771$ 1,194,744$ 122,325$ 34,476,310$ 5,011,451$ 10.00% 10.00% 20.00% 10.00% 10.00% 17.48% 18.23%Actual fare ratio10.66% 10.43% 20.24% 10.41% 14.48% 20.64% 20.60%Fare ratio compliance statusMetMetMetMetMetMetMetSource: 2017 Financial Statements 1The audits for RTA and SunLine were completed by other auditors hired by each entity.Transportation Development Act Article 4 ScheduleYear Ended June 30, 2017Section 992606/26/2018ATTACHMENT 2105 BLANK Blindness SupportBoys & Girls Club of Southwest County Care-A-VanCare ConnexxusCommunity Connect - 211Community Connect - TAPRUHS Dept of Mental HealthForest FolkFriends of Moreno ValleyIndependent Living PartnershipCity of NorcoRiverside County Regional Medical Center/ (RUHS)United States Veterans InitiativeVoices for ChildrenOperating revenues:Measure A 65,859$ 175,868$ 352,161$ 238,983$ 75,125$ 113,901$ 196,576$ 52,000$ 68,376$ 376,789$ 60,000$ 305,000$ 32,028$ 92,369$ In-kind match6,000 - 102,088 - 19,751 48,187 - 39,714 18,324 609,721 - - -204,573 Cash match: other revenue27,928 90,600 79,329 123,112 29,989 18,564 101,267 7,748 23,682 - 30,911 369,125 16,960 - Total operating revenues99,787 266,468 533,578 362,095 124,865 180,652 297,843 99,462 110,382 986,510 90,911 674,125 48,988 296,942 Operating expenses-in kind6,000 - 102,088 - 19,751 48,187 - 39,714 18,324 609,721 - - -204,573 Operating expenses-salaries & benefits65,849 172,736 304,619 178,396 57,572 41,912 238,758 25,311 -145,408 60,575 468,705 35,358 38,246 Operating expenses-nonpersonnel24,945 93,732 126,871 156,935 22,846 51,287 59,085 34,404 105,117 218,962 25,536 205,420 16,190 54,123 Operating expenses-administrative overhead--- 26,764 6,577 12,641 - - - 14,360 4,800 - -- Total operating expenses/capital expenditures96,794 266,468 533,578 362,095 106,746 154,027 297,843 99,429 123,441 988,451 90,911 674,125 51,548 296,942 Change in net assets2,993 --- 18,119 26,625 - 33 (13,059) (1,941) - - (2,560) - Program administrative adjustments:- - - - - - - - - -- Reduction of FY 2017/18 Measure A allocations(1,975) - - - (4,672) (12,243) - - - - - - -- Available grant balance allocated in FY 2017/18- - - - - - - - - 701 - - -- Agency responsibility due to lack of available grant balance- - - - - - - - 13,059 - - - 2,560 - Net assets at beginning of year- - - - - - - - - 1,240 - - -- Net assets at end of year1,018$ -$ -$ -$ 13,447$ 14,382$ -$ 33$ -$-$-$ -$ -$-$ Match requirement-cash (as adjusted)26,910$ 90,599$ 79,329$ 123,112$ 16,543$ 4,182$ 90,958$ 7,748$ 32,824$ -$ 30,911$ 157,121$ 17,527$ -$ Match requirement-in kind (as adjusted)6,000$ -$ 102,088$ -$ 19,751$ 48,187$ -$ 26,058$ 2,400$ 235,061$ -$ -$ -$106,356$ Actual match-cash 27,928$ 90,600$ 79,329$ 123,112$ 29,989$ 18,564$ 101,267$ 7,748$ 23,682$ -$ 30,911$ 369,125$ 16,960$ -$ Actual match-in kind6,000$ -$ 102,088$ -$ 19,751$ 48,187$ -$ 39,714$ 18,324$ 609,721$ -$ -$ -$204,573$ Match requirement compliance status Met adjusted match Met adjusted match Met adjusted match Met adjusted match Met Met adjusted match Met Met adjusted match Met overall match requirement (although did not meet cash requirement) Met Met Met Did not meet adjusted cash requirements Met Source: 2017 Agreed-Upon ProceduresMeasure A Specialized Transit ScheduleYear Ended June 30, 2017Measure A Specialized Transit6/26/2018ATTACHMENT 3106 BLANK Banning CalimesaCanyon Lake Corona Eastvale Hemet Jurupa Valley Lake Elsinore Menifee Moreno Valley Murrieta Norco Perris Riverside San Jacinto Temecula WildomarRevenues:Intergovernmental allocations:Measure A550,506$ 153,097$ 171,437$ 3,898,330$ 1,237,636$ 1,636,832$1,943,104$ 1,262,042$ 1,619,512$4,106,484$ 2,267,650$633,842$ 1,457,121$7,126,504$ 824,611$ 2,890,482$618,545$ Reimbursements- 39,849 -7,514,575 - -- --217,609 ---179,179 --- Measure A/STIP Trade - --- - -- ---------- Other revenues- --(24,635) - -- -- 83,174 ------ 16,028 Interest income8,403 2,970 (765) - 24,555 (12,268) 2,028 2,933 7,132 76,966 79,307 9,544 390 10,639 22,816 43,170 122 Other financing sources-transfers in- --- - -- ---------- Total revenues558,909 195,916 170,672 11,388,270 1,262,191 1,624,564 1,945,132 1,264,975 1,626,644 4,484,233 2,346,957 643,386 1,457,511 7,316,322 847,427 2,933,652 634,695 Expenditures and other financing uses:Construction and maintenance- 447,144 -10,535,408 - 635,348 2,598,053 372,741 2,429,139 75,321 -792,106 1,149,029 --899,828 520,738 Engineering and administration- --- - -- --1,242,596 ------- Administrative overhead/overhead allocations/indirect costs- 12,248 -252,889 - - 3,515 --296,240 ---- 61,266 - 1,577 Capital outlay802,634 ---159,901 ----2,899,681 1,650,966 --5,194,275 --- Professional services- --- - - 7,210 --- 5,103 ------ Debt service- -142,000 - - -- ---------- Internal Service Transfers- --- - -- ---------- Transfers out- --- 113,599 - 90,205 472,645 1,302,488 2,551,422 727,425 --2,999,688 651,239 910,000 41,000 Total expenditures and other financing uses802,634 459,392 142,000 10,788,297 273,500 635,348 2,698,983 845,386 3,731,627 7,065,260 2,383,494 792,106 1,149,029 8,193,963 712,505 1,809,828 563,315 (243,725) (263,476) 28,672 599,973 988,691 989,216 (753,851) 419,589 (2,104,983) (2,581,027) (36,537) (148,720) 308,482 (877,641) 134,922 1,123,824 71,380 Prior period adjustment/rounding- --(1) - - 193 --2 ----1 (35,483) 1 Fund balances at beginning of year2,012,674 830,338 296,245 10,282,470 3,689,084 4,347,727 633,295 1,125,781 2,791,713 7,716,365 7,187,125 2,208,938 4,619,607 18,730,628 3,100,182 5,163,190 204,405 Fund balances at end of year1,768,949$ 566,862$ 324,917$ 10,882,442$ 4,677,775$ 5,336,943$(120,363)$ 1,545,370$ 686,730$ 5,135,340$ 7,150,588$2,060,218$4,928,089$17,852,987$ 3,235,105$ 6,251,531$275,786$ Fund balance by year received:2017558,909$ 195,916$ 170,672$ 10,882,442$ 1,262,191$ 1,624,564$ (120,363)$ 1,264,975$ 686,730$ 4,484,233$ 2,346,957$ 643,386$ 1,457,511$ 7,316,322$ 847,427$ 2,933,652$ 275,786$ 2016547,451 370,946 154,245 - 1,161,037 1,683,976 - 280,395 -651,107 2,161,621 597,498$ 1,445,117 8,334,756 776,338 2,769,563 - 2015662,589 --- 1,101,681 1,593,978 - ---2,076,116 587,449 2,025,461 2,201,909 765,829 548,316 - 2014 & Prior- --- 1,152,866 434,425 - ---565,894 231,885 --845,511 -- Total fund balances by year received1,768,949$ 566,862$ 324,917$ 10,882,442$ 4,677,775$ 5,336,943$(120,363)$ 1,545,370$ 686,730$ 5,135,340$ 7,150,588$2,060,218$4,928,089$17,852,987$ 3,235,105$ 6,251,531$275,786$ Cash and investments1,706,281$ 370,773$ 311,773$ 10,407,531$ 4,492,110$ 4,917,190$1,645,464$ 1,339,232$ 401,131$ 4,517,406$ 7,624,550$1,974,566$4,766,404$16,547,683$ 1,439,036$ 6,271,530$129,263$ MOE Base Year requirement164,325$ 2,401$ 28,873$ 2,208,200$ 38,949$ 18,924$ -$960,771$ 214,225$ 1,459,153$ 595,702$ 22,536$ 1,218,470$12,449,203$ 156,391$ 1,431,799$-$ Amount of Excess MOE at end of year263,929$ 18,842$ 126,594$ 14,017,411$ 88,579$ 680,073$ -$ 11,189,579$ 855,116$ 5,694,641$ 359,166$ 58,765$ 1,323,086$ 35,123,130$ 412,392$ 7,793,330$ -$ MOE compliance statusMet Met Met MetMet Met N/AMet Met MetMet with use of carryoverMet MetMetMetMet N/ASource: 2017 Agreed-Upon ProceduresMeasure A Local Streets and Roads ScheduleYear ended June 30, 2017Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures and other financing usesWestern CountyMeasure A Local Streets Roads1 of 26/26/2018ATTACHMENT 4107 Revenues:Intergovernmental allocations:Measure AReimbursementsMeasure A/STIP Trade Other revenuesInterest incomeOther financing sources-transfers inTotal revenuesExpenditures and other financing uses:Construction and maintenanceEngineering and administrationAdministrative overhead/overhead allocations/indirect costsCapital outlayProfessional servicesDebt serviceInternal Service TransfersTransfers outTotal expenditures and other financing usesPrior period adjustment/roundingFund balances at beginning of yearFund balances at end of yearFund balance by year received:2017201620152014 & PriorTotal fund balances by year receivedCash and investmentsMOE Base Year requirementAmount of Excess MOE at end of yearMOE compliance statusSource: 2017 Agreed-Upon ProceduresMeasure A Local Streets and Roads ScheduleYear ended June 30, 2017Excess (deficiency) of revenues over (under) expenditures and other financing usesCoachella ValleyPalo Verde ValleyCathedral City CoachellaDesert Hot Springs Indian Wells Indio La Quinta Palm Desert Palm Springs Rancho Mirage Blythe- 1,441,719$ 563,592$ 464,468$ 229,804$ 1,841,834$ 716,338$ 2,627,896$ 1,982,585$ 973,336$ 818,196$ 7,122,124$ - - - - 1,035,535 - 1,430,603 631,479 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,106,410 - 34,167 - - - 80,975 8,551 - 35,839 - - - 274 (2,313) 15 - 1,843 2,491 113,730 21,436 (1,425) 9,537 6,440 54,641 - - - - - - - - - - 1,530,801 561,279 464,483 229,804 2,960,187 727,380 4,172,229 2,671,339 971,911 1,934,143 7,128,564 1,932,337 - 211,326 245,000 2,284,540 - 1,873,433 2,229,509 - - 5,230,878 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 12,779 - 279,655 - - - - 65,456 1,814,153 - - - - - 664,141 - - 320,958 - - - 36,848 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 673,382 - - 1,102,200 - 236,212 - - - - - 52,119 - - - - - - 115,337 880,147 200,000 - - - - - - 1,763,744 - 2,047,674 916,995 424,105 245,000 3,289,696 664,141 1,873,433 3,331,709 320,958 2,065,412 7,045,031 (516,873) (355,716) 40,378 (15,196) (329,509) 63,239 2,298,796 (660,370) 650,953 (131,269) 83,533 - - - - - - - (5,441) - - (192,645) 963,369 1,619,407 5,194 35,716 1,055,064 791,552 19,246,471 8,034,878 2,698,435 2,463,550 1,844,555 446,496$ 1,263,691$ 45,572$ 20,520$ 725,555$ 854,791$ 21,545,267$ 7,369,067$ 3,349,388$ 2,332,281$ 1,735,443$ 446,496$ 561,279$ 45,572$ 20,520$ 725,555$ 727,380$ 4,172,229$ 2,671,339$ 971,911$ 1,934,143$ 1,735,443$ - 609,455 - - - 127,411 6,885,291 2,060,667 901,270 398,138 - - 92,957 - - - - 4,319,120 2,637,061 880,507 - - - - - - - - 6,168,627 - 595,700 - - 446,496$ 1,263,691$ 45,572$ 20,520$ 725,555$ 854,791$ 21,545,267$ 7,369,067$ 3,349,388$ 2,332,281$ 1,735,443$ 345,155$ 1,173,193$ (1)$ -$ 108,360$ 734,548$ 36,166,273$ 7,385,490$ 3,272,207$ 2,240,379$ 1,733,170$ 391,688$ 92,205$ 75,147$ 963,640$ 2,048,564$ 937,007$ 2,398,146$ 1,498,732$ 674,811$ 170,000$ -$ 3,523,874$ 4,182,855$ 1,268,741$ 12,557,141$ 8,033,591$ 4,570,824$ 8,445,638$ 17,732,139$ 3,905,425$ 96,090$ -$ MetMetMetMetMetMetMetMetMetMet with use of carryoverN/ACounty of RiversideMeasure A Local Streets Roads2 of 26/26/2018108 AGENDA ITEM 8F BLANK Agenda Item 8F RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Michele Cisneros, Deputy Director of Finance THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Enterprise Resource Planning Software Implementation Project Management Oversight BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve sole source Agreement No. 19-19-003-00 to SDI Presence, LLC (SDI) for Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software implementation project management oversight for a two-year period in the amount of $436,800, plus a 15 percent contingency amount of $65,500, for a total amount not to exceed $502,300; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 3) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve contingency work pursuant to the agreement terms up to the total amount; and 4) Approve a budget adjustment in the amount of $251,100. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In January 2018, the Commission approved Agreement No. 18-19-082-00 with Tyler Technologies (Tyler) for the implementation of Munis ERP software and annual cloud-based service. At that time, staff informed the Commission additional costs may be necessary for consultant support to help staff manage the implementation of Munis ERP software and staff would return to the Commission for approval. The Commission’s implementation of Munis ERP software and the engagement of an ERP software implementation project management oversight firm is time sensitive. The primary system design for the Interstate 15 Express Lanes is currently being developed, and the need to build interfaces with the Commission’s ERP system is required immediately. It is critical the Commission updates the technology of its current ERP software and begin implementation. Staff is finalizing the agreement with Tyler for the Munis ERP software and will soon develop a project schedule after execution of agreement. Tyler estimates that Munis ERP software implementation would begin 60-90 days after execution of agreement. Therefore, it is important 109 Agenda Item 8F that an ERP implementation project management oversight firm be on board to assist staff to ensure the implementation of Munis ERP software is managed effectively and timely. Given the unique nature of this consulting task, staff contacted four firms to gather qualifications and scope of service pricing to assist in the management of implementing Munis ERP software. Two of the four firms declined to provide a response, citing the significant amount of on-site support needed for project management oversight and suggested the Commission may be better served by a local firm. The two firms that did respond include Panorama Government Solutions at an estimated total of $814,400 and SDI at an estimated total of $436,800. SDI has been providing information technology planning and project management oversight services to local public agencies since 1999. SDI has an extensive California customer base and has served as project management oversight consultant for several Munis ERP implementations, including other Tyler software products. SDI is quite familiar with the particulars of working with Tyler and implementation of Munis ERP software. Staff verified the references of SDI through the Tyler user community and the California Society of Municipal Finance Officers’ community and SDI was highly recommended. Additionally, the Commission’s auditors recommended SDI. Based on qualifications and pricing, staff identified SDI as a qualified firm to provide Munis ERP software implementation project management oversight and staff desires to enter into an agreement for these services. SDI will serve as a liaison between the Commission and Tyler, by supplementing and enhancing the Commission’s current resources in the implementation of Munis ERP software. Services include but are not limited to project, change, and risk management, data conversion monitoring, and post implementation support. Staff has verified SDI’s hourly rate of $175.00 is comparable to four local southern California public agencies that are currently under contract with SDI for similar ERP project management oversight services. Staff is anticipating the need to upgrade the Commission’s timesheet technology and may require the support of SDI to identify changes to business processes and augment staff resources to implement new timesheet technology. After the Munis ERP software is fully implemented, staff will reassess the current timesheet technology and the Commission’s business process compatibility with Munis ERP and determine if additional timesheet technology business process changes are warranted. Should staff require the additional support to upgrade the Commission’s timesheet technology business processes, staff is requesting the Commission approve a 15 percent contingency, not to exceed $65,500, to allow staff to move quickly and amend SDI’s agreement to add contingency work to supplement staff resources and continue timesheet technology implementation without interruption. Staff is requesting the Commission’s approval of an agreement with SDI for ERP software implementation project management oversight services for a two-year period in the amount of $436,800, plus a 15 percent contingency of $65,500, for a total amount not to exceed $502,300. Staff recommends the Commission authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission and the Executive Director or designee to approve contingency work up to the authorized amount. 110 Agenda Item 8F Staff is requesting a budget adjustment of $251,100 for Fiscal Year 2018/19 to cover the first year of ERP software implementation project management oversight. No federal funds will be used to fund the cost of the ERP software implementation project management oversight. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: No N/A Year: FY 2018/19 FY 2019/20 Amount: $251,100 $251,200 Source of Funds: Measure A, LTF, STAF, TUMF, FSP, SAFE, and Toll Operations Budget Adjustment: Yes N/A GL/Project Accounting No.: 001001 65520 00000 0001 101 19 65520 $502,300 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 08/20/2018 Attachment: Draft Agreement No. 19-19-003-00 111 BLANK DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 Agreement No. 19-19-003-00 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AGREEMENT FOR ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING PROJECT OVERSIGHT SERVICES WITH SDI PRESENCE LLC 1. PARTIES AND DATE. This Agreement is made and entered into this day of , 2018, by and between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ("the Co- mmission") and SDI PRESENCE LLC ("Consultant"), a Delaware limited liability company. 2. RECITALS. 2.1 Consultant desires to perform and assume responsibility for the provision of certain professional consulting services required by Commission on the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement. Consultant represents that it is a professional consultant, experienced in providing ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING PROJECT OVERSIGHT SERVICES to public clients, is licensed in the State of California, and is familiar with the plans of Commission. 2.2 Commission desires to engage Consultant to render certain consulting services for the ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING PROJECT OVERSIGHT SERVICES Project ("Project") as set forth herein. 3. TERMS. 3.1 General Scope of Services. Consultant promises and agrees to furnish to Commission all labor materials, tools, equipment, services, and incidental and customary work necessary to fully and adequately provide professional consulting services and advice on various issues affecting the decisions of Commission regarding the Project and on other programs and matters affecting Commission, hereinafter referred to as "Services". The Services are more particularly described in Exhibit "A" attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. All Services shall be subject to, and performed in accordance with, this Agreement, the exhibits attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference, and all applicable local, state, and federal laws, rules and regulations. 3.2 Term. The term of this Agreement shall be from the date first specified above to December 31, 2020, unless earlier terminated as provided herein. Consultant shall complete the Services within the term of this Agreement and shall meet any other established schedules and deadlines. 112 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 2 3.3 Schedule of Services. Consultant shall perform the Services expeditiously, within the term of this Agreement, and in accordance with the Schedule of Services set forth in Exhibit "B" attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference. Consultant represents that it has the professional and technical personnel required to perform the Services in conformance with such conditions. In order to facilitate Consultant's conformance with the Schedule, the Commission shall respond to Consultant's submittals in a timely manner. Upon request of the Commission, Consultant shall provide a more detailed schedule of anticipated performance to meet the Schedule of Services. 3.4 Independent Contractor; Control and Payment of Subordinates. The Services shall be performed by Consultant under its supervision. Consultant will determine the means, method and details of performing the Services subject to the requirements of this Agreement. Commission retains Consultant on an independent contractor basis and Consultant is not an employee of Commission. Consultant retains the right to perform similar or different services for others during the term of this Agreement. Any additional personnel performing the Services under this Agreement on behalf of Consultant shall not be employees of Commission and shall at all times be under Consultant's exclusive direction and control. Consultant shall pay all wages, salaries, and other amounts due such personnel in connection with their performance of Services under this Agreement and as required by law. Consultant shall be responsible for all reports and obligations respecting such additional personnel, including, but not limited to: social security taxes, income tax withholding, unemployment insurance, and workers' compensation insurance. 3.5 Conformance to Applicable Requirements. All work prepared by Consultant shall be subject to the approval of Commission. 3.6 Substitution of Key Personnel. Consultant has represented to Commission that certain key personnel will perform and coordinate the Services under this Agreement. Should one or more of such personnel become unavailable, Consultant may substitute other personnel of at least equal competence and experience upon written approval of Commission. In the event that Commission and Consultant cannot agree as to the substitution of key personnel, Commission shall be entitled to terminate this Agreement for cause, pursuant to provisions of Section 3.16 of this Agreement. The key members of Consultant’s personnel for performance of this Agreement are as follows: Michael Gomez, Senior Project Manager; Patrick Griffin, Engagement Manager. 3.7 Commission’s Representative. Commission hereby designates Anne Mayer, Executive Director, or his or her designee, to act as its representative for the performance of this Agreement ("Commission’s Representative"). Commission's representative shall have the power to act on behalf of Commission for all purposes under this Agreement. Consultant shall not accept direction from any person other than Commission's Representative or his or her designee. 3.8 Consultant’s Representative. Consultant hereby designates [___INSERT NAME OR TITLE___], or his or her designee, to act as its representative for 113 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 3 the performance of this Agreement ("Consultant’s Representative"). Consultant’s Representative shall have full authority to represent and act on behalf of the Consultant for all purposes under this Agreement. The Consultant’s Representative shall supervise and direct the Services, using his or her best skill and attention, and shall be responsible for all means, methods, techniques, sequences and procedures and for the satisfactory coordination of all portions of the Services under this Agreement. 3.9 Coordination of Services. Consultant agrees to work closely with Commission staff in the performance of Services and shall be available to Commission's staff, consultants and other staff at all reasonable times. 3.10 Standard of Care; Licenses. Consultant shall perform the Services under this Agreement in a skillful and competent manner, consistent with the standard generally recognized as being employed by professionals in the same discipline in the State of California. Consultant represents and maintains that it is skilled in the professional calling necessary to perform the Services. Consultant warrants that all employees and subcontractors shall have sufficient skill and experience to perform the Services assigned to them. Finally, Consultant represents that it, its employees and subcontractors have all licenses, permits, qualifications and approvals of whatever nature that are legally required to perform the Services and that such licenses and approvals shall be maintained throughout the term of this Agreement. Consultant shall perform, at its own cost and expense and without reimbursement from Commission, any Services necessary to correct errors or omissions which are caused by the Consultant’s failure to comply with the standard of care provided for herein, and shall be fully responsible to the Commission for all damages and other liabilities provided for in the indemnification provisions of this Agreement arising from the Consultant’s errors and omissions. 3.11 Laws and Regulations. Consultant shall keep itself fully informed of and in compliance with all local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations in any manner affecting the performance of the Project or the Services, including all Cal/OSHA requirements, and shall give all notices required by law. Consultant shall be liable for all violations of such laws and regulations in connection with Services. If the Consultant performs any work knowing it to be contrary to such laws, rules and regulations and without giving written notice to Commission, Consultant shall be solely responsible for all costs arising therefrom. Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold Commission, its officials, directors, officers, employees and agents free and harmless, pursuant to the indemnification provisions of this Agreement, from any claim or liability arising out of any failure or alleged failure to comply with such laws, rules or regulations. 114 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 4 3.12 Insurance. 3.12.1 Time for Compliance. Consultant shall not commence work under this Agreement until it has provided evidence satisfactory to the Commission that it has secured all insurance required under this section, in a form and with insurance companies acceptable to the Commission. In addition, Consultant shall not allow any subcontractor to commence work on any subcontract until it has secured all insurance required under this section. 3.12.2 Minimum Requirements. Consultant shall, at its expense, procure and maintain for the duration of the Agreement insurance against claims for injuries to persons or damages to property which may arise from or in connection with the performance of the Agreement by the Consultant, its agents, representatives, employees or subcontractors. Consultant shall also require all of its subcontractors to procure and maintain the same insurance for the duration of the Agreement. Such insurance shall meet at least the following minimum levels of coverage: (A) Minimum Scope of Insurance. Coverage shall be at least as broad as the latest version of the following: (1) General Liability: Insurance Services Office Commercial General Liability coverage (occurrence form CG 0001 or exact equivalent); (2) Automobile Liability: Insurance Services Office Business Auto Coverage (form CA 0001, code 1 (any auto) or exact equivalent); and (3) Workers’ Compensation and Employer’s Liability: Workers’ Compensation insurance as required by the State of California and Employer’s Liability Insurance. (B) Minimum Limits of Insurance. Consultant shall maintain limits no less than: (1) General Liability: $2,000,000 per occurrence for bodily injury, personal injury and property damage. If Commercial General Liability Insurance or other form with general aggregate limit is used, either the general aggregate limit shall apply separately to this Agreement/location or the general aggregate limit shall be twice the required occurrence limit; (2) Automobile Liability: $1,000,000 per accident for bodily injury and property damage; and (3) if Consultant has an employees, Workers’ Compensation and Employer’s Liability: Workers’ Compensation limits as required by the Labor Code of the State of California. Employer’s Practices Liability limits of $1,000,000 per accident. 3.12.3 Professional Liability. [___INCLUDE ONLY IF APPLICABLE - DELETE OTHERWISE___] Consultant shall procure and maintain, and require its sub- consultants to procure and maintain, for a period of five (5) years following completion of the Project, errors and omissions liability insurance appropriate to their profession. Such insurance shall be in an amount not less than $1,000,000 [___INCREASE IF NECESSARY - OTHERWISE LEAVE AS IS AND DELETE THIS NOTE___] per claim. This insurance shall be endorsed to include contractual liability applicable to this Agreement and shall be written on a policy form coverage specifically designed to protect against acts, errors or omissions of the Consultant. “Covered Professional Services” as designated in the policy must specifically include work performed under this Agreement. The policy must “pay on behalf of” the insured and must include a provision establishing the insurer's duty to defend. 115 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 5 3.12.4 Insurance Endorsements. The insurance policies shall contain the following provisions, or Consultant shall provide endorsements on forms approved by the Commission to add the following provisions to the insurance policies: (A) General Liability. (i) Commercial General Liability Insurance must include coverage for (1) bodily Injury and property damage; (2) personal Injury/advertising Injury; (3) premises/operations liability; (4) products/completed operations liability; (5) aggregate limits that apply per Project; (6) explosion, collapse and underground (UCX) exclusion deleted; (7) contractual liability with respect to this Agreement; (8) broad form property damage; and (9) independent consultants coverage. (ii) The policy shall contain no endorsements or provisions limiting coverage for (1) contractual liability; (2) cross liability exclusion for claims or suits by one insured against another; or (3) contain any other exclusion contrary to this Agreement. (iii) The policy shall give the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, and agents insured status using ISO endorsement forms 20 10 10 01 and 20 37 10 01, or endorsements providing the exact same coverage. (iv) The additional insured coverage under the policy shall be “primary and non-contributory” and will not seek contribution from the Commission’s insurance or self-insurance and shall be at least as broad as CG 20 01 04 13, or endorsements providing the exact same coverage. (B) Automobile Liability. The automobile liability policy shall be endorsed to state that: (1) the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be covered as additional insureds with respect to the ownership, operation, maintenance, use, loading or unloading of any auto owned, leased, hired or borrowed by the Consultant or for which the Consultant is responsible; and (2) the insurance coverage shall be primary insurance as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents, or if excess, shall stand in an unbroken chain of coverage excess of the Consultant’s scheduled underlying coverage. Any insurance or self-insurance maintained by the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents shall be excess of the Consultant’s insurance and shall not be called upon to contribute with it in any way. 116 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 6 (C) Workers’ Compensation and Employers Liability Coverage. (i) Consultant certifies that he/she is aware of the provisions of Section 3700 of the California Labor Code which requires every employer to be insured against liability for workers’ compensation or to undertake self-insurance in accordance with the provisions of that code, and he/she will comply with such provisions before commencing work under this Agreement. (ii) The insurer shall agree to waive all rights of subrogation against the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents for losses paid under the terms of the insurance policy which arise from work performed by the Consultant. (D) All Coverages. (i) Defense costs shall be payable in addition to the limits set forth hereunder. (ii) Requirements of specific coverage or limits contained in this section are not intended as a limitation on coverage, limits, or other requirement, or a waiver of any coverage normally provided by any insurance. It shall be a requirement under this Agreement that any available insurance proceeds broader than or in excess of the specified minimum insurance coverage requirements and/or limits set forth herein shall be available to the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents as additional insureds under said policies. Furthermore, the requirements for coverage and limits shall be (1) the minimum coverage and limits specified in this Agreement; or (2) the broader coverage and maximum limits of coverage of any insurance policy or proceeds available to the named insured; whichever is greater. (iii) The limits of insurance required in this Agreement may be satisfied by a combination of primary and umbrella or excess insurance. Any umbrella or excess insurance shall contain or be endorsed to contain a provision that such coverage shall also apply on a primary and non-contributory basis for the benefit of the Commission (if agreed to in a written contract or agreement) before the Commission’s own insurance or self-insurance shall be called upon to protect it as a named insured. The umbrella/excess policy shall be provided on a “following form” basis with coverage at least as broad as provided on the underlying policy(ies). (iv) Consultant shall provide the Commission at least thirty (30) days prior written notice of cancellation of any policy required by this Agreement, except that the Consultant shall provide at least ten (10) days prior written notice of cancellation of any such policy due to non-payment of premium. If any of the required coverage is cancelled or expires during the term of this Agreement, the Consultant shall deliver renewal certificate(s) including the General Liability Additional Insured Endorsement to the Commission at least ten (10) days prior to the effective date of cancellation or expiration. 117 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 7 (v) The retroactive date (if any) of each policy is to be no later than the effective date of this Agreement. Consultant shall maintain such coverage continuously for a period of at least three years after the completion of the work under this Agreement. Consultant shall purchase a one (1) year extended reporting period A) if the retroactive date is advanced past the effective date of this Agreement; B) if the policy is cancelled or not renewed; or C) if the policy is replaced by another claims-made policy with a retroactive date subsequent to the effective date of this Agreement. (vi) The foregoing requirements as to the types and limits of insurance coverage to be maintained by Consultant, and any approval of said insurance by the Commission, is not intended to and shall not in any manner limit or qualify the liabilities and obligations otherwise assumed by the Consultant pursuant to this Agreement, including but not limited to, the provisions concerning indemnification. (vii) If at any time during the life of the Agreement, any policy of insurance required under this Agreement does not comply with these specifications or is canceled and not replaced, Commission has the right but not the duty to obtain the insurance it deems necessary and any premium paid by Commission will be promptly reimbursed by Consultant or Commission will withhold amounts sufficient to pay premium from Consultant payments. In the alternative, Commission may cancel this Agreement. The Commission may require the Consultant to provide complete copies of all insurance policies in effect for the duration of the Project. (viii) Neither the Commission nor any of its directors, officials, officers, employees or agents shall be personally responsible for any liability arising under or by virtue of this Agreement. Each insurance policy required by this Agreement shall be endorsed to state that: 3.12.5 Deductibles and Self-Insurance Retentions. Any deductibles or self-insured retentions must be declared to and approved by the Commission. If the Commission does not approve the deductibles or self-insured retentions as presented, Consultant shall guarantee that, at the option of the Commission, either: (1) the insurer shall reduce or eliminate such deductibles or self-insured retentions as respects the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees and agents; or, (2) the Consultant shall procure a bond guaranteeing payment of losses and related investigation costs, claims and administrative and defense expenses. 3.12.6 Acceptability of Insurers. Insurance is to be placed with insurers with a current A.M. Best’s rating no less than A:VIII, licensed to do business in California, and satisfactory to the Commission. 3.12.7 Verification of Coverage. Consultant shall furnish Commission with original certificates of insurance and endorsements effecting coverage required by this 118 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 8 Agreement on forms satisfactory to the Commission. The certificates and endorsements for each insurance policy shall be signed by a person authorized by that insurer to bind coverage on its behalf. All certificates and endorsements must be received and approved by the Commission before work commences. The Commission reserves the right to require complete, certified copies of all required insurance policies, at any time. 3.12.8 Subconsultant Insurance Requirements. Consultant shall not allow any subcontractors or subconsultants to commence work on any subcontract until they have provided evidence satisfactory to the Commission that they have secured all insurance required under this section. Policies of commercial general liability insurance provided by such subcontractors or subconsultants shall be endorsed to name the Commission as an additional insured using ISO form CG 20 38 04 13 or an endorsement providing the exact same coverage. If requested by Consultant, the Commission may approve different scopes or minimum limits of insurance for particular subcontractors or subconsultants. 3.13 Safety. Consultant shall execute and maintain its work so as to avoid injury or damage to any person or property. In carrying out its Services, the Consultant shall at all times be in compliance with all applicable local, state and federal laws, rules and regulations, and shall exercise all necessary precautions for the safety of employees appropriate to the nature of the work and the conditions under which the work is to be performed. Safety precautions as applicable shall include, but shall not be limited to: (A) adequate life protection and life-saving equipment and procedures; (B) instructions in accident prevention for all employees and subcontractors, such as safe walkways, scaffolds, fall protection ladders, bridges, gang planks, confined space procedures, trenching and shoring, equipment and other safety devices, equipment and wearing apparel as are necessary or lawfully required to prevent accidents or injuries; and (C) adequate facilities for the proper inspection and maintenance of all safety measures. 3.14 Fees and Payment. 3.14.1 Compensation. Consultant shall receive compensation, including authorized reimbursements, for all Services rendered under this Agreement at the rates set forth in Exhibit "C" attached hereto. The overhead rates included in the attached Exhibit “C” shall be fixed for the term of the Master Agreement, and shall not be subject to adjustment, unless required by the applicable funding source. The total compensation shall not exceed Four hundred thirty six thousand eight hundred ($436,800) without written approval of Commission's Executive Director (“Total Compensation”). Extra Work may be authorized, as described below, and if authorized, will be compensated at the rates and manner set forth in this Agreement. 3.14.2 Payment of Compensation. Consultant shall submit to Commission a monthly statement which indicates work completed and hours of Services rendered by Consultant. The statement shall describe the amount of Services and supplies provided since the initial commencement date, or since the start of the subsequent billing periods, as appropriate, through the date of the statement. Commission shall, within 45 119 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 9 days of receiving such statement, review the statement and pay all approved charges thereon. 3.14.3 Reimbursement for Expenses. Consultant shall not be reimbursed for any expenses unless authorized in writing by Commission. 3.14.4 Extra Work. At any time during the term of this Agreement, Commission may request that Consultant perform Extra Work. As used herein, "Extra Work" means any work which is determined by Commission to be necessary for the proper completion of the Project, but which the parties did not reasonably anticipate would be necessary at the execution of this Agreement. Consultant shall not perform, nor be compensated for, Extra Work without written authorization from Commission's Executive Director. 3.15 Accounting Records. Consultant shall maintain complete and accurate records with respect to all costs and expenses incurred and fees charged under this Agreement. All such records shall be clearly identifiable. Consultant shall allow a representative of Commission during normal business hours to examine, audit, and make transcripts or copies of such records and any other documents created pursuant to this Agreement. Consultant shall allow inspection of all work, data, documents, proceedings, and activities related to the Agreement for a period of three (3) years from the date of final payment under this Agreement. 3.16 Termination of Agreement. 3.16.1 Grounds for Termination. Commission may, by written notice to Consultant, terminate the whole or any part of this Agreement at any time and without cause by giving written notice to Consultant of such termination, and specifying the effective date thereof. Upon termination, Consultant shall be compensated only for those services which have been fully and adequately rendered to Commission through the effective date of the termination, and Consultant shall be entitled to no further compensation. Consultant may not terminate this Agreement except for cause. 3.16.2 Effect of Termination. If this Agreement is terminated as provided herein, Commission may require Consultant to provide all finished or unfinished Documents and Data, as defined below, and other information of any kind prepared by Consultant in connection with the performance of Services under this Agreement. Consultant shall be required to provide such document and other information within fifteen (15) days of the request. 3.16.3 Additional Services. In the event this Agreement is terminated in whole or in part as provided herein, Commission may procure, upon such terms and in such manner as it may determine appropriate, services similar to those terminated. 120 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 10 3.17 Delivery of Notices. All notices permitted or required under this Agreement shall be given to the respective parties at the following address, or at such other address as the respective parties may provide in writing for this purpose: CONSULTANT: COMMISSION: SDI Presence LLC Riverside County 200 E. Randolph Street Transportation Commission Suite 3550 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Chicago, IL 60601 Riverside, CA 92501 Attn: David Gupta, CEO Attn: Executive Director Such notice shall be deemed made when personally delivered or when mailed, forty-eight (48) hours after deposit in the U.S. Mail, first class postage prepaid and addressed to the party at its applicable address. Actual notice shall be deemed adequate notice on the date actual notice occurred, regardless of the method of service. 3.18 Ownership of Materials/Confidentiality. 3.18.1 Documents & Data. This Agreement creates an exclusive and perpetual license for Commission to copy, use, modify, reuse, or sub-license any and all copyrights and designs embodied in plans, specifications, studies, drawings, estimates, materials, data and other documents or works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, including but not limited to, physical drawings or data magnetically or otherwise recorded on computer diskettes, which are prepared or caused to be prepared by Consultant under this Agreement (“Documents & Data”). Consultant shall require all subcontractors to agree in writing that Commission is granted an exclusive and perpetual license for any Documents & Data the subcontractor prepares under this Agreement. Consultant represents and warrants that Consultant has the legal right to grant the exclusive and perpetual license for all such Documents & Data. Consultant makes no such representation and warranty in regard to Documents & Data which were prepared by design professionals other than Consultant or provided to Consultant by the Commission. Commission shall not be limited in any way in its use of the Documents & Data at any time, provided that any such use not within the purposes intended by this Agreement shall be at Commission’s sole risk. 3.18.2 Intellectual Property. In addition, Commission shall have and retain all right, title and interest (including copyright, patent, trade secret and other proprietary rights) in all plans, specifications, studies, drawings, estimates, materials, data, enhancements, documents, and any and all works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium or expression, including but not limited to, physical drawings or other data 121 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 11 magnetically or otherwise recorded on computer media prepared or developed by or on behalf of Consultant under this Agreement (“Intellectual Property”). The Commission shall have and retain all right, title and interest in Intellectual Property developed or modified under this Agreement whether or not paid for wholly or in part by Commission, whether or not developed in conjunction with Consultant, and whether or not developed by Consultant. Consultant will execute separate written assignments of any and all rights to the above referenced Intellectual Property upon request of Commission. Consultant shall also be responsible to obtain in writing separate written assignments from any subcontractors or agents of Consultant of any and all right to the above referenced Intellectual Property. Should Consultant, either during or following termination of this Agreement, desire to use any of the above-referenced Intellectual Property, it shall first obtain the written approval of the Commission. All materials and documents which were developed or prepared by the Consultant for general use prior to the execution of this Agreement and which are not the copyright of any other party or publicly available and any other computer applications, shall continue to be the property of the Consultant. However, unless otherwise identified and stated prior to execution of this Agreement, Consultant represents and warrants that it has the right to grant the exclusive and perpetual license for all such Intellectual Property as provided herein. Commission further is granted by Consultant a non-exclusive and perpetual license to copy, use or modify any and all pre-existing intellectual property otherwise owned by Consultant which is provided to Commission by Consultant in performance of the Services under this Agreement or is the basis or foundation for any derivative, collective, insurrectional, or supplemental work created under this Agreement. 3.18.3 Consultant and Third-Party IP. Notwithstanding anything in this Agreement to the contrary the terms “Documents and Data” and “Intellectual Property” shall not include any Consultant or third-party pre-existing intellectual property in any form. 3.18.4 Confidentiality. All ideas, memoranda, specifications, plans, procedures, drawings, descriptions, computer program data, input record data, written information, and other Documents and Data either created by or provided to Consultant in connection with the performance of this Agreement shall be held confidential by Consultant. Such materials shall not, without the prior written consent of Commission, be used by Consultant for any purposes other than the performance of the Services. Nor shall such materials be disclosed to any person or entity not connected with the performance of the Services or the Project. Nothing furnished to Consultant which is otherwise known to Consultant or is generally known, or has become known, to the related industry shall be deemed confidential. Consultant shall not use Commission's name or insignia, photographs of the Project, or any publicity pertaining to the Services or the Project in any 122 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 12 magazine, trade paper, newspaper, television or radio production or other similar medium without the prior written consent of Commission. 3.18.5 Infringement Indemnification. Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold the Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, volunteers and agents free and harmless, pursuant to the indemnification provisions of this Agreement, for any alleged infringement of any patent, copyright, trade secret, trade name, trademark, or any other proprietary right of any person or entity in consequence of the use on the Project by Commission of the Documents & Data, including any method, process, product, or concept specified or depicted. 3.19 Cooperation; Further Acts. The Parties shall fully cooperate with one another, and shall take any additional acts or sign any additional documents as may be necessary, appropriate or convenient to attain the purposes of this Agreement. 3.20 Attorney's Fees. If either party commences an action against the other party, either legal, administrative or otherwise, arising out of or in connection with this Agreement, the prevailing party in such litigation shall be entitled to have and recover from the losing party reasonable attorney's fees and costs of such actions. 3.21 Indemnification. To the fullest extent permitted by law, Consultant shall defend (with counsel of Commission’s choosing), indemnify and hold Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, volunteers, and agents free and harmless from any and all claims, demands, causes of action, costs, expenses, liability, loss, damage or injury, in law or equity, to property or persons, including wrongful death, in any manner arising out of or incident to alleged negligent acts, omissions, or willful misconduct of Consultant, its officials, officers, employees, agents, consultants, and contractors arising out of or in connection with the performance of the Services, the Project or this Agreement, including without limitation the payment of consequential damages, expert witness fees, and attorneys’ fees and other related costs and expenses. Consultant shall defend, at Consultant's own cost, expense and risk, any and all such aforesaid suits, actions or other legal proceedings of every kind that may be brought or instituted against Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents, or volunteers. Consultant shall pay and satisfy any judgment, award or decree that may be rendered against Commission or its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents, or volunteers, in any such suit, action or other legal proceeding. Consultant shall reimburse Commission and its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents, and/or volunteers, for any and all legal expenses and costs, including reasonable attorney’s fees, incurred by each of them in connection therewith or in enforcing the indemnity herein provided. Consultant's obligation to indemnify shall not be restricted to insurance proceeds, if any, received by Commission, its directors, officials, officers, employees, consultants, agents, or volunteers. If Consultant’s obligation to defend, indemnify, and/or hold harmless arises out of Consultant’s performance as a “design professional” (as that term is defined under Civil Code section 2782.8), then, and only to the extent required by Civil Code section 123 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 13 2782.8, which is fully incorporated herein, Consultant’s indemnification obligation shall be limited to claims that arise out of, pertain to, or relate to the negligence, recklessness, or willful misconduct of the Consultant, and, upon Consultant obtaining a final adjudication by a court of competent jurisdiction, Consultant’s liability for such claim, including the cost to defend, shall not exceed the Consultant’s proportionate percentage of fault. Consultant’s obligations as set forth in this Section shall survive expiration or termination of this Agreement . 3.22 Entire Agreement. This Agreement contains the entire Agreement of the parties with respect to the subject matter hereof, and supersedes all prior negotiations, understandings or agreements. This Agreement may only be supplemented, amended, or modified by a writing signed by both parties. 3.23 Governing Law. This Agreement shall be governed by the laws of the State of California. Venue shall be in Riverside County. 3.24 Time of Essence. Time is of the essence for each and every provision of this Agreement. 3.25 Commission's Right to Employ Other Consultants. The Commission reserves the right to employ other consultants in connection with this Project. 3.26 Successors and Assigns. This Agreement shall be binding on the successors and assigns of the parties, and shall not be assigned by Consultant without the prior written consent of Commission. 3.27 Prohibited Interests and Conflicts. 3.27.1 Solicitation. Consultant maintains and warrants that it has not employed nor retained any company or person, other than a bona fide employee working solely for Consultant, to solicit or secure this Agreement. Further, Consultant warrants that it has not paid nor has it agreed to pay any company or person, other than a bona fide employee working solely for Consultant, any fee, commission, percentage, brokerage fee, gift or other consideration contingent upon or resulting from the award or making of this Agreement. For breach or violation of this warranty, Commission shall have the right to rescind this Agreement without liability. 3.27.2 Conflict of Interest. For the term of this Agreement, no member, officer or employee of Commission, during the term of his or her service with Commission, shall have any direct interest in this Agreement, or obtain any present or anticipated material benefit arising therefrom. 3.27.3 Conflict of Employment. Employment by the Consultant of personnel currently on the payroll of the Commission shall not be permitted in the performance of this Agreement, even though such employment may occur outside of the 124 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 14 employee’s regular working hours or on weekends, holidays or vacation time. Further, the employment by the Consultant of personnel who have been on the Commission payroll within one year prior to the date of execution of this Agreement, where this employment is caused by and or dependent upon the Consultant securing this or related Agreements with the Commission, is prohibited. 3.27.4 Employment Adverse to the Commission. Consultant shall notify the Commission, and shall obtain the Commission’s written consent, prior to accepting work to assist with or participate in a third-party lawsuit or other legal or administrative proceeding against the Commission during the term of this Agreement. 3.28 Equal Opportunity Employment. Consultant represents that it is an equal opportunity employer and it shall not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, sex or age. Such non-discrimination shall include, but not be limited to, all activities related to initial employment, upgrading, demotion, transfer, recruitment or recruitment advertising, layoff or termination. Consultant shall also comply with all relevant provisions of Commission's Disadvantaged Business Enterprise program, Affirmative Action Plan or other related Commission programs or guidelines currently in effect or hereinafter enacted. 3.29 Subcontracting. Consultant shall not subcontract any portion of the work or Services required by this Agreement, except as expressly stated herein, without prior written approval of the Commission. Subcontracts, if any, shall contain a provision making them subject to all provisions stipulated in this Agreement. 3.30 Prevailing Wages. By its execution of this Agreement, Consultant certified that it is aware of the requirements of California Labor Code Sections 1720 et seq. and 1770 et seq., as well as California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Section 16000 et seq. (“Prevailing Wage Laws”), which require the payment of prevailing wage rates and the performance of other requirements on certain “public works” and “maintenance” projects. If the Services are being performed as part of an applicable “public works” or “maintenance” project, as defined by the Prevailing Wage Laws, and if the total compensation is $1,000 or more, Consultant agrees to fully comply with such Prevailing Wage Laws. The Commission shall provide Consultant with a copy of the prevailing rate of per diem wages in effect at the commencement of this Agreement. Consultant shall make copies of the prevailing rates of per diem wages for each craft, classification or type of worker needed to execute the Services available to interested parties upon request, and shall post copies at the Consultant's principal place of business and at the project site. Consultant shall defend, indemnify and hold the Commission, its elected officials, officers, employees and agents free and harmless from any claims, liabilities, costs, penalties or interest arising out of any failure or alleged failure to comply with the Prevailing Wage Laws. 3.30.1 DIR Registration. If the Services are being performed as part of an applicable “public works” or “maintenance” project, then pursuant to Labor Code Sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, the Consultant and all subconsultants must be registered with the Department of Industrial Relations. If applicable, Consultant shall maintain registration 125 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 15 for the duration of the Project and require the same of any subconsultants. This Project may also be subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. It shall be Consultant’s sole responsibility to comply with all applicable registration and labor compliance requirements. 3.31 Employment of Apprentices. This Agreement shall not prevent the employment of properly indentured apprentices in accordance with the California Labor Code, and no employer or labor union shall refuse to accept otherwise qualified employees as indentured apprentices on the work performed hereunder solely on the ground of race, creed, national origin, ancestry, color or sex. Every qualified apprentice shall be paid the standard wage paid to apprentices under the regulations of the craft or trade in which he or she is employed and shall be employed only in the craft or trade to which he or she is registered. If California Labor Code Section 1777.5 applies to the Services, Consultant and any subcontractor hereunder who employs workers in any apprenticeable craft or trade shall apply to the joint apprenticeship council administering applicable standards for a certificate approving Consultant or any sub-consultant for the employment and training of apprentices. Upon issuance of this certificate, Consultant and any sub-consultant shall employ the number of apprentices provided for therein, as well as contribute to the fund to administer the apprenticeship program in each craft or trade in the area of the work hereunder. The parties expressly understand that the responsibility for compliance with provisions of this Section and with Sections 1777.5, 1777.6 and 1777.7 of the California Labor Code in regard to all apprenticeable occupations lies with Consultant. 3.32 No Waiver. Failure of Commission to insist on any one occasion upon strict compliance with any of the terms, covenants or conditions hereof shall not be deemed a waiver of such term, covenant or condition, nor shall any waiver or relinquishment of any rights or powers hereunder at any one time or more times be deemed a waiver or relinquishment of such other right or power at any other time or times. 3.33 Eight-Hour Law. Pursuant to the provisions of the California Labor Code, eight hours of labor shall constitute a legal day's work, and the time of service of any worker employed on the work shall be limited and restricted to eight hours during any one calendar day, and forty hours in any one calendar week, except when payment for overtime is made at not less than one and one-half the basic rate for all hours worked in excess of eight hours per day ("Eight-Hour Law"), unless Consultant or the Services are not subject to the Eight-Hour Law. Consultant shall forfeit to Commission as a penalty, $50.00 for each worker employed in the execution of this Agreement by him, or by any sub-consultant under him, for each calendar day during which such workman is required or permitted to work more than eight hours in any calendar day and forty hours in any one calendar week without such compensation for overtime violation of the provisions of the California Labor Code, unless Consultant or the Services are not subject to the Eight-Hour Law. 126 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 16 3.34 Subpoenas or Court Orders. Should Consultant receive a subpoena or court order related to this Agreement, the Services or the Project, Consultant shall immediately provide written notice of the subpoena or court order to the Commission. Consultant shall not respond to any such subpoena or court order until notice to the Commission is provided as required herein, and shall cooperate with the Commission in responding to the subpoena or court order. 3.35 Survival. All rights and obligations hereunder that by their nature are to continue after any expiration or termination of this Agreement, including, but not limited to, the indemnification and confidentiality obligations, and the obligations related to receipt of subpoenas or court orders, shall survive any such expiration or termination. 3.36 No Third-Party Beneficiaries. There are no intended third-party beneficiaries of any right or obligation assumed by the Parties. 3.37 Labor Certification. By its signature hereunder, Consultant certifies that it is aware of the provisions of Section 3700 of the California Labor Code which require every employer to be insured against liability for Workers’ Compensation or to undertake self-insurance in accordance with the provisions of that Code and agrees to comply with such provisions before commencing the performance of the Services. 3.38 Counterparts. This Agreement may be signed in counterparts, each of which shall constitute an original. 3.39 Incorporation of Recitals. The recitals set forth above are true and correct and are incorporated into this Agreement as though fully set forth herein. 3.40 Invalidity; Severability. If any portion of this Agreement is declared invalid, illegal, or otherwise unenforceable by a court of competent jurisdiction, the remaining provisions shall continue in full force and effect. 3.41 Conflicting Provisions. In the event that provisions of any attached exhibits conflict in any way with the provisions set forth in this Agreement, the language, terms and conditions contained in this Agreement shall control the actions and obligations of the Parties and the interpretation of the Parties’ understanding concerning the performance of the Services. 3.42 Headings. Article and Section Headings, paragraph captions or marginal headings contained in this Agreement are for convenience only and shall have no effect in the construction or interpretation of any provision herein. 3.43 Assignment or Transfer. Consultant shall not assign, hypothecate, or transfer, either directly or by operation of law, this Agreement or any interest herein, without the prior written consent of the Commission. Any attempt to do so shall be null and void, and any assignees, hypothecates or transferees shall acquire no right or interest by reason of such attempted assignment, hypothecation or transfer. 127 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 17 3.44 Authority to Enter Agreement. Consultant has all requisite power and authority to conduct its business and to execute, deliver, and perform the Agreement. Each Party warrants that the individuals who have signed this Agreement have the legal power, right, and authority to make this Agreement and bind each respective Party. 128 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 18 SIGNATURE PAGE TO RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AGREEMENT FOR ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING PROJECT OVERSIGHT SERVICES WITH SDI PRESENCE LLC IN WITNESS WHEREOF, this Agreement was executed on the date first written above. RIVERSIDE COUNTY CONSULTANT: TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION SDI PRESENCE LLC By: __________________________ By: ____________________________ [INSERT NAME] Signature Chairman ___________________________ Name [NOT NEEDED IF APPROVED BY COMMISSION] ____________________________ Title By: ____________________________ Anne Mayer Executive Director Approved as to Form: Attest: By: ____________________________ By: ________________________ Best Best & Krieger LLP General Counsel Its: ________________________ * A corporation requires the signatures of two corporate officers. One signature shall be that of the chairman of board, the president or any vice president and the second signature (on the attest line) shall be that of the secretary, any assistant secretary, the chief financial officer or any assistant treasurer of such corporation. If the above persons are not the intended signatories, evidence of signature authority shall be provided to RCTC. 129 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 B-1 EXHIBIT "A" SCOPE OF SERVICES The following outlines the scope of services sought: 1) Project Management a) Provide necessary tools to monitor the project plan, reprioritize tasks, and realign resources as necessary to optimize the projected timeline; ensure that the best resources are assigned to each sub-team and create an environment conducive to the successful completion of the project; assist in monitoring and controlling direct and hidden costs; identify, quantify, and mitigate risks that may impact scope, schedule resources, and costs of the project; ensure clear and open communications among the parties regarding status, problems, and resolutions; and provide additional end-user training for team members and/or RCTC staff. b) Coordinate resolution of critical issues by documenting Tyler Technologies provided recommendations related to security, system availability/redundancy, disaster recovery, cloud-based solutions, desk procedures, project controls, and related issues. c) Participate in phase, milestone, and final project reviews. d) Document configuration decisions, including status, results, and next steps. e) Identify areas of schedule related concerns and ensure deliverables are performed timely. f) Define agreed-upon report templates. Provide assistance as needed, to develop customized reports through Munis SaaS ERP. g) Submit bi-weekly project status reports that will include estimate to complete/estimate at completion. The following outlines the scope of services sought: 2) Change Management a) Review the Munis SaaS ERP with RCTC project manager and other key RCTC staff and recommend how best to configure the Munis SaaS ERP and cloud-based solutions to accomplish RCTC’s goals. b) Recommend improvements, solve problems, and take corrective actions when problems arise. c) Provide business process evaluation and “best practices” recommendations during software configuration. Ensure that recommendations or decisions are in the best interest of RCTC. d) Identify potential benefits or drawbacks, including long-term effects of the selection of one process over another. e) Lead the effort to track, manage, and resolve software and hardware related issues (configurations, bugs, trainings, etc). Identify replacement of hardware (scanners, printers, barcodes, etc.) needs to ensure efficient configuration with Munis SaaS ERP. 130 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 B-2 f) Create “Go Live” checklist. 3) Risk Management a) Track the training of RCTC’s core users to determine if they have received the levels of training recommended by Tyler Technologies. b) Develop a testing plan to reflect unit, integration, and performance testing and interfaces. c) Support the development of unit and integration test scripts for the system. Track the accomplishment of test scripts and report the progress to the Tyler Technologies project manager. 4) Review Existing Data/Munis Data Conversion a) Work with appropriate RCTC staff to set up application databases by mapping data from existing system to Munis SaaS ERP. b) Assist RCTC staff in determining what data should be maintained and how it should be maintained. c) Assist Commission staff in determining what data should be brought over into Munis SaaS ERP. d) Assist RCTC staff in determining how to do a “data clean-up” before bringing data over into Munis SaaS ERP. e) Assist RCTC staff in determining the most economical and efficient method of bringing the data into the Munis SaaS ERP and assist in the transition of the data. The following outlines the scope of services sought: f) Develop a conversion plan that includes developing and setting up application databases, rollover/convert historical data, define security features, and define user categories and profiles. g) Review source data and the relationships between tables to identify inaccuracies or situations that may cause duplication of entries in the new system. h) Technology: On an as needed basis, provide technological support in such areas as system administration, security, systems integration, and testing and system conversion and interfaces. 5) Post Implementation Support a) Be onsite for one week to assist users during core financials and human resources/payroll “Go Live”. Estimated Travel Included in hourly rate Estimated Total $436,800 131 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 B-3 EXHIBIT "B" SCHEDULE OF SERVICES [___INSERT___] 132 DRAFT17336.00000\8752982.5 C-1 EXHIBIT "C" COMPENSATION [___INSERT___] 133 AGENDA ITEM 8G BLANK Agenda Item 8G RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM Budget and Implementation Committee Cheryl Donahue, Public Affairs Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Report, April – June 2018 BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file the Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Report for April – June 2018. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: During the May 2018 Commission meeting, staff presented the Commission’s first Quarterly Public Engagement Metrics Report. The report included data related to public engagement goals from January-March 2018, and serves as a baseline for ongoing activities. An updated report for the second quarter, which covers April – June 2018, is provided. These quarterly reports provide a data-driven approach for measuring progress toward public engagement goals, allow staff to assess the effectiveness of its efforts on an ongoing basis, and provide transparency into how the Commission’s resources are being used to engage and educate the public. The quarterly report includes two sets of data: 1) Metrics for RCTC’s overall public engagement activities, including website use and access; website top pages visited; email notifications; social media likes, engagement and reach; and public sentiment 2) Metrics for RCTC’s Interstate 15 Express Lanes Project public engagement activities, including email activity, website sessions, and social media. The report may evolve as staff refines its approaches to measuring public engagement activities and in response to any feedback from Commissioners. Report highlights for this quarter follow and are included in a graphical format with this agenda item. It is important to note the metrics reflect a sizeable expenditure of social media advertising during the second quarter, resulting in significant growth in most areas. 134 Agenda Item 8G RCTC Overall Public Engagement 1) Website a. For the quarter, there were 32,417 website sessions, an 83 percent increase from last quarter’s 17,750 sessions. There also were a total of 22,714 unique users, which represent a jump of 127 percent over the previous quarter’s 10,015 unique users. b. Most people (34 percent) access the website by using a direct search (keying in rctc.org). A smaller number (26 percent) used display ads or paid searches to reach the site. Smaller numbers use organic searches, such as Google (18 percent), social media (16 percent), and referrals from other websites (6 percent). c. More than two-thirds of users (68 percent) access the site through a smart phone or other mobile device, versus a desktop computer (32 percent). The homepage continues to be the most frequently visited page, followed by “The Point” subscription page, Metrolink Angels Express information, and “The Point” e-newsletter. 2) Social Media a. Facebook: At the end of the quarter, the Facebook page had 8,046 likes, an increase of 5 percent over last quarter’s 7,677 likes. The page also had 25,640 forms of engagement, such as likes, comments and shares. This reflects a 21 percent increase from last quarter, which had 21,158 forms of engagement. Facebook also had 4,664,262 impressions, which is the number of times that RCTC’s content was displayed to people in their news feed. This is a giant increase – 2,049 percent – from last quarter’s 227,678 impressions. b. Twitter: RCTC’s Twitter page showed a 4 percent increase in followers, from 996 to 1,040. Engagement grew 64 percent, from 407 forms of engagement to 668. Impressions skyrocketed by 3,664 percent – from 19,208 to 722,900 impressions. c. Instagram: The Instagram page grew 46 percent, from 175 to 255 followers. Engagement declined by 22 percent, from 696 forms of engagement to 546. Impressions jumped 183 percent to a total of 26,299, compared to last quarter’s 9,277 impressions. d. Overall public sentiment was largely positive, with the exception of comments received on May 13, in response to an Orange County Transportation Authority- produced video about tolling, and on June 24, due to comments about the Gas Tax. 3) RCTC’s The Point: RCTC continues to produce content for its online blog, The Point, and distributes this information via email to subscribers. RCTC’s subscriber rate grew by 30 percent, from 815 to 1,061, of which 36 percent opened The Point, and 7 percent clicked on links to learn more. The open rate last quarter was 35 percent, and the click- through rate last quarter remained the same at 7 percent. 135 Agenda Item 8G Interstate 15 Express Lanes Construction Public Engagement 1) Emails: There were a total of 209 new email sign-ups for the quarter compared to last quarter’s 305, and 15 email inquiries received, compared to last quarter’s 14 email inquiries. 2) Website: There were 5,460 website visits during the quarter, compared to 3,924 sessions last quarter, which represents a 39 percent increase. This was the greatest number of sessions to date for the project, likely due to construction activity that began in April. 3) Social Media: The project uses Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and is working to build its audiences. The Facebook page grew to 1,477 likes from 1,297 likes last quarter, an increase of 14 percent. Twitter grew 19 percent from 148 followers to 176. Instagram followers jumped 248 percent, from 52 to 176. For both RCTC’s overall public engagement and the I-15 Express Lanes Project, RCTC is working to build its audiences and expects public engagement figures to continue to increase, particularly during quarters with heavy digital advertising buys. Public Engagement Metrics Reports will be provided quarterly with comparison data from the previous quarter. Attachments: 1) RCTC Overall Public Engagement Metrics 2) I-15 Express Lanes Public Engagement Metrics 136 BLANK Overall Social Media Sentiment Eblasts +30% Subscribers1,061 AverageOpen %36% AverageClick7% Social Media Web 32,417Number of Sessions +83%22,714Number ofUnique Users Top Pages Visited Subscribe to The Point2 3 Play Ball — Metrolink Angels Express The Point4 Homepage is #1 most visited page Public Engagement Metrics: Q2 April – June 2018 +127% Desktop vs Mobile Users Top Channels Direct (34%) — 7,786 Display Ads (19%) — 4,346 Organic (18.3%) — 4,196 Social (15.8%) — 3,622 Paid Search (7.3%) — 1,674 Referral (5.7%) — 1,297 5/18 (-) Negative comments on 91 Express Lanes video 6/2 (+) Positive comments on RTA 25-cent student fares6/4 (+/-) Initial positive comments on I-15 construction video, followed by negative comments on tolling6/24 (-) Negative comments on Gas Tax Metrics reflect significant increase in social media advertising during Q2 Q1-Q2 DifferencesIn Q2 RCTC began running Google display ads and Google search ads, adding 2 new sectors to the pie chart. Percentages for direct, organic, social and referral went down as a result, but overall traffic grew. 32%68%Desktop Mobile Facebook Impressions4,664,262 +2,049% Page Likes8,046 +5% Engagement25,640 +21% Impressions722,900 +3,664% Followers1,040 +4% Engagement668 +64% Twitter Impressions26,299 +183% Followers255 +46% Engagement546 -22% Instagram 4/154/1 4/29 5/13 5/27 6/10 6/24 0 .05 .10 .15 .20 .25 .30 ATTACHMENT 1 137 BLANK 15 Express Lanes ProjectOutreach Metrics Dec 2016 – Jun 2018 0 300 600 900 1200 1500 Oct – Dec 2016Jan – Mar 2017Apr – Jun 2017Jul – Sep 2017Oct – Dec 2017Jan – Mar 2018Apr – Jun 20180 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 Oct – Dec 2016Jan – Mar 2017Apr – Jun 2017Jul – Sep 2017Oct – Dec 2017Jan – Mar 2018Apr – Jun 20180 100 200 300 400 500 600 Oct – Dec 2016Jan – Mar 2017Apr – Jun 2017Jul – Sep 2017Oct – Dec 2017Jan – Mar 20180 3 6 9 12 15 Oct – Dec 2016Jan – Mar 2017Apr – Jun 2017Jul – Sep 2017Oct – Dec 2017Jan – Mar 2018Apr – Jun 2018Number of Sign-UpsNumber of EmailsNumber of Likes/FollowsWebsite Visits45 845 2790 2145 3033 2243 3924 5460 21 127 195 932 979 1297 1477 69 589 537 161 305 Apr – Jun 2018209 7 13 12 8 8 14 15 Email List Sign-Ups Emails Received Website Visits Social Media Likes/Follows 52 148 176 181 Facebook Page Likes Instagram Followers (Account Opened 02/05/18) Twitter Followers (Account Opened 02/05/18) ATTACHMENT 2 138 BLANK AGENDA ITEM 8H BLANK Agenda Item 8H RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Shirley Medina, Planning and Programming Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: SB 132 Agreement for McKinley Grade Separation Project BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 19-31-005-00 with the city of Corona for the McKinley Grade Separation project that received an allocation of $84,450,000 of SB 132 funds; and 2) Authorize the Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement and any future amendments considered minor, with the exception of changes to funding. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: SB 132 was passed by the state Legislature and signed by the Governor on April 28, 2017 as part of the budget trailer bill. SB 132 created the Riverside County Transportation Efficiency Corridor and allocates $427,172,000 for five projects in Western Riverside County. These projects and funding amounts are specifically called out in the bill as follows: Project Description Amount 91 Toll Connector to Interstate 15 $ 180,000,000 Interstate 15/Limonite Interchange 48,000,000 McKinley Grade Separation 84,450,000 Hamner Bridge Widening 6,322,000 Jurupa Road Grade Separation 108,400,000 Total $ 427,172,000 The SB 132 funds are to be administered by the Commission. Therefore, the Commission has entered into agreements with the project sponsors for the above projects outlining invoicing procedures for SB 132 expenditures. The McKinley Grade Separation project is the last SB 132 project agreement to be approved by the Commission, which the city of Corona approved at its July 18, 2018 city council meeting. 139 Agenda Item 8H The McKinley Grade Separation project will construct a four-lane or six-lane overcrossing bridge of McKinley Street, including sidewalks, streetlights and bike lanes over the existing BNSF tracks and Arlington Channel. The number of through lanes will be determined based on the outcome of traffic studies. SB 132 funds will be used for final design, right of way, and construction. SB 132 requires all appropriated funding to be encumbered and liquidated by June 30, 2023. The local agency costs and related SB 132 funds will pass through the Commission; however, the costs are limited to the SB 132 funds available for each project. These agreements do not commit the Commission to funding the projects above the allocated amounts cited in SB 132. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes N/A Year: FY 2018/19 FY 2019/20+ Amount: FY 2018/19 $27,750,000 FY 2019/20+ $56,700,000 Source of Funds: SB 132 Funds Budget Adjustment: No N/A GL/Project Accounting No.: 003042 415 41510 605 31 41501 $27,750,000 SB 132 revenues 003042 81101 605 31 81101 $ 7,750,000 Engineering 003042 81401 605 31 81401 $20,000,000 Right of Way Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 08/09/2018 Attachments: 1) July 18, 2018 City of Corona Council Approval of Draft Agreement No. 19-31-005-00 2) McKinley Grade Separation Map 140 17336.00001\30680385.6 1 5/8/18 Version Agreement No. ___-___-___-___ SB 132 FUNDING AGREEMENT FOR MCKINLEY GRADE SEPARATION PROJECT IMPROVEMENTS WITH THE CITY OF CORONA 1.Parties and Date. 1.1 This Agreement is executed and entered into this 18 day of July , 2018, by and between the RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION (“COMMISSION”) and the CITY OF CORONA (“CITY”). COMMISSION and CITY are sometimes collectively referred to herein as the “Parties”. 2.Recitals. 2.1 COMMISSION is a county transportation commission created and existing pursuant to California Public Utilities Code Sections 130053 and 130053.5. 2.2 The CITY is a municipal corporation and general law city authorized to undertake transportation improvements within its jurisdiction. 2.3 Pursuant to Senate Bill 132, amendment to Budget Act of 2016, 2660-110-0042, for local assistance of the Riverside County Transportation Efficiency Corridor, funds from the State Highway Account (“Funds”) shall be made available for three (3) transportation projects on the State Highway System (“On-System Projects”), within the county of Riverside. 2.4 The McKinley Grade Separation Project is one of the On-System Projects identified in SB 132 and will improve the existing at -grade crossing of the Burlington Northern Sant a Fe Railway at McKinley Street (the “Project”). 2.5 Pursuant to Senate Bill 107, amendment to Budget Act of 2016, the California Department of Transportation (“Caltrans”) intends to make available the Funds directly to COMMISSION. 2.6 The Funds shall be made available to COMMISSION pursuant to the terms of that certain Master Funding Agreement (“Master Agreement”) entered into between Caltrans and COMMISSION for the transfer of Funds for eligible projects, including the Project. 2.7 Senate Bill 132 and Senate Bill 107 provide that the Funds shall be available for encumbrance and liquidation until June 30, 2023. DRAFT141 ATTACHMENT 1 17336.00001\30680385.6 2 2.8 The Master Agreement terminates on July 1, 2023. COMMISSION is required under the terms of the Master Agreement to request final reimbursement of eligible project expenditures to Caltrans no later than April 15, 2023. As further set forth herein, to be eligible for reimbursement under this Agreement, the CITY shall be required to submit all invoices for Project costs to COMMISSION no later than March 15, 2023. 2.9 COMMISSION will fund the Project in accordance with the terms of this Agreement, and the Master Agreement. Funding for the Project hereunder is contingent on the continued effect of and availability of funding under the Master Agreement. 3. Terms. 3.1 Description of Work. This Agreement is intended to distribute Funds to the CITY for the Project, which will improve the existing at -grade crossing of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway at McKinley Street, separate heavily congested McKinley Street near SR-91 from the BNSF railroad in the City of Corona, and to potentially expand McKinley Avenue from four to six lanes, as determined necessary based on a future traffic study (“the Work”). The Work, including a timetable and a detailed scope of work, is more fully described in Exhibit “A” attached hereto and, pursuant to Section 3.15 below, is subject to modification as requested by the CITY and approved by COMMISSION. The Work may include, as further set forth in Exhibit “A”: 1) PA&ED – Project Approvals & Environmental Document 2) PS&E – Plans, Specifications and Estimates 3) R/W – Right of Way Acquisition and Utility Relocation 4) CONS – Construction The Project is more fully described in Exhibit “A” attached hereto. It is understood and agreed that the CITY shall expend Funds only as set forth in this Agreement and only for the Work. The Parties agree that the exact scope of the Work has not been determined by CITY. The Work shall not include nor will reimbursement be made for analysis, feasibility assessments or alternative evaluations comparing options for separating the crossing i.e., railroad over street versus street over railroad. CITY shall proceed with the Work only upon det ermination of the crossing type, and only following an amendment to this Agreement to more specifically define the Work. The City Manager and the COMMISSION Executive Director shall have authority to execute such amendments. Any use of funds provided pursuant to this Agreement shall be subject to the review and approval of COMMISSION. 3.2 COMMISSION Funding Amount. COMMISSION hereby agrees to distribute to the CITY, on the terms and conditions set forth herein, and in the attached exhibits, a sum not to exceed Eighty-Four Million, Four Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars ($84,450,000) to be used exclusively for reimbursing the CITY for eligible Work expenses as described herein (“Funding Amount”). The CITY acknowledges and agrees that the Funding Amount may be less than the actual cost of the Work, and that COMMISSION shall not contribute Funds in excess of the maximum authorized in this section. DRAFT142 17336.00001\30680385.6 3 3.2.1 Eligible Work Costs. The total Work costs (“Total Work Cost”) may include the following items, provided that such items are included in the Project scope of work attached as Exhibit “A”: (1) CITY and/or consultant costs associated with direct Work coordination and support; (2) funds expended in preparation of preliminary engineering studies; (3) funds expended for preparation of environmental review documentation for the Work; (4) all costs associated with right -of-way acquisition, including right -of-way engineering, appraisal, acquisition, legal costs for condemnation procedures if authorized by the CITY, and costs of reviewing appraisals and offers for property acquisition; (5) costs reasonably incurred if condemnation proceeds; (6) costs incurred in the preparation of plans, specifications, and estimates by CITY or consultants; (7) BNSF, Riverside County Flood Control District, and other agency costs for review of plans, specifications and estimates, if required for the Work; (8) CITY costs associated with bidding, advertising and awarding of the Work contracts, and with obtaining and maintaining any required permits for construction ; (9) construction costs, including change orders to construction contract approved by the CITY; (10) construction management, field inspection and material testing costs; (11) BNSF flagging costs related to shoefly and track work; and (12) CITY administrative costs. 3.2.1.1 Right-of-Way Acquisition. The Parties acknowledge that in order to protect the CITY’s ability to deliver the Project in a timely cost effective manner, the CITY may purchase parcels of property in advance of the completion of the Project’s final design (PS&E). The Parties acknowledge that acquired parcels or remnants purchased in advance of final design may not ultimately be required for the Project. Upon completion of the Project’s final design, the CITY shall provide COMMISSION with a detailed list of all parcels purchased by the CITY for which it received Funds pursuant to this Agreement. The CITY shall identify any parcels or remnants thereof which were acquired using Funds and are not required for construction of the Project. A preliminary list shall be submitted to the COMMISSION 30 days before the issuance of bid documents for construction of the Project and a final list shall be submitted to the COMMISSION no later than 30 days following the recording of the Certificated of Completion for the Project. 3.2.1.2 Valuation and Repayment of Any Property Remnants. Upon receipt of the CITY’s final list, COMMISSION shall meet with the CITY for the purpose of identifying any parcel or reasonably usable remnant of a parcel for which Funds were expended that may reasonably be developed for other use by the CITY and/or sold. The Parties shall confer in good faith to agree upon the disposition of such parcels and remnant parcels and their fair market value as of a date agreed to by the parties, but in no event later than the date of completion of the Project. “Fair Market Value” shall have the definition set forth in Code of Civil Procedure Section 1263.320 and “remnant” shall have the definition set forth in Code of Civil Procedure Section 1240.410. Nothing herein shall preclude the CITY and COMMISSION from beginning the meetings earlier in the event both parties agree that the parcel or remnant will not be used for the Project. 3.2.1.3 Reimbursement for Unused Parcels. Following recordation of the Certificate of Completion for the Project, the CITY shall be responsible for promptly reimbursing COMMISSION for any Funds that were used to acquire parcels which are completely unused in the Project. If CITY funds other than Funds were used to purchase the Parcel, those local funds shall be considered in determining the reimbursement amount. DRAFT143 17336.00001\30680385.6 4 3.2.1.4 Appeal to Commission. In the event of a disagreement between the Parties regarding the reimbursement of Funds under this section 3.2.1, either party may appeal, in writing, to the COMMISSION Board. The COMMISSION Board’s determination regarding excess right -of-way and value pursuant to this section shall be final. 3.2.2 Ineligible Work Costs. The Total Work Cost shall not include the following items which shall be borne solely by the CITY without reimbursement: (1) any CITY fees attributed to the processing of the Work; (2) expenses for items of work not included within the scope of work in Exhibit “A”; and (3) analysis, feasibility assessments or alternative evaluations comparing options for separating the crossing i.e., railroad over street versus street over railroad; and (4) any costs not in compliance with Caltrans funding requirements. 3.2.3 Cost Savings. In the event that bids for the Work are lower than anticipated, or there are cost savings for any other reason, such savings may be allocated by COMMISSION as Project contingency funds to be used for change order costs or additional property acquisition costs. The CITY shall inform COMMISSION of any cost savings and the Parties shall amend this Agreement to reflect the reallocation of Funds. COMMISSION’s Executive Director and the CITY Manager shall be authorized to execute any such amendment. 3.2.4 No Funding for Temporary Improvements. Only segments or components of the Work that are intended to form part of or be integrated into the Work may be funded by Funds. No improvement which is temporary in nature, including but not limited to temporary roads, curbs, or drainage facilities, shall be funded with Funds except as needed for staged construction of the Work. Funds may be utilized to construct a BNSF shoefly, if necessary for completion of the Work. 3.3 CITY’s Funding Obligation to Complete the Work. In the event that the Funds allocated to the Work represent less than the total cost of the Work, the CITY shall provide such additional funds as may be required to complete the Work as described in Exhibit “A”, or as otherwise required. 3.3.1 CITY’s Obligation to Repay Funds to COMMISSION. In the event that: (i) the CITY, for any reason, determines not to proceed with or complete the Work; or (ii) the Work is not timely completed, subject to any extension of time granted by COMMISSION pursuant to Section 3.15; the CITY agrees that any Funds that were distributed to the CITY for the Work shall be repaid in full to COMMISSION. The Parties shall enter into good faith negotiations to establish a reasonable repayment schedule and repayment mechanism which may include, but is not limited to, withholding of the CITY’s allocation of Measure A Local Streets and Roads revenues. The CITY acknowledges and agrees that COMMISSION shall have the right to withhold any Measure A Local Streets and Roads revenues due the CITY, in an amount not to exceed the total of the funds distributed to the CITY, and/or initiate legal action to compel repayment, if the CITY fails to repay COMMISSION within a reasonable time period not to exceed 180 days from receipt of written notification from COMMISSION that repayment is required. 3.4 Work Responsibilities of the CITY. The CITY shall be responsible for the following aspects of the Work, in compliance with state and federal law provided that such items are included in the Project scope of work attached as Exhibit “A”: (i) development and approval DRAFT144 17336.00001\30680385.6 5 of plans, specifications and engineer’s estimate (PS&E), environmental clearance, right of way acquisition, and obtaining all permits required by impacted agencies prior to commencement of the Work ; (ii) all aspects of bidding, awarding, and administration of the contracts for the Work; (iii) all construction management of any construction activities undertaken in connection with the Work, including survey and material testing; and (iv) development of a budget for the Work prior to award of any contract for the Work, taking into consideration available funding, including Funds. 3.5 Term/Notice of Completion. The term of this Agreement shall be from the date first herein above written until: (i) the date COMMISSION formally accepts the Work as complete, which shall occur upon its acceptance by COMMISSION’s Executive Director; (ii) termination of this Agreement pursuant to Section 3.9; or (iii) the CITY has fully satisfied its obligations under this Agreement, including full repayment of Funds to COMMISSION as provided herein. All applicable indemnification provisions of this Agreement shall remain in effect following the termination of this Agreement. 3.6 Representatives of the Parties. COMMISSION’s Executive Director, or his or her designee, shall serve as COMMISSION’s representative and shall have the authority to act on behalf of COMMISSION for all purposes under this Agreement. The CITY hereby designates the Public Works Director, or his or her designee, as the CITY’s representative to COMMISSION. The CITY’s representative shall have the authority to act on behalf of the CITY for all purposes under this Agreement and shall coordinate all activities of the Work under the CITY’s responsibility. The CITY shall work closely and cooperate fully wit h COMMISSION’s representative and any other agencies which may have jurisdiction over or an interest in the Work. 3.7 Expenditure of Funds by CITY Prior to Execution of Agreement. Nothing in this Agreement shall be construed to prevent or preclude the CITY from expending funds on the Work prior to the execution of the Agreement, or from being reimbursed by COMMISSION for such expenditures. However, the CITY understands and acknowledges that any expenditure of funds on the Work prior to the execution of the Agreement is made at the CITY’s sole risk, and that some expenditures by the CITY may not be eligible for reimbursement under this Agreement. 3.8 Review of Services. The CITY shall allow COMMISSION’s Representative to inspect or review the progress of the Work at any reasonable time in order to determine whether the terms of this Agreement are being met. 3.9 Termination. This Agreement may be terminated for cause or convenience as further specified below. 3.9.1 Termination for Convenience. 3.9.1.1 Notice. Either COMMISSION or the CITY may, by written notice to the other party, terminate this Agreement, in whole or in part, for convenience or by giving thirty (30) days' written notice to the other party of such termination and specifying the effective date thereof. In addition, and not as a limitation to the foregoing, COMMISSION may terminate this Agreement for convenience should Funds become unavailable for the Project and/or should Caltrans terminate the Master Agreement. DRAFT145 17336.00001\30680385.6 6 3.9.1.2 Effect of Termination for Convenience. In the event that the CITY terminates this Agreement for convenience, the CITY shall, within 180 days, repay to COMMISSION in full all Funds provided to the CITY under this Agreement. In the event that COMMISSION terminates this Agreement for convenience, COMMISSION shall, within 90 days, distribute to the CITY Funds in an amount equal to the aggregate total of all unpaid invoices which have been received from the CITY regarding the Work at the time of the notice of termination; provided, however, that COMMISSION shall be entitled to exercise its rights under Section 3.14.2, including but not limited to conducting a review of the invoices and requesting additional information. This Agreement shall terminate upon receipt by the non-terminating party of the amounts due it under this Section 3.9.1.2. 3.9.2 Termination for Cause. 3.9.2.1 Notice. Either COMMISSION or the CITY may, by written notice to the other party, terminate this Agreement, in whole or in part, in response to a material breach hereof by the other party, by giving written notice to the other party of such termination and specifying the effective date thereof. The written notice shall provide a 30-day period to cure any alleged breach. During the 30-day cure period, the Parties shall discuss, in good faith, the manner in which the breach can be cured. 3.9.2.2 Effect of Termination for Cause. In the event that the CITY terminates this Agreement in response to COMMISSION's uncured material breach hereof, COMMISSION shall, within 90 days, distribute to the CITY Funds in an amount equal to the aggregate total of all unpaid invoices which have been received from the CITY regarding the Work at the time of the notice of termination. In the event that COMMISSION terminates this Agreement in response to the CITY's uncured material breach hereof, the CITY shall, within 180 days, repay to COMMISSION in full all Funds provided to the CITY under this Agreement. Notwithstanding termination of this Agreement by COMMISSION pursuant to this Section 3.9.2.2, COMMISSION shall be entitled to exercise its rights under Section 3.14.2, including but not limited to conducting a review of the invoices and requesting additional information. This Agreement shall terminate upon receipt by the terminating party of the amounts due it under this Section 3.9.2.2. 3.9.3 Cumulative Remedies. The rights and remedies of the Parties provided in this Section are in addition to any other rights and remedies provided by law or under this Agreement. 3.10 Prevailing Wages. The CITY and any other person or entity hired to perform services on the Work are alerted to the requirements of California Labor Code Sections 1770 et seq., which would require the payment of prevailing wages were the services or any portion thereof determined to be a public work, as defined therein. The CITY shall ensure compliance with these prevailing wage requirements by any person or entity hired to perform the Work. The CITY shall defend, indemnify, and hold harmless COMMISSION, its officers, employees, consultants, and agents from any claim or liability, including without limitation attorneys, fees, arising from its failure or alleged failure to comply with California Labor Code Sections 1770 et seq. 3.11 Progress Reports. COMMISSION may request the CITY to provide COMMISSION with progress reports concerning the status of the Work. DRAFT146 17336.00001\30680385.6 7 3.12 Indemnification. 3.12.1 CITY Responsibilities. In addition to the indemnification required under Section 3.10, the CITY agrees to indemnify and hold harmless COMMISSION, its officers, agents, consultants, and employees from any and all claims, demands, costs or liability arising from or connected with all activities governed by this Agreement including all design and construction activities, due to any act of the CITY or its subcontractors whatsoever, regardless of fault, including negligent acts, errors or omissions or willful misconduct, except that caused by the sole negligence of COMMISSION. The CITY will reimburse COMMISSION for any expenditures, including reasonable attorneys’ fees, incurred by COMMISSION, in defending against claims ultimately determined to be due to any act of the CITY or its subcontractors whatsoever, regardless of fault, including negligent acts, errors or omissions or willful misconduct, except that caused by the sole negligence of COMMISSION. 3.12.2 Effect of Acceptance. The CITY shall be responsible for the professional quality, technical accuracy and the coordination of any services provided to complete the Work. COMMISSION’s review, acceptance or funding of any services performed by the CITY or any other person or entity under this agreement shall not be construed to operate as a waiver of any rights COMMISSION may hold under this Agreement or of any cause of action arising out of this Agreement. Further, the CITY shall be and remain liable to COMMISSION, in accordance with applicable law, for all damages to COMMISSION caused by the CITY’s performance of this Agreement or supervision of any services provided to complete the Work. 3.13 Insurance. The CITY shall require, at a minimum, all persons or entities hired to perform the Work to obtain, and require their subcontractors to obtain, insurance of the types and in the amounts described below and satisfactory to the CITY and COMMISSION. Such insurance shall be maintained throughout the term of this Agreement, or until completion of the Work, whichever occurs last. 3.13.1 Commercial General Liability Insurance. Occurrence version commercial general liability insurance or equivalent form with a combined single limit of not less than $2,000,000.00 per occurrence. If such insurance contains a general aggregate limit, it shall apply separately to the Work or be no less than two times the occurrence limit. Such insurance shall: 3.13.1.1 Name COMMISSION and CITY, and their respective officials, officers, employees, agents, and consultants as insured with respect to performance of the services on the Work and shall contain no special limitations on the scope of coverage or the protection afforded to these insured; 3.13.1.2 Be primary with respect to any insurance or self-insurance programs covering COMMISSION and CITY, and/or their respective officials, officers, employees, agents, and consultants; and 3.13.1.3 Contain standard separation of insured provisions. DRAFT147 17336.00001\30680385.6 8 3.13.2 Business Automobile Liability Insurance. Business automobile liability insurance or equivalent form with a combined single limit of not less than $1,000,000.00 per occurrence. Such insurance shall include coverage for owned, hired and non-owned automobiles. 3.13.3 Professional Liability Insur ance. Errors and omissions liability insurance with a limit of not less than $1,000,000.00 Professional liability insurance shall only be required of design or engineering professionals. 3.13.4 Workers’ Compensation Insurance. Workers’ compensation insurance with statutory limits and employers’ liability insurance with limits of not less than $1,000,000.00 each accident. 3.14 Procedures for Distribution of Funds to CITY; Deadline for Submission of Invoices. 3.14.1 Initial Payment by the CITY. The CITY shall be responsible for initial payment of all the Work costs as they are incurred. Following payment of such Work costs, the CITY shall submit invoices to COMMISSION requesting reimbursement of eligible Work costs. Each invoice shall be accompanied by detailed contractor invoices, or other demands for payment addressed to the CITY, and documents evidencing the CITY’s payment of the invoices or demands for payment. The CITY shall submit invoices not more often than monthly and not less often than quarterly. 3.14.2 Review and Reimbursement by COMMISSION. Upon receipt of an invoice from the CITY, COMMISSION may request additional documentation or explanation of the Work costs for which reimbursement is sought. For undisputed amounts, the COMMISSION shall reimburse CITY for PROJECT related expenses pursuant to the CITY’s invoice as allowed under regulations established for SB 132 funding. In the event that COMMISSION or Caltrans disputes the eligibility of the CITY for reimbursement of all or a portion of an invoiced amount, the Parties shall meet and confer in an attempt to resolve the dispute. If the meet and confer process is unsuccessful in resolving the dispute, the CITY may appeal COMMISSION’s decision as to the eligibility of one or more invoices to COMMISSION’s Executive Director. The CITY may appeal the decision of the Executive Director to the full COMMISSION Board, the decision of which shall be final. If the appeal relates to an invoice rejected, in whole or in part, by Caltrans, the COMMISSION will submit the appeal to Caltrans, and the decision of Caltrans shall be final. Additional details concerning the procedure for the CITY’s submittal of invoices to COMMISSION and COMMISSION’s consideration and payment of submitted invoices similar to Exhibit “B”, attached hereto. 3.14.2.1 Compliance with Caltrans Requirements. The CITY is not required to use the recommended forms attached as part of Exhibit “B”, and may instead use its own forms. However, the CITY acknowledges that the Funds are State funds provided through Caltrans, and the CITY shall comply with all applicable Caltrans requirements including, but not limited to, the Caltrans Local Assistance Procedures Manual and Caltrans Construction Manual. Per the Master Agreement, Caltrans will not require pre-award audits of any agreements related to On-System Projects. Caltrans will require one or more cooperative agreements for the Project. The CITY shall comply with all applicable terms and conditions of such cooperative agreements. The DRAFT148 17336.00001\30680385.6 9 Caltrans cooperative agreement(s) for the Project, once executed and provided to CITY, shall be automatically incorporated into this Agreement by reference. 3.14.3 Deadline for Submission of Invoices. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Agreement, to be eligible for reimbursement, all invoices for Project costs must be submitted to Commission by March 15, 2023. Any invoices submitted after the foregoing date shall be ineligible for reimbursement under this Agreement. 3.14.4 Funding Amount/Adjustment. If a post Work audit or review indicates that COMMISSION has provided reimbursement to the CITY in an amount in excess of the maximum Funds provided for in section 3.2 of this Agreement, , or if any audit or review indicates that COMMISSION has provided reimbursement of ineligible Work costs, the CITY shall reimburse COMMISSION for the excess or ineligible payments within 30 days of notification by COMMISSION. 3.15 Work Amendments. Changes to the characteristics of the Work, including the deadline for Work completion, and any responsibilities of the CITY or COMMISSION may be requested in writing by the CITY and are subject to the approval of COMMISSION’s Representative, which approval will not be unreasonably withheld, provided that extensions of time for completion of the Work shall be approved in the sole discretion of COMMISSION’s Representative. Nothing in this Agreement shall be construed to require or allow completion of the Work without full compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (Public Resources Code Section 21000 et seq.; “CEQA”) and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 USC 4231 et seq.), but the necessity of compliance with CEQA and NEPA shall not justify, excuse, or permit a delay in completion of the Work. 3.16 Conflict of Interest. For the term of this Agreement, no member, officer or employee of the CITY or COMMISSION, during the term of his or her service with the CITY or COMMISSION, as the case may be, shall have any direct interest in this Agreement, or obtain any present or anticipated material benefit arising therefrom. 3.17 Limited Scope of Duties. COMMISSION’s and the CITY’s duties and obligations under this Agreement are limited to those described herein. COMMISSION has no obligation with respect to the safety of any Work performed at a job site. In addition, COMMISSION shall not be liable for any action of CITY or its contractors relating to the condemnation of property undertaken by CITY or construction related to the Work. 3.18 Books and Records. Each party shall maintain complete, accurate, and clearly identifiable records with respect to costs incurred for the Work under this Agreement. They shall make available for examination by the other party, its authorized agents, officers or employees any and all ledgers and books of account, invoices, vouchers, canceled checks, and other records or documents evidencing or related to the expenditures and disbursements charged to the other party pursuant to this Agreement. Further, each party shall furnish to the other party, its agents or employees such other evidence or information as they may require with respect to any such expense or disbursement charged by them. All such information shall be retained by the Parties for at least three (3) years following termination of this Agreement, and they shall have access to such information during the three-year period for the purposes of examination or audit. DRAFT149 17336.00001\30680385.6 10 3.19 Equal Opportunity Employment. The Parties represent that they are equal opportunity employers and they shall not discriminate against any employee or applicant of reemployment because of race, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, sex or age. Such non- discrimination shall include, but not be limited to, all activities related to initial employment, upgrading, demotion, transfer, recruitment or recruitment advertising, layoff or termination. 3.20 Governing Law. This Agreement shall be governed by and construed with the laws of the State of California. Venue shall be in Riverside County. 3.21 Attorneys’ Fees. If either party commences an action against the other party arising out of or in connection with this Agreement, the prevailing party in such litigation shall be entitled to have and recover from the losing party reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs of suit. 3.22 Time of Essence. Time is of the essence for each and every provision of this Agreement. 3.23 Headings. Article and Section Headings, paragraph captions or marginal headings contained in this Agreement are for convenience only and shall have no effect in the construction or interpretation of any provision herein. 3.24 Notification. All notices hereunder and communications regarding interpretation of the terms of the Agreement or changes thereto shall be provided by the mailing thereof by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested, postage prepaid and addressed as follows: CITY OF CORONA COMMISSION Public Works Department Riverside County Transportation Commission 400 S. Vicentia Ave 4080 Lemon, 3rd Floor Corona, CA 92882 Mailing address: P.O. Box 12008 Riverside, CA 92501 ATTN: Public Works Director ATTN: Executive Director Any notice so given shall be considered served on the other party three (3) days after deposit in the U.S. mail, first class postage prepaid, return receipt requested, and addressed to the party at its applicable address. Actual notice shall be deemed adequate notice on the date actual notice occurred regardless of the method of service. 3.25 Conflicting Provisions. In the event that provisions of any attached appendices or exhibits conflict in any way with the provisions set forth in this Agreement, the language, terms and conditions contained in this Agreement shall control the actions and obligations of the Parties and the interpretation of the Parties’ understanding concerning the performance of the Services. 3.26 Contract Amendment. In the event that the Parties determine that the provisions of this Agreement should be altered, the Parties may execute a contract amendment to add any provision to this Agreement or delete or amend any provision of this Agreement. All such contract amendments must be in the form of a written instrument signed by the original signatories to this Agreement, or their successors or designees. DRAFT150 17336.00001\30680385.6 11 3.27 Entire Agreement. This Agreement constitutes the entire agreement between the Parties relating to the subject matter hereof and supersedes any previous agreements or understandings. 3.28 No Waiver. Failure of COMMISSION to insist on any one occasion upon strict compliance with any of the terms, covenants or conditions hereof shall not be deemed a waiver of such term, covenant or condition, nor shall any waiver or relinquishment of any rights or powers hereunder at any one time or more times be deemed a waiver or relinquishment of such other right or power at any other time or times. 3.29 Validity of Agreement. The invalidity in whole or in part of any provision of this Agreement shall not void or affect the validity of any other provision of this Agreement. 3.30 Independent Contractors. Any person or entities retained by the City or any contractor shall be retained on an independent contractor basis and shall not be employees of COMMISSION. Any personnel performing services on the Work shall at all times be under the exclusive direction and control of the CITY or contractor, whichever is applicable. The CITY or contractor shall pay all wages, salaries and other amounts due such personnel in connection with their performance of services on the Work and as required by law. The CITY or consultant shall be responsible for all reports and obligations respecting such personnel, including, but not limited to: social security taxes, income tax withholding, unemployment insurance and workers’ compensation insurance. 3.31 Survival. All rights and obligations hereunder that by their nature are to be performed after any expiration or termination of this Agreement shall survive any such expiration or termination. 3.32 No Third-Party Beneficiaries. There are no intended third-party beneficiaries of any right or obligation assumed by the Parties. 3.33 Counterparts. This Agreement may be signed in counterparts, each of which shall constitute an original. [Signatures on following page] DRAFT151 17336.00001\30680385.6 12 SIGNATURE PAGE TO SB 132 FUNDING AGREEMENT FOR MCKINLEY GRADE SEPARATION PROJECT IMPROVEMENTS WITH THE CITY OF CORONA RIVERSIDE COUNTY CITY OF CORONA TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: By: ______________________________ Chair (Name, Title) ATTEST: By: _________________________ City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: _________________________________ By: ________________________ Best, Best & Krieger Dean Derleth, City Attorney Counsel to the Riverside County Transportation Commission DRAFT152 Exhibit A 17336.00001\30680385.6 EXHIBIT “A” PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND/OR DEPICTION, SCOPE OF WORK, FUNDING AND TIMETABLE SCOPE OF WORK: The Project includes the construction of a four-lane or six-lane overcrossing bridge of McKinley Street with sidewalks, streetlights and bike lanes over the existing BNSF tracks and Arlington Channel. The needed number of lanes through the corridor shall be determined based on traffic studies and modeling. McKinley Street is currently listed in the City’s General Plan as a 4-Lane Major Arterial, which is defined as a roadway with 106 feet of right-of-way width and includes 4 traffic lanes, a 14-foot median, and two 12-foot parkways (one on each side of the roadway). However, the classification of McKinley may need to be modified to a 6-Lane Major Arterial, which is defined as a roadway with 130 feet of right-of-way width and includes: 6 traffic lanes, a 14-foot median, and two 12-foot parkways. This proposed modification will only be approved if the traffic studies and modeling support it. With this modification, the City’s street classification will match the RTIP project description of a 6-lane grade separation structure. The Project will construct a direct connection for southbound traffic to Samson Avenue and a new alternate connector road from McKinley Street to Sampson Avenue and possibly Anselmo Drive with necessary traffic signals. Modifications to Caltrans traffic signals, striping and off-and on-ramps for the eastbound SR-91; the intersection of Estelle Street, and the intersection of Magnolia Avenue will also be constructed. Street lights, signs and landscaping disturbed or removed to accommodate the construction of the Project will be restored in kind. For general location and site map, see attached. The Phases of Work to be performed under this Agreement include the Project Approvals and Environmental Documents; Plans, Specifications and Estimates; Right -of-Way Acquisition and Utility Relocation; and Construction. FUNDING: Proposed local, state and/or federal funding for each Phase of Wo rk: PHASE SB 132 Funds LOCAL TUMF ZONE TOTAL PA&ED $400,000 $100,000 $500,000 PS&E $5,450,000 $4,550,000 $1,000,000 $11,000,000 RIGHT-OF-WAY $21,000,000 $21,000,000 CONSTRUCTION $58,000,000 $58,000,000 TOTAL $84,450,000 $4,950,000 $1,100,000 $90,500,000 TIMETABLE: Notice to Proceed August 2018 Design Connector Road Option November 2018 Project Approvals & Environmental Documents December 2018 to March 2020 Issue for Bid October 2020 Construction March 2021 to January 2023 DRAFT153 Exhibit A 17336.00001\30680385.6 DRAFT154 Exhibit B 17336.00001\30680385.6 EXHIBIT “B” PROCEDURES FOR SUBMITTAL, CONSIDERATION AND PAYMENT OF INVOICES 1. COMMISSION recommends that the CITY incorporate Exhibit “B-1” into its contracts with any subcontractors to establish a standard method for preparation of invoices by contractors to the CITY and ultimately to COMMISSION for reimbursement of CITY contractor costs. 2. Each month the CITY shall submit an invoice for eligible Work costs incurred during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to COMMISSION’s Executive Director with a copy to COMMISSION’s Project Coordinator. Each invoice shall be accompanied by a cover letter in a format substantially similar to that of Exhibit “B-2”. 3. Each invoice shall include documentation from each contractor used by the CITY for the Work, listing labor costs, subcontractor costs, and other expenses. Each invoice shall also include a monthly progress report and spreadsheets showing the hours or amounts expended by each contractor or consultant for the month and for the entire Work to date. A sample progress report is attached as Exhibits “B-4”. All documentation from the CITY’s contractors should be accompanied by a cover letter in a format substantially similar to that of Exhibit “B-3”. 4. If the CITY is seeking reimbursement for direct expenses incurred by CITY staff for eligible Work costs, the CITY shall detail the same level of information for its labor and any expenses in the same level of detail as required of contractors pursuant to Exhibit “B” and its attachments. 5. Charges for each task and milestone listed in Exhibit “A” shall be listed separately in the invoice. 6. Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the CITY Representative or his or her designee which reads as follows: “I hereby certify that the hours and salary rates submitted for reimbursement in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the consultants or contractors listed. Signed ________________________________ Title __________________________________ Date __________________________________ Invoice No. ____________________________ DRAFT155 Exhibit B 17336.00001\30680385.6 7. For undisputed amounts, the COMMISSION shall reimburse the CITY for PROJECT related expenses pursuant to the CITY’s invoice as allowed under regulations established for SB 132. If COMMISSION or Caltrans disputes any portion of an invoice, payment for that portion will be withheld, without interest, pending resolution of the dispute. 8. The final payment under this Agreement will be made only after: (i) the CITY has obtained a Release and Certificate of Final Payment from each contractor or consultant used on the Work; (ii) the CITY has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment; and (iii) the CITY has provided copies of each such Release to COMMISSION. DRAFT156 Exhibit “B-1” 17336.00001\30680385.6 EXHIBIT “B-1” SAMPLE FORM - ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION For the satisfactory performance and completion of the Work under this Agreement, City will pay the Consultant compensation as set forth herein. The total compensation for this service shall not exceed (_____INSERT WRITTEN DOLLAR AMOUNT___) ($___INSERT NUMERICAL DOLLAR AMOUNT___) without written approval of City’s City Engineer (“Total Compensation”). 1. ELEMENTS OF COMPENSATION. Compensation for the Work will be comprised of the following elements: 1.1 Direct Labor Costs; 1.2 Fixed Fee; and 1.3 Additional Direct Costs. 1.1 DIRECT LABOR COSTS. Direct Labor costs shall be paid in an amount equal to the product of the Direct Salary Costs and the Multiplier which are defined as follows: 1.1.1 DIRECT SALARY COSTS Direct Salary Costs are the base salaries and wages actually paid to the Consultant's personnel directly engaged in performance of the Work under the Agreement. (The range of hourly rates paid to the Consultant's personnel appears in Section 2 below.) 1.1.2 MULTIPLIER The Multiplier to be applied to the Direct Salary Costs to determine the Direct Labor Costs is _________________, and is the sum of the following components: 1.1.2.1 Direct Salary Costs ____________________ 1.1.2.2 Payroll Additives ____________________ The Decimal Ratio of Payroll Additives to Direct Salary Costs. Payroll Additives include all employee benefits, allowances for vacation, sick leave, and holidays, and company portion of employee insurance and social and retirement benefits, all federal and state payroll taxes, premiums for insurance which are measured by payroll costs, and other contributions and benefits imposed by applicable laws and regulations. DRAFT157 Exhibit “B-1” 17336.00001\30680385.6 1.1.2.3 Overhead Costs ____________________ The Decimal ratio of Allowable Overhead Costs to the Consultant Firm's Total Direct Salary Costs. Allowable Overhead Costs include general, administrative and overhead costs of maintaining and operating established offices, and consistent with established firm policies, and as defined in the Federal Acquisitions Regulations, Part 31.2. Total Mult iplier ____________________ (sum of 1.1.2.1, 1.1.2.2, and 1.1.2.3) 1.2 FIXED FEE. 1.2.1 A Fixed Fee of _______________ shall be paid to Consultant for Consultant’s complete and satisfactory performance of this Agreement and all Services required. The Fixed Fee shall be paid in monthly installments based upon the percentage of the Services completed at the end of each billing period, as determined in the sole discretion of the City. Consultant shall not be entitled to and shall forfeit any portion of the Fixed Fee not earned as provided herein. 1.2.2 A pro -rata share of the Fixed Fee shall be applied to the total Direct Labor Costs expended for services each month, and shall be included on each monthly invoice. 1.3 ADDITIONAL DIRECT COSTS. Additional Direct Costs directly identifiable to the performance of the services of this Agreement shall be reimbursed at the rates below, or at actual invoiced cost. Rates for identified Additional Direct Costs are as follows: ITEM REIMBURSEMENT RATE [___insert charges___] Per Diem $ /day Car mileage $ /mile Travel $ /trip Computer Charges $ /hour Photocopies $ /copy Blueline $ /sheet LD Telephone $ /call Fax $ /sheet Photographs $ /sheet Travel by air and travel in excess of 100 miles from the Consultant's office nearest to City’s office must have City’s prior written approval to be reimbursed under this Agreement. DRAFT158 Exhibit “B-1” 17336.00001\30680385.6 2. DIRECT SALARY RATES Direct Salary Rates, which are the range of hourly rates to be used in determining Direct Salary Costs in Section 1.1.1 above, are given below and are subject to the following: 2.1 Direct Salary Rates shall be applicable to both straight time and overtime work, unless payment of a premium for overtime work is required by law, regulation or craft agreement, or is otherwise specified in this Agreement. In such event, the premium portion of Direct Salary Costs will not be subject to the Multiplier defined in Paragraph 1.1.2 above. 2.2 Direct Salary Rates shown herein are in effect for one year following the effective date of the Agreement. Thereafter, they may be adjusted annually to reflect the Consultant's adjustments to individual compensation. The Consultant shall notify City in writing prior to a change in the range of rates included herein, and prior to each subsequent change. POSITION OR CLASSIFICATION RANGE OF HOURLY RATES [___sample___] Principal $ .00 - $ .00/hour Project Manager $ .00 - $ .00/hour Sr. Engineer/Planner $ .00 - $ .00/hour Project Engineer/Planner $ .00 - $ .00/hour Assoc. Engineer/Planner $ .00 - $ .00/hour Technician $ .00 - $ .00/hour Drafter/CADD Operator $ .00 - $ .00/hour Word Processor $ .00 - $ .00/hour 2.3 The above rates are for the Consultant only. All rates for subconsultants to the Consultant will be in accordance with the Consultant's cost proposal. 3. INVOICING. 3.1 Each month the Consultant shall submit an invoice for Work performed during the preceding month. The original invoice shall be submitted to City’s City Engineer with two (2) copies to City’s Project Coordinator. 3.2 Charges shall be billed in accordance with the terms and rates included herein, unless otherwise agreed in writing by City’s Representative. 3.3 Base Work and Extra Work shall be charged separately, and the charges for each task and Milestone listed in the Scope of Work, shall be listed separately. The DRAFT159 Exhibit “B-1” 17336.00001\30680385.6 charges for each individual assigned by the Consultant under this Agreement shall be listed separately on an attachment to the invoice. 3.4 A charge of $500 or more for any one item of Additional Direct Costs shall be accompanied by substantiating documentation satisfactory to City such as invoices, telephone logs, etc. 3.5 Each copy of each invoice shall be accompanied by a Monthly Progress Report and spreadsheets showing hours expended by task for each month and total project to date. 3.6 Each invoice shall indicate payments to DBE subconsultants or supplies by dollar amount and as a percentage of the total invoice. 3.7 Each invoice shall include a certification signed by the Consultant's Representative or an officer of the firm which reads as follows: I hereby certify that the hours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the employees listed. Signed _____________________________ Title _____________________________ Date _____________________________ Invoice No. _____________________________ 4. PAYMENT 4.1 City shall pay the Consultant within four to six weeks after receipt by City of an original invoice. Should City contest any portion of an invoice, that portion shall be held for resolution, without interest, but the uncontested balance shall be paid. The final payment for Work under this Agreement will be made only after the Consultant has executed a Release and Certificate of Final Payment. DRAFT160 Exhibit “B-2” 17336.00001\30680385.6 EXHIBIT “B-2” Sample Cover Letter to COMMISSION Date Ms. Anne Mayer Executive Director Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street, 3rd Floor Riverside, CA 92501 ATTN: Accounts Payable Re: Project Title - Invoice #__ Enclosed for your review and payment approval is the City of _____________’s invoice for professional and technical services that was rendered by our contractors in connection with the _______________ Agreement No. ________ effective (Month/Day/Year). The required support documentation received from each contractor is included as backup to the invoice. Invoice period covered is from Month/Date/Year to Month/Date/Year. Total Authorized Agreement Amount: $0,000,000.00 Total Invoiced to Date: $0,000,000.00 Total Previously Invoiced: $0,000,000.00 Balance Remaining: $0,000,000.00 Amount due this Invoice: $0,000,000.00 =========== I certify that the hours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the contractors listed. By: _____________________________ Name Title cc:DRAFT161 Exhibit “B-3” 17336.00001\30680385.6 EXHIBIT “B-3” Sample Letter from Contractor to City/County Month/Date/Year ______________ ______________ ______________ Attn: Accounts Payable Invoice #____________ For [type of services] rendered by [contractor name] in connection with [name of project] This is per agreement No. XX-XX-XXX effective Month/Date/Year. Invoice period covered is from Month/Date/Year to Month/Date/Year. Total Base Contract Amount: $000,000.00 Authorized Extra Work (if Applicable) $000,000.00 ------------------ TOTAL AUTHORIZED CONTRACT AMOUNT: $000,000.00 Total Invoice to Date: $000,000.00 Total Previously Billed: $000,000.00 Balance Remaining: $000,000.00 Amount Due this Invoice: $000,000.00 ========== I certify that the hours and salary rates charged in this invoice are the actual hours and rates worked and paid to the employees listed, By: ____________________ Name Title DRAFT162 Exhibit B-4 17336.00001\30680385.6 EXHIBIT B-4 Sample Progress Report REPORTING PERIOD: Month/Date/Year to Month/Date/Year PROGRESS REPORT: #1 A. Activities and Work Completed during Current Work Periods TASK 01 – 100% PS&E SUBMITTAL 1. Responded to Segment 1 comments from Department of Transportation 2. Completed and submitted Segment 1 final PS&E B. Current/Potential Problems Encountered & Corrective Action Problems Corrective Action None None C. Work Planned Next Period TASK 01 – 100% PS&E SUBMITTAL 1. Completing and to submit Traffic Signal and Electrical Design plans 2. Responding to review comments DRAFT163 BLANK HARLOWIND IA N A M C K I N L E Y E L L I S GRIFFIN ESTELLE FAN PALMH A R V I L L VIANAPOIREINDEERT R E E L I N E MAGNOLIAB Y R O N A L P I N E M ISTG R A N T D E L I L A H D A V I D S O N B R O T H E R T O N TE L LER DUPONT SAMPSON B L A I R MARVALEP R O M E NA DEC R O U S E B R I A R V A L E W I N D S O N G R IV E R S ID E ANSELMO9 1 E A S T B O U N D OFF R A MP91 WEST BO U N D O FFR A M P HIGHPOIN T EAUTUMNWALKW E A T H E R WOO DRICHE Y WINDSTORMCOLLETTWELLESLEYSHOPPINGCENTER91W E S TBOUNDONRAMP91EASTBOUNDONRAMPµPROJECT NO. 2012-12MCKINLEY GRADE SEPARATION 0 5010025 Feet City of Corona Legend Project Location Freeway Parcels ATTACHMENT 2 - LOCATION MAP 164 BLANK AGENDA ITEM 8I BLANK Agenda Item 8I RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Martha Masters, Senior Management Analyst Lorelle Moe-Luna, Planning and Programming Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Fiscal Year 2018/19 Annual Local Transportation Fund Planning Allocations to Western Riverside Council of Governments and Coachella Valley Association of Governments BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to approve an allocation of Local Transportation Fund (LTF) funds for planning in the amount of $775,500 for Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) and $423,000 for the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) for efforts identified in each agency’s Fiscal Year 2018/19 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan (Work Plan) that supports transportation planning programs and functions consistent with regional and subregional plans, programs, and requirements. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The LTF established in state law by the Transportation Development Act (TDA) is funded through a one-quarter of one cent of the state’s 7.25 percent sales tax (based on point of sale and returned to source). LTF funds are used to fund transportation planning, operations, and capital projects. The action requested at this time is specifically to allocate the planning funds to the two councils of governments, WRCOG, and CVAG. Other LTF allocations such as those for transit and rail operations and capital projects are part of the approvals of the annual Short Range Transit Plans. Bicycle and pedestrian facilities are also funded by LTF and are part of the biennial SB 821 Call for Projects. The LTF funding is distributed by the State Board of Equalization to the counties on a pro rata basis, pursuant to Section 99233.2 of the TDA, providing up to 3 percent of annual revenues to fund transportation planning and programming efforts. The Commission, as the regional transportation planning agency, is legally responsible for apportioning the LTF funds. Based on the projected FY 2018/19 revenues of $94 million, 3 percent of the projected revenue, or $2.82 million, is for planning and programming. By statute, the TDA also requires one half of these LTF funds of $1.41 million be allocated for planning activities within the Western Riverside County and the Coachella Valley areas, as determined by the Commission. Distribution of the funding, as confirmed by the Commission in October 2014, is as follows: 165 Agenda Item 8I Planning Agency Percentage Apportionment/Allocation RCTC 15 $211,500 WRCOG 55 $775,500 CVAG 30 $423,000 Total 100 $1,410,000 WRCOG and CVAG submitted their respective FY 2018/19 Work Plans in accordance with existing guidelines. WRCOG’s Work Plan is divided into two program areas and includes the following activities: 1) Planning Programs and Energy/Environment Programs – including, but not limited, to: - Riverside County Traffic Analysis Model (RIVTAM) Update - SB 743 Implementation Study - Framework development of a long-term cybersecurity/transportation systems strategy for the WRCOG subregion - Research on the effects of automated vehicles on the WRCOG subregion - Transportation related climate change and climate adaptation analyses and planning for the WRCOG subregion 2) Regional Transportation Programs - Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Program - Riverside County Transportation Commission Programs CVAG’s Work Plan consists of nine main program areas: 1) Transportation Department Operations; 2) Project Management and Contract Administration; 3) CV Link Project Development; 4) Riverside County Transportation Commission Programs; 5) Planning, Programming, and Monitoring Program; 6) Miscellaneous Programs including GIS Information Services, support for the RIVTAM model and Regional Arterial Traffic Count Program; 7) Congestion Management/Air Quality Programs; 8) TUMF Program; and 9) Governmental and Special Projects. Staff reviewed the Work Plans and found them to be consistent with the Commission’s overall transportation programming and planning objectives and recommends approval. The Work Plans also benefit the respective geographic regions and are consistent with subregional and regional plans including the Southern California Association of Government’s (SCAG) Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy (RTP/SCS). WRCOG and CVAG, in conjunction with SCAG, are responsible for subregional planning efforts that implement and are in conformance with the RTP/SCS. 166 Agenda Item 8I Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes Year: FY 2018/19 Amount: $1,198,500 Source of Funds: LTF Budget Adjustment: No GL/Project Accounting No.: 106 65 86205 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 08/14/2018 Attachments: 1) CVAG FY 2018/19 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan 2) WRCOG FY 2018/19 LTF Program Objectives/Work Plan 167 BLANK Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG) Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Local Transportation Funds Program Objectives The Work Plan for FY 2018/2019 is divided into two program areas: 1. Planning Programs and Energy/Environment Programs California Air Resources Board Department of Energy (DOE) South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Southern California Associations of Governments (SCAG) California Association of Councils of Governments (CALCOG) Local Jurisdictions within WRCOG subregion Planning: This program includes staff time to develop and work on six main projects: Riverside County Traffic Analysis Model (RIVTAM) Update; a Senate Bill (SB) 743 Implementation Study; research, agenda preparation, and staffing for WRCOG Planning Directors Committee; research, agenda preparation, and staffing for WRCOG Public Works Committee; framework development of a long-term cybersecurity strategy for the WRCOG subregion; research on the effects of automation on the WRCOG subregion; outreach for WRCOG Programs and activities and engagement with WRCOG members and partner agencies; and staff time for climate change and climate adaptation analyses and planning for the WRCOG subregion. The RIVTAM Update will provide updates on socio-economic forecasts to reflect SCAG’s recently adopted growth forecasts, updates to the roadway network, utilize data from SCAG’s most recent Regional Travel Model to ensure consistency, and correct any significant structural issues related to RIVTAM. The SB 743 Implementation Study will assist stakeholders with transition from utilizing a vehicle miles traveled methodology for mitigation impacts to level of service. The research, agenda preparation, and staffing for the WRCOG Planning Directors Committee will support WRCOG member agencies to obtain information, access to research, and awareness of applicable grant opportunities, as well as foster discussions between WRCOG member jurisdictions regarding the latest challenges and opportunities facing the WRCOG subregion, in order to achieve more cost effective and efficient solutions to planning-related matters on a monthly basis. The research, agenda preparation, and staffing for the WRCOG Planning Directors Committee will support WRCOG member agencies to obtain information, access to research, and awareness of applicable grant opportunities, as well as foster discussions between WRCOG member jurisdictions regarding the latest challenges and opportunities facing the WRCOG subregion, in order to achieve ATTACHMENT 1 168 more cost effective and efficient solutions to public works or engineering-related matters matters on a monthly basis. The framework of a cybersecurity strategy will focus on a large-scale plan to provide direction for future research and regional policy development on cybersecurity and transportation systems for the subregion as the system increases the level of connectivity with traffic signals and cameras, and transportation management centers regularly communicate with each other and the outside world. The effects of automation on the subregion will analyze the subregion’s current economic structure, strategic positioning, and risks as reference points. The research will then analyze the expected future economic structure and opportunities for strategic positioning, and discuss future risks based on the technical automation potential of industry sectors. The outreach for WRCOG Programs and activities and partner agencies will include assisting local jurisdictions and education institutions on Programs such as the WRCOG Public Service Fellowship, which encourages students to seek careers in public policy and local government by gaining meaningful, hands-on experience at WRCOG member agencies. The staff time for climate change and climate adaptation efforts for the WRCOG subregion will include overseeing studies and planning efforts to identify effects of climate change to the subregion and opportunities to mitigate these effects, particularly as it relates to transportation infrastructure. One specific effort that will be supported by LTF will be the development of design guidelines to create climate reliant transportation infrastructure. These funds will be used as matching funds to support the development of this guidebook, as funded through SB 1 Planning Funds. Smart Cities and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Development, and Air Quality: These programs include the following activities: research and implementation of Smart Cities technologies for local transportation infrastructure including the possible development of a regional ITS program for Western Riverside County; provide outreach to the jurisdictions regarding air quality issues and funding opportunities; support WRCOG Clean Cities and programs that WRCOG has developed to assist jurisdictions in the purchase of alternative fuel vehicles and the development of the supporting infrastructure; continued staff participation in SCAQMD activities, rule-making, and funding opportunities. 2. Regional Transportation Programs Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) Riverside Transit Agency Caltrans SCAG CALCOG TUMF: This program includes staff time to administer the TUMF Program, which includes but is not limited to: program contract/agreement administration; public outreach/information; the Annual Report; signage program; TUMF Zone Transportation Improvement Program development and amendments; prepare the annual audit; preparation of annual adjustment for construction costs; maintain TUMF data base of fee collections and disbursements; work with developers on 169 credit and reimbursement agreements; review available data to determine how to address distribution center land use and how it applies to TUMF Program; research the land uses of a shopping center to determine how it affects and applies to TUMF Program; review how projects within Program are implemented and assist local jurisdictions to identify options and funding strategies for projects, and amend all program documents as necessary. Riverside County Transportation Commission Programs: These programs include staff time and project management to assist in transportation planning and air quality programs to include: participation in TUMF Program tasks as needed to assist RCTC in the implementation of the Regional TUMF Program; participate in evaluation committees as requested; outreach assisting with RCTC’s Programs and goals, and other planning related tasks as determined in consultation with the RCTC Executive Director. 170 BLANK ATTACHMENT 2 171 BLANK 172 173 174 BLANK AGENDA ITEM 8J BLANK Agenda Item 8J RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Monica Morales, Management Analyst Josefina Clemente, Transit Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Riverside Transit Agency Fiscal Year 2018/2019 Short Range Transit Plan Amendment BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve an amendment to the Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) Fiscal Year 2018/19 Short Range Transit Plan (SRTP) for $22.1 million related to the payment of RTA’s current unfunded pension liability; 2) Approve an allocation of $22.1 million in Local Transportation Fund (LTF) Western County Bus Unallocated LTF fund balance to provide funding for RTA to pay its current unfunded pension liability; and 3) Approve an adjustment to the FY 2018/19 budget in the amount of $22.1 million to increase transit operating expenditures. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: As part of the RTA’s compensation package, it offers eligible employees a defined benefit plan (pension) under contract with the California Public Employees Retirement System (CalPERS). Employee and employer contributions fund the normal cost and amortization of the unfunded pension liability. Current accounting standards require governments who offer a pension benefit to regularly measure the funded status and unfunded liability of their plan in their accounting records and financial statements. AB 1912, currently being considered in the state legislature, would make member agencies of a joint powers authority (JPA) such as RTA jointly and severally liable for the JPA’s retirement obligations. RTA’s JPA currently has no provision to make member agencies liable for such obligations. Based on the accounting standards and pending legislation, RTA staff was directed to evaluate RTA’s options related to payment of the unfunded pension liability in order to maintain its financial health. RTA’s most current actuarial valuation dated June 30, 2017, indicated that its 175 Agenda Item 8J plan is 78 percent funded with an unfunded liability of $22.1 million. Based on the current schedule of unfunded pension liability payments through FY 2046/47, the annual payments total $49.5 million due to interest. RTA does not carry excess fund balances other than for programmed activities and projects; however, the Commission maintains public transit reserves in the LTF on behalf of the transit operators to be used for emergencies and shortfalls. At its July 26 meeting, the RTA Board of Directors approved recommendations to direct staff to request $22.1 million of LTF from the Commission and amend the SRTP in order to make a one- time payment of $22.1 million to CalPERS against RTA’s unfunded pension liability. The Commission has sufficient LTF funds for an allocation to RTA to cover the total amount of $22.1 million needed to pay its current unfunded pension liability. Therefore, staff recommends approval of an SRTP amendment and allocation of LTF funds in the amount of $22.1 million for payment of the unfunded pension liability. Since this was not included in the FY 2018/19 budget, a budget adjustment is required. RTA intends to request the additional allocation upon receipt of an invoice from CalPERS and then immediately use the funds to pay the invoice for the unfunded pension liability. Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: No Year: FY 2018/19 Amount: $22.1 million Source of Funds: LTF (Western County Bus) Budget Adjustment: Yes GL/Project Accounting No.: 002210 86101 00000 0000 601 62 86101 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 07/30/2018 176 AGENDA ITEM 8K BLANK Agenda Item 8K RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Monica Morales, Management Analyst Josefina Clemente, Transit Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Riverside County Public Transportation: Annual Countywide Performance Report for Fiscal Year 2016/17 BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Committee to receive and file the Riverside County Public Transportation: Annual Countywide Performance Report (Countywide Report) for Fiscal Year 2016/17. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Transportation funding in the state is governed by the Transportation Development Act (TDA). In order for the Commission to annually approve funding, the TDA requires the Commission to have a formal process in place wherein transit operator productivity and performance is reviewed. Data was compiled and audits of each transit operator have been completed for FY 2016/17. Accordingly, this information becomes the basis for compiling and drafting the Countywide Report, which is intended to meet the TDA requirement, Public Utilities Code (PUC) 99244. DISCUSSION: The Commission approved the goals and objectives for crafting the Countywide Report. These goals and objectives are as follows: 1) The Countywide Report is to be a standalone review of transit service measured via annual audited financial performance. 2) The Countywide Report utilizes farebox recovery as the only mandated metric (PUC 6633.2). 3) The Countywide Report is also to derive additional metrics that allow for a macro discussion of transit performance countywide. 4) The metrics are to be repeatable and deliver consistent results, which provide a baseline year and a recurring snapshot in time over many years. 5) The Countywide Report should possess the capability to be expandable to other modes. 177 Agenda Item 8K 6) The Countywide Report requires the transit operators to utilize the TransTrack program for the reporting of operator specific performance information for a reliable and consistent pool of data to examine on an as-needed basis. The FY 2016/17 Countywide Report continues a comprehensive performance reporting program for Riverside County with the goal of documenting how public transit funding was spent and the results achieved for the dollars invested. This report is the fifth iteration, with the first report completed in FY 2012/13. The following represents a high-level recap of the information contained in the report. Farebox Recovery The primary and only state-mandated indicator described in the Countywide Report is farebox recovery ratio. Farebox recovery is the proportion that passenger fares, and other eligible revenues, contribute to the transit program’s general operating expenses over and beyond the subsidy provided by the local, state, and federal government. The farebox recovery ratio is extremely useful as a tool for measuring and assessing a transit program’s strength. The overall countywide farebox recovery ratio for FY 2016/17 was 20.0 percent, down slightly from the FY 2015/16 ratio of 22.9 percent. It should be noted the FY 2015/16 was also a decrease from the prior year at 23.8 percent and shows this ongoing downward trend of ridership and the ability to sustain farebox recovery ratios. This ratio reflects the interaction of operator fare policy, efficiency in the operators’ handling of routine expenses, and riders’ utilization of the service. In FY 2016/17 countywide total operating expenses totaled $113 million, a large increase of $14.45 million in operating expenses, or 14.67 percent. The majority of this increase comes from the Commission’s largest transit operator in the County, which is Riverside Transit Agency with an increase of $11.76 million. It is good news that each Riverside County public transit operator met or exceeded its minimum state-mandated farebox recovery ratio, however, it will be necessary for each operator to diligently watch operating expenses and ridership. Figure 1 provides a historical view of farebox recovery for the public transit providers in the county of Riverside. 178 Agenda Item 8K Trips Per Capita Trips per capita reflect total transit trips provided in relation to the overall county population. The total population for Riverside County in FY 2016/17 was 2.38 million and the total transit trips provided were 15.05 million. This follows previous years’ trends with a decrease of 5 percent in the total number of trips provided over the previous year. Considering all public transit modes of rail, fixed route bus, demand responsive dial-a-ride, and specialized transportation, a trips per capita rate of 6.3 was achieved during FY 2016/17, which is a small decline from 6.8 in the prior reporting period. Again it should be noted this decreased a second consecutive year decrease in trips per capita with a percentage decrease of 8.2 percent. Transit Related Resources Finally, a big picture perspective of Riverside County’s public transportation system can be measured by reviewing the financial resources available to the transit operators. Service in FY 2016/17 increased for the second consecutive year by 4 percent (vehicle revenue miles) indicating that more transit service was provided in Riverside County. State and local funding resources increased from the prior fiscal year by 13 percent, by approximately $9.92 million for a total of $81.9 million. This increase in funding was sufficient to cover the total operating increase for all the transit operators, but as mentioned above under farebox recovery, closely monitoring operations costs in future fiscal years is increasingly important. Should operating costs exceed revenue received, the Commission will need to use reserves in order to fund the transit agencies at existing service levels or transit agencies may be forced to reduce service. Next Steps Generally, the public transit measures reported in the Countywide Report were positive and overall represent good news for the Commission and the operators. Sufficient resources were identified for the level of service provided to support mobility for Riverside County residents. Service is also identified by the Countywide Report as being operated in a cost effective manner 179 Agenda Item 8K although more emphasis can be placed by the operators in addressing increases to ridership and farebox return. The above-referenced metrics and conclusions are more fully described in the attached FY 2016/17 Countywide Report. Staff will continue to provide oversight with respect to the data reporting process via the TransTrack system, as well as with the individual operator audits and financial reporting for FY 2017/18. This item does not have any budgetary impacts to the Commission. Attachment: Riverside County Public Transportation: Annual Countywide Performance Report for Fiscal Year 2016/17 180 Prepared by AUGUST 2018 Riverside County Public TransportationAnnual CountywidePerformance ReportFY 2016/2017 181 This page intentionally left blank. 182 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction n 1 New Transit Initiatives n 21 City of Corona | 26 City of Riverside | 26 Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency | 27 Pass Transit - City of Banning | 28 Pass Transit - City of Beaumont | 28 Riverside Transit Agency | 28 Sunline Transit Agency | 29 About This Report | 1 Context for Public Transit | 1 Performance Reporting n 3 Purposes | 3 The Measures | 3 Policy and Compliance | 4 Utilization | 7 Accessibility and Coverage | 10 Connectivity | 20 Resources | 21 Summary of How We’re Doing n 21 What Do This Year’s Indicators Suggest for Riverside County Public Transportation | 27 The Challenge Going Forward n 30 Strategies to Promote Responsiveness to Customer Needs | 31 183 TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendices n 32 Appendix A – Definitions, Data Sets, and References | 33 Appendix B – Public Transit Trips Provided, All Modes | 34 Appendix C – Bus Stop Location Counts by Operators Supporting Table 5 (Transfer Locations) | 35 Appendix D – Public Transit Fleet Size Over Four Fiscal Years | 39 Appendix E – Public Utilities Code Requirement for Performance Monitoring | 40 184 1 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Introduction About This Report This fifth iteration of the RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT, FISCAL YEAR 2016/2017 (COUNTYWIDE REPORT) examines the performance of public transportation services of rail, bus, demand response and specialized transportation in Riverside County. Prepared in compliance with Public Utilities Code Section 99244, this report reflects Transportation Development Act (TDA) requirements that county transportation planning agencies monitor transit provider performance. The COUNTYWIDE REPORT serves another purpose: providing a comprehensive, countywide picture of public transit expenditures and what was provided and consumed for these investments. Two timeframes are considered here. First, for the FY 2016/2017 reporting year, audited transit expenditure and performance information examines transit provider experience in relation to five performance measures. Secondly, for the more recent FY 2017/2018 program year, selected transit initiatives are highlighted that contribute to a current picture of the public transit experience in Riverside County. Context for Public Transportation This COUNTYWIDE REPORT comes at a time of great change and opportunity, but also at a time of uncertainty, with recent years’ decline in public transit ridership both nationally and in this region. This brings increased attention to how to invite new riders to and retain existing riders on the regional multimodal transportation network. The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) undertook a region-wide analysis of the downturn in transit ridership. The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) authors identify that dramatically increased car ownership has contributed to lost public transit ridership. Given this and other factors, they conclude that getting traditional transit riders back is unlikely. Of greater potential, they believe, is to “convince the vast majority of people who rarely or never use transit to begin riding occasionally instead of driving.1” The UCLA researchers propose that if just one in every four non-riders can be 1 Manville, P. Taylor, B. Bluemenberg, E. Falling Transit Ridership: California and Southern California Prepared for the Southern California Association of Governments, January 2018. Untapped Potential The report’s authors found that traditionally transit-dependent riders who are now able to buy vehicles aren’t likely to return to transit. Instead of working to gain back lost riders, they urge transit providers to focus on new riders and encourage them to use transit sometimes for some trips......................................................䘀愀氀氀椀渀最 吀爀愀渀猀椀琀  刀椀搀攀爀猀栀椀瀀㨀 䌀愀氀椀昀漀爀渀椀愀 愀渀搀 匀漀甀琀栀攀爀渀 䌀愀氀椀昀漀爀渀椀愀  䴀椀挀栀愀攀氀 䴀愀渀瘀椀氀氀攀 䈀爀椀愀渀 䐀⸀ 吀愀礀氀漀爀 䔀瘀攀氀礀渀 䈀氀甀洀攀渀戀攀爀最 䄀唀吀䠀伀刀匀 185 2 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 encouraged to take a transit trip just once every two weeks, “annual ridership would grow by 96 million—more than compensating for the losses of recent years”. Riverside County is now seeing declines in transit ridership use, 6% below last year’s ridership levels and the second year of decline after multiple years of ridership growth. Riverside County transit operators, as reported in the New Transit Initiatives section of this REPORT, are already responding to this loss of ridership — and developing calls to seek new riders — through creative marketing efforts and the introduction of new routes, responsive to new markets. Additionally, this is a critical time in the public transportation industry. Transit faces threats to its basic business model not just through declining ridership, but also through the immediacy offered by transportation network company (TNC) services of Uber and Lyft where people can order and expect a trip pick-up within minutes. Future threats loom as autonomous vehicles and electrification potentially change the face of personal mobility. These and other developments open new opportunities and change expectations. This COUNTYWIDE REPORT presents the current state of fixed and specialized transportation in Riverside County in order to position Riverside County Transportation Commission and the transit operators to better determine their opportunities during this period of fundamental change. Figure 1. Fixed-Route Transit Service Areas in Riverside CountySource: Riverside County Strategic Assessment, 2016 186 3 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Performance Reporting Purposes This fifth RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDEPERFORMANCE REPORT, FY 2016/2017, describes the County’s transit provider experience in relation to key performance areas. In addition to compliance with governing law, the COUNTYWIDE REPORT will: • Present a countywide view of transit performance. • Provide a snapshot in time, a benchmark group of measures by which to monitor change. • Use outcome-based performance methodologies to comply with PL 114-94 Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act) and the California Transportation Development Act (Appendix E). • Support an expandable performance measurement framework. The Measures Public transportation in Riverside County is financially supported through a mix of federal, state and local funding. RCTC has responsibility for the programming of federal funding that public transit operators receive and for providing oversight on regulatory compliance. The Commission does not physically hold or distribute these funds as they are drawn directly from the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) by the operators. RCTC is directly responsible for managing state Transportation Development Act (TDA) funds and Local Measure A sales tax receipts, which it does distribute. Direct management and distribution of these funds is mandated by TDA and cannot be passed down to transit operators. RCTC also has administrative and operational responsibility for rail funding allocated to Riverside County by the U.S. Department of Transportation. This COUNTYWIDE REPORT continues to focus only on the state and local funds received by Riverside County because these are the funds under RCTC’s purview. The performance measures selected for analysis in this report provide a comprehensive picture of the county’s investment in transit and the resultant levels of delivered service. 187 4 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 The various measures are presented in five main categories: 1. Policy and Compliance – farebox recovery ratio calculations based on operating costs and revenue generated from service delivery. 2. Utilization – the delivery of passenger trips across all modes of transit. 3. Accessibility and Coverage – measuring the county’s population in proximity to available transit service. 4. Connectivity – expanding linkages throughout the transportation network. 5. Resources – monetary investment and available assets to deliver service. Appendix A presents definitions of most data elements used in this report. 1. POLICY AND COMPLIANCE This is the only COUNTYWIDE REPORT measure for which there is a regulatory requirement. This measure of the farebox recovery ratio has its basis in existing California law under the Transportation Development Act (TDA). California transit operators must achieve established minimum contributions to operating costs from their riders’ fares, called farebox. Section 6633.2 of the TDA statutorily requires minimum contributions from passenger fares to ensure basic efficiencies and protect continued funding of public transit programs receiving Local Transportation Funds (LTFs). Expressed as the farebox recovery ratio, standards vary between rural and urban providers, and are based upon population density, to reflect a mandatory proportion of total operating costs that must be covered from passenger fares. The TDA allows for some additional dollars to be counted towards farebox, such as Measure A revenues and contributions from local funding sources, and also allows for farebox recovery exemptions on new routes, new route extensions and newly urbanized areas. Presented in Table 1 are farebox recovery ratios for each Riverside County transit provider receiving funds from TDA LTF for the reporting year 2016/2017. All operators do meet their state-mandated farebox minimums, which is generally 20% for urban transit providers and 10% for rural or demand response-only providers. However, Riverside County has established “blended” minimum farebox standards, approved by Caltrans, that consider the combined urban and rural environments of each operators’ respective service area. Specifically, RTA and SunLine use these “blended” farebox standards. Agency Farebox Recovery Ratios: • Reflect the interaction of factors that include ridership, agency policy and operating costs; • Are influenced by ridership, as more riders will generate increased fare revenue while declining ridership will bring down the fare contribution to operating costs; • Reflect critical agency policy as transit fares are a key policy area determined by the transit provider; • Are influenced by attention to operating costs as systems operating efficiently will have lower expenses with fares representing comparatively higher proportions of total costs and higher farebox ratios......................................................188 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 20175 Table 1. Countywide Transportation Development Act (TDA) Audited Farebox Recovery, FY 16/17 Audit Results All Operators COUNTYWIDE COUNTYWIDE BANNING BEAUMONT CORONA PVVTA RIVERSIDE RTA SUNLINE COUNTYWIDE 2015 2016 2017 2017 [3]2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 2017 Total Operating Revenue from Passenger Fares [1] $22,847,887 $22,577,428 $157,159 $166,782 $444,548 $125,735 $359,596 $14,538,806 $6,791,675 $22,584,301 Total Operating Expenses, Net Farebox [2] $96,144,717 $98,536,146 $1,473,649 $1,599,462 $2,196,759 $868,249 $3,453,446 $70,437,592 $32,962,649 $112,991,806 Standard — Minimum Farebox Recovery Requirement, Per TDA and RCTC Adopted Policy No Standard No Standard 10%10%20%10%10%17.44%18.23%No Standard Actual — Farebox Recovery Ratio/Operator 23.8%22.9%10.7%10.4%20.2%14.5%10.4%20.6%20.6%20.0% Meeting Requirement Meets Meets Meets Meets Meets Meets Meets [1] Per RCTC Policy: Operators may supplement fare revenues with local funds and support such as Measure A. [2] Net farebox is based upon agency policy, nin conformance with TDA rules and RCTC adopted policy. Source: Annual Financial Statements with Idependent Auditor’s Report For the Year Ending June 30, 2017 189 6 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 How Are We Doing? As noted, all operators met their minimum farebox requirements. However, as Riverside County continues to experience declining ridership it becomes more difficult to maintain these minimums, given increases in operating costs that transit operators must manage year over year. This is reflected in the fact that although each operator met its respective minimum farebox ratio, the countywide farebox recovery ratio has now decreased in consecutive years, dropping by almost 4% between FY 14/15 at 23.8% and FY 16/17 at 20%. The almost 3% drop in the past year is attributed to a 13% increase in operating cost countywide, driven largely by a rise in renegotiated contract costs for RTA and their launch of new feeder services to support the Metrolink Perris Valley Line. All but two operators experienced a decrease in its farebox recovery rate this reporting period, compared to the prior year. Figure 2 illustrates farebox recovery ratios over the last five years for each of the County’s public operators. The minimum farebox standard is identified by the red bar in Figure 2. Diminishing ridership is reflected in the drop in FY 16/17 farebox recovery for the majority of the county’s operators. Each of the audited providers has continually met their farebox standards, but the future is of concern as ridership continues to decline while operating costs continue to rise. The County’s operators must continue to closely manage their systems’ efficiencies, balancing the level and cost of services provided relative to passenger utilization and fare pricing. While declining ridership has been a nationwide trend for several years, including double-digit ridership losses in neighboring Los Angeles and Orange counties, Riverside County had experienced increases in ridership in recent years and is only now beginning see ridership declines. The transit industry as a whole is in a period of rediscovery, exploring ways to better identify and meet the needs of today’s transit user, embracing new modes of transportation and innovations in technology that make transit easier to use and operate most efficiently. Figure 2. Historical Fare Box Experience – Riverside County Public Transit Providers 190 7 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 2. Utilization The Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) has identified trips per capita as a significant measure of the relationship between transit trips taken and population growth. Trips per capita is the ratio of trips provided to the area population. SCAG uses per capita transit trips as a regional performance indicator that has a long history dating back to the 2001 Regional Transportation Plan. For all public transportation modes, including rail, fixed-route, demand response and specialized transportation, Riverside County presents a trips-per-capita rate of 6.3 trips per resident per year for FY 2017. This calculation reflects population growth by 3% during this period, but a decline in the number of trips provided — from 15.8 million passenger trips in FY 15/16 to less than 15.1 million trips in FY 16/17. This is an overall decline of 5%. As presented in Table 2, the fixed-route service is the largest segment of transit trips provided, accounting for more than 85% of all trips. Fixed-route trips experienced a decrease of more than half a million trips, a 4% drop from the previous year. The second largest ridership mode is rail trips provided on the Metrolink system, at just over a million trips per year or almost 7% of all trips. Rail service saw a decline in passengers at 7% during the reporting year. Demand response transportation provided by the county’s public operators remained flat, fluctuating by only a thousand trips per year over the past two years while accounting for just over 5% of all passenger trips. The specialized transit program, supported predominantly by the County’s Measure A sales tax initiative, accounts for 2.6% of all trips and experienced the largest decrease by service mode at 43% for the reporting period. Over the past two years, reductions in specialized transit trips are largely due to the introduction of operational funds attached to the long-standing FTA 5310 capital program, which shifted some reporting of trips out of RCTC’s specialized program over to Caltrans as the administrator of these federal funds. There has also been a shift away from specialized transit funding for some long-standing fixed-route initiatives to traditional formula funding sources, which are now captured in the general fixed-route ridership. Appendix B details ridership by mode and provider, reflecting the changes in ridership over time between modes and amongst services. 191 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 20178 Table 2. Public Transit Trips Per Capita, FY 16/17 Public Transportation Trips Provided Countywide FY 2012/13 Countywide FY 2013/14 Countywide FY 2014/15 Countywide FY 2015/16 Countywide FY 2016/17 Service by Mode Trips Trips Trips Trips Trips % of Total Trips % Change FY 15/16 to FY 16/17 Rail [1]888,844 898,216 1,048,003 1,071,669 1,005,052 6.8%-7% Public Bus, Fixed Route [2]13,603,825 14,102,821 14,159,311 13,460,620 12,920,479 85.3%-4.18% Public Demand Response 795,503 823,649 840,811 840,167 839,110 5.3%-0.13% Specialized Transportation/Universal Call Program 559,104 577,736 543,296 416,338 290,186 2.6%-43% ALL TRIPS: Including Rail, Public Transit, Measure A, JARC and New Freedom Programs 15,847,276 16,402,422 16,591,421 15,788,794 15,054,827 100%-5% TOTAL POPULATION 2,227,577 2,255,059 2,279,967 2,308,441 2,382,640 3% Trips per Capita[4]7.1 7.3 7.3 6.8 6.3 -8.2% Notes: [1] Annualized rail boardings are from average weekday daily boardings at Riverside CountyMetrolink stations with historical FY14/15 totals corrected: Riverside, 91 and IEOC Lines. Reported May 9, 2017. [2] ‘Public Bus, Fixed Route’ trip counts do not include Specialized Transportation funded fixed route trips. [3] Public transit trips extracted from TransTrack ‘Table 2 — SRTP Service Summary’ on 5/25/18. Specialized Transit operators reported from Measure A audits. Rail trips reported directly. [4] California Department of Finance, Demographic Research Unit as of January 1, 2017. 192 9 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 How Are We Doing? Monitoring the trips per capita indicator over time allows for an assessment of public transit’s ability to keep pace with the county’s continually growing population. Transit service areas with higher population densities typically have higher trips per capita rates than non-urban or rural areas. Due to the mix of these types of environments throughout Riverside County, this measure should not be used to rank or compare productivity amongst operators, but to contrast this county’s experience with other providers whose operating characteristics, population, service area size or population density are similar. Table 3 presents peer information: the 2016 service area population and unlinked passenger trips for the three Riverside County transit operators that report to the National Transit Database (NTD) and for nine other regional providers. This provides perspective on the Riverside County experience. 2016 Peer Agency Trips per Capita Service Area Population Unlinked Passenger Trips Trips per Capita Service Area Square Mileage Population per Square Mile (In persons) Audited Motor Bus Statistics Only SunLine Transit Agency (from Countywide Report) 422,874 4,151,467 9.8 1,120 378 Riverside Transit Agency (from Countywide Report) 1,747,410 8,284,221 4.7 2,725 641 Corona Cruiser (from Countywide Report) 170,964 132,469 0.8 41 4,170 NTD Motor Bus Statistics Only Los Angeles County MTA dba Metro 8,626,817 320,869,835 37.2 1,513 5,702 Long Beach Transit 796,609 26,271,977 33.0 98 8,129 Montebello Bus Lines 315,074 7,588,606 24.1 151 2,087 San Diego MTS 2,462,707 52,190,298 21.2 720 3,420 Orange County Transit Authority 3,077,903 43,271,533 14.1 463 6,648 North County Transit District, San Diego 849,420 7,558,076 8.9 403 2,108 Antelope Valley Transit Authority 349,050 3,033,755 8.7 1,200 291 Omnitrans (San Bernardino County) 1,487,235 12,379,517 8.3 466 3,191 Victor Valley Transit Authority (San Bernardino County)429,481 1,937,143 4.5 950 452 Riverside Countywide Annual Performance Report All Riverside County Providers \* 2,382,640 15,054,827 6.3 4,499 530 Source: Profile Year 2016 National Transit Database https://www.transit.dot.gov/ntd/transit-agency-profiles \* Source: As documented in Appendix B of this report Table 3. Trips Per Capita Rates Contrasted with Other Areas 193 10 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 The unlinked passenger trips presented for these three Riverside County transit agencies are as reported in their FY 16/17 audits while other transit agency data was directly obtained from 2016 NTD operator profile reports. Passenger trips presented for all transit agencies reflect only trips taken on fixed-route bus service (i.e. motor bus, commuter bus, rapid bus) and do not include trips on rail, demand response or other modes of service. Unlinked passenger trips for all Riverside County providers, regardless of service mode are included (last line of Table 3) for a countywide perspective of service delivery and population density. In Table 3, the factor population density, presented as population per square mile, is important to trips per capita. Riverside County’s two largest fixed-route providers, RTA and SunLine, have less population density in contrast to some of their neighboring Southern California transit systems, hence generating trips per capita measures of 4.7 and 9.8 respectively. As expected, their trips per capita indicator is lower than more urban environments like Los Angeles, Long Beach and San Diego with greater population density and reflected in trips per capita rates ranging from the low 20’s to the high 30’s. The Corona Cruiser shares portions of its service area with RTA and operated a general public dial-a-ride during the reporting period, both contributing factors to its measure of only 0.8 trips per person. 3. Accessibility and Coverage The varying landscapes of each of the county’s operators present unique challenges in the provision of service. To better understand the ability of the county’s population to access the available transit services, some measurement of transit’s service coverage is important. This measure is defined in this COUNTYWIDE REPORT as the percentage of residents living within ¼ mile and within ¾ of a mile of public fixed-route transit service. This population coverage measure excludes commuter routes with limited access due to long distances between stops and dial-a-ride or specialized transit service areas that stretch beyond the distance calculations of the measure as it pertains to fixed-route service. The ¾ mile envelope is consistent with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirement for the provision of complementary paratransit to eligible persons with disabilities that is comparable to the level of service provided to individuals without disabilities using the fixed-route system. This year’s COUNTYWIDE REPORT introduces a ¼ mile measure as representative of a walkable distance that is commonly used by transit planners to measure service accessibility as the longest distance an individual might walk to a bus stop. 194 11 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 This measure of accessibility to a bus route only considers the proximity of accessible transit to potential riders and does not reflect the number of available service days, span of service hours or service frequency. How Are We Doing? Operators instituted various service structure changes, some extending their service envelope and increasing their population coverage levels while others added service within their existing footprint. In the following pages, Figures 3 through 7 present maps illustrating each transit provider’s service area and its fixed-route network in relation to the ¼- and ¾-mile buffers. Figure 8 presents countywide population coverage within ¼- and ¾- of a mile of fixed-route service. Riverside Transit Agency Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) (Figure 3) reports that 46% of the 1.75 million service area residents live within a ¼-mile walkable distance of its fixed-route system and a 75% population coverage level for those living within the ADA ¾-mile envelope. This level of ¾-mile coverage is consistent with prior years’ level of coverage but includes some service changes. Changes within the RTA network had minimal impact on the overall service footprint and include: • New Route 54 Downtown Riverside Metrolink Shuttle implemented October 2016 to link Perris Valley Line passengers with key job locations in downtown Riverside. • A 54F Festival of Lights route was also operated in November/December 2016 between Downtown Riverside Metrolink Station and downtown Riverside. • Sunday service was implemented on historically no-service days: Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. • Downtown Riverside bus operations were streamlined in January 2017, together with the closure of the existing Downtown Riverside bus terminal. • The January 2017 service changes included restructuring of Route 16 by terminating this route at University of California Riverside and coordinating the service with Route 1 through improved passenger connections. • In January 2017, Routes 31 and 35 were also merged to provide seamless service as one single Route 31 between Hemet, San Jacinto, Beaumont, Banning and Moreno Valley. SunLine Transit Agency The SunLine Transit Agency (Figure 4) reports a ¼-mile and ¾-mile envelopes at 50% and 82%, respectively. This ¾-mile level of coverage remains the same as last year’s COUNTYWIDE REPORT. Nonetheless, a number of current year changes were made within the network, including: 195 12 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 • Lines 14 — adjusted the schedule and terminus location at Indian Canyon and Ramon. • Line 24 — rerouted to serve Sunrise between Vista Chino and Racquet Club; discontinued fixed scheduled service to Vista Chino/Caballeros and Racquet Club/Caballeros, and provided supplemental service to accommodate school students; extended service to Ramon/San Luis Rey retail area and replace terminus loop route at south Palm Springs (Palm Springs Airport). • Line 30 — linked to changes to Route 24, adjusted the schedule and terminus location at Indian Canyon and Ramon, as well as realigned to serve the Palm Springs Airport at Tahquitz Canyon and El Cielo. • Line 53 — rerouted to serve Monterey/Dinah Shore at the Super Walmart; discontinued service to Joslyn Center, Xavier School and the segment of service on Highway 111 from San Pablo to Cook Street. • Lines 90, 91 and 95 — Line 91 will now serve the current Line 90 alignment in Indio. Implemented circular service in Coachella. Line 95 terminated at 5th/Vine to connect with Line 111, and route realigned to service Airport Boulevard east of SR 86 via Buchanan at Mecca/Thermal College of the Desert campus. • Line 111 — linked to changes to Route 24, adjusted schedule and terminus location at Indian Canyon and Ramon, as well as realigned westbound route alignment at Highway 111 and Flower. Corona Transit Corona Transit (Figure 5) had minimal changes to its route structure and reports a continued ¾-mile population coverage level of 73%, with 40% of its service area population living within a walkable ¼ mile. Services changes included: • October 2016 — Opening of Bell Street upon completion of construction improvements at the Corona Regional. This change affected both the Blue Line and the Red Line in both directions, allowing service to resume at the Corona Senior Center and the Corona Library. • September 2016 — Redline Westbound to stand down at Centennial High School from 2:49 to 2:55 p.m. to allow students time to board the bus. Pass Transit The Pass Transit (Figure 6) service area has 75% of its service area population living within ¼ mile and 91% of its population residing within ¾ mile of its fixed- route network. Service changes for FY 16-17 included: • The City of Banning reduced headway times on Route 1 and expanded service hours at the MSJC Pass Campus by Route 6. • The City of Beaumont eliminated Sunday service on Route 3-4 and added service to Mesa View Middle School in Calimesa on the newly launched Calimesa Route 136. 196 13 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA) (Figure 7) reports the highest coverage levels of the County’s operators with 80% of residents living within ¼-mile and 91% of its population living within ¾-mile. The ¾-mile coverage level of nine-out-of-10 residents is significant considering PVVTA operates a deviated fixed-route service that will provide curb-to-curb service within a ¾-mile envelope. PVVTA made no significant routing changes during the reporting period. However, PVVTA launched its new intercity Blythe Wellness Express medical lifeline service into the Coachella Valley in July 2017, establishing new connectivity with SunLine Transit for PVVTA riders. Table 4 presents each transit provider’s service area population and the proportion of residents living within ¼- and ¾- of a mile of the fixed-route footprint. The population envelopes are limited to persons living within Riverside County and do not include persons living within the envelope but who live across County lines. In summary, this analysis revealed that more than half, or 52%, of Riverside County residents have access to public transit within ¼-mile of where they live. Further analysis of the County’s population reveals that almost 82% of all residents live within a ¾-mile distance of a fixed-route bus, an impressive accomplishment for a county with such large sectors of rural terrain. While more current population data exists and is used elsewhere in this REPORT, this coverage assessment uses 2010 Census data, as it is most recent data set where block level data is available at the most finite level necessary to create the County’s ¼- and ¾-mile “envelope” coverage calculations. One benefit of the necessary continued use of the 2010 Census data for these service coverage calculations is that it provides for comparison to a population baseline and more clearly shows change over time in the fixed-route network of each provider. Public Transit Operator Service Area Population 1/4 Mile Envelope % of Total Population 3/4 Mile Envelope % of Total Population Riverside Transit Agency 1,747,410 805,985 46% 1,305,476 75% SunLine Transit Agency 422,874 211,694 50% 347,303 82% Corona Cruiser (from Countywide Report) 170,964 68,728 40% 125,617 73% Pass Transit 84,113 63,089 75% 76,786 91% Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency 16,390 13,554 83% 14,833 91% Countywide* 2,189,641 1,131,520 52% 1,787,120 82% *Countywide service area population total is a unique count to avoid duplication from overlapping service areas in Western Riverside County. Population totals were extrapolated from 2010 U.S. Census Block Level Data. Table 4. Service Area Population Coverage by Transit Operator 197 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201714 ¨§¦15 ¨§¦215 Rancho Santa MargaritaRancho Santa Margarita ST74 ¨§¦10 BanningBanning BeaumontBeaumont ColtonColton HighlandHighland Loma LindaLoma Linda MiraMira LomaLoma NorcoNorco PerrisPerris RedlandsRedlands RialtoRialto RubidouxRubidoux SanSan JacintoJacinto YucaipaYucaipa CanyonCanyon LakeLake Coto de CazaCoto de Caza HemetHemet LakeLake ElsinoreElsinore MurrietaMurrieta SanSan ClementeClemente San JuanSan Juan CapistranoCapistrano SunSun CityCity TemeculaTemecula Trabuco CanyonTrabuco Canyon ValleValle VistaVista WildomarWildomar CathedralCathedral CityCity Desert HotDesert Hot SpringsSprings PalmPalm SpringsSprings RanchoRancho MirageMirage YuccaYucca ValleyValley CoronaCorona FontanaFontana MorenoMoreno ValleyValley OntarioOntario RanchoRancho CucamongaCucamonga RiversideRiverside SanSan BernardinoBernardino Cleveland National Forest ¨§¦210 ¨§¦15 ¨§¦215 ¨§¦5 ¨§¦10 ST83 ST62 ST259 ST79 ST66 ST71 ST210 ST111 ST60 ST371 ST91 ST74 Population of Riverside Transit Agency (RTA) District Service Area and Within 3/4 & 1/4 Mile of RTA Bus Routes RTA Bus Routes Commuter Bus Routes Data Source: 2010 U.S. Census, DEC_10_SF1_P1, Block level data Methodology: e.g.: Census Block Population = 5,000, % of Census Block within 3/4 mile buffer = 50%, Estimated Population of Census Block within 3/4 mile buffer = 2,500. Projection: NAD_1983_State Plane,_California_VI_FIPS_0406_Feet - GISWS, May 2018´0 10 205 Miles RTA District BoundaryRiverside County Boundary 3/4 Mile Buffer1/4 Mile Buffer P O P U L A T I O N 0 - 51 52 - 141 142 - 292 293 - 545 546 - 1,017 1,018 - 2,406 Service Area = 1,747,410 (100%)3/4 Mile Buffer = 1,305,476 (78%)1/4 Mile Buffer = 805,985 (46%) Figure 3. Riverside Transit Agency Population Coverage Within ¼ and ¾ of a Mile 198 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201715 San Bernardino CountySan Bernardino County San Diego CountySan Diego County Imperial CountyImperial County SunLineService A r e a ¨§¦10 CathedralCathedral CityCity IndioIndio PalmPalm SpringsSprings Joshua Tree National Park San Bernardino National Forest Mt San Jacinto State Park Riverside CountyRiverside County CoachellaCoachella Desert Desert HotHot SpringsSprings La QuintaLa Quinta PalmPalm DesertDesert RanchoRancho MirageMirage ThermalThermal ¨§¦10 ST86 ST86S ST243 ST62 ST371 ST111 ST74 ST111 Salton Sea Source: 2010 U.S. Census, DEC_10_SF1_P1, Block leveldata. Methodology: e.g.: Census Block Population = 5,000, % ofCensus Block within 3/4 mile buffer = 50%, Estimated Population of Census Block within 3/4 mile buffer = 2,500Projection: NAD_1983_StatePlane_California_VI_FIPS_0406_FeetBy: GISWS, May 2018 Population of SunLine Service Area and Within 1/4 & 3/4 Mile of SunLine Bus Routes ´0 7.5 153.75 Miles Sunline Bus Routes Commuter Bus Routes 3/4 Mile Buffer1/4 Mile Buffer POPULATION 0 - 35 36 - 107 108 - 242 243 - 487 488 - 1,019 1,020 - 2,018 Service Area = 422,874 (100%)3/4 Mile Buffer = 347,303 (82%)1/4 Mile Buffer = 211,694 (50%) Figure 4. SunLine Transit Agency Population Coverage Within ¼ and ¾ of a Mile 199 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201716 NorcoNorco RiversideRiversideChinoChino HillsHills El CerritoEl Cerrito HomeHome GardensGardens La SierraLa Sierra MayMay NorcoNorco PepperPepper CornerCorner CoronaCorona Cleveland National Forest Prado Basin Park ¨§¦15 ST31 ST91 ST71 6thStOntario Ave6thSt E2ndSt 6th StButterfield Dr Weirick RdNMapleStSm i t h Av e W2ndSt Lester AveS Lincoln AveGarretsonAveFoothillP k y W Ontario Ave 6th StH id d e n ValleyP k yCorydon AveEChaseDr 2nd St Ont a r i o AveNBuenaVistaAveWOliveSt W 10th St PierceStRimpauAveRiver Rd EUpperDr W RinconSt NSmithAveRi v e r R d MagnoliaAveG r a n t St 3rd St Ontario Ave LincolnAve4th St EOntarioAveBorder AveOntario Ave HillsideAveCorydonAveVIAPacificaS Main StIndianaA ve SSheridanStUpperDr Magnolia AveCorydonAveC a ja lc o R dLincolnAveCrestaRdFoothillPkyTemescalAveMagnolia AveB u c h a n a n A v e L a Sierra A v e PASEO GrandeTe m escal C anyon R d Palisades Dr Hidde n V a lle y Pky S JoyStPi erc eSt SSmithAveK n a b e R d RiverwalkPkyF u l l e r t o n A v e Railro a d S t Rimpau AveAviation Dr C a lifo rn ia AveSMainStE 6th St SMainStMagnolia AveE 6 t h St N M ckinle y StPromenadeAve GreenRiverRd SerfasClubDrCorona Municipal AirportCorona Municipal Airport Data Source: 2010 U.S. Census, DEC_10_SF1_P1, Block level dataMethodology: e.g.: Census Block Population = 5,000, % of CensusBlock within 3/4 mile buffer = 50%, Estimated Population of CensusBlock within 3/4 mile buffer = 2,500Projection: NAD_1983_StatePlane_California_VI_FIPS_0406_Feet Population of Corona Cruiser & Dial-A-Ride Service Area and within 1/4 and 3/4 Mile of Cruiser Bus Routes San Bernardino County Riverside County Cruiser Bus Routes ´0 1 2 30.5 Miles 3/4 Mile Buffer C oro n a C ruis e r & Dial-A-RideServiceArea GISWS May 2018 PO P U L A T I O N 0 - 37 38 - 101 102 - 188 189 - 334 335 - 679 680 - 1,265 Service Area = 170,964 (100%)1/4 Mile Buffer = 68,728 (40%)3/4 Mile Buffer = 125,617 (73%) 1/4 Mile Buffer Figure 5. Corona Cruiser Population Coverage Within ¼ and ¾ of a Mile 200 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201717 BeaumontBeaumont San Bernardino National Forest ¨§¦10 ¨§¦10 ST79 ST38 ST60 ST243 Calimesa Blvd 5th StBryant StW Ramsey S t C o u n t y L i n e R d Nuevo Rd N 8th StAVE F Cherry Valley Blvd E George St Vineland St E 14th St Fields Rd14th StDutton St Cottonwood Ave MorongoR d N R a m o n a B l v d Contour Ave E Ramsey StCrafton AveLakeviewAveDavisRd W Wilson St Bonita AveW Westward Ave Outer W il d w o o d C a ny o n R d Yucaipa Blvd J u n ip e r Fl at sRdE 8th St San Tim oteo CanyonRd Gilman S prin g s R d Brookside Ave Bl u f f S t Soboba R d Ramona ExpyJackRabbitTrlColoradoSt DesertLawn Dr O a k GlenRdCR R3N Warren RdBanningBanning BeaumontBeaumont CabazonCabazon CalimesaCalimesa CherryCherry ValleyValley CraftonCrafton DunlapDunlap AcresAcres Eden HotEden Hot SpringsSprings El CascoEl Casco Gilman Hot SpringsGilman Hot Springs HighlandHighland SpringsSprings HindaHinda MentoneMentone NicklinNicklin Oak GlenOak Glen OwlOwl SanSan JacintoJacinto Soboba Hot SpringsSoboba Hot Springs YucaipaYucaipa LakeviewLakeview Pass Transit Bus Routes * Commuter Bus Routes 0 3 61.5 Miles ´ Population of Pass Transit Service Area and 1/4 & 3/4 Mile of Pass Bus Routes Data Source: 2010 U.S. Census, DEC_10_SF1_P1, Block level dataMethodology: e.g.: Census Block Population = 5,000, % of CensusBlock within 3/4 mile buffer = 50%, Estimated Population of CensusBlock within 3/4 mile buffer = 2,500Projection: NAD_1983_StatePlane_California_VI_FIPS_0406_Feet* Fixed Routes include: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 25,136 GISWS 7_18 Riverside County Pass Transit Service Area 3/4 Mile Buffer 1/4 Mile Buffer 1/4 Mile Buffer = 63,089 (75%)3/4 Mile Buffer = 76,786 (91%)Service Area = 84,113 (100%) P O P U L A T I O N 0 - 18 19 - 53 54 - 107 108 - 215 216 - 445 446 - 966 Figure 6. Pass Transit Population Coverage Within ¼ and ¾ of a Mile 201 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201718 !Palo Verde HS !Casa Encinas ! KMART ! Baldwin SeniorApartments !Palo Verde College IronwoodState Prison Ripley Mesa Verde Ehrenberg Blythe L a P az L a P az C o u nty C o u nty R i v e r side R i v e r side C o u nty C o u nty ¨§¦10 £¤95 ST78 ST60¨§¦10 £¤95 ST78 11 88 tt hh AA vv ee 22nd Ave22nd Ave 32nd Ave32nd Ave S Lovekin BlvdS Lovekin BlvdS Intake BlvdS Intake BlvdRannells BlvdRannells BlvdSeeley AveSeeley Ave 10th Ave10th Ave 24th Ave24th Ave 28th Ave28th Ave Seeley AveSeeley Ave MM ii dd ll aa nn dd R R dd N Lovekin BlvdN Lovekin BlvdCCAAnnddDDBBllvvddStSt 20th Ave20th Ave 28th Ave28th Ave 8th Ave8th Ave 25th Ave25th Ave SSttStSt 26th Ave26th Ave Lewis RdLewis Rd StSt StStStSt 11th Ave11th Ave StSt S 3rd StS 3rd StStSt Arizona AveArizona AveAiello RdAiello Rd 15th Ave15th Ave Garcia DrGarcia DrScott LnScott Ln Joy PlJoy Pl15th Ave15th Ave Reeder RdReeder Rd SSttStSt 20th Ave20th Ave SSt tHilber AveHilber Ave5th Ave5th Ave5th Ave5th Ave Arrowhead BlvdArrowhead Blvd17th Ave17th Ave Phillips StPhillips St 34th Ave34th Ave 7th Ave7th Ave Jones RdJones RdLudy BlvdLudy Blvd6th Ave6th Ave RRiivviieerraaDDrrIndianIndian10th Ave10th AveArrowheadArrowheadBlvdBlvd Keim BlvdKeim BlvdKeim BlvdKeim BlvdStStFord DrFord Dr16th Ave16th Ave 9th Ave9th Ave 16th Ave16th Ave BB ll aa cc kk RR oo cckk RR dd 35th Ave35th Ave 30th Ave30th Ave Oden WayOden WayMesa DrMesa DrHunter BlvdHunter BlvdS Rannells BlvdS Rannells Blvd5th Ave5th Ave Eugene DrEugene Dr16th Ave16th Ave 20th Ave20th Ave 32nd Ave32nd Ave 25th Ave25th Ave Seeley AveSeeley Ave 22nd Ave22nd Ave 8th Ave8th Ave Riverside AveRiverside Ave 24th Ave24th Ave 22 00tthhAAvv ee 6th Ave6th Ave S BroadwayS Broadway4th St4th St 34th Ave34th Ave Buck BlvdBuck BlvdRannels BlvdRannels Blvd10th Ave10th Ave 6th Ave6th Ave MMeessaaDDrrS Defrain BlvdS Defrain Blvd18th Ave18th Ave Stephenson BlvdStephenson BlvdTT hhee BB rraa ddss hh aa ww TTrr ll 34th Ave34th Ave YYuummaaPPrroovviinnggGG rroouunndd 30th Ave30th AveWWiilleeyyWWeellllRRdd 2nd Ave2nd Ave SSCCAAnnddDDBBllvvddKeim BlvdKeim BlvdSSAArrrroowwhheeaaddBBllvvdd4th Ave4th Ave Stephenson BlvdStephenson BlvdWW 11 44 tthh AAvv eeDefrain BlvdDefrain BlvdStStS t S t RR ii vv ii ee rr aa DDrr OOxxBBoowwRRddStStStSt StSt StStStSt StStStStStStMMeessaaDDrrLLeevveeeeRRddW W e l l s R d W W e l l s R d StSt StStStSt StStStStPPee ttee rr DD MM cc iinn tt yy rr ee AA vveeGravel Pit RdGravel Pit RdNeighbors BlvdNeighbors BlvdPVVTA Service Area Boundary ´ Population of Palo Verde Valley Transit Service Area and Within 1/4 and 3/4 Mile of PVVTA Bus Routes 0 2.5 51.25 Miles Data Source: 2010 U.S. Census, DEC_10_SF1_P1, Block leveldata. Methodology: e.g.: Census Block Population = 5,000, % ofCensus Block within 3/4 mile buffer = 50%, Estimated Populationof Census Block within 3/4 mile buffer = 2,500. Projection: NAD_1983_StatePlane_California_VI_FIPS _0406_Feet 3/4 Mile Buffer Bus Routes Bus Stops Service Area = 16,661 (100%)3/4 Mile Buffer = 14,819 (89%) GISWS May 2018 KKaaiisseerrRRddRRiicceeRRdd¨§¦10 ST177 Ragsdale Rd Ragsdale Rd OOaassii ss RR dd ¨§¦10 Pinto Rd Pinto Rd CC iirr iiaa cc oo RR dd Joshua Tree National Park Desert Post Office Ciriaco Summit 1/4 Mile Buffer (Note: Ironwood State Prison population of 7,595 has been excluded from these calculations) P O P U L A T I O N 0 - 12 13 - 38 39 - 82 83 - 182 183 - 488 489 - 2,616 Service Area = 16,390 (100%)1/4 Mile Buffer = 13,554 (83%)3/4 Mile Buffer = 14,833 (91%) 0 1 20.5 Miles Figure 7. Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Population Coverage Within ¼ and ¾ of a Mile 202 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201719 Riverside County 2010 Population = 2,189,641 (100%) !■ -■ ---■ -♦-■-■ -I -■-■ ,Illa I -■-■ - I - ■-■ -I-! ·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·-·��' -·'., ·"I I ., I' ., \ , I 1, j .. , -·-■-■ -·-·-· -·-■-■ -·-. -· -■-■ -·-·-·-. -■-■ -·-···-. -·-· -·-·---■-■-■ -·-·-· __ ,.. __ , __ .,,._, -■-,J RTA, Coron a Cruiser & Pass Transit: ¼ Mile Buffer= 906 ;l72 (41.39%) ¾ Mile Buffer= 1,424,984 (65 .08%) Sunline: ¼ Mile Buffer= 211,694 (9.67%) ¾ Mile Buffer= 347,303 (15.86%) Blyth (ex,cludes lronv.,oo d St ate Prison): ¼ Mile Buffer= 1 3,554 (0 .62%) 1/4 Mile Buffer= 14,833 (0.68%) 1/4 Mile Buffer = 1,131,520 (51.68%) 3/4 Mile Buffer = 1,787,120 (81.62%) Figure 8. Countywide Population Coverage Within ¼ and ¾ of a Mile of Fixed-Route Service Note: As noted previously, the 2010 Decennial Census was used to calculate the population living within the buffer zones, being the most recent data set where block level data is available Current 2017 population information from the California Department of Finance is used elsewhere in this REPORT. 203 20 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 4. Connectivity A measure of connectivity is critical for a county as large and diverse as Riverside where travel between communities and neighboring counties is often necessary. Intercommunity travel may require transfers within and between systems and along the corridors of the Inland region to navigate such a robust transportation network. While riders prefer a one-seat ride, transfers are often necessary to accommodate the breadth of trip origins and destinations that Riverside County’s transit users necessarily make. How Are We Doing? Table 5 presents the number of locations within the County where a physical transfer is possible, based upon where fixed-route buses travel and intersect with each other. This count of unique locations does not consider wait time, only that particular routes converge at the same location. Transfer locations are counted as connections within systems, to other operators within the county, to regional bus operators in other counties, and to rail and intercity bus providers. Transfer connections are reported by the operators themselves to account for better accuracy and currency of service data. This COUNTYWIDE REPORT shows a significant 21% increase in transfer locations, attributed mainly to new connections in Western Riverside County and split evenly between RTA and Pass Transit. Table 5. Bus and Rail Transfer Location Counts for Riverside County Public Transportation Transfer Locations Countywide FY 13/14 Countywide FY 14/15 Countywide Totals FY 15/16 Western Riverside County FY 16/17 Coachella Valley FY 16/17 Palo Verde Valley FY 16/17 Countywide Totals FY 16/17 % Change fromFY 15/16 Fixed-Route and Rail #%#%#%#% Intra-System Bus 1,070 85%1,184 82%1,216 84%1,395 105 20 1,520 87%25% Intra-County Bus, Within County 66 5%113 8%91 6%90 6 2 98 6%8% Regional Bus Transit Between Counties 77 6%75 5%59 4%54 0 0 54 3%-8% Regional Rail and Inter- City Bus 42 3%75 5%75 5%62 10 1 73 4%-3% TOTAL 1,255 100%1,447 100%1,441 100%1,601 121 23 1,745 100%21% Source: See Appendix C, Bus Stop Location Counts by Operators, for detail by operator. 204 21 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 5. Resources The final measure of this report categorizes the resources available to support the County’s investment into transit. Table 5 shows the three geographic regions of Riverside County, related to four areas of resources: 1. State and local funding that support transit services and can match available federal funding; 2. Public transit vehicles by which these programs provide trips; 3. Revenue vehicle miles, reflecting the quantities of service provided by public fixed-route and demand responsive transit services across each provider’s service area. 4. Vehicles per square mile quantifies current fleet size in relation to the transit service area size, providing a measure of service volumes available within these large service areas. How Are We Doing? Table 6 indicated that State and local funding has risen by 13% over the past year, an increase of more than $11 million, but which must accomodate the noted increase in Western Riverside County’s operating costs. Transit fleet size nets an increase of one vehicle, resulting in no change in the vehicles per square mile indicator since no changes were made in total service area square mileage of all the operators. In terms of geography, Western Riverside County has a greater concentration of vehicles at 0.16 vehicles per square mile compared to 0.1 and 0.01 for the Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley, respectively. Vehicle revenue miles increased by 4%, reflecting an impressive 700,000 additional miles of revenue service. This increase is reflective of increased service frequency and/or increased spans of service hours. Summary of How We’re Doing This COUNTYWIDE REPORT paints a different picture than that of previous years’ assessments with downward trends appearing in performance categories that historically reported consistent growth. Ridership and trips per capita have declined although funding and revenue miles have increased. Table 6 details the $81 million in state and local transit funding, which reflects a 13% increase and reports a 4% increase in vehicle revenue miles, to almost 19.8 million service miles. Table 7 summarizes other key markers, including the 6% overall decline in transit trips, with the good news being that we do not see the double-digit percentage decreases of some areas, including neighboring Los Angeles County. 205 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201722 Table 6. Public Transportation Resources in Riverside County: Commission Allocated State and Local Transit Funding, Vehicles and Vehicle Revenue Miles Public Transportation Resources, Three Time Periods FY 13-14 Countywide Totals FY 14-15 Countywide Totals FY 15-16 Countywide Totals FY 16-17 Countywide Totals % Change from FY 15/16 Western Riverside County Coachella Valley Palo Verde Valley State and Local Transit Funding, Excluding all Federal Funds $61,835,874 $69,988,653 $72,640,997 $56,568,975 $24,487,568 $882,472 $81,939,015 13% Programmed LTF and Measure A Transit, FY 2016/17, exclusive of state and local rail funding Transit Vehicles (fixed route and paratransit; no taxis) [1]484 494 495 376 112 8 496 0% RTA, City of Riverside, Corona, Banning, Beaumont, SunLine, Palo Verde Valley Vehicle Revenue Miles (fixed route and paratransit) [2]16,856,113 17,830,287 19,086,249 15,109,775 4,498,671 153,869 19,762,315 4% RTA, City of Riverside, Corona, Banning, Beaumont, SunLine, Palo Verde Valley Transit Service Area Square Mileage 4,499 4,499 4,499 2,337 1,120 1,042 4,499 0% Measure - Vehicles per Square Mile 0.11 0.11 0.11 0.16 0.10 0.01 0.11 0% [1] Transit Vehicles: reported directly by operators on May 3, 2018 to RCTC staff. [2] Revenue Miles: extracted from TransTrack ‘Table 2 — SRTP Service Summary’ on May 25, 2018. [3] Square mileage: for total county from U.S. Census Quick Facts; SRTP for SunLine; GIS analysis for RTA presented in Figure 1; for PVVTA presented in Figure 3. 206 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201723 Table 7. Summary of Countywide Transit Performance Riverside County Public Transportation Summary of Countywide Performance FY 2012/13 FY 2013/14 FY 2014/15 FY 2015/16 FY 2016/17 % Chng from FY 15/16 Farebox Recovery Ratio 25.5%23.3%20.0%20.0%20.0%0% Total Transit Trips, including Metrolink 15,847,276 16,402,422 16,591,421 15,788,794 14,764,641 -6% Bus only trips 14,958,432 15,504,206 15,543,418 14,717,125 13,759,589 -7% Metrolink only trips 888,844 898,216 1,048,003 1,071,669 1,005,052 -6% Transit Trips Per Capita 7.1 7.3 7.3 6.8 6.3 -8% Transit Accessibility and Coverage Countywide Avg. 1/4 Mile Population Access to Fixed Route N/A 76%76%77%77%N/A Countywide Avg. 3/4 Mile Population Access to Fixed Route N/A N/A N/A N/A 45%N/A Bus Stop Transfer Connections 1,315 1,255 1,447 1,441 1,745 21% Intra-System 88%85%82%84%87%3% Intra-County Bus, Within County 3%5%8%6%6%-11% Regional Bus Transit Between Counties 6%6%5%4%3%-24% Regional Rail and National Inter-City Bus 3%3%5%5%4%-20% FY 16/17 Transportation Resources State and Local Operating Funds $53,903,436 $61,835,874 $69,988,653 $72,640,997 $81,939,015 13% Public Transit Vehicles (Fixed Route and Paratransit)447 484 494 495 496 0% Vehicle Revenue Miles (Fixed Route and Paratransit)16,132,145 16,856,113 17,830,287 19,086,249 19,762,315 4% Square Miles of Transit Service Area 4,887 4,499 4,499 4,499 4,499 0 Vehicles Per Square Mile 0.09 0.11 0.11 0.11 0.11 0% Vehicle Revenue Miles Per Square Mile 3,301 3,747 3,963 4,242 4,393 4% 207 24 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 What Do This Year’s Indicators Suggest for Riverside County Public Transit? While all of the County’s operators met the required farebox recovery ratio this reporting year, they did so with smaller margins.This will require closer attention in the current and coming years. Particularly, close attention should be paid to the following areas of concern: • Trend of declining farebox recovery for each operator. • Further reductions in trip utilization for bus and rail service. • Falling trips per capita indicator — continued population growth coupled with fewer trips provided in consecutive years. • Increases in vehicle revenue miles while ridership and farebox decline. After multiple years of steady ridership growth, Figure 9 depicts this new pattern of declining ridership for all modes except public demand response, which generally carries the highest cost per passenger trip provided. Figure 10 shows the relationship of falling ridership to the County’s ever-growing population by recording the lowest trips per capita indicator of 6.3 since the development of the COUNTYWIDE REPORT, a 7% decline from the prior year. Figure 9. Transit Trips by Mode for Riverside County, Over Six Reporting Periods 208 25 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Figure 10. Riverside County Transit Trips, Population and Trips per Capita 209 26 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 New Transit Initiatives This section reports on selected Riverside County transit operators’ initiatives undertaken during FY 2017/2018 and beginning in FY2018/2019. This only highlights some changes; more details about each provider’s initiatives are presented in their individual Short Range and Long Range Transit Plans. City of Corona Dial-A-Ride Transitioned to Specialized Service Corona Dial-A-Ride services transitioned from General Public to Specialized Service serving seniors (60 and older), persons with disabilities and persons certified under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This change was approved by the City Council on Aug. 17, 2017, and implemented on Jan. 2, 2018. Implementation involved assisting riders to secure eligibility under the new requirements. Nearly 300 individuals have submitted applications to use Dial-A- Ride. Policies have also been clarified and distributed consistent with the ADA requirements. Marketing Strategies to Encourage Use of Public Transit Corona Cruiser will be implementing several marketing strategies specifically geared towards growing ridership. This Free Fare Program will include: special free fare days, such as Bike-to-Work Day, Dump the Pump Day, and days for targeted passengers; Fixed Route Training Program; and Summer Student Program. Offering various free fare programs seeks to encourage new riders to try the service without any cost. Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) Funds are being utilized to offset lost rider fares associated with the Free Fare Program. City of Riverside Marketing Plan for Special Transportation Special Transportation (ST) has been working with the City of Riverside’s marketing team to help develop a brand identity for the City’s paratransit service. The rebranding effort is a response to customer feedback about negative connotations associated with the existing name. This “Rebranding” anticipates a drastic new look Corona Dial-A-Ride Application City of Corona Dial-a-Ride Service Eligibility Application Page 1 of 3 City of Corona Dial-A-Ride Program Eligibility Application For eligibility based on age 60 or older: Complete Sections 1 & 2. Provide a copy of “proof of age” documents which shows your picture and date of birth. Valid proof of age may include the following: DMV Identification card, Medicare Identification card with matching photo ID, or another form of photo identification showing proof of age. For eligibility based on disability (those certified under ADA do not need to apply): Complete Sections 1, 2 & 3. Valid proof of disability may include the following: Department of Motor Vehicles disabled Identification card, Social Security Disability Award letter, Federal Medicare Card, Veteran Affairs letter confirming a disability of 50% or greater, or Braille Institute Identification Card. Matching photo ID required as proof of identification. If you do not have such proof of disability, please have your physician/qualifying health care professional complete the related Certification section of the application. Please Note: A $2.00 non-refundable processing fee will apply (check or money order payable to City of Corona Transit System — no cash). A $2.00 fee will also apply for replacement, lost/stolen ID. Where to Submit Your Application Your completed application package can be emailed, mailed or dropped off in person at the below address. Completed package includes the following: completed & signed application, 2x2 photo (digital photo can also be emailed or taken in person at the below address), $2.00 non-refundable processing fee and copy of proof of eligibility. Do not send original proof of age/disability documents. Public Works/Transportation 400 S. Vicentia Ave Corona, CA 92882-2187 publwks@CoronaCA.gov Once your completed application has been received, it will take approximately 10 working days for it to be processed. Upon approval, depending on your preference marked on the application, your identification card will either be mailed or you will be contacted for pickup. City of Corona Dial-A-Ride Brochure The Dial-A-Ride brochure further details the Dial-A-Ride program guidelines. Brochure can be mailed, picked up from the above address, or downloaded from City of Corona’s Transit Service website www.CoronaTransit.com. 210 27 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 to paratransit vehicles, including a change in design, color and the service name to better capture what ST does for City of Riverside seniors and persons with disabilities — and ensure the service is distinguished from similar services that operate in the City. ST will continue with its advertisements on the back of the minibuses to help promote the service. ST has also launched a new website for the Special Transportation Services Program to improve information provided to residents of Riverside. Technology Updates City of Riverside ST is embracing new technology advancements that will dramatically ease customers’ experience through a two-step process. • New fare technology: ST will provide increased fare payment options through the introduction of smart cards and a mobile payment function. • Online reservations will be possible through a second phase effort. Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Blythe Wellness Express Service Launched July 2017 The Blythe Wellness Express (BWE) is a lifeline service provided by PVVTA between the City of Blythe and its surrounding communities and the Coachella Valley to provide access to health care. There has been a long-standing need for a public transit connection between Blythe and the Indio to Palms Springs area, especially for health-related services that don’t exist in Blythe. This program was made possible by FTA’s introduction of the Rides to Wellness (R2W) grant program. RCTC took the lead in developing a R2W grant application to support PVVTA as the operator of the BWE and expand their mobility management role for the Palo Verde Valley. BWE was selected as one of the R2W program’s 19 successful applicants nationally and one of only two projects in the state of California. The BWE runs on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, leaving Blythe each day at 6:30 a.m. in route to Coachella Valley medical facilities. The BWE operates as a deviated fixed-route shuttle, stopping at the SunLine Transfer Center in Indio, the John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Indio, the Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, and the Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs and additional medical destinations upon request. The trip between Blythe and Indio is just over 100 miles and the BWE service registers 265 route miles per service day. BWE service launched on July 3, 2017. As of May 2018, 277 individuals have registered to ride and 982 one-way trips have been provided. The ultimate goal of the BWE is sustainability beyond the 18-month pilot period. Blythe Wellness Express Rider’s Guide 211 28 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 PVVTA and RCTC are exploring funding opportunities and a service design that will enable continuing the service beyond the life of R2W grant funds. Pass Transit – City of Banning Cabazon Fare Reduction Initiatives undertaken by the City of Banning include utilizing Low Carbon Operations Program (LCTOP) funds to eliminate a zone fare for passengers traveling into Cabazon. Pass Transit – City of Beaumont CNG Station The City of Beaumont is in the planning stages of designing and building a CNG Fueling Station and working towards its goal of clean transportation. A feasibility study of two pre-selected locations for the station is underway. Additionally, the City Council has approved a future release of bid for the construction of the station. Free Fares for Three Years The City of Beaumont has applied for Low Carbon Transportation Operations Program (LCTOP) funding to initiate a three-year Free Fare program. Free Fares for college students, veterans and travel training participants will be marketed on Beaumont’s Pass Transit fixed and commuter routes. The project will also include rider appreciation days and special events like Dump the Pump events and Free Fare Fridays. New Commuter Route 125 The City of Beaumont is introducing a new route to provide access to medical destinations and intercounty connectivity. Commuter Route 125 will travel from Beaumont to Calimesa and Redlands. Medical destinations will be served and will include Kaiser Medical Offices and the VA Ambulatory Care Center in Redlands. This service also responds to the discontinuation of Calimesa Route 136, which despite extensive marketing efforts, was no longer productive to run. Policy Change Dueue to a reduction in ridership from oversaturation in shared corridors, the City of Banning is terminating the 2002 agreement with the City of Beaumont which allowed for the crossing of each agency’s jurisdictional boundary lines. Service areas, such as the Ramsey Street Corridor, will no longer be shared by the two cities. A new MOU will be executed that is equally beneficial to each respective agency..........................................212 29 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Riverside Transit Agency RapidLink Gold Line Service New RapidLink Gold Line limited-stop service began in August 2017. This line runs between University of California, Riverside and Corona along Magnolia Avenue. Free rides are being offered July 1 through Sept. 3, 2018, to promote the service. CommuterLink Express Route 200 links the Inland Empire to Orange County. It serves San Bernardino, Riverside, Anaheim and Route 205, serving Temecula-Corona-Village at Orange, and began operation in January of 2018. Seven Day a Week Service RTA is expanding service on most of its fixed-routes and paratransit service to seven days a week. As many RTA routes offer lifeline services, including trips to weekend employment, this change responds to the growing need to access basic services and employment locations every day of the week. The increase in cost will be offset by changes to Saturday service hours, ensuring that weekend service is provided during the times of highest demand. SunLine Transit Agency Responding to Changes in Industry In July of 2017, SunLine adopted its ReThink Transit Campaign, designed to identify potential cost savings by investing in its most productive bus lines and finding low-cost alternatives to serve segments of its service area and demographic with lower levels of service utilization. SunLine is also studying ways to improve and change its service model in order to remain competitive and continue to provide valued service to the community. In light of declining ridership, SunLine is undergoing a year-long comprehensive network analysis and redesign study to evaluate new service models that may enable SunLine to more cost- effectively serve the Coachella Valley. SunLine anticipates evaluating its existing services for modifications, reductions and/or discontinuation, with extensive opportunities for Board and community involvement, to help SunLine prepare for its future. Free Rides for College Students SunLine will offer free rides to College of the Desert (COD) students for three years through LCTOP grant funds. RapidLink Gold Line Map 32 | RIVERSIDE TRANSIT AGENCY Downtown University Linden Canyon Crest DrMission Inn A v e Lemon St14th St 12th St 11th St Market StIowa AveChicago AveMadison St Central Ave Adams St Van Buren B l v d Tyler St La Sierra A v e Hole Ave McKinley St Main S tGrand BlvdMagnolia AveMagnolia AveArlington Ave UCR Parkview Community Hospital Riverside Plaza Cesar ChavezCommunityCenter University Village MarcyLibrary Central M.S. Riverside Community Hospital Kaiser Medical Center Corona City Hall Galleria at Tyler Chemawa M.S. Arlington Library Villegas M.S. Home Gardens Library Sherman Indian H.S. CaliforniaBaptistUniversity Ramona H.S. RiversideCity College RIVERSIDE CORONA Stop LocationNOTE: RapidLink buses serve these stops only. Legend | Map not to scale No service on weekends or: Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. RapidLink Gold Line Corona - Magnolia Ave - UCR GOLDLINE Gold Line 1 6th & Belle Corona Cruiser Blue, RedSixth StRouting and timetables subject to change. Rutas y horarios son sujetos a cambios. Corona Park-And-Ride 91 91 91 Gold Line Iowa at University 1 14 16 51 52 204 Gold Line 1 13 14 22 Chicago & University Gold Line Boarding diagram | Page 28 Galleria at Tyler 1 10 12 2713 200 14 15 21 Gold Line 206 Boarding diagram | Page 27 Corona Transit Center 3 2051 Corona Cruiser Blue, Red Metrolink 1 Magnolia & McKinley Gold Line Corona Cruiser Blue Gold Line 1 15 Magnolia & La Sierra Gold Line 1 16 51 52 204 UCR at Bannockburn Information Center (951) 565-5002RiversideTransit.comRTABus.com University & Lemon 1 10 14 15 200 204 22 29 12 49 208 21054 212 Omnitrans 215 Gold Line Hours of Service: BUSES DEPART EVERY 15 MINUTES. Monday – Friday only. 5:30-8:30 a.m. and 2:30-5:30 p.m. GOLD LINEFREE RIDES JULY 1 TO SEPTEMBER 3 ReThink Transit Campaign Information 213 30 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Student IDs will be scanned onboard vehicles in lieu of paying a fare. The anticipated start date is August 2018. Through a partnership with COD, SunLine anticipates student fees to cover the expense following this three-year program. The Challenge Going Forward As the UCLA researchers document in their 2018 report “Falling Transit Ridership,” the traditional “transit-dependent” users are increasingly buying their own cars and joining our car-centric Southern California culture. Concurrently, congestion grows and commute travel times increase, trends that RCTC and its partners are addressing in the built environment with freeway expansion and new toll roads. But public transit does offer important benefits and advantages to potential new riders and to new markets. These benefits include cost savings over operating a vehicle, decreased stress in traveling the region’s freeways and the opportunity to use one’s cell phone, to read or even sleep on the way to work and elsewhere. Riverside County operators are already implementing strategies to identify these new markets and “potential” new users. Initiatives underway to encourage new users include free fare programs, new branding, targeted marketing initiatives and strategic planning. Riverside County public transit providers are encouraged to present to these “potential” riders the advantages public transit can offer to them of lower cost travel, a hands-free ride and less stressful commutes. Addressing first-and-last- mile connections are also important to attracting new riders, particularly to regional rail services that otherwise provide high-quality links between home and work. Finding new riders will require continued emphasis on communication and education, to invite these potential riders to try transit and educate them on how to do so, an experience foreign to too many Southern Californians. Technology provides critical tools to aid potential riders’ access and use. Promoting simple “trip discovery” tools such as Google Transit and the Transit App are important avenues that have little or no associated costs. Additionally, experimentation with easy fare payment capabilities with apps such as Token Transit, which was recently adopted by Omnitrans in neighboring San Bernardino, offers important convenience and ease to new riders, particularly to those commuters who cross county lines. Exploring these and other strategies to retain existing riders and reach out to and attract new riders is of critical importance to Riverside County public transit operators and their partners, including RCTC. 214 31 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Strategies to Promote Responsiveness to Customer Needs Moving forward, a customer-centric approach to public transportation and mobility within Riverside County is expected to help grow use of the considerable, existing public transportation network. Selected initiatives and activities of such a customer orientation include: • Implementing RTA’s Perris Valley Line feeder services and promoting these to provide first-and-last-mile connections for commuters, thereby increasing Metrolink use. • Launching of PVVTA’s Blythe Wellness Express, which meets a significant need for inter-city travel by Blythe residents and was met with great appreciation by its users; the need now is to secure continuation funding beyond the pilot period. • Embracing new or nontraditional ways to deliver service, such as carsharing, pooling of ride hail services, including exploring the public transit operators’ role in these alternative modes. • Using technology, including Google Transit and other apps, to better communicate with riders and potential riders, particularly to help them discover multimodal connections. • Enhancing multimodal opportunities through regional cooperative ventures. • Considering new service evaluation studies to reduce underperforming service and replace with lower cost initiatives that are more responsive to targeted ridership markets. • Developing aggressive marketing campaigns and travel training to younger populations, such as fare incentives for middle school, high school and college students, that invite early adoption of transit as a lifestyle. • Exploring the use of technology around contests, challenges and gamification as an attraction that encourages use of transit and alternate modes by introducing fun. • Continuing attention to first-and-last-mile barriers, including improvements to pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure throughout the County. 215 32 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Appendices Appendix A – Definitions, Data Sets and References Appendix B – Public Transportation Trips Provided, All Modes - Six Fiscal Years Appendix C – Bus Stop Location Counts by Operators Supporting Table 5 (Transfer Locations) Appendix D – Public Transit Fleet Size Over Five Fiscal Years Appendix E – Public Utilities Code Requirement for Performance Monitoring 216 33 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Appendix A – Definitions, Data Sets and References Data Element Anticipated Data Sources Definition Passenger trips - TransTrack data – extracted from Table 2 – SRTP Service Summary on June 2, 2018. - Metrolink boardings separately calculated from SCRAA data. - One-way passenger boardings of fixed-route, paratransit, deviated fixed-route; - Metrolink boardings at Riverside County stations only. Operating expense FY 2016/17 Annual Financial Statements with Independent Auditor’s Report Definition from March 2008 adopted Commission policy, all operating expense object classes exclusive of depreciation and amortization, vehicle lease expense. PUC 99247(a) Fare revenue FY 2016/17 Annual Financial Statements with Independent Auditor’s Report - Definition from March 2008 adopted Commission policy: - Fare revenue plus supplemental fare revenues from local support, which may include interest, advertising, etc. as provided for in PUC 6611.3 Transit route structure Active service operating along a fixed- route or deviated fixed-route. GIS shape files for active routes County population data at the block level 2010 US Census - Total county population - Block level data for most current decennial census Transit transfer data: Intra-system Inter-system Inter-county Transfer locations at which routes connect; each location counted only once; counts validated by operator Calculated by each operator, these count each stop-level transfer location one time for each operator, as of June 30, 2016. Vehicle revenue miles TransTrack data – extracted from Table 2 – SRTP Service Summary on June 2, 2018 - Annual revenue service miles as of June 30, 2017 - Or total vehicle service miles, inclusive of deadhead. Square mileage US Census County square mileage Operator service area square mileage reported in NTD Whatever is reported to NTD, by operator. Vehicle revenue hours TransTrack data – extracted from Table 2 – SRTP Service Summary on June 2, 2018 Annual revenue service hours as of June 30, 2017 Accessibility and coverage GIS calculation for Figures 2 through 6 The methodology used to calculate population within the ¾ mile buffers and service areas is included on each map. Using the local California State Plan Coordinate system with distance units measured in feet, buffer and service area polygons for each set of transit routes were first overlaid on top of the area’s 2010 US census blocks. Then, 2010 census population counts for each block intersecting these polygons were applied to the corresponding buffer or service area using an area-ratio calculation. If, for example, only ¼ of the area of a census block fell within the buffer or service area then only ¼ of the population of that census block was applied to it. The sum of all these census block calculations, in turn, comprised the population estimate for the corresponding buffer or service area. 217 34 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Appendix B – Public Transportation Trips Provided, All Modes - Six Fiscal Years A-M-M-A.,8/7/18 Public Transportation Trips Provided Service by Mode [1]Trips %of Total Trips # of Vehicles in Active Service Trips % of Total Trips # of Vehicles in Active Service Trips % of Total Trips # of Vehicles in Active Service Trips % of Total Trips # of Vehicles in Active Service Trips % of Total Trips # of Vehicles in Active Service Trips % of Total Trips / % Change Rail [2]2,700,117 19%888,844 6%898,216 5%1,048,003 6%1,071,669 7%1,005,052 7% RCTC Commuter Rail - Riverside 1,101,646 208,230 175,032 160,388 157,748 149,436 -6% RCTC Commuter Rail - Inland Empire Orange County 1,066,541 500,786 553,520 626,557 610,482 546,948 RCTC Commuter Rail - 91 531,930 179,828 169,664 261,058 303,439 308,668 Public Bus, Fixed Route [3] 10,575,445 76%269 13,603,825 86%380 14,102,821 86%306 14,159,311 85%305 13,460,620 85%324 12,920,479 86% RTA FR 5,718,234 94 6,861,830 191 7,155,365 124 7,203,364 122 7,081,410 129 6,804,534 -4% SunLine FR 3,474,361 69 4,494,549 69 4,643,147 71 4,645,097 76 4,316,234 76 4,151,467 RTA Contract FR 916,366 80 1,713,555 90 1,744,652 79 1,753,518 78 1,534,671 80 1,479,687 Banning FR 183,265 5 138,503 5 146,981 5 135,244 7 127,524 8 122,265 Corona FR 146,983 4 163,054 4 169,745 6 168,303 6 152,728 7 132,469 Beaumont FR 89,962 9 190,589 13 198,499 13 204,112 11 202,826 16 184,250 Palo Verde Valley FR 46,274 8 41,745 8 44,432 8 49,673 5 45,227 8 45,807 Public Demand Response 548,845 4%206 795,503 5%219 823,649 5%188 840,811 5%187 840,167 5%172 839,110 6% RTA DAR 199,322 125 384,442 106 398,636 98 406,000 102 413,968 81 415,326 0% Riverside Special Transportation Services DAR 145,223 29 172,725 47 182,878 36 175,276 32 167,439 35 161,552 SunLine DAR 83,956 31 136,208 45 139,042 33 153,183 37 164,024 36 164,802 Corona DAR 58,892 12 65,635 12 68,852 12 66,015 9 63,162 12 65,580 Beaumont DAR 28,656 4 18,710 3 16,899 3 18,640 3 10,910 3 9,879 RTA Taxi 18,536 -8,539 -8,271 -11,963 -10,594 -11,051 Banning DAR 9,463 5 9,244 6 9,071 6 9,734 4 10,070 5 10,920 Specialized Transportation/ Universal Call Program [4]61,859 0.4%45 559,104 4%54 577,736 4%50 543,296 3%46 416,338 3%39 290,186 2% Fixed Route: -100% RTA Extended Services -108,180 68,726 50,851 -27,033 -0 RTA Commuter Link -64,171 62,542 73,635 -0 -0 SunLine Extended Services ----0 SunLine Commuter Link 220 -12,868 14,528 13,952 -6,437 -0 SunLine Line 95 North Shore --26,603 15,605 -36,295 -0 Paratransit/ Community Shuttle Services: Boys & Girls Club of Southwest County -13 49,135 16 41,676 14 38,767 13 40,663 10 36,279 Care-A-Van/ HOPE Bus 9,295 10 25,060 12 29,845 13 22,394 9 22,203 10 19,687 Care Connexxus 13,755 4 17,597 5 16,333 5 17,296 - 18,273 - 12,498 City of Norco - Senior Shuttle 2,606 1 2,066 1 1,956 1 2,189 1 2,984 1 2,467 CVAG Roy's Desert Resource Center -2 46,561 2 45,272 2 17,288 - -- - Forest Folk, Inc.4,842 - 0 - 0 -0 1 2,270 1 2,981 Friends of Moreno Valley Senior Center Inc., MoVan 4,842 1 4,941 1 3,002 1 4,574 1 4,313 1 4,152 Inland AIDS Project 1,974 2 2,354 2 2,342 1,723 - 2,046 - Operation Safehouse -1 309 1 624 1 765 1 1,406 1 642 Riverside University Health System RUHS (Riverside -10 9,208 10 5,835 10 7,640 17 7,629 10 8,041 County of Riverside Department of Mental Health --- 1,408 2 2,481 United States Veterans Initiative ---4 5,217 3 2,333 3 3,774 3 4,046 Wildomar Senior Community -1 446 ----- -- - Mileage Reimbursement (one-way trips supported): Crt. App'td Spec. Advocates-CASA/Voice for Children -6,696 5,702 -n/a -n/a - Voices for Children -0 0 -n/a 3,222 88 6,122 TRIP - Partnership to Preserve Independent Living (West County, Measure A portion)24,393 83,831 87,850 89,828 n/a 59,302 n/a 55,189 TRIP - Partnership to Preserve Independent Living (East County)--19,779 n/a -n/a - Bus Passes/Taxi Vouchers/ Vanpool Trips:Desert Samaritans - Taxi trips --Community Connect/ TAP Bus Pass Trips -62,742 65,212 71,230 n/a 74,818 n/a 31,377 RCTC Commuter benefits/ Coachella Van Pool Trips -17,700 18,740 -n/a -n/a - RTA - Travel Training 39,334 65,354 81,031 n/a 94,213 n/a 95,929 RTA - Dial A Ride Plus 0 n/a 1,558 n/a 1,782 SunLine Taxi Voucher Program -5,905 10,377 12,416 n/a 6,491 n/a 6,513 Mobility Management and Travel Training Projects: Care Connexxus - Driver Sensitivity Training -n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Community Connect/ 211 -n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Blindness Support - Travel Training -n/a n/a n/a n/a 40 n/a RTA Travel Training -n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a ALL TRIPS: Including Rail, Public Transit, Measure A JARC and New Freedom 13,886,266 100%520 15,847,276 100%653 16,402,422 100%544 16,591,421 100%538 15,788,794 100%535 15,054,827 100% -5% TOTAL POPULATION 2,005,477 2,227,577 2,255,059 2,279,967 2,308,441 2,382,640 Trips per Capita for 2006 Total Population [5]6.9 Trips per Capita for 2013 Total Population [7] Trips per Capita for 2014 Total Population [8]7.2 Trips per Capita for 2015 Total Population [9]7.3 Trips per Capita for 2016 Total Population [10]6.8 Trips per Capita for 2017 Total Population [10]6.3 Notes: [1] Public transit operator ridership data extracted from TransTrack 'Table 2 — SRTP Service Summary' on April 4, 2017. Vehicle data reported directly from operators on April 6, 2017. RCTC's Annual Report FY 16/17 [4] Specialized Transportation ridership and vehicle data reported directly by specialized transportation operators. RTA and SunLine included in public bus [3] [5] through [9] RCTC Fiscal Year Mid-Year Revenue Projections - Department of Finance January 1st: Demographic Research Unit county FY14-15 and FY 15-16 Annualized from average weekday AND average weekend daily boardings from SCRRA reported monthly ridership at Riverside County stations. There is no weekend service on the Riverside line. RCTC's Annual Report FY 15/16 [3] Public bus, fixed route trips for RTA and SunLine do not include Specialized Transportation funded fixed route trips: RTA Extended, Commuterlink and RTA Travel Training, SunLine CommuterLink and Line 95, and Community Connect TAP/RTA. RCTC's Annual Report FY 13/14FY 12/13 RCTC's Annual Report 7.1 RCTC's Annual Report FY 14/15 2007 Coordinated Plan FY 05/06 [2] FY13-14 Annualized from average weekday daily boardings at Riverside County stations: Riverside, 91 and Inland Empire-Orange County Lines. 218 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201735 Appendix C – Bus Stop Location Counts by Operators Supporting Table 5 (Transfer Locations) RTA Routes and Connections/ Transfer Locations As at Jan 2018 INTRA SYSTEM INTRA-COUNTY REGIONAL ROUTES/ SYSTEMS1RL 3 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 29 30 31 32 33 40 41 42 49 50 51 52 54 55 61 74 79 200 202 204 205 206 208 210 212 217 Highlander ShuttleCorona CruiserCorona Cruiser RedCorona Cruiser BluePassTransitTemecula Trolley MetrolinkAMTRAKOmni 2GreyhoundOmnitrans82Omnitrans 215Omnitrans 325OmniTrans 61,65,66,67,68,80NCTD CoasterSunLine 220NCTDNCTD SprinterMTSOCTA 794OCTA 24,42,46,50,51,55Foothill Trasit1 13 1 3 4 4 4 5 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 2 3 2 1 1 2 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 74 RL 13 1 2 2 4 4 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 54 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 1 11 8 1 1 1 1 1 5 10 3 2 3 3 4 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 36 11 1 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 13 12 4 2 3 4 3 6 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 38 13 4 4 3 4 3 5 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 44 14 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 45 15 5 4 3 6 5 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 49 16 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 2 1 1 1 20 18 3 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 15 19 2 1 3 2 1 1 1 2 2 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 25 20 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 20 21 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 17 22 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 35 23 1 2 2 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 16 24 2 2 2 3 1 10 26 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 15 27 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 3 1 1 2 2 1 1 33 29 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 22 30 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 10 31 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 27 32 1 2 3 2 3 1 2 2 16 33 3 2 3 1 3 2 1 1 16 40 1 1 1 1 1 5 41 1 3 2 1 1 1 9 42 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 10 49 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 19 50 1 1 1 1 1 5 51 3 3 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 19 52 2 1 2 1 2 3 2 1 14 54 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 55 2 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 2 15 . 61 3 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 16 74 1 1 3 2 2 3 3 1 2 2 3 2 3 2 2 32 79 3 3 1 1 1 2 1 3 2 3 1 1 1 1 1 3 28 200 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 32 202 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 16 204 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 30 205 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 16 206 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 15 208 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 3 3 1 3 1 1 2 51 210 3 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 1 1 6 1 2 45 212 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 2 1 3 3 2 2 1 1 1 44 217 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 3 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 27 OCTA 794 1 1 1 3 63 53 5 5 35 12 37 42 40 43 19 14 23 19 15 33 16 10 13 32 20 9 24 16 16 5 9 10 18 5 18 14 18 15 15 30 28 32 9 24 12 12 44 34 39 23 0 1 6 6 2 0 29 7 1 12 8 9 2 2 1 15 3 2 1 2 2 1 1140 TOTALS BY TYPE OF CONNECTION 1028 Intra-County 15 Regional Rail 49 Regional Bus 48 219 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201736 SunLine Routes and Connections/ Transfer Locations as of January 2018 INTRA-SYSTEM INTER-COUNTY REGIONAL RAIL/INTER-CITY Routes 14 15 20 21 24 30 32 54 70 80 81 90 91 95 111 220 Pass TransitMetrolinkAMTRAKGreyhound14 2 1 1 2 1 1 8 15 2 1 1 4 **** 20 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 *****21 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 24 1 1 1 1 4 30 2 1 2 2 7 32 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 10 *** 54 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 13 70 1 1 1 3 80 2 3 1 2 8 81 2 3 1 2 1 9 90 1 1 1 3 91 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 ** 95 1 1 1 3 111 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 3 21 * 220 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 8 4 7 6 4 7 9 12 2 8 8 3 6 3 18 5 1 1 7 2 121 TOTALS BY TYPE OF CONNECTION Intra-System 105 Inter-Co.6 Regional 10 121 *Effective date: September 10, 2012 **Effective date: September 2, 2013 ***Effective date: January 6, 2014 ****Effective date: January 3, 2016 ****Effective date: January 7, 2018 220 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201737 INTRA-SYSTEM INTRA-COUNTY Corona Cruiser Routes and Connections/ Transfer Locations REGIONAL RAIL/ INTERCITY BUS Routes Red Blue RTASunLineMetrolinkAMTRAKGreyhoundRed 9 23 3 35 Blue 9 29 5 43 Intra-System Intra-County Regional 18 52 8 78 TOTALS BY TYPE OF CONNECTION Pass Transit Routes and Connections/ Transfer Locations REGIONL RAILINTRA-SYSTEM INTRA-COUNTY REGIONAL BUS Route #s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 120 136 Total Intra-SystemRTA 14RTA 31RTA 35SunLine 220/RTA 210Total Intra-CountyOmni 1Omni 2Omni 325MARTA Big BearMARTA RIMVVTA 15Total Regional BusMetrolink -San BernardinoAMTRAKGreyhoundTotal Regional Bus/Rail1 54 6 7 3 1 1 1 2 1 1 77 2 54 10 10 8 8 4 4 3 1 2 1 1 106 3 6 10 11 7 7 1 2 1 1 1 47 4 7 10 11 7 7 1 1 1 1 1 47 5 8 7 7 1 2 1 26 6 8 7 7 1 2 1 26 7 4 2 1 4 1 12 9 1 4 2 1 4 1 1 1 15 120 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 136 4 1 5 69 101 46 45 23 23 10 15 13 4 1 11 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 384 TOTALS BY TYPE OF CONNECTION Intra-System Bus 349 Intra-County Bus 23 Regional Bus 6 Regional Rail/ Intercity Bus 6 384 221 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 201738 PVVTA Routes and Connections/ Transfer Locations INTRA-COUNTYINTRA-SYSTEM REGIONAL RAIL Routes 1 2 3 4 5 6 RTASunLineMetrolinkAMTRAKGreyhound1 3 1 2 1 7 2 3 1 2 6 3 1 1 1 3 4 2 2 1 5 5 0 6 2 2 TOTALS 6 6 3 5 0 0 2 0 0 1 23 Note: Route 5 is a weekend route and is the only route in operation. No other routes are available to transfer to. Quartzsite Transit Services in Arizona connects paratransit services into Blythe/PVVTA Monday-Friday. 222 39 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Appendix D – Public Transit Fleet Size Over Five Fiscal Years Public Transit Vehicles FY 2012/2013 [1] FY 2013/2014 [1] FY 2014/2015 [2]FY 2015/2016 FY 2016/2017 % Change from Prior Year5-Year History Transit Vehicles only (fixed-route and demand response, excluding taxis) RTA, City of Riverside, Corona, Banning, Beaumont, SunLine, Palo Verde Valley Western Riverside County 339 372 382 374 376 1% Fixed Route 198 217 227 224 240 Demand Response 141 155 155 150 136 Coachella Valley 100 104 104 113 112 -1% Fixed Route 69 69 71 76 76 Demand Response 31 35 33 37 36 Palo Verde Valley 8 8 8 8 8 0% Fixed Route 8 8 8 5 8 Countywide Totals 447 484 494 495 496 0% [1] Revised reporting from prior year reports; excludes support vehicles. [2] Excludes support vehicles and includes vehicles active as of June 30, 2015 Source: Vehicle information directly reported by operators May, 2018. 223 40 RIVERSIDE COUNTY PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ANNUAL COUNTYWIDE PERFORMANCE REPORT FY 2017 Appendix E – Public Utilities Code Requirement for Performance Monitoring California Code, Public Utilities Code — PUC § 99244 Each transportation planning agency shall annually identify, analyze, and recommend potential productivity improvements which could lower the operating costs of those operators who operate at least 50 percent of their vehicle service miles, as defined in subdivision (i) of Section 99247, within the area under its jurisdiction. However, where a transit development board created pursuant to Division 11 (commencing with Section 120000 ) or a county transportation commission exists, the board or commission, as the case may be, shall have the responsibility of the transportation planning agency with respect to potential productivity improvements. The recommendations for improvements and productivity shall include, but not be limited to, those recommendations related to productivity made in the performance audit conducted pursuant to Section 99246. A committee for the purpose of providing advice on productivity improvements may be formed by the responsible entity. The membership of this committee shall consist of representatives from the management of the operators, organizations of employees of the operators, and users of the transportation services of the operators located within the area under the jurisdiction of the responsible entity. Prior to determining the allocation to an operator for the next fiscal year, the responsible entity shall review and evaluate the efforts made by the operator to implement such recommended improvements. If the responsible entity determines that the operator has not made a reasonable effort to implement the recommended improvements, the responsible entity shall not approve the allocation to the operator for the support of its public transportation system for the next fiscal year which exceeds the allocation to the operator for such purposes for the current fiscal year. 224 AGENDA ITEM 8L BLANK Agenda Item 8L RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: John Tarascio, Bechtel Project Manager Michael Blomquist, Toll Program Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Construction Agreement with Spectrum Construction Group for the Interstate 15 Express Lanes Regional Operations Center and Storage and Maintenance Facility and the 91 Express Lanes Customer Service Center STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Award Agreement No. 18-31-170-00 to Spectrum Construction Group, Inc. (Spectrum), as the lowest responsible bidder submitting a responsive bid, for the construction of the Interstate 15 Express Lanes Regional Operations Center (ROC) and Storage and Maintenance Facility (SAM) and the 91 Express Lanes Customer Service Center (CSC) project (Project) in the amount of $3,600,075, plus a contingency amount of $360,000, for a total amount not to exceed $3,960,075; 2) Waive informalities and minor irregularities in the Spectrum bid; 3) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 4) Authorize the Executive Director, or designee, to approve contingency work up to the total amount not to exceed as required for the Project; and 5) Approve a $1,157,550 adjustment to the Fiscal Year 2018/19 budget to increase toll building construction costs. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Toll Building Development In support of the current and future needs of the Commission’s toll program, three new building facilities were identified to provide operations, maintenance and customer support services. Buildout of these facilities including interior remodeling, exterior site work, parking lot modifications and accessibility upgrades are required in order to prepare them for service. These building facilities are each located in the city of Corona as follows: 225 Agenda Item 8L 1. I-15 Express Lanes ROC located at 291 Corporate Terrace Circle. 2. SAM Facility located at 120 N. Joy St. 3. 91 Express Lanes CSC located at 301 Corporate Terrace Circle. Toll Building Location Plan At its November 2017 meeting, the Commission approved agreement No. 18-31-006-00 with Owen Group, Inc. for architectural-engineering and construction management services for the ROC and SAM buildouts. Architectural-engineering services for the 91 CSC was performed by Parsons through amendment to the Project and Construction Management Services Contract for the State Route 91 Corridor Improvement Project (Agreement No. 09-31-081-05). Plans, specifications and engineer’s estimates were developed for the three building facilities and combined into one construction bid package. Procurement Process On July 17, 2018, the Commission advertised Invitation for Bids (IFB) No. 18-31-170-00 for construction of the Project. A public notice was advertised in the Press Enterprise, and the complete IFB, including all contract documents, was posted on the Commission’s PlanetBids website, which is accessible through the Commission’s website. Electronic mail messages were sent to vendors registered in the Commission’s PlanetBids database that fit the IFB qualifications. Storage & Maintenance Facility 120 N. Joy St. I-15 Regional Operations Center 291 Corporate Terrace Cir. 91 Customer Service Center 301 Corporate Terrace Cir. 226 Agenda Item 8L Forty-eight firms downloaded the IFB. Twelve are located in Riverside County. A pre-bid conference was held at the Commission’s office on July 24, and on August 14, five bids were received and publicly opened. A summary of the bids received is shown in Table A. Table A Construction of I-15 Express Lanes ROC and SAM and the 91 Express Lanes CSC Bid Summary Firm (In order from low bid to high bid) Bid Amount Engineer’s Estimate $3,019,164 1 Spectrum Construction Group $3,600,075 2 Braughton Construction, Inc. $4,128,999 3 Faris Construction $4,185,000 4 Dalke & Sons Construction, Inc. $4,284,388 5 Hamel Contracting $4,385,671 The basis for award for a public works contract is the lowest responsive and responsible bidder as defined by the Commission’s procurement policy and state law. The bid analysis (Attachment 2) shows the bid amounts of the five bidders, the total price per item and percent variation from the engineer’s estimate for each bid item. After analyzing the five bids received, staff concluded that Spectrum is the lowest responsible bidder submitting a responsive bid in the amount of $3,600,075 for the Project. Upon review of Spectrum’s bid, staff discovered a discrepancy between the written amount of the bid and the numerical amount of the bid. However, the IFB provides that “The Total Lump Sum Bid Price shall be the sum of the Total Prices….” The numerical amount of the bid is equal to the sum of the total prices included in the bid. Therefore, in accordance with the IFB, the numerical amount of the bid governs and the discrepancy is considered an informality or minor irregularity that the Commission may waive, in accordance with its rights under the IFB. Although the lowest responsible bid is higher than the engineer’s estimate, the bids were analyzed for any irregularities or omissions and reasoning for the difference from the engineer’s estimate. It was determined that the higher cost was due to a significantly higher bid price for Package 3 (Parking Lot and Site Improvements at the SAM Facility) compared to the engineer’s estimate. The Commission received a bid protest dated August 16, 2018 and supplemental support document dated August 17, 2018, from the second low bidder, Braughton Construction Inc. (Braughton), protesting the bid submitted by Spectrum (Attachment 3). Braughton’s protest indicates Spectrum’s bid is nonresponsive based on Spectrum’s failure to comply with subcontractor listing requirements under the Subcontracting and Subletting Fair Practices Act, codified at Public Contract Code section 4100 et seq. Subsequently, staff provided Spectrum the 227 Agenda Item 8L protest letter and requested a formal response addressing Braughton’s allegations (Attachment 4). After receipt of Spectrum’s response, Commission staff, in consultation with legal counsel, prepared a recommended resolution of the protest for consideration by the Executive Director. Ultimately, the Executive Director determined Braughton’s protest to be meritless (Attachment 5). Pursuant to the Commission’s Procurement Policy Manual, the Executive Director’s decision is final and there is no further administrative recourse at the local level. Staff recommends award of Agreement No. 18-31-170-00 for the construction of the Project to Spectrum as the lowest responsible bidder submitting a responsive bid in the amount of $3,600,075 plus a contingency amount of $360,000, to fund potential change orders and supplemental work, for a total amount not to exceed $3,960,075. Additionally, staff recommends the Commission waive informalities and minor irregularities in Spectrum’s bid. Further, authorization is requested for the Chair or Executive Director to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission and for the Executive Director or designee to approve contingency work up to the total not to exceed amount specified above as may be required for the Project. Budget Impacts The Project construction costs reflected in the Spectrum construction bid exceed the amounts included in the approved FY 2018/19 budget for the I-15 Express Lanes Project (I-15 ELP) and the 91 Express Lanes, as summarized below: I-15 ELP 91 Express Lanes Total Spectrum construction costs, including contingency $ 2,628,529 $ 1,331,547 $ 3,960,075 FY 2018/19 Budget 2,628,529 173,997 2,802,525 Difference $ - $ 1,157,550 $ 1,157,550 The $1,157,550 difference for the 91 Express Lanes portion of the Project construction costs is primarily due to $811,835 of costs related to the 91 Express Lanes CSC that are the responsibility of the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) per prior agreement. The Commission will initially pay these costs in its role as contracting agency and subsequently be reimbursed by OCTA. The expenditure of the $811,835 was erroneously omitted from the FY 2018/19 budget. The remaining $345,715 difference is related to the higher construction bid compared to the engineer’s estimate. Accordingly, staff recommends an adjustment in the amount of $1,157,550 to increase the FY 2018/19 budget capital expenditures related to the Project . 228 Agenda Item 8L Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes No Year: FY 2018/19 FY 2018/19 Amount: $2,802,525 $1,157,550 Source of Funds: 2009 Measure A Sales Tax Revenue Bond Proceeds and Toll Revenues Budget Adjustment: Yes - $1,157,550 GL/Project Accounting No.: 003027 90501 00000 0000 262 31 90501 $2,628,529 009199 90501 00000 0000 591 31 90501 $173,996 009199 90501 00000 0000 591 31 90501 $1,157,550 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 08/31/2018 Attachments: 1) Draft Agreement No. 18-31-170-00 2) RCTC Bid Analysis 3) Braughton Bid Protest Letter 4) Spectrum Bid Protest Response 5) Notice of Intent to Reject Bid Protest 229 BLANK Contract-1 17336.0601K\29695231.1 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ************** CONTRACT ************** CONSTRUCTION SERVICES FOR THE I-15 EXPRESS LANES REGIONAL OPERATIONS CENTER, THE I-15 EXPRESS LANES STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE BUILDING AND THE SR-91 EXPRESS LANES CUSTOMER SERVICE RCTC Agreement No. 18-31-170-00 July 17, 2018 BETWEEN RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION AND SPECTRUM CONSTRUCTION GROUP INC. ATTACHMENT 1 230 BLANK Contract-2 17336.0601K\29695231.1 CONSTRUCTION SERVICES FOR THE I-15 EXPRESS LANES REGIONAL OPERATIONS CENTER, THE I-15 EXPRESS LANES STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE BUILDING AND THE SR-91 EXPRESS LANES CUSTOMER SERVICE RCTC AGREEMENT NO. 18-31-170-00 1. PARTIES AND DATE. This Contract is made and entered into this ____ day of ____________, 2018 by and between the Riverside County Transportation Commission (hereinafter called the "Commission") and Spectrum Construction Group, Inc. (hereinafter called the "Contractor"). This Contract is for that Work described in the Contract Documents entitled CONSTRUCTION SERVICES FOR THE I-15 EXPRESS LANES REGIONAL OPERATIONS CENTER, THE I-15 EXPRESS LANES STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE BUILDING AND THE SR-91 EXPRESS LANES CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTER 2. RECITALS. 2.1 The Commission is a County Transportation Commission organized under the provisions of Sections 130000, et seq. of the Public Utilities Code of the State of California, with power to contract for services necessary to achieving its purpose; 2.2 Contractor, in response to a Notice Inviting Bids issued by Commission on July 17, 2018, has submitted a bid proposal for CONSTRUCTION SERVICES FOR THE I-15 EXPRESS LANES REGIONAL OPERATIONS CENTER, THE I-15 EXPRESS LANES STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE BUILDING AND THE SR-91 EXPRESS LANES CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTER 2.3 Commission has duly opened and considered the Contractor's bid proposal and duly awarded the bid to Contractor in accordance with the Notice Inviting Bids and other Bid Documents. 2.4 Contractor has obtained, and delivers concurrently herewith, Performance and Payment Bonds and evidences of insurance coverage as required by the Contract Documents. 3. TERMS. 3.1 Incorporation of Documents. This Contract includes and hereby incorporates in full by reference this Contract and the following Contract Documents provided with the above referenced Notice Inviting Bids, including all exhibits, drawings, specifications and documents therein, and attachments thereto, all of which, including all addendum thereto, are by this reference incorporated herein and made a part of this Contract: 231 Contract-3 17336.0601K\29695231.1 a. NOTICE INVITING BIDS b. INSTRUCTIONS TO BIDDERS c. CONTRACT BID FORMS d. FORM OF CONTRACT e. PAYMENT AND PERFORMANCE BOND FORMS f. ESCROW AGREEMENT FOR SECURITY DEPOSITS g. CONTRACT APPENDIX PART "A" - Regulatory Requirements and Permits PART "B" – General Conditions PART "C" – Special Provisions PART "D" - Contract Plans PART "E" – Technical Specifications PART "F" - Reference Documents h. ADDENDUM NO.(S) 1,2,3,4 3.2 Contractor's Basic Obligation. Contractor promises and agrees, at his own cost and expense, to furnish to the Commission all labor, materials, tools, equipment, services, and incidental and customary work for CONSTRUCTION SERVICES FOR THE I-15 EXPRESS LANES REGIONAL OPERATIONS CENTER, THE I-15 EXPRESS LANES STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE BUILDING AND THE SR-91 EXPRESS LANES CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTER Notwithstanding anything else in the Contract Documents, the Contractor shall complete the Work for a total of Three Million Six Hundred Thousand Seventy-Five Dollars ($3,600,075), as specified in the bid proposal and pricing schedules submitted by the Contractor in response to the above referenced Notice Inviting Bids. Such amount shall be subject to adjustment in accordance with the applicable terms of this Contract. All Work shall be subject to, and performed in accordance with the above referenced Contract Documents. 3.3 Period of Performance. Contractor shall perform and complete all Work under this Contract within 256 calendar days of the effective date of the Notice to Proceed, and in accordance with the Milestone Completion Dates set forth in the table below. Contractor agrees that if such Work is not completed within the aforementioned periods, liquidated damages will apply as provided by the applicable provisions of the General Conditions, found in Part "B" of the Contract Appendix. The amount of liquidated damages shall equal five hundred dollars ($500.00) for each day or fraction thereof, it takes to complete the Work, or specified portion(s) of the Work, over and above the number of days specified herein or beyond the Project Milestones established by approved Construction Schedules. 232 Contract-4 17336.0601K\29695231.1 MILESTONE NO. TITLE COMPLETION DATE 1A Package 1 (301 Building) - Substantial Completion (including Interfacing Items Within Package 2). See below for details. NTP + 136 days 1B Package 1 (301 Building) - Final Completion NTP + 164 days 2 Package 2 (291 Building) - Substantial Completion NTP + 225 days 3 Package 3 (SAM Building) - Substantial Completion NTP + 225 days 4 Package 2 and Package 3 - Final Completion NTP + 256 days   Contractor shall further complete elements of the Work in accordance with the following milestone descriptions: Milestone 1A – Complete all Work within Package 1 for turnover to the Commission. In addition to the completion of all Work within Package 1, complete all interfacing Work from Package 2 to allow for uninterrupted and seamless operation of the 301 Building Customer Service Center while completion of the 291 Building Work continues including, but not limited to, the following:  All civil parking lot modifications including all ADA improvements, striping and signage.  Standby generator and all related components, testing, commissioning and permits necessary to supply standby power to the 301 Building.  All 291 Building related low voltage cabling, conduits, boxes and appurtenances located within the 301 Building.  Roof structure modifications, if any, within the 301 Building for the roof mounted PV system.  Doorway openings and finishes at the interface pointes between the 291 and 301 Buildings. Provide temporary (substantial) barricades to seal off the 301 Building while work continues within the 291 Building. During the Work, coordinate and provide access for the Commission’s Toll Services Provider (Cofiroute) and their subcontractors to install and test camera systems, information technology systems, alarm systems, sound masking systems and other necessary systems. Access shall be given at logical stages throughout the Work to allow for seamless prosecution and ease of installation. No less than 10 days prior to the milestone date, conduct Punch List walks/inspections with Commission and Cofiroute representatives. Immediately commence work on the Punch List 233 Contract-5 17336.0601K\29695231.1 and diligently prosecute to completion. Any outstanding Punch List items remaining beyond the milestone date will be required to be addressed during off hours to allow for uninterrupted operation of the 301 Building Customer Service Center. Milestone 1B – Complete all remaining Punch List items and any outstanding non-conformances associated with Package 1 and the interfacing items within Package 2. Milestone 2 – Complete all remaining Work within Package 2 for turnover to the Commission’s Toll Services Provider (Kapsch). During the Work, coordinate and provide access for Kapsch and their subcontractors to install and test camera systems, information technology systems, alarm systems and other necessary systems. Access shall be given at logical stages throughout the work to allow for seamless prosecution and ease of installation. No less than 10 days prior to the milestone date, conduct Punch List walks/inspections with Commission and Kapsch representatives. Immediately commence work on the Punch List and diligently prosecute to completion. Milestone 3 – Complete all Work within Package 3 for turnover to the Commission. No less than 10 days prior to the milestone date, conduct Punch List walks/inspections with Commission representatives. Immediately commence work on the Punch List and diligently prosecute to completion. Milestone 4 – Complete all remaining Punch List items and any outstanding non-conformances associated with Package 2 and Package 3. 3.4 Commission's Basic Obligation. Commission agrees to engage and does hereby engage Contractor as an independent contractor to furnish all materials and to perform all Work according to the terms and conditions herein contained for the sum set forth above. Except as otherwise provided in the Contract Documents, the Commission shall pay to Contractor, as full consideration for the satisfactory performance by the Contractor of services and obligation required by this Contract, the above referenced compensation in accordance with Compensation Provisions set forth in the Contract Documents. 3.5 Contractor's Labor Certification. Contractor maintains that he is aware of the provisions of Section 3700 of the Labor Code which require every employer to be insured against liability for Worker's Compensation or to undertake self-insurance in accordance with the provisions of that Code, and agrees to comply with such provisions before commencing the performance of the Work. A certification form for this purpose is attached to this Contract as Exhibit “A” and incorporated herein by reference, and shall be executed simultaneously with this Contract. 234 Contract-6 17336.0601K\29695231.1 3.6 Successors. The parties do for themselves, their heirs, executors, administrators, successors, and assigns agree to the full performance of all of the provisions contained in this Contract. Contractor may not either voluntarily or by action of law, assign any obligation assumed by Contractor hereunder without the prior written consent of Commission. 3.7 Notices. All notices hereunder and communications regarding interpretation of the terms of the Contract or changes thereto shall be provided by the mailing thereof by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested, postage prepaid and addressed as follows: Contractor: Commission: Spectrum Construction Group, Inc. Riverside County Transportation Commission 32 Edelman P.O. Box 12008 Irvine, CA 92618 Riverside, California 92502-2208 Attn: Bisher Aljazzar Attn: Executive Director Any notice so given shall be considered received by the other party three (3) days after deposit in the U.S. Mail, first class postage prepaid, addressed to the party at the above address. Actual notice shall be deemed adequate notice on the date actual notice occurred, regardless of the method of service. SPECTRUM CONSTRUCTION RIVERSIDE COUNTY GROUP, INC. TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION By: ______________________ By: _________________________ Name Anne Mayer Riverside County Transportation Commission ______________________ Title Tax I.D. Number: APPROVED AS TO FORM: By: _________________________ Best Best & Krieger LLP Counsel, RCTC 235 Contract-7 17336.0601K\29695231.1 EXHIBIT “A” CERTIFICATION LABOR CODE - SECTION 1861 I, the undersigned Contractor, am aware of the provisions of Section 3700 et seq. of the California Labor Code which require every employer to be insured against liability for Worker's Compensation or to undertake self-insurance in accordance with the provisions of the Code. I agree to and will comply with such provisions before commencing the Work governed by this Contract. CONTRACTOR: Name of Contractor: Spectrum Construction Group, Inc. By: _______________________________ Signature _______________________________ Name _______________________________ Title _______________________________ Date 236 BIDDER'S NAME AND ADDRESS BID $ BID RANK 1.Spectrum Construction Group 32 Edelman Irvine, CA 92618 2.Braughton Construction, Inc. 10722 Arrow Route STE 810 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91738 3.Faris Construction 2180 El Camino Real Oceanside, CA 92054 4.Dalke & Sons Construction, Inc. 4585 Allstate Drive Riverside, CA 92501 4.Hamel Contracting 26431 Jefferson Ave, Suite A Murrieta, CA 92562 $3,019,164.00 Subcontractors of Spectrum Construction Group Daniels Heating & Air Conditioning Loma Linda RCTC Agreement No. 18-31-170-00 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISION BID OPENING 2:00 PM, Tuesday, August 14, 2018 I-15 EXPRESS LANES REGIONAL OPERATIONS CENTER AND STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE FACILITY AND THE 91 EXPRESS LANES CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTER PROJECT City Work $3,600,075.00 1 > low bid14.7% 16.2% > low bid 2 3 $4,128,999.00 $4,185,000.00 Engineer's Estimate (EE): COMMENTS $4,385,671.00 5 21.8% > low bid low bid $4,284,388.00 4 19.0% > low bid HVAC ATTACHMENT 2 237 UNIT PRICE TOTAL PRICE 1 Package 1 - Tenant Improvements @ 301 Corporate Terrace Circle (301 Building) (Excluding Items 4 & 5 from below) 1 LS $1,110,796.00 $1,110,796.00 2 Package 2 - Tenant Improvements @ 291 Corporate Terrace Circle (291 Building) (Excluding Items 4 & 5 from below) 1 LS $1,049,931.85 $1,049,931.85 3 Package 3 – Parking Lot & Site Improvements at 120 N. Joy St. (SAM Building)1 LS $100,248.00 $100,248.00 4 291/301 Corporate Terrace Circle Photovoltaic (PV) System 1 LS $399,144.38 $399,144.38 5 291/301 Corporate Terrace Circle Stand-by Generator, Ductbank and Related Equipment 1 LS $359,043.77 $359,043.77 TOTAL (ENGINEER'S ESTIMATE)$3,019,164.00 Contingency 10%$301,916.40 Total Contract $3,321,080.40 I-15 EXPRESS LANES REGIONAL OPERATIONS CENTER AND STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE FACILITY AND THE 91 EXPRESS LANES CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTER PROJECT Riverside County Transportation Commission RCTC Agreement No. 18-31-170-00 ITEM NO.DESCRIPTION QUANTITY ENGINEER'S EST. 238 Bid Amount% Diff from EEBid Amount% Diff from EEBid Amount% Diff from EEBid Amount% Diff from EEBid Amount % Diff from EEAverage Bid Amount Average % Diff from EE1Package 1 - Tenant Improvements @ 301 Corporate Terrace Circle (301 Building)(Excluding Items 4 & 5 from below)1 LS $1,100,000.00 -1.0% $1,311,909.00 18.1% $1,250,000.00 12.5% $1,404,868.00 26.5% $1,511,745.00 36.1% $1,315,704.40 18.4% $1,110,796.002Package 2 - Tenant Improvements @ 291 Corporate Terrace Circle (291 Building)(Excluding Items 4 & 5 from below)1 LS $1,025,000.00 -2.4% $1,300,513.00 23.9% $1,320,000.00 25.7% $1,398,680.00 33.2% $1,269,431.00 20.9% $1,262,724.80 20.3% $1,049,931.853Package 3 – Parking Lot & Site Improvements at 120 N. Joy St. (SAM Building)1 LS $600,075.00 498.6% $227,886.00 127.3% $200,000.00 99.5% $334,680.00 233.9% $316,075.00 215.3% $335,743.20 234.9% $100,248.004291/301 Corporate Terrace Circle Photovoltaic (PV) System1 LS $275,000.00 -31.1% $450,729.00 12.9% $665,000.00 66.6% $459,680.00 15.2% $652,721.00 63.5% $500,626.00 25.4% $399,144.385291/301 Corporate Terrace Circle Stand-by Generator, Ductbank and Related Equipment1 LS $600,000.00 67.1% $837,962.00 133.4% $750,000.00 108.9% $686,480.00 91.2% $635,699.00 77.1% $702,028.20 95.5% $359,043.77$3,600,075.00 19.2% $4,128,999.00 36.8% $4,185,000.00 38.6% $4,284,388.00 41.9% $4,385,671.00 45.3% $4,116,826.60 36.4% $3,019,164.00$528,924.00 14.7% $584,925.00 16.2% $684,313.00 19.0% $785,596.00 21.8% $516,751.60 14.4% -$580,911.00ENGINEER'S ESTIMATE (EE)TotalHIGHER THAN LOWEST BIDDERRiverside County Transportation CommissionI-15 EXPRESS LANES REGIONAL OPERATIONS CENTER AND STORAGE AND MAINTENANCE FACILITY AND THE 91 EXPRESS LANES CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTER PROJECTRCTC Agreement No. 18-31-170-00 ITEM NO.DESCRIPTION QntyLow BidderSpectrum Construction Group3rd Low BidderFaris Construction5th Low BidderHamel ContractingAVERAGE of ALL BIDDERS2nd Low BidderBraughton Construction4th Low BidderDalke & Sons Construction$1,100,000.00$1,025,000.00$600,075.00$275,000.00$600,000.00$3,600,075.00$1,315,704.40$1,262,724.80$335,743.20$500,626.00$702,028.20$4,116,826.60$1,511,745.00$1,269,431.00$316,075.00$652,721.00$635,699.00$4,385,671.00$1,110,796.00$1,049,931.85$100,248.00$399,144.38$359,043.77$3,019,164.00$0.00 $500,000.00 $1,000,000.00 $1,500,000.00 $2,000,000.00 $2,500,000.00 $3,000,000.00 $3,500,000.00 $4,000,000.00 $4,500,000.00 $5,000,000.00123456dfdfdffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffBid Items Low, High, Average & Engineer's Estimate ComparisonLow BidAverageHigh BidEngineer's EstPV SystemPackage 1GeneratorTotal AmountPackage 3Package 2239 BLANK ATTACHMENT 3 240 241 242 243 ATTACHMENT 4 244 245 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION August 20, 2018 Mr. John Braughton Braughton Construction, Inc . 10722 Arrow Route, Suite #810 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 4080 Lemon Street , 3rd Floor • Riverside, CA Mailing Address : P.O. Box 12008 • Riverside , CA 92502-2208 951.787.7141 • 951.787.7920 • www .rctc.org RE : Riverside County Transportation Commission -Construction Services for the 1-15 Express Lanes Regional Operations Center, 1-15 Express Lanes Storage and Maintenance Building and SR-91 Express Lanes Customer Service Center (Agreement No. 18-31-170-00} Notice of Intent to Reject Bid Protest Dear Mr. Braughton: The Riverside County Transportation Commission (Commission) is in receipt of Braughton Construction, Inc.'s (Braughton) protest letter dated August 16, 2018 and supplemental support document dated August 17, 2018, submitted on the above-captioned project (Project) and finds the bid protest meritless. Commission staff will recommend the Commission award the contract to the lowest responsible bidder submitting a responsive bid, Spectrum Construction Group, Inc . (Spectrum). The contract award process will proceed as scheduled under the provisions of the Invitation for Bids for the Project. Braughton argues Spectrum improperly failed to (i) list a subcontractor in its bid for the fire notification system installation work and (ii) list a subcontractor for the solar photovoltaic installation work. With respect to the fire notification system work, Braughton alleges a specialty Class C-7 or C-10 license is required to perform the work, and Spectrum does not itself possess these specialty licenses and otherwise failed to list a subcontractor possessing the appropriate specialty license in its bid. The Subletting and Subcontracting Fair Practices Act, codified at Public Contract Code section 4100 et seq ., requires bidders to list subcontractors in their bid if the subcontractor will perform work in excess of 0.5 percent of the total bid amount. For those scopes of work that are not covered by a listed subcontractor, the subcontract must fall below the 0 .5 percent threshold or the prime contractor must self-perform the work. In this case, both scenarios are available. Spectrum indicated it received subcontractor bids below the 0 .5 percent threshold for ATTACHMENT 5 246 Mr. John Braughton August 20, 2018 Page 2 the fire notification system work . Spectrum additionally hold s a Cla ss A and Clas s B contractor's license . A Cla ss B general building contractor is authorized to perform work "in connection with any structure built, being built, or to be built, for the support, shelter, and enclosure of persons, animals, chattels, or movable property of any kind , requirin g in its construction the use of at least two unrelated building trades or crafts, or to do or superintend the whole or any part thereof." (Bu s. & Profs. Code ,§ 7057.) The only specialty work a Cla ss B general building contractor is statutorily barred from self-performing is work covered by either a specialty Cla ss C-16 or C-S7 licen se. Given the project involves approximately 19 different trades or crafts and the fire notification system work is covered by a Cla ss C-7 or C-10 license, nothing precludes Spectrum from self-performing that work . As to the solar photovoltaic installation work, Braughton alleges Spectrum failed to list a certified SunPower contractor and is not itself a certified SunPower contractor. Braughton misunderstands the reference to Sun Pow er in the contract specification s, and mi scharacterizes a manufacturer's certification requirement as a bid requirement. With respect to the reference to Sun Power in the specification s, Article 7 of the General Condition s provides as follows: Unless specifically designated in the Contract Document s, whenever any material, process, or article is indicated or specified by grade, patent, or proprietary name or by name of manufacturer, such Specification s shall be deemed to be used for the purpose of facilitating the description of the material, process, or articl e desired and shall be de emed to be followed by the words "or equal." Contractor may, unless otherwise stated, offer for sub stitution an y material, process or article which is sub stantially equal or better in every respect to what is specified in the Contract Documents. Similarly, General Note 1 of Sheet E-l.S2 of Part D Contract Plans Package 2 1-15 Express Lane s Regional Operations Center provides as follows: THE PHOTOVOLTAIC (PV) SYSTEM DESIGN IN THIS PROJECT IS BASED ON : E-SERIES E20-327-COM SUNPOWER COMMERCIAL DC PV PANELS AND HELIX PLUG-AND-PLAY SMA TRIPOWER (STP -US) ROOF MOUNT PV POWER INVERTER STATIONS, OR AN EQUIVALENT SYSTEM . (Emphasis added .) Th erefore, Spectrum is not obligated to use SunPower components and may sub stitute an equal system for which Spectrum has all necess ary licenses and ce rtification s to install. As to the purported SunPower certification requirement, no bidder is express ly required under the bid documents to carry a SunPower certification at the time of bid . It is entirely pos sible for Spectrum to obtain the required certification from 247 Mr. John Braughton August 20, 2018 Page 3 Sun Power prior to commencement of the solar photovoltaic installation work under the contract if Spectrum intend s to utilize Sun Power components. The Commis sion will con sider award of the contract for this Project at the September 12, 2018 meeting. Commis sion staff will recommend the Board award the contract to the lowest responsible bidder submitting a responsive bid , Spectrum . Sincerely, f±:.,rl1 ttr<---' Executive Director 248 BLANK AGENDA ITEM 8M BLANK Agenda Item 8M RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Brian Cunanan, Commuter and Motorist Assistance Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Agreement with the California Department of Transportation for a Senate Bill 1 Funded Operation of the Freeway Service Patrol Program in Riverside County STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Approve Agreement No. 19-45-007-00 with the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) for the operation of the Riverside County Freeway Service Patrol (FSP) program in an amount not to exceed $1,656,973 in SB 1 funding; 2) Authorize the Chair or Executive Director, pursuant to legal counsel review, to execute the agreement on behalf of the Commission; 3) Approve an adjustment to the Fiscal Year 2018/19 motorist assistance budget in the amount of $347,900, to increase revenues for the Freeway Service Patrol program; and 4) Recommend that the Commission adopt Resolution No. 18-015 approving Agreement No. 19-45-007-00. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: In 1986, the Commission established itself as the Riverside County Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies (RC SAFE) after the enactment of SB 1199 in 1985. The purpose of the formation of SAFEs in California was to provide call box services and, with excess funds, provide additional motorist aid services. Funding for RC SAFE is derived from a one dollar per vehicle registration fee on vehicles registered in Riverside County. Initially, these funds were used only for the call box program. As additional motorist aid services were developed, SAFE funds were also used to provide FSP and the Inland Empire 511 traveler information services as part of a comprehensive motorist aid system in Riverside County. In 1990, Proposition C was passed to fund transportation improvements and to help reduce traffic congestion in California. From this, the FSP program was created by Caltrans, which developed the corresponding local funding allocation plan to distribute funds to participating jurisdictions through a formula based on population, urban freeway lane miles, and levels of congestion. 249 Agenda Item 8M The Commission, acting in its capacity as the RC SAFE, is the principal agency in Riverside County, in partnership with Caltrans and the California Highway Patrol, managing the FSP program. The purpose of the FSP program is to provide a continuously roving tow services patrol along designated freeway segments (referred to as beats) to relieve freeway congestion and facilitate the rapid removal of disabled vehicles and those involved in minor accidents on local freeways. Currently, the Commission contracts with three tow truck operators to provide service during peak commute hours across 101 centerline miles. In FY 2017/18, FSP performed 41,417 assists. The Commission’s FSP program is a popular service amongst motorists in Riverside County and has consistently demonstrated a very high benefit to cost score statewide, however, Caltrans funding for FSP has been static since 2006-07 budget. As such, the Commissions FSP service hours and coverage area has remained flat since that time. DISCUSSION: In April 2017, the California Legislature passed SB 1 which included additional funding for FSP. In March 2018, Caltrans released the SB 1 FSP funding guidelines which allocates $25 million for FSP statewide to participating jurisdictions based on the existing formula, resulting in $1,656,973 for Riverside County. Per the guidelines, this allocation is to be applied to a) CHP costs for FSP oversight and supervision, b) inflation and hour adjustments to baseline service, and c) for new or expanded FSP service. The allocation of SB 1 funds for new FSP service will be applied to expand coverage into southern Riverside County. The projected benefit cost for this expansion scored high (7.5) and surpassed the minimum benefit cost threshold (3.0) by more than double. As such, in May 2018, the Commission awarded three towing contracts expanding FSP as far south as the I-15/79 South interchange benefitting commuters traveling from and through Lake Elsinore, Wildomar, Menifee, Murrieta, and Temecula. In July 2018, the Commission approved funding for Border CHP oversight and supervision of the new service in southern Riverside County. Both the towing agreements and CHP agreement supporting the service expansion will be funded by the FY 2017/18 SB 1 FSP fund transfer agreement from Caltrans in the amount of $1,656,973. An early estimate of $1,309,000 was applied to the FY 2018/19 budget; accordingly, staff recommends a budget adjustment of $347,900 to SB 1 funding. Staff estimates that the SB1 funded expansion into southern Riverside County can be sustained for at least three years, even if SB 1 is repealed in November 2018. After one year of service in FY 2018/19 and realizing only one year of SB 1 funds, it is estimated that motorist assistance will have a fund balance reserve of $7.3 million. An additional two years of service may be sustained by applying motorist assistance fund balance reserves. In this scenario, staff projects that a fund balance of approximately $5 million would be available at the end of FY 2020/21. 250 Agenda Item 8M Financial Information In Fiscal Year Budget: Yes No Year: FY 2018/19 Amount: $ 1,309,000 $ 347,900 Source of Funds: SB 1 funding Budget Adjustment: No Yes GL/Project Accounting No.: 002173 415 41510 201 45 41501 Fiscal Procedures Approved: Date: 08/14/2018 Attachments: 1) Caltrans SB 1 Fund Transfer Agreement 2) Resolution No. 18-015 approving Agreement No. 19-45-007-00 251 BLANK ATTACHMENT 1 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 BLANK ATTACHMENT 2 RESOLUTION NO. 18-015 RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION APPROVING THE AGREEMENT WITH THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FOR SB 1 FUNDED OPERATION OF FSP PROGRAM IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY WHEREAS, the Riverside County Transportation Commission (the “Commission”) acting in its capacity as the Riverside County Service Authority for Freeway Emergencies (“RC Safe”), is the principal agency in Riverside County, in partnership with the California Department of Transportation (“Caltrans”) and the California Highway Patrol (“CHP”), managing the Riverside County Freeway Service Patrol (“FSP”) Program; WHEREAS, in April 2017, the California legislature passed Senate Bill 1 (“SB 1”), which included additional funding for Riverside County to be applied to CHP costs for FSP oversight and supervision, inflation and hour adjustments to baseline service, and for new or expanded FSP service; WHEREAS, the Commission desires to enter into an agreement with Caltrans for the operation of the FSP Program for the purpose of expanding FSP Program service to southern Riverside County to be funded with SB 1 funding. NOW, THEREFORE, be it resolved by the Riverside County Transportation Commission as follows: Section 1. The Riverside County Transportation Commission hereby adopts Agreement No. 19-45-007-00 with the California Department of Transportation for the operation of Riverside County Freeway Service Patrol program services (the “Agreement”). A copy of the Agreement is included with the agenda materials accompanying this Resolution and is incorporated herein by reference. Section 2. The Board Chair or the Executive Director are authorized to execute the Agreement on behalf of the Commission. APPROVED AND ADOPTED this 12th day of September, 2018. 259 SIGNATURE PAGE TO RESOLUTION NO. 18-015 RESOLUTION OF THE RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ADOPTING THE AGREEMENT WITH THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FOR SB1 FUNDED OPERATION OF FSP PROGRAM IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY _____________________________________ Dana W. Reed, Chair Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTEST: _________________________________ Lisa Mobley Clerk of the Board 260 AGENDA ITEM 9 BLANK Agenda Item 9 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Budget and Implementation Committee Jillian Guizado, Legislative Affairs Manager THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: State and Federal Legislative Update BUDGET AND IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE AND STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on state and federal legislation. DISCUSSION: State Update 2017-18 Legislative Session The California State Legislature concluded the two-year regular legislative session on August 31. Staff will provide an oral report on the status of notable bills. Federal Update Grant Funding Pursuit Staff submitted a grant application to the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) for $25 million in Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development (BUILD) grant funding to help fund construction of the State Route 71/91 Interchange Improvement Project (Project). Included in the Commission’s grant application were letters of support from federal and state delegation members, including: Representatives Calvert, Takano, Ruiz, and Aguilar, Senator Roth, and Assemblymember Cervantes. In addition, staff created a webpage where over 400 members of the public registered their support for the Project with the understanding their names would be submitted to USDOT as part of the Commission’s BUILD grant application. Statutorily, USDOT has until December 18, 2018, to make grant awards. Infrastructure Discussion Draft Congressman Bill Shuster, Chairman of the United States House Committee on Transportation, released an Infrastructure Discussion Draft (Draft) in late July 2018. Highlighted below are the various notable sections of the Draft. 261 Agenda Item 9 Highway Trust Fund The Draft identifies the impending insolvency of the Highway Trust Fund (HTF), which has long-seen declining revenues due to a decrease in the gallons of gasoline purchased and a decrease in the purchasing power of a gas tax rate set in the 1990s. Solutions proposed for the future include: • Establishing a Highway Trust Fund Commission responsible for making recommendations to Congress for achieving long-term solvency of the HTF; and • Establishing a national mileage based user fee pilot, similar to the pilot California recently conducted. Near-term HTF solutions proposed in the draft include: • Increasing the federal gas tax by 15 cents and the federal diesel fuel tax by 20 cents, to be phased in over three years, then indexed to inflation, and sunset in 2028; • Extending other user fees currently paid into the HTF; and • Extending HTF expenditure authority through September 20, 2021. Immediate HTF reforms proposed in the draft include: • Eliminating the reduced user fee on fuel for intercity and public transportation buses; • Reinstating the 4.3 cents per gallon user fee on diesel used by passenger trains and indexing this fee to inflation; • Implementing a 10 percent fee on the price of batteries used in electric vehicles; and • Implementing a 10 percent fee on adult bicycle tires. Investment in Infrastructure • Continuing the BUILD grant program, funded at $3 billion for Fiscal Years 2019 through 2023, with the following additional criteria or uses: o Minimum of 30 percent of the funds goes to projects in rural areas; o Funding within the program available for use as incentive grants to agencies that use revenues from leased infrastructure assets to make additional infrastructure investments; o $500 million set-aside for project of national significance; • Extending the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act one year to September 30, 2021; • Repealing the $7.6 billion rescission in the FAST Act; • Increasing Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) funding $4.5 billion through 2021; • Increasing Bus and Bus Facilities Grants funding $900 million through 2021; • Increasing Amtrak and various other rail programs grant funding; and • Setting aside $200 million annually from the Infrastructure for Rebuilding American (INFRA) program for Congress to award funding to eligible projects not in receipt of INFRA grant funding. 262 Agenda Item 9 Accelerating Project Delivery • Directing the Build America Bureau to facilitate accelerated project delivery, enabling the Bureau to provide assistance on compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act to transportation project sponsors, and directing the Bureau to ensure a record of decision be issued for transportation projects within two years; • Expediting environmental review for projects with categorical exclusions; and • Establishing a pilot program for accelerating project delivery through innovative approaches to environmental review. Chairman Shuster expressed interest in passing an infrastructure bill prior to his retirement from Congress at the end of 2018. The Draft was released just prior to the House of Representatives (House) adjourning for summer recess, which concludes at the end of August. A hearing for the bill has not been yet been scheduled. Staff will provide updates to the Commission should movement be seen on the Draft. Attachment: Legislative Matrix – September 2018 263 BLANK RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION - POSITIONS ON STATE AND FEDERAL LEGISLATION – SEPTEMBER 2018 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption AB 1189 (Garcia) Clarifying legislation that allows the Commission to implement a second self- help sales tax, subject to approval of two-thirds of the electorate in a future election. Enrolled and presented to the Governor. (September 13, 2017) SPONSOR 1/26/217 AB 91 (Cervantes) Requires Caltrans to study converting existing HOV lanes in Riverside County to operate only during hours of heavy commuter traffic; during all other times the lanes would be open to all vehicles, including those with a single occupant. In Assembly to concur in Senate amendments. (August 29, 2018) OPPOSE Opposition removed 5/30/17 as a result of amendments 3/8/17 AB 351 (Melendez) Proposes to bring truck weight fees back to transportation accounts. Died pursuant to Article IV, Section 10(c) of the Constitution. (January 31, 2018) SUPPORT 3/8/17 AB 179 (Cervantes) Changes the membership of the California Transportation Commission. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (October 13, 2017) OPPOSE 4/12/2017 AB 408 (Chen) Final offer of compensation in eminent domain cases. Died prior to going to committee pursuant to Joint Rule 62(a). (March 20, 2017) OPPOSE 4/12/2017 AB 697 (Fong) Exempts private ambulances from paying tolls when responding to emergency and urgent calls. Ordered to enrolling and engrossing. (August 27, 2018) OPPOSE Opposition removed 6/14/2017 as a result of amendments 4/12/2017 SB 132 (Budget and Fiscal Review Committee) Amendment to the Budget Act of 2016. Creates the Riverside County Transportation Efficiency Corridor. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (April 28, 2017) SUPPORT 4/12/2017 264 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption SB 268 (Mendoza) Changes the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority board of directors governance structure. Re-referred to Assembly Local Government Committee. (September 5, 2017) OPPOSE 5/9/2017 Staff action based on platform AB 1523 (Obernolte) Authorizes the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) to use design-build for local agencies to reconstruct the Mt. Vernon Avenue Viaduct project in San Bernardino. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (July 31, 2017) SUPPORT 5/10/2017 SB 150 (Allen) Requires the state board to update and revise greenhouse gas emission reduction targets while considering vehicle miles traveled (VMT) reductions. Requires the state board to assess current and historic VMT. Requires the state to prepare a report every four years that assesses metropolitan planning organization progress toward meeting metrics. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (October 10, 2017) OPPOSE 5/10/2017 SB 264 (Nguyen) Requires net excess toll revenue from the Orange County Transportation Authority’s (OCTA) Interstate 405 Improvement Project to be allocated to OCTA and project corridor jurisdictions and requires the moneys to be spent on specified transportation improvement projects. Returned to Secretary of Senate pursuant to Joint Rule 56. (February 1, 2018) OPPOSE 5/10/2017 SB 477 (Cannella) Allows for the extension of an existing rail corridor to provide intercity rail service beyond the defined boundaries of the corridor, subject to approval by the joint powers authority board and Secretary of Transportation. Held in Assembly Appropriations Committee. (September 1, 2017) SUPPORT 5/10/2017 AB 686 (Santiago) Requires agencies to “affirmatively further fair housing” opportunity with all governmental actions. Ordered to enrolling and engrossing. (August 27, 2018) OPPOSE Opposition removed 6/25/18 as a result of amendments 6/14/2017 SB 768 (Allen, Wiener) Extends authority to Caltrans and regional transportation agencies to enter into public private partnership agreements for transportation projects. Returned to Secretary of Senate pursuant to Joint Rule 56. (February 1, 2018) SUPPORT 6/14/2017 H.R. 100 (Brownley) Increases the sub-allocation for local communities under the Surface Transportation Block Grant Program (STBG). Referred to House T&I subcommittee on Highways and Transit. (January 4, 2017) SUPPORT 6/14/2017 265 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption AB 115 (Ting); SB 99 (Budget) Trailer bill containing elements that will streamline transportation project delivery. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (June 27, 2017) SUPPORT 6/14/2017 Staff action based on platform AB 805 (Gonzalez Fletcher) Changes the San Diego Association of Governments board of directors governance and voting structure. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (October 11, 2017) OPPOSE 6/15/2017 Staff action based on platform AB 1069 (Low) Requires ten countywide transportation agencies, including the Commission, to regulate taxicabs. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (October 13, 2017) OPPOSE 6/28/2017 Staff action based on platform AB 1282 (Mullin) Requires the California State Transportation Agency Secretary to establish a Transportation Permitting Task Force. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (October 10, 2017) SUPPORT 7/12/2017 AB 135 (Budget) Trailer bill containing elements that allow agencies to request approval for letters of no prejudice to advance spending on SB 1 projects using local funding sources; authorizes the California State Transportation Agency to perform NEPA Assignment on transit, rail, and multimodal projects; and provides flexibility to cities and counties for adopting Local Streets and Roads project lists. Approved by the Governor. Chaptered by Secretary of State. (September 16, 2017) SUPPORT 9/13/2017 Staff action based on platform H.R. 1 Amends the Internal Revenue Code to reduce tax rates and modify policies, credits, and deductions for individuals and businesses. Signed by President. (December 22, 2017) SEEK AMENDMENTS 12/13/2017 ACA 5 (Proposition 69) Assembly Constitutional Amendment passed by two-thirds of the California State Legislature and signed by Governor Brown. If passed by the voters, amends the California Constitution to protect SB 1 revenues from seizure to fund other programs and expenses. Approved by electorate. (June 5, 2018) SUPPORT 1/25/2018 California Voter Approval for Gas and Vehicle Taxes Initiative (Proposition 6) Repeals revenues raised by SB 1 that are dedicated to road repair and transportation funding. Henceforward, requires a majority vote of Californians to increase transportation revenues once passed by two-thirds of the California State Legislature. Approved initiative to be on November 2018 general election ballot. (June 2018) OPPOSE 1/25/2018 266 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption SCR 90 (Roth) Designates the 60/91/215 interchange in Riverside County as the Joseph Tavaglione Interchange. Held at Assembly desk. (July 3, 2018) SUPPORT 2/1/2018 Staff action based on platform AB 1759 (McCarty) Starting in Fiscal Year 2022/23, requires the State Controller to withhold local streets and roads funds provided under SB 1 from cities and counties not meeting their share of regional housing needs. Withheld funds would be placed in an escrow account until the non-compliant agency is deemed to be in compliance. Grants the Sacramento Waterfront Parcel and the Sand Cove Parcels to the city of Sacramento as public trust lands and authorizes the City to use the lands to promote their use as public trust lands. Enrolled and presented to the Governor. (August 20, 2018) OPPOSE 3/14/2018 AB 1905 (Grayson) Limits a court’s ability to stop projects with lawsuits against their environmental documents from moving forward if the project is in SCAG’s adopted SCS. Amended; re-referred to Assembly Committee on Natural Resources. (April 16, 2018) SUPPORT 3/14/2018 SB 1262 (Beall) Makes the Construction Manager / General Contractor (CM/GC) procurement and project delivery method a permanent tool available to Caltrans, removes the project cost minimums prescribed in the current pilot program, and eliminates the requirement for Caltrans to use its own employees or consultants to perform project design and engineering services on a CM/GC project. Ordered to enrolling and engrossing. (August 24, 2018) SUPPORT 3/14/2018 SB 1119 (Beall) Allows for the 50 percent requirement of Low Carbon Transit Operations Program (LCTOP) funding to be spent on projects or services that benefit disadvantaged communities to be met by transit agencies spending LCTOP funding on transit fare subsidies, transit connections, and/or technology improvements that reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ordered to enrolling and engrossing. (August 28, 2018) SUPPORT 4/11/2018 AB 3027 (Chávez) Relating to CEQA lawsuits, specifies that attorney’s fees may be awarded only to a prevailing plaintiff or petitioner that is a homeowner, property owner, or business owner located within a specified mailing radius established by law or by the lead agency, or a nonprofit organization formed to protect the environment and whose membership exceeds 50,000. Referred to Assembly Committee on Natural Resources. (April 17, 2018) SUPPORT 5/9/2018 AB 1912 (Rodriguez) Seeks to require all JPA member agencies to assume the liability of the JPA in the event it cannot cover its pension liabilities. Ordered to third reading in Senate. (August 27, 2018) OPPOSE 6/13/2018 267 Legislation/ Author Description Bill Status Position Date of Board Adoption AB 2734 (Frazier) Restores the California Transportation Commission’s (CTC) status as an independent agency, removing it from the purview of the California State Transportation Agency, and specifying that the CTC is to act in an independent oversight role. Enrolled and presented to the Governor. (August 20, 2018) SUPPORT 7/11/2018 268 BLANK AGENDA ITEM 10 BLANK Agenda Item 10 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: September 12, 2018 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Lorelle Moe-Luna, Acting Multimodal Services Director John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Update on the Regional Truck and Logistics Mitigation Fee Study and Review of the Draft Nexus Study STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to receive and file an update on the Regional Logistics Fee Study. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Purpose of the Study In 2015, the Commission and the County of Riverside (County) filed a lawsuit against the City of Moreno Valley and Highland Fairview, the developer of the World Logistics Center (WLC) project. The lawsuit challenged the environmental impact report to ensure adequate mitigation to impacts created by the WLC project. The WLC is proposed to be located in the eastern portion of the city, southerly of State Route 60, between Redlands Boulevard and Gilman Springs Road. The project would encompass over 2,610 acres with 40 million square feet for a large-scale logistics operation and is estimated to attract over 14,000 truck trips and 68,721 trips daily. In July 2016, a settlement agreement was reached between the Commission, the County, the City of Moreno Valley, and Highland Fairview. A key provision of the settlement required that the four parties each contribute $250,000, for a total of $1 million, for the Commission to conduct a regional transportation study to evaluate a logistics-related regional fee, including the fee structure and implementing mechanism. A result of the study could be a new fee program that would, for example, set a fee on new distribution center warehouses, based on facility size, to help pay for highway improvements. This fee would differ from existing Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Programs in that it would only focus on highway projects, as compared to the regional TUMF Programs, which collect funds for regional arterials and local streets. Per the settlement agreement, if the County or at least 75 percent of the Commission’s member cities adopt a regional warehouse fee within two years after a final court judgment is issued, Highland Fairview will pay 65 cents per square foot for each operating warehouse within the 269 Agenda Item 10 WLC. If no regional fee is adopted, the fee would be 50 cents per square foot. Proceeds would be used for projects identified as part of the regional truck study. Scope of Work The scope of work includes five tasks as summarized in the table below: Task/Scope Task 1: Existing and Future Conditions Analysis • Inventory existing and forecasted (2040) logistics facilities in the County, analyze the various types of logistics facilities, the functions that they serve, and the types of businesses that utilize them. • Quantify truck traffic and impacts on the highway system related to existing and forecasted (2040) logistics facilities in the County; describe the nature of the truck trips such as origin/destination, type of cargo, time-of-day, and equipment. Task 2: Funding and Cost Analysis • Identify and quantify currently available funding sources and mechanisms to offset impacts of logistics facilities in the County. • Identify and quantify costs of addressing existing deficiencies in highway infrastructure in the County. Task 3: Nexus Study • Establish the relationship between growth of logistics-related facilities within the County, truck traffic growth, and the needed improvements to mitigate such growth. Task 4: Fee Allocation Structure and Implementing Mechanism • Design a fee program based on the research and review of existing and similar fess throughout the County and other states with consideration to the legal, political, and practical implications; conduct an economic elasticity analysis that measures the impact of a logistics-related facilities mitigation fee, particularly focused on local employment and economic development. • The proposed fee program will, at minimum, include: legal requirements; actions required by the Commission and other local jurisdictions; implementation mechanism; fee schedule; anticipated revenues; parameters of expenditures from fee revenues; and timeframe of the fee program. 270 Agenda Item 10 Task 5: Study Recommendations • A compilation of all information gathered from all tasks to make findings and recommendations to the Commission on actions it can take to establish a new regional logistics-related facilities mitigation fee in the County. Project Status In January 2017, the Commission approved the award for a regional truck study and development and implementation of a regional logistics mitigation fee to WSP USA, formerly Parsons Brinckerhoff, Inc. The study was kicked off in spring 2017 and a study advisory team was created to review and discuss the data and deliverables provided by the consultant team. Since then, staff also provided updates on the study to the Commission’s Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), comprised of Public Works Directors and City Engineers as appointed by the City Managers. At its June 2018 Commission meeting, staff and the project consultant provided an update on this effort. At that time, Tasks 1 and 2 were completed, and Task 3 was underway. A summary of the completed tasks, concluded the following: • Sufficient data sources are available to justify the completion of a Nexus Study; • Logistics warehousing is estimated to grow in Riverside County by about 37 million square feet by 2040; • Future deficiencies in the highway network caused by logistics growth were identified in western county; • Proposed projects to mitigate the logistics growth could range from the addition of an auxiliary lane at on-and-off ramps, or, the widening of a mainline; • Existing capacity deficiencies, pass-through trips in Riverside County, and infrastructure improvements that are already planned or have been completed (i.e. SR-91 Capital Improvement Program or French Valley Parkway) would be excluded; • Total cost of infrastructure improvements is estimated at $383.3 million, of which the attributable share to logistics growth is $47.8 million; and • A potential fee could be up to $1.28 per square foot of gross floor area. A Nexus Study is under development to establish the relationship between growth related to logistics facilities and truck traffic and the improvements needed to mitigate such growth. The Mitigation Fee Act requires an agency to make five findings with respect to a proposed fee, as follows: 1. Purpose of the Fee 2. Use of Fee Revenues 3. Use/Type-of-Development Relationship 4. Need/Type-of-Development Relationship 5. Proportionality Relationship 271 Agenda Item 10 As the Nexus Study is further developed, the report will be presented to the Commission for review and discussion after additional stakeholder outreach is conducted. Stakeholder Outreach At the July 2018 Commission meeting, public comments were made regarding the Fee Study. Since then, additional letters were also submitted to the Clerk of the Board. See the attachment for copies of the letters. A stakeholder workshop will be held on Friday, September 28, 2018 at 9:30 am at the County Administrative Center, Board Chambers, at 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside, CA 92501. An additional workshop is also tentatively scheduled for Wednesday, October 24, 2018. The workshop will target public and private stakeholders, including local and regional agencies and the development community, and will be advertised via the website, social media, the study advisory team, the Commission and partnering-agency distribution lists. In addition, a webpage for the study, located at www.rctc.org/feestudy, will also be accessible for stakeholders to submit comments and review study materials. Comments received will be compiled and provided to the Commission at a future meeting for consideration. Next Steps The scope also calls for an analysis of the Fee Allocation Structure and Implementing Mechanism (Task 4). This task is also underway and will include the review of other similar types of fees, the administration and structure of a logistics-related fee program, and an economic market analysis to see how a fee might impact development growth in the county. Staff proposes returning to the Commission by the end of the year with an update on the status of the study, including outcomes from the workshops. Fiscal Impact There is no financial impact for this item. Attachment: Letters Submitted Regarding the Logistics Fee Study 272 25241 Paseo de Alicia, Suite 120, Laguna Hills, CA 92653 Tel: (951) 710-8768 NAIOP 2018 OFFICERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENTMike Del Santo, Alere Property Group, LLC PRESIDENT-ELECTJohn Dobrott, Conor Commercial Real Estate TREASURERSteve Haston, Lee & Associates - Ontario SECRETARYLarry Cochrun, LDC Industrial Realty NAIOP CORPORATE REPRESENTATIVEKim Snyder, Prologis Steven Ames, USAA Real Estate Company Thomas Bak, Trammell Crow Companies Todd Burnight, Carson Companies John Condas, Allen Matkins Leck Gamble Mallory & Natsis LLP Eloy Covarrubias, CBRE, Inc. Giancarlo Da Prato, IDI Logistics Dan de la Paz, CBRE, Inc. Tommy Dirks, Trammell Crow Company Travis Durfee, Prologis Matt Englhard, Proficiency Capital LLC Carter Ewing, CT Realty Paige Fullmer West, Fullmer Construction Trevor Halverson, TH Real Estate Scott Hildebrandt, Albert A. Webb Associates Mike Lee, City of Moreno Valley Milo Lipson, Cushman & Wakefield of California Ward Mace, Goodman Tom Myers, Ware Malcomb Brian Parno, Stirling Development LLC Tony Perez, Oltmans Construction Co. Matt Pilliter, First American Title Insurance Eric Ruehle, West Harbor Capital Chris Sanford, Black Creek Group Brian Thienes, Thienes Engineering, Inc. Terry Thompson, San Bernardino County Jeffrey N. Trenton, Proficiency Capital LLC Kyle Valley, Majestic Realty Co. Ron Washle, Newmark Knight Frank Sharon Wortmann, JLL ADVISORY BOARD Stephen Batcheller, Batcheller Equities, Inc. Chuck Belden, Cushman & Wakefield of California Inc. David Burback, Kidder Mathews Gary Edwards, Western Realco Ed Konjoyan, Majestic Realty Co. John Magness, Hillwood, A Perot Company Kevin McKenna, Colliers International Graham Tingler, Space Center, Inc. NAIOP INLAND EMPIRE STAFF Robert Evans, Executive Director Devon Sulli, Executive Assistant www.naiopie.org July 9, 2018 VIA E-MAIL Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board LMobley@RCTC.org Anne Mayer, Executive Director AMayer@RCTC.org Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street Riverside, CA 92501 Re: RCTC Regional Logistics Mitigation Fee Dear Ms. Mobley: Please accept this letter as preliminary comments from NAIOP Inland Empire (NAIOP) in connection with the proposed “Regional Logistics Mitigation Fee” (“Fee”). At this time, NAIOP has not been provided with the background data in order to provide formal comments on the technical issues. With the limited data provided to date, NAIOP has serious reservations about the proposed Fee from a legal, technical, and policy perspective. NAIOP also believes it is a mischaracterization to label NAIOP as a “stakeholder” in the process to date and believes the notion that NAIOP has been a contributing member to the process is a misrepresentation. In fact, after raising policy and legal concerns with the proposed Fee, NAIOP was informed that the time to comment on these types of issues was in the future and we were advised to cease such communication until a later date (“[NAIOP] and other affected parties will also have the opportunity to argue the merits of such a program if and when a specific proposal is brought to our Commission, but that has yet to be scheduled and will not take place until the completion of the technical work. [February 7, 2018 Letter from Executive Director Anne Mayer”]). Accordingly, NAIOP has ceased raising these categories of issues until now and seek a public forum to do so. We request the Commission properly agendize this matter for public hearing before RCTC so that NAIOP and other stakeholders can be heard. ATTACHMENT 1 Letters submitted regarding the Logistics Fee Study 273 Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission July 9, 2018 Page 2 The below encompasses our preliminary comments on the proposed Fee: •The Fee is Not Needed to Fund Improvements. In a March 2018 Technical Memorandum prepared for RCTC, it was determined that a “relatively small proportion of …cost [for deficient roadway segments] can be attributed to new warehousing and logistics developments.” It was further determined that “the estimates of alternative funding sources (absent the Fee) clearly indicate that the remaining costs to complete [the identified] improvement projects could reasonably be expected to be obtained from existing and proposed funding sources.” •The Fee is Based on Faulty Assumptions. The Fee is based on the false and/or unsubstantiated assumptions that: (i) there will be future deficiencies in the County’s freeway network and supporting infrastructure during peak traffic hours (which dictate design issues for solutions); and, (ii) distribution center land uses are major contributors to the truck traffic and congestion on the freeways. There is no evidence showing that trucks from logistics and distribution facilities located within the County are a direct and major contributor to peak hour traffic congestion and impacts either now or in the future. In fact, for most of the improvements, RCTC’s own consultants have determined for the majority of improvements, the percentage of deficiency attributable to new trucking uses is 2% or less. •The Fee Fails to Consider Project-Specific Circumstances and Impacts. The Fee fails to adequately account for the specific locations and relative transportation impacts of individual logistics centers that would be subject to the Fee in the future. For example, a distribution facility situated on the fringes of the County and requiring minimal use of County freeways and roads by trucks servicing the facility would pay the same fee amount as a different, more centrally- located logistics center that requires a much greater number of truck trips over County freeways and, consequently, is theoretically responsible for a much larger number of transportation-related impacts. •The Fee Would Not Actually Reduce Peak Traffic Impacts. The Fee would not result in any significant or measurable reduction to freeway congestion during peak traffic hours; rather, the improvements to be funded by the Fee would only benefit and improve congestion conditions before and after peak traffic hours. Moreover, as a matter of industry practice, Southern California logistics facilities delay their traffic loads to off-peak hours in order to avoid contributing to congestion and/or other transportation-related impacts and enhance the efficiency of their own operations. The technical documents prepared in support of the Fee, do not properly account for the fact that the vast majority of truck trips are during off-peak times. It is highly inappropriate to utilize employment at logistic centers and blindly convert that data point into daily and peak-hour trips. Instead, RCTC should use actual traffic counts for High Cube and E- Commerce from the Inland Empire to generate truck trip rates for the peak hour. NAIOP already ATTACHMENT 1: Letters submitted regarding the Logistics Fee Study 274 Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission July 9, 2018 Page 3 has this data and RCTC’s consultants are in the initial phases of conducting studies to determine actual traffic counts. •The Fee Is Based on Limited and Incomplete Data. RCTC’s own consultants readily admit the data and assumptions to calculate the Fee are limited and incomplete and that future studies are in the process which would provide adequate data. NAIOP’s offer to share data with RCTC has been rebuffed. Actual data is available regarding trip generation of these facilities in the Inland Empire, and importantly how many truck trips are generated in the peak hours. Data exists about the truck mix that serves logistic locations based on actual counts. It does not match the SCAG truck mix which is analyzed for the entire region and for all land uses. This data is not accurate. The models should be run omitting the World Logistics Center which proposes to build over 40 million square feet of warehouses in order to demonstrate the impact of that single development and whether any identified deficiencies would disappear in order to determine whether the deficiencies are caused by this specific project. In the Technical Report (March 2018), RCTC’s consultants noted that their analysis contains one zone that contains a very significant amount of the future amount of logistics employment growth. The report states that, “Figure 2-10 shows the TAZs with the highest warehousing growth in the SCAG model SED. The large majority of growth is associated with the World Logistics Center—this TAZ contains 91% of the growth for the county. After the five TAZ with the largest growth, there are six TAZs each with less than 1% of the warehousing employment in the county.” The deficiency analysis appears to be driven by one particular area. Why should all logistics centers throughout the County pay for a problem generated by a specific project? No analysis is provided for whether such a Fee program would discourage logistics development in Riverside County and cause a large majority of these uses to move to San Bernardino County. A model should be completed to analyze this scenario. Such an analysis would test the Fee elasticity. It would also test the impact on the Riverside freeway network if all new warehousing would be in San Bernardino County. If the vast majority of new logistic facilities are in San Bernardino County, there will likely be the same truck traffic in Riverside County in order to get goods into the San Bernardino facilities and deliver the goods to Riverside County addresses. •The Fee Assumes Trucks are the Only Contributors to Deficiencies. The Fee analyzes new logistics growth and future non-logistics growth but determines its logistics traffic alone that adds the last bit of traffic and pushing the totals over the available capacity. Why isn’t it the other future growth that pushes the traffic over the limit? In virtually all cases, the non-logistic growth ATTACHMENT 1: Letters submitted regarding the Logistics Fee Study 275 Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission July 9, 2018 Page 4 far out paces the logistic growth traffic. The Fee is based on the faulty conjecture that new logistics growth is solely responsible for the identified deficiencies by ignoring other contributors. •The Fee Would Suppress Vital Economic Development. There is no dispute that warehousing and distribution center jobs have surpassed retail and commercial as the highest paying employment opportunities in the County. County residents depend upon these jobs for survival. Cities depend upon these projects as revenue sources. If approved, the Fee may dissuade industrial developers from building new distribution and logistics center projects within the County and thereby deny County residents of vital employment opportunities and deprive local cities of essential sources of revenue. The natural result is that industrial developers will choose to site industrial buildings in neighboring Counties close to the respective County lines. •The Majority of the Fee Would be Utilized to Fund Improvements in a Centralized Location Resulting in Cities Whose Projects Do Not Have Land Uses Which Contribute Trips to Subsidize Improvements Caused Far Outside Their Borders. As an example, Desert communities’ projects would be subject to the same Fee, but no improvements are identified in the locale. •The Fee is Unprecedented. No other city or county in Southern California has adopted a similar, uniformly-applied, land-use specific transportation mitigation fee. As such, the Fee not only has the potential to disincentive logistics and distribution center development in the County and surrounding region, but may also expose the County to significant liability. •The Fee Singles Out a Specific Industry. No fee is proposed for other new land uses which generate automobile and truck trips, such as residential, retail, or office. Very truly yours, Robert Evans, Executive Director NAIOP Inland Empire Chapter cc: All RCTC Commissioners (via email only) ATTACHMENT 1: Letters submitted regarding the Logistics Fee Study 276 0 CARSON COMPANIES CARSON ESTATE TRUST CARSON DOMINGUEZ PROPERTIES, L.P. CARSON ENERGY LLC www.carsoncompanies.com July 17, 2018 VIA E-MAIL Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board Anne Mayer, Executive Director Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street Riverside, CA 92501 Re: RCTC Regional Logistics Mitigation Fee Dear Ms. Mobley: LMobley@RCTC.org AMayer@RCTC.org The Carson Companies is one of the leading developers and long-term owners of buildings ideally suited for manufacturing, logistics, distribution and supply chain management businesses in southern California. Our company has been in business for over 100 years. We have a vested interest in, and longstanding commihnent to, furthering the economic development of this region for both residents and commercial interests. It has come to our attention that the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) is considering the adoption of a Regional Logistics Mitigation Fee (Logistics Fee) intended to mitigate and offset the traffic-related impacts of future logistic and goods distribution centers in Riverside County. Based upon the limited information made available for our review, there appears to be several issues and potential areas of concern regarding the Logistics Fee. Most notably is the potential for the Logistics Fee to deter industrial development within Riverside County and thereby deprive the County of vital sources of income, revenue and employment opportunities. Fees and taxes such as the proposed RCTC Logistics Fee ultimately affect all of us-the population and citizens of California who are the ultimate consumer of the goods being transported to homes, stores and businesses. In the end, the Logistics Fee you are proposing hurts the citizens of California. The recent, second statewide increase in the gas & diesel excise rates and increase in sales taxes applied to diesel purchases (SBl) was supposed to go towards improved transportation infrastructure -the same infrastructure the Logistics Fee is targeting. Existing excises, taxes and fees are already crippling California business. When will enough be enough? CORPORA TE OFFICE 100 Bayview Circle, Suite 3500 Newport Beach California 92660 949/725-6500 FAX 949/725-6550 RANCHO DOMINGUEZ OFFICE 18710 S. Wilmington Avenue, Suite 200 Rancho Dominguez , California 90220 FAX 310/884-5932 TEXAS OFFICE 9821 Katy Freeway , Suite 440 Houston, Texas 77024 713/360-7934 FAX 713/360-7952 ATTACHMENT 1: Letters submitted regarding the Logistics Fee Study 277 Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission July 17, 2018 Page2 As an active industrial developer and owner w ithin the Co unty, Carson Companies will undoubte dly b e impacted b y the proposed RCTC Logistics Fee. Our goal therefore is to ensure that the interests of Carson Companies and other st a keholders are g iven due consideration b y the RCTC and County. To that end, we urge the RCTC to publicly release all available studies, data and other information related to or justifyin g the Lo gistics Fee and provide an avenue for stakeholders, such as Carson Companies, to participate in the current and future public hearing process related t o the Log is tics Fee. We appreciate the RCTC's consideration of this le tter and, on behalf of Carson Companies, we l ook forward to working collaboratively with the RCTC and County on evaluating and addressing the potential significant impacts attributable to the Lo gi stics Fee. Carson Companies ATTACHMENT 1: Letters submitted regarding the Logistics Fee Study 278 _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 901 Via Piemonte, Suite 175 Ontario, CA 91764 Phone 909 382 0033 Fax 909 382 0073 hillwood.com July 20, 2018 VIA E-MAIL Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board LMobley@RCTC.org Riverside County Transportation Commission 4080 Lemon Street Riverside, CA 92501 Re: RCTC Regional Logistics Mitigation Fee Dear Ms. Mobley: We have recently been made aware that the Riverside County Transportation Commission (RCTC) is considering the adoption of a Regional Logistics Mitigation Fee (Logistics Fee) intended to mitigate and offset the traffic-related impacts of future logistic and goods distribution centers in Riverside County. We have not yet evaluated the potential impacts associated with this Logistics Fee, however, based upon the limited information made available for review, there appears to be several issues and potential areas of concern regarding this Logistics Fee. Of great concern, there is the potential for the Logistics Fee to deter industrial development within Riverside County, thus depriving the County of crucial sources of income, revenue and employment opportunities. Hillwood is ranked today as one of the top industrial, commercial and residential real estate developers in the country. Our signature projects have become premier environments for residents and customers to live and work. We actively develop and buy industrial land and buildings across the U.S. and have projects in the Inland Empire, including the County of Riverside. Hillwood strives to make an impact on the communities we serve by incorporating insightful master-planning development, innovation and creativity and focusing on long-term sustainability. As an active industrial and logistics/distribution facility developer within the County, Hillwood will unquestionably be impacted by the proposed RCTC Logistics Mitigation Fee. Therefore, our purpose is to ensure that the interests of Hillwood and other stakeholders are given due consideration by the RCTC as well as the County. We strongly request the RCTC to publicly release all available studies, data and other information related to or justifying the Logistics Fee and provide an opportunity for ATTACHMENT 1: Letters submitted regarding the Logistics Fee Study 279 Lisa Mobley, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission July 20, 2018 Page 2 of 2 stakeholders, such as Hillwood, to participate in the current and future public hearing process related to the Logistics Fee. We appreciate the Riverside County Transportation Commission’s consideration of this letter. We at Hillwood, look forward to working in association with the RCTC and the County of Riverside on evaluating and addressing the potential substantial impacts attributed to the Logistics Fee. Sincerely, John Magness Senior Vice President ATTACHMENT 1: Letters submitted regarding the Logistics Fee Study 280 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION Friday, September 28, 2018 9:30 a.m. 4080 Lemon Street, Riverside Supervisor Chambers Presentation to be provided on the purpose of the study, forecasted logistics growth in Riverside County, and funding and cost analysis of infrastructure improvements. For more information, go to: rctc.org/feestudy or contact Lorelle Moe-Luna at lmoe-luna@rctc.org RSVP https://rctc.eventbrite.com ~ m ~11 m INN~VAlmN ~AIR SEPTEMBER 9,2018 IO:OOAM -2:00PM 464 EST 4TH ST. RosA PARKS STATE BLONG. DOB. NNOVATION@DOT.CA.GOV Transportation Connects Our Lives Going to work . Taking your childre n to school. Shopping for groceries . Visiting fami ly and friends . A ttend i ng sporting events . Riding your bike. Seeing your doctor. W alking your dog . These day -to-day activities connect us to what's importa nt , and they require a transportation system that w orks in Riverside County. Whether w e travel by car, train, b u s, bicycle or on foot, an efficient and we ll -maintained transportation system benefits Ri verside County. The better our infrastructure, the better our quality of life . Just as repairs to your home or vehicle have to be made, maintaining our transportation infrastructure is eq u ally important. Funds for Transportation Infrastructure The Gas Tax, or Senate Bi ll 1 (SB 1 ), is the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017, which was approved by Ca lifornia's Legislature in A pril 20 17 . The Gas Tax generates funds for our transportation infrastruct ure through increased gasol ine taxes and ann ual veh icle fees . It began to provide funds to cities and counties in November 20 17 . Protection for Transportation Revenues The passage of Proposition 69 on J une 5, 20 18 provides constitutiona l protection for transportation revenues generated by the Gas Tax . The State Legis lature and Governor wi ll be prohibited from borrowing or diverting Gas Tax funds for uses other t han transportation . What The Gas Tax Provides for Riverside County In 2018, Riverside County will receive close to $150 mil lion from the Gas Tax, which nearly doub les funds for transportation maintenance and upgrades in local cities and unincorporated communities . The Gas Tax funds projects, such as : • 1-15 Railroad Canyon Interchange in Lake Elsinore • 1-15 French Valley Parkway Interchange in Temecula • State Route 60 M oreno Beach Drive bridge in Moreno Va lley • Temescal Canyon Road in the Temescal Va lley • 1-15 Express Lanes from Corona to Lake Elsinore • Safe routes to schoo ls in Cabazon , Banning and Perris • County Line Road in Calimesa and Yucaipa • Separating trains and vehicles on A venue 66 in Mecca • CV Link in the Coachella Valley • Hemet Val ley Bikeway Connect project In addition to projects like these, the Gas Tax provides funds for the Freeway Service Patrol roadside assistance in the western Riverside County, Metro link commuter train service, and local bus service county-wide . It will also pay for 555 local road repairs in Ri verside County in 2017-18 . For a full list of projects funded by the Gas Tax, visit rebuildingca .ca .gov/map .html. Projects Funded by SB 1 "The Gas Tax" Map------------------------- W est ern · Riverside County +.-+ State H ighway Projects • Lo ca l Street and Road Projects Coachella Valley RIVERSIDE COUNTY Palo Verde Valley • For mo re information about th e Road Repair and Accountab ility A ct, visit rebuilding ca.c a.gov o r rctc .org . *Map not to sc al e Ju ly 20 18 OOG @TheRCTC