Loading...
01 January 31, 2019 Annual WorkshopRIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION www.rctc.org WORKSHOP AGENDA* *Actions may be taken on any item listed on the agenda January 31 – February 1, 2019 Temecula Creek Inn 44501 Rainbow Canyon Road Temecula, California In compliance with the Brown Act and Government Code Section 54957.5, agenda materials distributed 72 hours prior to the meeting, which are public records relating to open session agenda items, will be available for inspection by members of the public prior to the meeting at the Commission office, 4080 Lemon Street, Third Floor, Riverside, CA, and on the Commission’s website, www.rctc.org. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Government Code Section 54954.2, if you need special assistance to participate in a Commission meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board at (951) 787-7141. Notification of at least 48 hours prior to meeting time will assist staff in assuring that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility at the meeting. THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 2019 NOTE: COMMISSION MEETING TO RUN FROM 12:00 – 12:45 p.m. Lunch 11:30 a.m. – noon PUBLIC COMMENTS – Each individual speaker is limited to speak three (3) continuous minutes or less. The Commission may, either at the direction of the Chair or by majority vote of the Commission, waive this three minute time limitation. Depending on the number of items on the Agenda and the number of speakers, the Chair may, at his/her discretion, reduce the time of each speaker to two (2) continuous minutes. In addition, the maximum time for public comment for any individual item or topic is thirty (30) minutes. Also, the Commission may terminate public comments if such comments become repetitious. Speakers may not yield their time to others without the consent of the Chair. Any written documents to be distributed or presented to the Commission shall be submitted to the Clerk of the Board. This policy applies to Public Comments and comments on Agenda Items. Under the Brown Act, the Commission should not take action on or discuss matters raised during public comment portion of the agenda that are not listed on the agenda. Commission members may refer such matters to staff for factual information or to be placed on the subsequent agenda for consideration. 1:00 p.m. – 1:30p.m. WELCOME AND WORKSHOP OVERVIEW Chuck Washington, Chair Anne Mayer, Executive Director 1:30 p.m. – 1:50 p.m. DISADVANTAGED COMMUNITIES AND ITS IMPACT ON STATE GRANTS Tom Kirk, CVAG Executive Director (Receive an oral report) 1:50 p.m. – 2:10 p.m. THE FIRST HALF OF 2019 – WHAT’S ON THE HORIZON? John Standiford, Deputy Executive Director (Presentation Only) 2:10 p.m. – 2:40 p.m. 2:40– 3:00 3:00 – 3:45 PUBLIC TRANSIT ISSUES TODAY AND WHAT IS THE FUTURE (AGENDA ITEM ATTACHED) Lorelle Moe-Luna, Multi Modal Services Director This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive and file a report on the status of public transit; and 2) Direct staff to come back to the Commission by June 2019 with recommendations on any funding formula adjustments or transit policies that are needed to support public transit in Riverside County (County). BREAK WHAT’S NEXT FOR EXPRESS LANES IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY (AGENDA ITEM ATTACHED) Michael Blomquist, Toll Programs Director This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive study summary results and staff recommendations; and 2) Provide direction on staff recommendations. 3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. BREAK PRIORITIES FOR 2019 & BEYOND (AGENDA ITEM ATTACHED) Anne Mayer, Executive Director Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive and file the RCTC Staff Insight Brief; 2) Commit necessary 91 Express Lanes toll revenue to fully fund the 15/91 Express Lanes Connector design-build phase; 3) Assign the Future Funding Initiatives ad hoc Committee to thoroughly vet and make specific recommendations to the Commission no later than July 2019 on the following: a. Measure A Expenditure Plan Review and update; b. 2019-2029 Western County Highway Delivery Plan; c. A new local funding measure for the 2020 general election; and d. Innovative financing of express lanes revenues. 5:00 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. WRAP UP AND NEXT STEPS Chair Washington 5:15 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. BREAK 6:00 p.m. DINNER 6:30 p.m. Get on Board and Meet Metrolink’s New CEO Presentation From Metrolink CEO Stephanie Wiggins 7:00 p.m. ADJOURNMENT 9:00 A.M. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2019 7:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. BREAKFAST WORKSHOP OVERVIEW January 31, 2019 Anne Mayer, Executive Director 1 22 Workshop Overview Workshop Overview 3 Workshop Overview 4 Priorities: Project Delivery Workshop Overview 5 Highways for National Defense 6 Challenges, Opportunities Workshop Overview 7 We’re Growing! Workshop Overview 8Photo Credit: The Press-Enterprise Workshop Overview Workshop Overview 9 10 Workshop Overview 11 $0 $20,000,000 $40,000,000 $60,000,000 $80,000,000 $100,000,000 $120,000,000 $140,000,000 $160,000,000 Riverside County Before & After SB 1 Local Streets and Roads Revenues before SB 1 after SB 1 Workshop Overview Workshop Overview 12 $0 $500,000 $1,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,000,000 $2,500,000 $3,000,000 $3,500,000 Coachella & Palo Verde Valleys before SB 1 after SB 1 Workshop Overview 13 $0 $2,000,000 $4,000,000 $6,000,000 $8,000,000 $10,000,000 $12,000,000 $14,000,000 Western Riverside County before SB 1 after SB 1 Workshop Overview 14 15 Workshop Overview Workshop Overview 16 Workshop Overview 17 Workshop Overview 18 Workshop Overview 19 Workshop Overview 20 Workshop Overview 21 Workshop Overview 22 Workshop Overview 23 Tom Kirk RCTC January 31, 2019 Linking State Objectives Sounds Laudable… Newsom leaps headfirst into state housing crisis CALmatters even if their voters don't like it. He announced that commentary Attorney General Xavier Becerra was suing Hunting - Dan Walters ton Beach for stubbornly refusing to meet housing goals. "The state doesn't tale this action lightly," Newsom said, "The huge housing costs and sky-high rents are Garvin Newsom began his governorship this month eroding quality of life for families across this state. by promising to confront what he described as Cali- California's housing crisis is an existential threat to M tre. In 1997, my wife enrolled my two kids, Justin and Kayla, in a new theater summer camp and it wasn't long before Marsha and the kids Oland 8 at the time} where voluntarily removing the old gymnasium floor in the Frances S. Stevens School to make way for what would become PCT's 215-seat sloped auditori- um. ..Tustin and Kayla performed throughout elemen- tary and high school. Marsha helped with costumes and props and, a few years in, I joined the kids on stage. Theater is a magical place if you let yourself be en- veloped by it. Our family -- and many others like ours - have become part of the Palm Canyon Theatre_ We are a part of its life's blood, as are many local families including the Careys, Walkers, Van Dijks and others. It all started with the first family of Palm Canyon Theatre — the Laynes. Legislative Platform: Support maintaining the legislative intent behind Senate Bill 1 (Statutes 2017), including, but not limited to: Opposing efforts to tie distribution of transportation funding to ancillary policy matters, such as housing. Cap & Trade Affordable Housing and Sustainable Communities Program EM- $667 $41 Total $M Statewide So, how is RivCo doing in this housing-transport linked program? RivCo’s “Fair Share” $667 $6 Total $M Statewide ACTUAL SHARE So, how is RivCo doing in this housing-transport linked program? $667 $0 Total $M Statewide ACTUAL SHARE In Coachella Valley So, how is RivCo doing in this housing-transport linked program? Cap & Trade Transformative Climate Communities Winners: $70M to Fresno $35M to LA & Ontario TCC targets disadvantaged communities Which we believed was great for the CV!(I know what you are thinking) 86 of 126 census tracts 86 of 126 census tracts But, new math for disadvantaged communities CalEnviroscreen How is CalEnviroscreen scored? Pollution Burden Population Characteristics Enviroscreen Score Let me demonstrate 86 of 126 census tracts 8 of 126 census tracts TCC Planning $ $170K grant Positioned for BIG $$$$$$$ TCC Planning $ $170K grant Positioned for BIG $$$$$$$ Also can’t apply Also can’t apply No top 5% New math isn’t working for CVAG $200M total cost $140M state & fed funding Not in top 25% What if? CalEnviroscreen Used or Affordable Housing What if? Why is this a pressing issue? •Transport $ tied to housing •Legislative interest –Asm. Garcia and others Legislative Platform: Support maintaining the legislative intent behind Senate Bill 1 (Statutes 2017), including, but not limited to: Opposing efforts to tie distribution of transportation funding to ancillary policy matters, such as housing. Shared goals & Objectives Questions? 1 January 2019 •First Segment of Mid-County Parkway •Includes community and environmental improvements •Improves freeway access to and from Perris and surrounding communities 2 I-215 Placentia Interchange January 2019 •Ongoing effort throughout the year •Provides foundation to allow RCTC to take positions on pending legislation or regulation 3 Approval of Legislative Platform January 2019 •Provides service on 91 Express Lanes to Orange County •171,000 Annual Boardings •Round Trip Fare of only $3 4 One-Year Anniversary of Route 200 January 2019 •CTC Approved Awards on Jan. 29 •Riverside County Receives $27.4 million •Six Projects Selected •Additional Funding Available For Region and From SB 821 Program 5 Active Transportation Grant Awards February 2019 •Located Primarily South of the 91 •Among the first actions on the project •I-15 on schedule for 2020 Opening 6 Sound Walls on I-15 February 2019 Seeking Funding for Event Trains & Tier 2 Environmental Document & Service Plan 7 State Grant Decision on Coachella Valley Rail February 2019 •Park and Ride Expansion •Additional Bus Bays •Muffins with the Mayor 8 Riverside/La Sierra Metrolink Station Improvements February 2019 •Start Funding Process for Following Year •Collaborative Effort with Operators 9 Short Range Transit Plan Workshop March 2019 •Comprehensive Outreach Effort •Opportunity for public input and ideas •Accessible through social media & website 10 March 2019 •Use of the facility continues to exceed expectations •Improved striping and access on both ends 11 91 Express Lanes 2nd Anniversary March 2019 •New location near 91 & I-15 •Will serve Express Lanes on both facilities 12 91 Express Lanes New Customer Service Office March 2019 •Update on Outreach and Presentations •Return in May for Nexus Study 13 Truck Study Update March 2019 •Seeking $75 Million in Federal Funding •Strong Support from Neighboring Agencies •Comprehensive Improvements for the Entire 91 Corridor 14 INFRA Grant Submittal April 2019 15 RCTC VanClub 1st Anniversary May 2019 16 Environmental Work Begins May 2019 17 I-15 Railroad Canyon Interchange May 2019 •Single Document for Future Planning •Establishes Future Action for Regional Transportation Plan •Informs other Planning Efforts 18 Complete Long Range Transportation Plan June 2019 •Sets Spending Plan for Coming Year •Last of Multiple Commission Presentations as Part of the Process •Recipient of Multiple GFOA Awards 19 Adoption of FY 2019/20 Budget June 2019 •Establishes service and funding plans for all transit operators •Subsequent changes in service require Commission approval •Heightened priority on cooperative approach •Study of service in Pass Area 20 Adoption of Short-Range Transit Plans Spring 2019 21 Launch Design Build Procurement Process •Received Funding from SB 132 (Roth & Cervantes) •Connects 91 Express Lanes to new I-15 Express Lanes North of the 91 June 2019 •Transponders to be replaced •Transitions to 6C technology •Improves interoperability 22 Updating Transponder Technology June 2019 •Annual Effort Between OCTA & RCTC •Updates Planned Projects in Corridor •Required by State Law 23 91 Implementation Plan Update Summer 2019 •Further Reductions in Sites •Use Continues to Drop •Lifeline service still needed 24 Call Box Optimization Summer 2019 •Climbing and Descending Lanes •$126 Million Project •New Lanes Open to Traffic in 2021 •Requires Extensive Outreach 25 60 Truck Lanes Construction Begins Summer 2019 •Updates Rail Corridor in Riverside •Key Corridor for Metrolink Line •Cooperation with Union Pacific and Caltrans 26 Pachappa Bridge Construction Bids Opening Summer 2019 •Opens for traffic in 2020 •Required cooperation with other jurisdictions for interchanges •Features intermediate access and serves multiple communities 27 I-15 Express Lanes –50% Construction Milestone THANK YOU 28 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: January 31, 2019 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Lorelle Moe-Luna, Acting Multimodal Services Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Public Transit Today and Opportunities for Growth STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive and file a report on the status of public transit; and 2) Direct staff to come back to the Commission by June 2019 with recommendations on any funding formula adjustments or transit policies that are needed to support public transit in Riverside County (County). BACKGROUND INFORMATION As a county transportation commission, two primary responsibilities relate to transit and include: • Development and approval of short-range transit plans; and • Coordination and approval of public transit service within the County. The state of California (state) enacted the Transportation Development Act (TDA) in 1971 to improve public transportation services and encourage regional transportation coordination and to provide the primary funding source for transit services. As the regional transportation planning agency, the Commission is responsible for approving TDA allocations to transit operators based on anticipated revenues and the relative needs of the operators and recommending potential productivity improvements. TDA funding is comprised of the Local Transportation Fund (LTF) and State Transit Assistance (STA): LTF STA Source of funds ¼ of one cent of the state’s sales tax Statewide sales tax on diesel fuels and Senate Bill 1 funds (beginning Fiscal Year 2017/18) State distribution basis Returned to source Allocated on basis of population and as a percentage of fare revenues Use of funds Operating and capital purposes Capital purposes In November 2002, County voters approved the extension of Measure A (half-cent transaction and use tax) for a 30-year period beginning in 2009 through 2039 (2009 Measure A) and an accompanying Expenditure Plan. The 2009 Measure A Expenditure Plan included funding for public transit in the Western County and Coachella Valley areas of the County, with emphasis on commuter rail and intercity bus services, ridesharing, and discount fares and transit services for seniors and disabled persons. This year marks the 10-year anniversary of the 2008 Transit Vision and 2009 Measure A. Both documents are significant because one served as the blueprint for transit principles and priorities and the other as one of the primary funding mechanisms to accomplish those principles. 10 Years Ago – 2008 Transit Vision In June 2008, the Commission adopted the 2008 Transit Vision that laid the foundation for transit service throughout the County with a theme and goals for the next 10 years. Developing the 2008 Transit Vision was a two-year process, beginning with a recommendation from a TDA triennial performance audit and the Transit Policy Committee directing staff to work with transit operators to develop a 10-year conceptual plan. The planning process included priority setting with the Commission’s regional programs (rideshare and specialized transit) and the eight transit operators in the County: cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside; Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency (PVVTA); Riverside Transit Agency (RTA); SunLine Transit Agency (SunLine); and Metrolink. The 2008 Transit Vision was also influenced by the adoption of the Riverside County Coordinated Public Transit-Human Services Transportation Plan, which identified needs to improve coordination between the public transit operators and non-profit human/health service providers in order to provide increased mobility and cost-effective transportation options for seniors, the disabled community, and low-income residents within the County. The stakeholders identified services and projects that totaled over $2.6 billion over the next 10 years (2009 – 2019). The 2008 Transit Vision was based on five primary goals: 1. Increase Coordination with the Transit and Rideshare Community; 2. Remove Barriers to Transit Use; 3. Provide Efficient and Effective Transit and Rideshare Service; 4. Ensure Adequate Funding; and 5. Promote Energy Efficiency. To carry out the plan, the 2008 Transit Vision allowed for the opportunity to review and assess the allocation formulas for transit funds at the time. Recommendations were made to continue with the LTF and STA distributions at the time and further allocate Measure A Western County public transit funds to programs identified in the 2009 Measure A. Subsequently in October 2013, the Commission approved a bus/rail funding split for the Coachella Valley in support of a rail program. After a phase-in period of two years through FY 2015/16, the current Coachella Valley funding split is 10 percent of STA funds for rail and 90 percent for bus. Thus, the current formulas for LTF, STA, and Measure A are: • LTF distribution: o Palo Verde Valley – 100% bus o Coachella Valley – 100% bus o Western County – 78% bus/22% rail • STA distribution: o Palo Verde Valley – 100% bus o Coachella Valley – 90% bus/10% rail o Western County – 78% bus/22% rail • Measure A Public Transit Account: o Coachella Valley – 100% for specialized and public transit service o Western County –  Commuter Rail – 52%  Intercity Bus – 13%  Specialized Transit – 16.5%  Specialized Transit (Consolidated Transportation Services Agency) – 5.5%  Commuter Services – 13% At the time of adoption of the 2008 Transit Vision, the Commission also approved a timeline for funding formulas to be reviewed in FY 2018/19 for implementation in FY 2020/21. Staff monitors and has observed that transit expenditures are outpacing annual revenues. One example of this is the increasing operations and capital needs of commuter rail. As a member agency of Metrolink, the Commission manages Western County commuter rail funds. LTF funds are used primarily for Metrolink operations and capital, while Measure A funds are used to support the operations and maintenance of the nine Commission-owned commuter rail stations in the County. The costs for commuter rail services are not only increasing due to expanded service, but also because the Commission manages almost double the number of stations now than in 2008. Accordingly, long-term sustainability of funding for commuter rail needs to be addressed while also considering public bus and specialized transit needs. In connection with the assessment of funding formulas, a review of the Commission’s transit policies is necessary to ensure that the use of TDA and Measure A funds provides sufficient flexibility to leverage with other federal, state, and local sources. Staff recommends the Commission direct staff to come back to the Commission by June 2019 with recommendations on any funding formula adjustments or transit policies that are needed to support public transit in the County. Where Are We Now? Tremendous strides have been made in the last 10 years to expand transit options in the County considering the Great Recession impacted the primary operating funds of LTF and Measure A with a decrease in revenues of about 19 percent from FY 2007/08 to FY 2009/10. Despite these challenges, significant services and projects implemented since the 2008 Transit Vision include the following:  Annual Countywide Revenue Service Hours increased 32 percent from FY 2008/09 to FY 2017/18.  Over $27 million has been awarded since 2008 to social service/non-profit agencies to offer more choices for specialized transit users.  Eight new intercity express routes were deployed since 2008.  Expansion of commuter assistance programs such as IE Commuter, a service that offers incentives for ridesharing, and VanClub, the Western County vanpool program.  In 2016, the Commission completed construction of the Perris Valley Line and Metrolink officially extended service to four new stations in the County.  RTA’s RapidLink Gold Line commenced in 2017, serving the densest corridor in the County along University and Magnolia Avenues, designating it the County’s first High Quality Transit Corridor with service levels of at least 15-minute frequencies.  Intelligent Transportation System programs such as RTA’s BusWatch were launched to provide real-time bus arrival information,  In 2017, SunLine was one of the first in the state to receive cap-and-trade funds for the purchase of five hydrogen-powered buses and a hydrogen-generating station for the Coachella Valley.  In 2016, PVVTA started the Blythe Wellness Express, a service that provides residents access to specialized healthcare providers in the Coachella Valley.  Since 2014, Metrolink added two additional peak trains on the Inland Empire-Orange County and 91 Lines and new weekend service on the 91 Line.  Special event trains such as the Festival of Lights, Angels Express, and football trains were also added with service from Riverside County.  In 2018, the Commission launched VanClub, the first official carpool network for Western County.  New marketing programs were deployed by Metrolink, SunLine, RTA, and the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Corona, and Riverside to attract new riders and growth market segments such as college students and express bus riders with reduced or free fares. Ridership Trends Every year the Commission approves the Public Transit Countywide Performance Report, which provides a comprehensive picture of various performance indicators and trends in the County. The last report determined that ridership is continuing to decline in the County and farebox recovery ratios have also dropped about 4 percentage points from 23.8 percent in FY 2014/15 to 20 percent in FY 2016/17. This is attributed to the increase in operating cost countywide, primarily for labor to sustain existing services. Declining ridership has been a nationwide trend for several years now, including double-digit ridership losses in neighboring Los Angeles and Orange counties. The ridership decline in Riverside County lagged behind other major cities and only in the last three years has it become more apparent, namely for bus operators. Fixed route bus ridership dropped about 11 percent from FY 2013/14 to FY 2017/18, and public demand response (i.e., Dial-A-Ride) also declined about 7 percent during the same years. Since FY 2013/14, systemwide Metrolink ridership has stayed relatively flat, but ridership in the County has increased about 9 percent. The Southern California Association of Governments undertook a region-wide analysis of the downturn in transit ridership in conjunction with the University of California, Los Angeles Institute of Transportation Studies to determine the cause. The study evaluated various factors within and outside of transit operators’ control, such as fuel prices, transportation network companies (e.g., Uber, Lyft), and population changes. They concluded that traditional transit- dependent riders who are now able to buy vehicles are not likely to return to transit. Instead of working to gain back lost riders, they urge transit providers to focus on new riders and encourage them to use transit sometimes for some trips. Even before this study was published, most transit operators within the County began analyzing the growth potentials within their own systems. For example, Corona Cruiser started a Free Fare Program that provided special free fare days and days for targeted passengers, a Fixed Route Training Program, and Summer Student Program. The city of Beaumont also initiated a three- year Free Fare Program for college students, veterans, and travel training participants to market the Pass Transit fixed and commuter routes. SunLine is also undergoing a Transit Network Redesign effort that will simplify and consolidate routes for a goal of frequencies of 30-minutes or less, implement new ride share-type programs, and launch a “Transit Ambassador” program to focus on the customer. Transit Opportunities – Preview of Long Range Transportation Plan The Commission is embarking on its first ever countywide Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP). The LRTP will be the opportunity to shape the vision for what an integrated transportation system will look like in Riverside County in the next 20 years. The plan will take a comprehensive look at state highway, local streets and roads, and transit projects. Although the plan is a 20-year horizon, the next 10 years will be the focal point, and the transit component in particular will highlight “transit opportunities” that can be combined with corridor projects to strengthen the backbone of the regional transportation network. The long term vision will also establish a focus on delivering existing services more efficiently. Staff will come back to the Commission in the spring with an update on the LRTP. The study will include an analysis of historical transit funding revenues and trend forecasts for operating and capital programs. Study recommendations will allow the Commission and transit operators to better prioritize and understand transit needs across the County. Fiscal Impact There is no financial impact for this report. PUBLIC TRANSIT TODAY AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE Lorelle Moe-Luna, Multimodal Services Director 1 Outline 2 1. Basics –RCTC’s role in public transit –Who are the 8 Transit Operators? 2.2008 Transit Vision 3.Highlights of the last 10 Years 4.Ridership Trends 5.Opportunities for Future Growth 3 QUIZ 4 QUIZ 1.Who is the oldest transit operator? a.Riverside Special Transportation b.City of Banning c.Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency 2.What percent of the population utilizes public transit? a.2% b.10% c.17% 3.Why were the STA, LTF, and Measure A funding formulas established? a.To leverage and/or maximize other transportation funding sources b.To support the 2008 Transit Vision goals c.To increase coordination between public transit operators and social service/non-profit providers d.All of the above 4.What did the SCAG/UCLA study determine to be the main reason for the decline in ridership in recent years? a.Transportation Network Companies (i.e., Uber, Lyft) b.Quality and Quantity of Transit Service c.Rising Vehicle Ownership d.All of the above 5.What is the average subsidy per passenger for fixed-route bus and demand response (i.e., Dial-A-Ride)? a.Both are about $5.77 per passenger b.$27.97 for fixed-route, $5.77 for demand response c.$5.77 for fixed-route, $27.97 for demand response 6.Which mode/category has seen the highest increases in ridership? a.Commuter Bus b.Dial-A-Ride/Paratransit c.Commuter Rail RCTC’s Role in Public Transit 5 •Primary responsibility of county transportation commissions established in Public Utilities Code 1.Development and approval of short-range transportation improvement program 2.Coordination and approval of public transit service within County •Transportation Development Act of 1971 –Transportation planning agency responsibilities •Approve allocations to claimants based on analysis and evaluation of anticipated amounts and relative needs of each claimant •Identify, analyze and recommend potential productivity improvements 8 Transit Operators 6 Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency 7 •Established in 1978 •Services the Palo Verde Valley including the City of Blythe and unincorporated areas of Mesa Verde and Ripley. •Operates 5 deviated fixed routes known as “Desert Roadrunner,” the Blythe Wellness Express, and ADA paratransit service. SunLine Transit Agency 8 •Established 1977 •Serves 9 Coachella Valley cities and unincorporated areas of Bermuda Dunes, Desert Edge, Mecca, North Shore, Oasis, Thermal, and Thousand Palms •Operates 16 “SunBus” fixed routes, ADA paratransit service known as “SunDial,” and “SolVan” vanpool program Riverside Transit Agency 9 •Established 1977 •Service area includes 18 cities and unincorporated areas of County Districts 1, 2, 3, and 5. •Operates 48 fixed routes including 9 CommuterLinks and 1 RapidLink, and Senior/ADA Dial-A-Ride Corona Cruiser 10 •Established Dial-A-Ride in 1977, Corona Cruiser 2001 •Serves primarily Corona city boundaries •Operates 2 fixed routes and Senior/ADA Dial-A-Ride Riverside Special Transportation 11 •Established 1975 •Serves Riverside city of boundaries •Operates Senior/ADA paratransit service only Pass Transit 12 •Established 1973 •Serves primarily Banning city boundaries •Operates 3 fixed routes and Senior/ADA Dial-A- Ride •Established 1975 •Serves primarily Beaumont city boundaries •Operates 8 fixed routes, including 1 CommuterLink, and Senior/ADA Dial-A- Ride Metrolink 13 •Established 1992 •Operates 3 Commuter Rail Services: Inland Empire-Orange County, 91/Perris Valley Line, Riverside Line •9 RCTC-owned stations: Corona West, Corona North Main, Riverside La Sierra, Riverside Downtown, Riverside Hunter Park, Jurupa Valley Pedley, Moreno Valley/March Field, Perris Downtown, Perris South 8 Transit Operators 14 Palo Verde Valley Transit Agency •Combined service areas total over 3,700 square miles •Total county population of about 2.4 million About 2% utilize public transit Specialized Transit Providers 15 •Friends of Moreno Valley Sr Ctr •Independent Living Partnership •Michelle’s Place Treatment Travel Assistance •Operation Safehouse •Riverside Univ Health Medical Center, Behavioral Health •U.S. Vets •Voices for Children•Boys & Girls Club •Blindness Support Services, Inc •Care-A-Van Transit •City of Norco Parks & Rec •Community Connect 211-Vetlink •Community Connect Transportation Access Program •EXCEED •Forest Folk, Inc 2008 Transit Vision 16 •Purpose –Foundation for a 10-year conceptual plan of transit service throughout the County •5 Main Goals: 1.Increase Coordination with the Transit and Rideshare Community; 2.Remove Barriers to Transit Use; 3.Provide Efficient and Effective Transit and Rideshare Service; 4.Ensure Adequate Funding; and 5.Promote Energy Efficiency 2008 Transit Vision –Funding Formulas 17 Fund Source Western County Coachella Valley Palo Verde Valley TDA –STA 78% bus 22% rail 90% bus 10% rail* 100% bus TDA –LTF 78% bus 22% rail 100%bus 100% bus Measure A 52% Rail 13% Intercity Bus 5.5% CTSA 16.5% Specialized Transit 13% Commuter Services 100% public transit & specialized transit N/A *Approved by the Commission Oct 2013. Other funding sources:Federal FTA funds, Cap and Trade, MSRC, city or college programs, etc. Primary State and Local Funding Formulas 10 Years Later 18 Annual Revenue Service Hours increased 32% Over $27M awarded to social service agencies for specialized transit programs Expansion of 8 new intercity express routes Start of RTA’s RapidLink Gold Line in 2017 Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension in 2016 Metrolink added 2 new peak trains, weekend service, special event trains for the Festival of Lights Better technology for customers such as RTA’s BusWatch and the SunBus Tracker 10 Years Later 19 Sunline awarded Cap-and-Trade funds for hydrogen-powered buses and hydrogen- generating station IECommuter was started to match carpoolers and offer incentives to rideshare PVVTA started Blythe Wellness Express for specialized healthcare access New Vanpool Programs Created –SunLine’s SolVan, RCTC’s VanClub Various marketing programs to attract new riders and growth markets Ridership Trends -Bus 20 11,500,000 12,000,000 12,500,000 13,000,000 13,500,000 14,000,000 14,500,000 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Bus Fixed-Route Ridership Riverside County 700,000 750,000 800,000 850,000 900,000 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Demand Response Ridership Riverside County •Ridership declined about 11% for fixed-routes, 7% demand response since FY 2014 Why? Ridership Trends -Rail 21 40,000 40,500 41,000 41,500 42,000 42,500 43,000 43,500 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Metrolink -Average Weekday Trips Systemwide •Overall has remained about flat since FY 2014. •Metrolink ridership in Riverside County has increased about 9% since FY 2014, as a result of the Perris Valley Line extension 3,000 3,100 3,200 3,300 3,400 3,500 3,600 3,700 3,800 3,900 FY 2014 FY 2015 FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 Average Daily Boardings Riverside County Metrolink Stations Future Growth Opportunities 22 1.Focus on more cost efficient service –A decline in paratransit is not a bad thing –Fare analysis –Travel training and specialized transit programs help minimize cost of public transit service –Reduce overlap in services/overhead –Evaluate existing policies and funding formulas to provide flexibility to transit operators for maximized growth Future Growth Opportunities 23 2.Transit agencies are already “rethinking” the way they deliver service to attract new riders –Corona Cruiser offers special free fare days –Beaumont’s Free Fare Program for college students, veterans, and travel training participants –SunLine’s Transit Network Redesign Plan Future Growth Opportunities 24 3.Leverage other regional investments –Major highway projects such as the 91 Express Lanes –Metrolink’s SCORE program –Future employment centers such as CARB that will increase demand for more reverse commute service Next Steps 25 •Incorporate the next Transit Vision into the Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) •The LRTP will: –Shape a vision for an integrated transportation system in Riverside County for the next 20 years, focus on the next 10 years –Take a comprehensive look at state highway, local streets, and transit projects –Allow us and our local partners to better prioritize and compete for grants with a more “multimodal” and “corridor” approach •Update to be provided in the spring/early summer Staff Recommendation 26 •Receive and file a report on the status of public transit; and •Direct staff to come back to the Commission by June 2019 with recommendations on any funding formula adjustments or transit policies that are needed to support public transit in Riverside County QUESTIONS 27 Agenda Item RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: January 31, 2019 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Michael Blomquist, Toll Program Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Next Generation of Express Lanes STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive study summary results and staff recommendations; and 2) Provide direction on staff recommendations. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: At its January 2018 meeting, the Commission awarded a contract to HNTB Corporation to conduct a toll feasibility study. Tolling continues to emerge as a strategy to manage congestion in key corridors and generate revenue. This study’s purpose was to identify the most promising new and/or expanded express lane facilities within Riverside County. The study evaluated the feasibility to implement a potential express lane corridor relative to other express lane corridors and compared corridors to each other on mobility benefits (e.g. vehicle throughput, time savings, etc.), financial feasibility, connectivity to other express lane facilities and activity centers, project implementation impacts, and other factors. The Commission established its toll program in 2006. The primary activities of the toll program included developing and operating express lanes within the SR-91 and I-15 corridors, and the Commission augmented the organization with additional staff to deliver the projects and operate the facilities. The Commission opened its first tolled express lane facility in 2017 with the successful extension of the 91 Express Lanes into Riverside County. In FY 2017/18, the Commission’s 91 Express Lanes provided 14.5 million customer trips and generated almost $48 million of gross revenue. The Commission also significantly advanced its second tolled express lane facility, the 15 Express Lanes from State Route (SR) 60 to Cajalco Road, by completing key procurements for tolling, final design, and construction and project financing in 2017. The 15 Express Lanes from SR-60 to Cajalco Road is currently under construction and planned to open in 2020. Also in 2017, $180 million was made available through SB 132 to develop the 15/91 Express Lanes Connector Project, which will provide the northerly express lane connector between the 91 and Agenda Item 15 Express Lanes. This project is being developed and staff anticipates opening of this 15/91 Express Lanes Connector in 2022. At its April 2018 meeting the California Transportation Commission authorized $50 million of State Transportation Improvement Program funds for the project approval/environmental documentation (PA/ED) work phase for the southerly extension of the 15 Express Lanes from Cajalco Road to SR-74. This project will start the PA/ED phase in May with an expected contract award for professional services. Since the Commission awarded the toll feasibility study contract in January 2018, executive management, staff, and HNTB Corporation worked through a series of workshops to: - Identify key study criteria and assumptions; - Perform a screening analysis to establish a tiered ranking of potential corridors; - Perform a detailed analysis of the top tier potential corridors; and - Establish the overall feasibility of each top tier corridor. The study’s methodology and summary results for this year-long effort as well as staff recommendations will be presented via a presentation for Commission consideration and direction. WHAT IS NEXT FOR EXPRESS LANES IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY Michael Blomquist, RCTC Toll Program Director Greg Hulsizer, HNTB Project Manager 1 Riverside County Transportation Commission Annual Workshop Meeting January 31, 2019 Next Generation of Express Lanes Today’s Presentation JANUARY 31, 2019 2 •Commission’s January 2018 meeting –Authorized staff to commence Next Generation Toll Feasibility Study –Return with study results and recommendation •Current express lane program •Should we develop more express lanes? –Why? –Where? •Staff Recommendation 3 Current Express Lanes Program The 91 Experience 4 Next Generation of Express Lanes Why Pursue Express Lanes? JANUARY 31, 2019 5 •Limited state and federal funding •Erosion of the federal gas tax •Significant but finite Measure A funding •Continued increase in people, households, and jobs •Very limited freeway expansion plans by State –Operational improvements, maintaining the existing system Next Generation of Express Lanes Trends: 2006 & Now JANUARY 31, 2019 6 •Use of single-occupant vehicles •Long-term jobs-housing imbalance •Continued demand for less congested alternatives •Willingness of Riv. County residents to pay a toll for travel benefits Next Generation of Express Lanes Should we Develop Express Lanes? 7 •Deliver improvements sooner due to toll funding •91 and 15 Projects toll revenue-backed financing •91 Project = $598 million •15 Project = $152 million •Construct improvements not otherwise possible •Portion of 91 corridor General Purpose lane improvements •New express lanes in both corridors •Express Lanes Have Brought $750 Million to Riverside County Next Generation of Express Lanes New Choices for Solo Drivers JANUARY 31, 2019 8 •Pay a toll for travel benefits •Travel time certainty •Travel time savings •Use when you want •Daily commuter •Occasional/Weekend trip •Critical trip Next Generation of Express Lanes Meet Measure A Voter Commitments 9 •Voter commitment •I-15: one-lane/direction: SR-60 to San Diego County Line •Projects underway •I-15 Express Lanes (SR-60 to Cajalco): two lanes/direction •I-15 Express Lanes So. Ext. (Cajalco to SR-74): two lanes/direction •Reduced Measure A contribution to I-15 •Spend on other Measure A projects Next Generation of Express Lanes Meet Other Transportation Needs 10 •Corridor improvements not in Measure A •Recommended improvements to follow •Surplus toll revenue •Metrolink stations and service •Freeway lanes and interchanges •Recreational trail system •Express lane improvements Next Generation of Express Lanes Capitalize on the Investments Already Made JANUARY 31, 2019 11 •$1.9 +/-billion investment made in 91 and 15 corridors –Express lane backbone in place –Toll building purchase for long-term operations •Extend express lane network south and east –More Riverside County residents can benefit •Build on success –91 Express Lanes successful opening –15 Express Lanes to open next year Next Generation of Express Lanes Enables More Transit 12 •Express lane construction also provides transit infrastructure –No additional cost for express bus, van pool •RTA express bus route 200 uses the 91 Express Lanes –Operating since January 2018 •January: 385 boardings/day December: 625 boardings/day (+62%) •171,000 annual boardings •RCTC van pool program (VanClub) Next Generation of Express Lanes Improve All Lanes JANUARY 31, 2019 13 •Allow Carpool and General Purpose lanes to work better –Adds new lane capacity •Every car in the express lanes = one less car in the GP lanes –Raise occupancy requirement to 3+ •Ensures carpool demand doesn’t break down the carpool lane –Variable tolls manage demand ensuring free-flow express lanes •More cars moved, less congestion and delay in express lanes Next Generation of Express Lanes Degraded Carpool Lanes 14 •2017 Caltrans Report –Degraded locations •New express lane corridors Next Generation of Express Lanes Pays Operations & Maintenance Cost JANUARY 31, 2019 15 •No unfunded obligations for RCTC or Caltrans –50-years of O&M costs paid via tolls •Ensures well-maintained express lanes for customers –RCTC provides funding and ensure maintenance –Both annual and long-term rehabilitation maintenance Next Generation of Express Lanes Initial Backbone & the Network Expansion JANUARY 31, 2019 16 •We’ve done this before –2005-2006 toll feasibility work •Prioritization of 91 and 15 corridors –2009-2019 Delivery Plan •Prioritization of Measure A projects •Where should the expansion occur? Next Generation of Express Lanes Background 17 1. Purpose of the Study 2. Methodology and Results 3. Overall Feasibility Ranking Next Generation of Express Lanes Study Methodology 18 •Workshop-based Approach •Four Tasks 1. Identify Key Criteria and Assumptions 2. Screening Analysis and Tiered Rankings of Potential Facilities 3. Detailed Analysis of Top Tier Facilities 4. Establishment of Overall Feasibility Next Generation of Express Lanes Key Criteria & Assumptions JANUARY 31, 2019 19 Next Generation of Express Lanes 16 Potential Corridors 20 List of Corridors for RCTC Next Generation Tolling Study Length (Miles) 1 NOT USED 2 I-15 Express Lanes (SR-74 to I-215)14 3 I-15 Express Lanes (I-215 to San Diego County line)9 4 I-15 Express Lanes (SR-60 to San Bernardino County line)2 5 SR-91 HOT Lanes (I-15 to SR-60/I-215)14 6 SR-60 HOT Lanes (I-15 to SR-91/I-215)12 7A SR-60 (SR-60/I-215 split to Theodore Street Interchange)10 7B SR-60 (Theodore Street Interchange to I-10)8 8 I-215 HOT Lanes (SR-60/SR-91 to I-10) (2 miles-Riverside, 4 mile-SB County)6 9 I-215 (SR-60/SR-91 to SR-60/I-215 split)5 10 I-215 (SR-60/I-215 split to SR-74)12 11 I-215 (SR-74 to I-15)17 12 I-10 (SB County Line to SR-60)6 13 I-10 (SR-60 to SR-111)18 14 Mid-County Parkway (I-215 to SR-79)16 15 SR-79 (MCP to SR-74)7 16 SR-79 (SR-74 to I-15)11 Next Generation of Express Lanes Top Tier Corridors JANUARY 31, 2019 21 •91 Downtown Riverside –SR-91 from I-15 to SR-91/I-215/SR-60 Interchange •60 Jurupa-Riverside –SR-60 from I-15 to SR-91/I-215/SR-60 Interchange •60 Riverside-Moreno Valley –I-215/SR-60 from SR-91/I-215/SR-60 Interchange to Gilman Springs Road •60/215 Riverside-Moreno Valley –SR-60/I-215 from SR-91/I-215/SR-60 Interchange to Gilman Springs Road –SR-60/I-215 East Junction to Van Buren Boulevard Top Tier Corridors Map 22 Next Generation of Express Lanes 91 Downtown Riverside JANUARY 31, 2019 23 •14 Miles (I-15 to SR-60) –1 lane in each direction −Convert 1-HOV to 1-EL −Minimal R/W impacts •Capital Cost: $184 million Next Generation of Express Lanes 60 Jurupa-Riverside JANUARY 31, 2019 24 •10 miles (I-15 to I-215) −2 lanes in each direction –Convert 1-HOV and add 1 lane for 2-EL in each direction •Capital Cost: $508 million Next Generation of Express Lanes 60 Riverside-Moreno Valley JANUARY 31, 2019 25 •5 miles (I-215/SR-60);10 miles (SR-60) −1 lane in each direction −Convert 1-HOV to 1-EL in each direction •Capital Cost: $128 million Next Generation of Express Lanes 60/215 Riverside-Moreno Valley JANUARY 31, 2019 26 •5 miles (I-215/SR-60);10 miles (SR-60); 4 miles (I-215) −2 lanes in each direction portion −1 lane in each direction portions −Convert 1-HOV and add 1 lane for 2-EL in each direction •Capital Cost: $319 million Next Generation of Express Lanes Summary of Results 27 35-Year Net Revenue Next Generation of Express Lanes Financeability and Feasibility Ranking JANUARY 31, 2019 28 Summary of Financing Results ($M) 91 Downtown Riverside 60 Jurupa- Riverside 60 Riverside- Moreno Valley 60/215 Riverside- Moreno Valley Capital Cost (2018$)$184 $508 $128 $319 Capital Cost & O&M Reserve (2021$)$202 $544 $143 $347 Net Toll Revenue Bond Proceeds in 2020 $51 -$78 N/A $92 -$126 $284 -$388 Surplus / (Gap)$(151) -$(124)$(508)$(51) -$(17)$(63) -$41 Financing Feasibility % (Proceeds/Cost)25 -39%0%64 -88%82 -112% RANKING CORRIDOR 1 60/215 Riverside-Moreno Valley 2 60 Riverside-Moreno Valley 3 91 Downtown Riverside 4 60 Jurupa-Riverside Next Generation of Express Lanes Overall Feasibility JANUARY 31, 2019 29 Next Generation of Express Lanes Overall Feasibility Weighting JANUARY 31, 2019 30 Transportation Mobility 35% Financial Feasibility 30% Connectivity 15% Project Support and Schedule 10% Project Impacts 10% Next Generation of Express Lanes Overall Feasibility of Corridor Rankings JANUARY 31, 2019 31 1 2 3 4 2 4 3 1 60/215 Riverside- Moreno Valley 91 Downtown Riverside 60 Riverside- Moreno Valley 60 Jurupa-Riverside Next Generation of Express Lanes What Project East of 60/215/91 Interchange? 32 •“GOLD” = 60/215 Riverside Moreno Valley Express Lanes –Capacity increase •2 lanes/direction up to the 60/215 split –I-215 improvement •More benefit: SR-60 to Van Buren Blvd. –Financially more feasible •Most feasible out of all four corridors Next Generation of Express Lanes Next Step: Prepare Project Initiation Documents 33 •Project Initiation Document = Project Study Report –Establishes: •purpose and need statement •project scope •cost and schedule –Major work on the SHS requires Caltrans-approved Project Initiation Document –Meets statutory and CTC requirements for STIP-candidate projects Project Initiation Document Project Approval/ Environmenta l Document Plans, Specifications, and Estimates Construction Next Generation of Express Lanes Staff Recommendation 34 •Authorize staff to complete Project Initiation Documents for: –91 Downtown Riverside Express Lanes; –60 Jurupa-Riverside Express Lanes; and –60/215 Riverside-Moreno Valley Express Lanes •Authorize the Executive Director to execute non- funding agreements with Caltrans •Direct staff to return with a contract award recommendation for professional services to prepare Project Initiation Documents QUESTIONS 35 BONEYARD 36 Base Case Results 37 Next Generation of Express Lanes Note: −“35-Yr PV Debt Net Revs” calculation represents a high-level simulation of financing proceeds when introducing a 4.50% discount rate and 2.0x coverage level −Does not represent a financing analysis Equal Weighting 38 Next Generation of Express Lanes Transportation Financial Feasibility Connectivity 20% Project Support and Schedule Project Impacts Top Tier Corridors Next Generation of Express Lanes RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION DATE: January 31, 2019 TO: Riverside County Transportation Commission FROM: Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director THROUGH: Anne Mayer, Executive Director SUBJECT: Setting Priorities and a Vision for Riverside County’s Future STAFF RECOMMENDATION: This item is for the Commission to: 1) Receive and file the RCTC Staff Insight Brief; 2) Commit necessary 91 Express Lanes toll revenue to fully fund the 15/91 Express Lanes Connector design-build phase; 3) Assign the Future Funding Initiatives ad hoc Committee to thoroughly vet and make specific recommendations to the Commission no later than July 2019 on the following: a. Measure A Expenditure Plan Review and update; b. 2019-2029 Western County Highway Delivery Plan; c. A new local funding measure for the 2020 general election; and d. Innovative financing of express lanes revenues. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Commission staff prepared an insight brief (Attachment 1) describing the basis and need for the Commission to take timely action to set priorities and a vision for at least the next ten years. The white paper provides the rationale for the recommended near-term actions listed above. Attachment 2 is a visual aid for the Western Riverside County projects discussed in the white paper. Prioritization of Coachella Valley projects and distribution of Measure A funds in that sub-region occurs at the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG) according to the Transportation Project Prioritization Study and pursuant to a memorandum of understanding between the Commission and CVAG. Therefore, the white paper by Commission staff refrains from weighing in on prioritization of specific projects and funding allocations in the Coachella Valley. Similarly, the city of Blythe and the County of Riverside prioritize Palo Verde Valley projects. Nonetheless, the Coachella and Palo Verde Valleys have a significant stake in establishing a countywide vision for improved mobility and economic growth, as well as any potential future funding initiatives. The final and perhaps most fundamental material included in this staff report is Attachment 3, a copy of the Measure A expenditure plan and ordinance approved by Riverside County’s electorate in November 2002. The basis of most major decisions made by the Commission center on Measure A, Riverside County’s 0.5 percent sales tax administered by the Commission. At the workshop, staff will give an oral presentation on the recommendations set forth in this staff report and welcomes a robust discussion by the Commission on setting priorities, a vision, and a plan of action for Riverside County’s future. Attachments: 1) RCTC Staff Insight Brief 2) RCTC-Led Projects (Western Riverside County) 3) Measure A Expenditure Plan and Ordinance RIVERSIDE COUNTY TR A NSPORT A TION COMMISSION STAFF INSIGHT BRIEF 2019 RCTCWORKSHOP ATTACHMENT 1 Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 1 RCTC Baseline and Priority-setting It is time for RCTC to set priorities for the next ten years and establish a long-term vision for mobility in Riverside County. This opportunity is brought about by: • The success of delivering priority projects from the first ten years of the renewed Measure A, • Progress of previously-deferred Measure A projects, • Population and economic growth within Riverside County, • Updated revenue forecasts for all sources of funding, • 91 Express Lanes’ success and the potential expansion of toll facilities, • New found stability and clarity of state funding and policy, and • Review requirements within Measure A. While there are many positive indicators for the next ten years, the facts also demonstrate that expectations should be limited. Anticipated funding continues to fall short of capital project needs. Rail and transit operations funding levels are unsustainable for current levels of service, let alone expansion. Current Freeway Service Patrol levels will not be sustainable within a few years. Congestion is hampering mobility on nearly every highway and regional arterial in Riverside County. RCTC must set priorities, establish a vision, and pursue new funding. At the 2019 Commission Annual Workshop, staff seeks a vision and direction from the Commission to address the challenges and opportunities for improved mobility in Riverside County over the next decade and beyond. Specifically, staff proposes assigning the Future Funding Initiatives ad hoc Committee to conduct a thorough review of funding options, project priorities, and potential updates to Measure A and make recommendations to the full Commission no later than July 2019. The ad hoc committee was established several years ago to examine new funding initiatives; the committee’s membership is geographically diverse and includes the Commission’s three officers. After dialogue at the Commission Annual Workshop and receiving direction from the full Commission, the ad hoc committee and staff can spend several months looking at data regarding finances, project details, and public opinion to determine a prudent action plan. Committing to such a review process now and setting a mid-2019 deadline for recommendations is necessary: • To meet the spirit and intent of the Measure A ordinance, • To ensure feasibility of a local funding measure on the 2020 General Election ballot if the Commission wishes to keep that opportunity open, and DRAFT Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 2 • To ensure that priority projects continue to move forward without delay. Measure A 2019 Expenditure Plan Review The authors of Measure A in 2002 wanted to ensure that as the County grew and changed over the 30-year life span of the measure, RCTC would be able to adjust the expenditure plan to meet current and future needs. The Measure A ordinance, Ordinance 02-001 reads as follows: SECTION XIV. EXPENDITURE PLAN AMENDMENTS. The Expenditure Plan for Measure “A” funds may only be amended, if required, in accordance with Public Utilities Code section 240302, as amended. This section currently provides the following process for amendment: (1) initiation of the amendment by the Commission reciting findings of necessity; (2) approval by the Board of Supervisors; and, (3) approval by a majority of the cities constituting a majority of the incorporated population, unless such process is amended in a manner consistent with State legislation. Commencing in 2019 and at least every ten years thereafter, the Commission shall review and, where necessary propose revisions to the Expenditure Plan. Such revisions shall be submitted for approval according to the procedures set forth in this Section XIV. Until approved, the then existing Expenditure Plan shall remain in full force and effect. Thus, it is time for RCTC to review the Measure A expenditure plan and, where necessary propose revisions. The expenditure plan, which is attached to this report along with Ordinance 02-001, outlines several categories of funding, the amounts and percentages at which those categories are to be funded, as well as differences in how funds are spent in the three geographic sub-regions of the County. Upon initial review by RCTC Management, major revisions to the expenditure plan do not appear warranted; however there may be nuanced details that bear clarification and further examination to ensure the Measure A program is fulfilling the needs of Riverside County today and in the decade ahead. Guidance from the Commission is necessary. 2019-2029 Western County Highway Delivery Plan To establish priorities and a strategic implementation plan for the first ten years of the renewed Measure A, RCTC adopted a 10-Year Western County Highway Delivery Plan in 2006, nearly three years prior to the renewed measure taking effect. Adopting this 10-year plan was important because, different from the Coachella Valley where project priorities are determined by the Transportation Project Prioritization Study, the numerous projects identified in Measure A in Western County did not have such a criteria-based ranking. DRAFT Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 3 RCTC has completed or has under construction the following projects in the 2009-2019 Western County Highway Delivery Plan, adopted by the Commission in 2006 and updated in 2010 following the Great Recession (see Attachment 2 for a map of these projects):  91 Corridor Improvement Project  I-215 South: Murrieta Hot Springs Road to Scott Road  I-215 Central: Scott Road to Nuevo Road  I-215 Bi-County High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane addition  I-15 Express Lanes Project During that time, RCTC also completed projects from the original 1989 Measure A program such as the 60/215 East Junction and 91 HOV project in Riverside. The 2009-2019 Western County Highway Delivery Plan also set out to achieve environmental clearance of:  SR-79 Realignment, and  Mid County Parkway. Both of these projects have received final environmental approval. Finally, the 2009-2019 Western County Highway Delivery Plan established a broad goal of protecting right of way for long-range mega projects such as SR-79 Realignment and Mid County Parkway. While there is still more right of way to acquire for these projects, progress has been made. In the meantime, the I-10 Truck Lane identified in Measure A was deferred and the SR-60 Truck Lane through the Badlands was accelerated and is now in the construction phase. Additionally, the first construction package for Mid County Parkway, the I-215/Placentia Avenue Interchange, is beginning procurement in 2019. The I-15/French Valley Parkway Interchange led by the City of Temecula has remained a priority, though it has encountered delivery and funding challenges over the last decade. The project appears to be on track thanks in part to Senate Bill 1 (SB 1) infusing the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) with funding sufficient to move that project forward. In 2016 at the Commission Annual Workshop, the Commission voted to prioritize the following projects deferred due to lack of funding during the Great Recession:  I-15 Express Lanes Southern Extension between Cajalco Road and State Route 74;  71/91 Interchange; DRAFT Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 4  15/91 Express Lanes Connector; and  Continued progress and evaluation of CETAP and alternative corridors. In 2017, the State Legislature and Governor approved a special appropriation in Senate Bill 132 (SB 132) of $180 million to construct the 15/91 Express Lanes Connector, along with special legislation to accelerate the project through innovative contracting methods. The 15/91 Express Lanes Connector is on-track to complete construction by 2022, ahead of the June 30, 2023 statutory deadline to liquidate all $180 million in state funding. However, staff anticipates an additional $35-55 million will be needed to fully fund the design-build phase. RCTC staff intends to begin the design-build procurement phase in March 2019 with a contract award expected in spring 2020. Immediately following defeat of Proposition 6 in November 2018, RCTC released a procurement for the project approval and environmental document phase of the I-15 Express Lanes Southern Extension. With increased certainty regarding state funding levels, updated toll revenue forecasts for the 91 Express Lanes, and fresh revenue projections for Measure A, Local Transportation Fund (LTF), and federal formula programs, RCTC can more accurately assess what a realistic 2019- 2029 Western County Highway Delivery Plan can look like. RCTC issued significant debt backed by sales tax revenues to finance the first ten years of Measure A Western County Highway projects and habitat acquisitions to support transportation projects. These debt issuances result in substantially all Measure A revenues for western county highways being devoted to debt repayment, averaging $66.3 million annually for the next decade. Additionally, about $919 million of the $975 million debt ceiling contained in Measure A is has been used. These facts mean that there is limited opportunity to fund new major highway projects in western Riverside County through 2029. Instead, such projects will need to rely on a mix of Measure A New Corridors funds, Measure A Economic Development Incentive funds, Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee revenue, toll revenue, federal formula funds, and competitive state and federal grants. Candidate projects for the 2019-2029 Western County Highway Delivery Plan could include, but are not limited to:  I-15 Express Lanes Southern Extension: Cajalco Road to SR-74  71/91 Interchange  15/91 Express Lanes Connector  91 Corridor Operations Project  I-215 Box Springs Road to Nuevo Road  SR-71 Widening  I-10 Truck Climbing Lane  Mid County Parkway DRAFT Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 5  SR-79 Realignment  Next Generation Express Lanes Projects, which is the subject of another workshop report In the aggregate, these example projects cost billions of dollars beyond what is anticipated to be available to RCTC over the next 10 years, let alone additional projects not mentioned in Measure A for which support has been voiced by Commissioners and/or constituencies around the County. Additional Projects, Services, and Operations The following have been identified by Commissioners, stakeholders, or staff as worthy of funding, and do not have an identified funding source:  Coachella Valley-San Gorgonio Pass Intercity Rail Service  Ethanac corridor  Cajalco Road corridor  I-10 Bypass  I-15 widening in Temecula  Rail service to San Jacinto and Hemet  Rail service to Temecula  Increased frequency of existing Metrolink routes, including reverse commute service  Other rail corridors  Freeway Service Patrol in the Coachella Valley  Interchange and bridge reconstructions throughout Riverside County  New interchanges throughout Riverside County  Grade separations throughout Riverside County Funding Gap Analysis The RCTC Strategic Assessment (2016) identified the total capital needs for highway and transit infrastructure to meet the demand of Riverside County’s anticipated growth by 2039. The Strategic Assessment also identified revenues estimated to be available during the same timeframe from state, federal, and local sources to meet those needs. The analysis produced an estimated funding gap between reasonably expected revenues and needed capital funding of $15.9 billion. In 2017, the State Legislature and Governor approved new transportation revenues which closed the estimated funding gap for Riverside County’s transportation capital needs to approximately $12.6 billion. More recently, initial financial analysis being conducted as part of RCTC’s Long Range Transportation Plan has identified a $9.59 billion funding gap for highway projects through 2045. This gap is driven largely by the Mid County Parkway project between I-215 and SR-79 ($1.69 billion) and SR-79 Realignment project ($1.52 billion), as well as a future east-west DRAFT Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 6 corridor between I-15 and I-215 ($2.36 billion). These three projects aside, the highway funding gap through 2045 is still $4.02 billion. Assumptions about federal and state funding that were used to develop the Measure A expenditure plan and the 2009-2019 Western County Highway Delivery Plan have not come to fruition. While SB 1 is helpful, it came after several years of dramatic declines in state funding and is focused mainly on repair of existing facilities, rather than building new infrastructure for a growing economy such as Riverside County. Federal funding has remained flat and is held afloat only by budgetary one-time “patches” that mask the structural insolvency of the Highway Trust Fund. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, often called the “stimulus” bill, contained only a small percentage of funding for transportation infrastructure and was one-time funding. That bill did make significant investments in the I-10 interchanges in the Coachella Valley. Congress and the President have yet to make progress on a long-sought infrastructure bill. Additionally, macroeconomic conditions including, but not limited to, cost escalation and recessions, have widened the gap between what was forecast as feasible in 2002 and what reality has borne out. Strategies to Fill the Gap New Sales Tax Measure The preamble language to Ordinance 02-001, which was placed on the November 2002 General Election ballot as Measure A, begins: “The transportation system in Riverside County is rapidly deteriorating and our population and economy are growing rapidly. Maintenance and repairs of existing roadways and improvements to relieve congestion cannot be accomplished with available funds. Without additional funds, the system will bog down and pavement will crumble into permanent disrepair. State highway funds are inadequate and competition for funds is increasing. Projects in areas where local sales tax funds are available have been and will continue to be viewed much more favorably in the selection process of the California Transportation Commission. Local governments must either generate revenues to expand our system and maintain our investments or watch the system collapse and endanger the health, welfare and safety of all Riverside County residents.” In 2019 in Riverside County, past is prologue. In 2015, RCTC began examining the possibility of seeking voter approval for an additional 0.5% sales tax to fill the funding gap in the Measure A program and to fund new priorities that have emerged since the renewal of Measure A in 2002. In exploring this funding option, RCTC has DRAFT Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 7 acknowledged that the state and federal governments cannot be relied upon to wholly fulfill the needs and aspirations of Riverside County. RCTC has modernized its public engagement efforts throughout Riverside County to receive the input necessary to craft a transportation improvement plan that would earn voter confidence. RCTC has also achieved the approval of the State Legislature and Governor to pursue an additional 0.5% sales tax for transportation. Revenue Potential: Significant Initial estimates by the UC Riverside School of Business Center for Economic Forecasting & Development demonstrate the potential for a new countywide sales tax measure for transportation to yield anywhere between $3.1-$5.9 billion, depending on how the measure is structured. This would close the capital funding gap identified in the Strategic Assessment between 25-46% (Note: this figure does not include the expected long-term shortfall for transit operations). No other potential future funding source was identified by the Strategic Assessment that would raise this level of revenue. Potential sources also analyzed included raising the federal gas tax, new development fees, and per-mile fees in addition to gas taxes. A new measure would help in a meaningful way but is not the complete solution. Legal Authority: Yes RCTC obtained legal authority to administer an additional sales tax when Assembly Bill 1189 (AB 1189) (Garcia) was signed into law by the Governor in 2017. RCTC sponsored this bill. The law allows RCTC to impose a total sales tax rate of up to 1% if approved by the electorate by a two- thirds affirmative vote. The new measure authorized by AB 1189 is exempt from the state’s cap on local-option sales taxes, meaning that the tax could go into effect in all jurisdictions in Riverside County, including those where municipal sales taxes have recently been adopted. Consistency with RCTC policy: Yes The Commission has voted multiple times to pursue the option of a potential new sales tax measure to close the funding gap to meet Riverside County’s infrastructure demands in the coming decades. These votes occurred at the Commission’s Annual Workshops in 2016, 2017, and 2018. Feasibility: Possible With legal authority in-hand and Commission policy favorable toward moving in the direction of a new local funding measure, the primary remaining concern is voter sentiment. A two-thirds “yes” vote (66.67%) of the electorate is necessary to achieve passage. Public opinion research in 2017 demonstrated a maximum potential “yes” vote of 62% for likely voters in the 2020 General Election – 4.67% less than needed to pass in ideal conditions. In 2018, RCTC began a DRAFT Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 8 multi-year comprehensive Public Engagement Program with one of its goals being to increase awareness and education of Riverside County residents regarding transportation issues and to develop a transportation improvement and funding plan that can achieve approval by 66.67% of voters in 2020. RCTC staff and consultants are moving forward with the engagement program and early results are encouraging, but too soon to measure. During 2019, the engagement program will significantly increase its intensity and will include new research to give Commissioners data to determine feasibility of a 2020 measure. Risk: Medium Given that success hinges on the political electoral environment heading into the 2020 General Election, the most significant risks are political. Legal and technical risks are low, as statutory authority to pursue this funding source is already secure and resources necessary to develop a funding plan to place on the ballot are approved and budgeted. Many political risks are beyond the control of RCTC and subject to national and state affairs. Local political dynamics – over which Commissioners and colleagues have significant influence – will also play a major role in success or failure of a new measure. A risk inherent in pursuing any revenue source is macroeconomic conditions beyond RCTC’s control. As seen during the Great Recession, sales tax receipts are vulnerable to dips in the overall economy. Innovative Financing The current financial success of RCTC’s 91 Express Lanes and the hopeful success of the 15 Express Lanes opening in 2020 provide an opportunity for RCTC to use future anticipated toll revenues to accelerate improvements on the SR-91 and I-15 corridors. With strong credit ratings from the rating agencies, RCTC can use similar innovative financing approaches as those RCTC used to finance the 91 Project and the I-15 Express Lanes Project within the boundaries of state law. Given the systemic relationship between I-15 and SR-91 east of I-15, in that they serve primarily the same commute and goods movement patterns, RCTC may wish to consider obtaining legal authority for greater flexibility to allow 91 Express Lanes revenues to be invested throughout the 91 and 15 corridor system. Revenue Potential: Significant Updated traffic and revenue analysis by Stantec Consulting presented at the Commission’s December 2018 meeting demonstrates toll revenue from RCTC’s 91 Express Lanes will likely continue to exceed original estimates made in 2012. Stantec forecasts for the “base case” show an aggregate 10% increase in toll revenue through FY 2066, which is approximately $926 million more than anticipated when the 91 Project was financed. If RCTC constructs the 91 Corridor Operations Project (91 COP) by 2022, which is a new westbound lane between Green River Road and SR-241, toll revenue will be reduced by approximately $166 million between FY DRAFT Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 9 2022 and FY 2035 – accounting for a 2% reduction in revenue over the life of RCTC’s ownership of the express lanes. Despite this expected drop in toll revenue, there remains a significant amount of revenue expected to be available to fund future capital projects on the SR-91 corridor. 15 Express Lanes revenue is not expected to be as high as 91 Express Lanes revenue and performance versus projections cannot be measured until the facility is open for an extended period of time. Nonetheless, RCTC can begin exploring financing structures that would leverage any future available toll revenue to partially fund priority projects on I-15, including the 15 Express Lanes Southern Extension between Cajalco Road and SR-74. Legal Authority: Yes, with limitations For the 91 Express Lanes, Senate Bill 1316 (SB 1316) (Correa) requires that toll revenue beyond what is needed to pay debt obligations and operations and maintenance of the express lanes be invested in capital or operations improvements to enhance mobility in the SR-91 corridor between the county line and I-15. Financing such future toll revenues to accelerate improvements to SR-91 between the county line and I-15 is a legally permissible action. Should RCTC wish to use toll revenues to make improvements to SR-91 east of I-15 or on I-15 itself (or on another route), changes to state statute would need to be approved by the Legislature and Governor. For the 15 Express Lanes, Assembly Bill 1954 (AB 1954) (Jeffries) provides similar legal parameters for investment of toll revenues. The physical limits of improvements that could be funded with toll revenues are the I-15 corridor between the San Bernardino and San Diego County lines. Consistency with RCTC policy: Yes At its June 2012 meeting, the Commission adopted the following toll policy goals: 1. Provide a safe, reliable, and predictable commute for 91 Express Lanes customers; 2. Optimize vehicle throughput at free flow speeds; 3. Pay debt service and maintain debt service coverage; 4. Increase average vehicle occupancy; 5. Balance capacity and demand to serve customers who pay tolls as well as carpoolers with three or more persons who are offered discounted tolls; 6. Generate sufficient revenue to sustain the financial viability of the Commission’s 91 Express Lanes; 7. Ensure all covenants in the financing documents are met; and 8. Provide net revenues for Riverside Freeway/SR-91 corridor improvements. Feasibility: Possible DRAFT Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 10 RCTC has financial advisory services under contract and will likely secure the interest of underwriters for a potential financing without much difficulty. Rating agencies have demonstrated confidence in the local economy with: • Stable outlooks on RCTC’s sales tax revenue bonds, and • A recent upgrade by S&P Global Ratings with a positive outlook and a stable outlook by Fitch Ratings with an expectation of a positive revision based on current performance on RCTC’s 91 Express Lanes toll revenue financings. Stantec’s recent traffic and revenue study results only bolster RCTC’s case for additional financing. While financial market conditions are always outside of RCTC’s control, with a reasonably healthy economy forecast for the near future, a successful financing using the boundaries of current law appears likely. Risk: Low Exploration of innovative financing itself carries low risk. For reasons previously mentioned, such an exploration is likely to be well received by capital markets and Riverside County citizens eager for congestion relief as soon as possible. Risks increase an unknown amount should RCTC choose to explore a “system financing” where 91 Express Lanes revenue could be applied to the I-15 corridor, and vice versa. Risks of pursuing such a financing would be political in nature, as RCTC would need permission from the Legislature and the Governor. The degree of risk of such a legislative pursuit is unknown at this time because the exact scope and objective has not been fully defined by the financial and technical analysis which would need to take place first. As with sales tax revenues, toll revenues are partially dependent on overall economic conditions. Recessions can cause actual revenues to dip below assumptions integral to financing. Issuing additional debt would inherently increase risks RCTC to meet its obligations. Recommendation Staff recommends the Commission assign the Future Funding Initiatives ad hoc Committee to thoroughly vet and make specific recommendations to the Commission no later than July 2019 on the following: • Measure A Expenditure Plan Review and Update, • 2019-2029 Western County Highway Delivery Plan, • A new local funding measure on the 2020 general election ballot, and • Innovative financing of express lanes revenues. Further, staff recommends the Commission make a policy vote to commit sufficient 91 Express Lanes surplus revenues to fully fund construction of the 15/91 Express Lanes Connector, as this DRAFT Staff Insight Brief, 2019 RCTC Workshop 11 project is about to begin design-build procurement and is a stated priority of RCTC and the State of California. The exact amount of surplus toll revenues and mix of fund sources will be dependent on the outcome of federal INFRA grant awards sought by RCTC for this and other projects on the 91 corridor. Yucca Valley Twentynine Palms RanchoMirage Palm Springs PalmDesert La Quinta Indio Desert Hot Springs Coachella CathedralCity Wildomar Menifee Eastvale Temecula CanyonLake LakeMatthews LakePerris VailLake NewportBeach Murrieta LakeElsinore Laguna Woods Laguna Niguel Irvine AlisoViejo SanJacinto San Bernardino Perris MorenoValley Highland Hemet BeaumontBanning Yorba Linda Walnut Upland Tustin Santa Ana SanDimas Rialto RanchoCucamonga Pomona Placentia Ontario Norco JurupaValley LaVerne Glendora Fontana DiamondBar Corona Claremont Chino Hills Brea Anaheim Riverside Calimesa Diamond ValleyLake SAN BERNARDINO CO. RIVERSIDE CO. R I V E R S I D E CO .OR A NG E CO . RIVERSIDE CO. SAN DIEGO CO. SAN BERNARDINO CO. RIVERSIDE CO. 133 241 142 259 71 1 55 66 57 76 30 91 74 74 74 60 90 22 5 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 210 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 10 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 405 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 73 371 111 243 247 74 62 79 79 38 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 91 15 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 60 215 INTERSTATE CALIFORNIA 790510Miles N 2 21 26 3 17 23 18 22 24 4 5 7 6 8 11 24 30 32 31 33 34 44 26 25 28 37 27 29 35 9 13 11528 27 10 1416 29 12 25 20 19 41 4243 COMPLETED PROJECTS Date of Completion Project Cost WESTERN COUNTY 1 91 Project - added regular lanes, tolled express lanes and auxiliary lanes between the Orange County/Riverside County line and I-15 Spring 2017 $1.4 Billion 2 60/215 East Junction Project March 2014 $47 Million 3 74/215 Interchange Project March 2012 $20.6 Million 4 I-215 South Project September 2012 $29 Million 5 I-215 Bi-County Gap Closure June 2015 $170 Million 6 I-215 Central Project October 2015 $123.5 Million 7 I-215 Widening - Southbound - Blaine to Martin Luther King Boulevard September 2013 $2.8 Million 8 SR-74 Curve Widening June 2015 $5.6 Million 9 91/Perris Valley Line Metrolink Extension June 2016 $248.3 Million 10 SR-91 High Occupancy Vehicle Project April 2016 $248 Million UNDER CONSTRUCTION Estimated Date of Completion Estimated Project Cost WESTERN COUNTY 11 I-15 Express Lanes Project 2020 $489 Million 12 60 Truck Lanes Late 2021 $138.4 Million NEAR TERM Estimated Date of Completion Estimated Project Cost WESTERN COUNTY 13 I-215/Placentia Ave. Interchange - Mid County Parkway Construction Package #1 Mid 2022 $58 Million 14 15/91 Express Lanes Connector 2022 $235 Million 15 71/91 Interchange Project Late 2022 $121 Million 16 91 Corridor Operations Project Late 2021 $43 Million 17 I-15/Railroad Canyon Interchange 2022 $45 Million 18 15 Corridor Operations Project TBD TBD LONG TERM Estimated Date of Completion Estimated Project Cost WESTERN COUNTY 19 SR-79 Realignment Project - Environmental work complete TBD $1.523 Billion 20 Mid County Parkway - Environmental work complete TBD $1.7 Billion 21 I-215 North - Box Springs Road to Nuevo Road TBD TBD 22 15 Express Lanes Southern Extension TBD TBD 23 I-15 Corridor Improvements: SR-74 to San Diego County Line TBD TBD 24 71 Widening TBD TBD 25 10/60 Interchange TBD TBD 26 10 Truck Lane TBD TBD 27 Coachella Valley-San Gorgonio Pass Rail TBD TBD 28 91 Ultimate Project TBD TBD 29 91 Improvements East of I-15 TBD TBD RCTC-LED PROJECTS ATTACHMENT 2 ORDINANCE NO. 02-001 RIVERSIDE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION TRANSPORTATION EXPENDITURE PLAN AND RETAIL TRANSACTION AND USE TAX ORDINANCE PREAMBLE The transportation system in Riverside County is rapidly deteriorating and our population and economy are growing rapidly. Maintenance and repairs of existing roadways and improvements to relieve congestion cannot be accomplished with available funds. Without additional funds, the system will bog down and pavement will crumble into permanent disrepair. State highway funds are inadequate and competition for funds is increasing. Projects in areas where local sales tax funds are available have been and will continue to be viewed much more favorably in the selection process of the California Transportation Commission. Local governments must either generate revenues to expand our system and maintain our investments or watch the system collapse and endanger the health, welfare and safety of all Riverside County residents. Continuation of our one-half percent sales tax for transportation to supplement traditional revenues and revenues to be generated through locally-adopted developer fees and assessment districts for transportation improvements is the only way local governments can be sure the transportation system will serve the current and future travel needs of Riverside County. Collection of the one-half percent sales tax will commence upon the expiration of the existing tax. The Riverside County Transportation Commission will continue to seek maximum funding for transportation improvements through State and federal programs. The Commission will not provide sales tax revenues to any city or to the County unless revenues currently used by that agency for transportation are continued to be used for transportation purposes. The Riverside County Transportation Commission ordains as follows: SECTION 1. SUMMARY. This Ordinance provides for the imposition of a retail transaction and use tax of one-half percent for a period of thirty (30) years, the authority to issue bonds secured by such taxes, and the administration of the tax proceeds and a county transportation expenditure plan. SECTION II. DEFINITIONS. The following definitions shall apply in this ordinance: A. Expenditure Plan. “The Expenditure Plan” means the Riverside County Transportation Commission Expenditure Plan (attached as Exhibit B) and adopted as part of this Ordinance including any future amendments thereto. B. “County” means the County of Riverside. ATTACHMENT 3 C. “Commission” means the Riverside County Transportation Commission s set forth in Sections 130053, 130053.5 and 130053.7 of the Public Utilities Code. D. “TUMF” means Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee. This fee is charged on new development by local governments to assist with the building and improvement of regional arterials. E. “MSHCP” means the Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan currently under development by the County of Riverside. F. “Existing Tax” means the ½ % retail transactions and use tax adopted pursuant to Ordinance No. 88-01. SECTION III. AUTHORITY. This Ordinance is enacted, in part, pursuant to the provisions of Division 25 (commencing with Section 240000) of the Public Utilities Code, and Section 7252.22 of the Revenue and Taxation Code. SECTION IV. IMPOSITION OF RETAIL TRANSACTIONS AND USE TAX. Subject to voter approval of the same, the Commission shall impose, in the incorporated and unincorporated territory of the County of Riverside, a retail transactions and use tax (referred to as the Measure “A” fund tax) at a zero percent (0%) rate until the expiration of the Existing Tax. Thereafter, a tax shall be collected for a thirty (30) year period at the rate of one-half of one percent (0.5%). This tax shall be in addition to any other taxes authorized by law, including any existing or future state or local sales tax or transactions and use tax. SECTION V. PURPOSES. Measure “A” funds may only be used for transportation purposes including the administration of Division 25, including legal actions related thereto, the construction, capital, acquisition, maintenance, and operation of streets, roads, highways, including state highways and public transit systems and for related purposes. These purposes include expenditures for the planning, environmental reviews, engineering and design costs, and related right-of-way acquisition. SECTION VI. BONDING AUTHORITY. Upon voter approval of Measure “A” , the Commission shall have the power to sell or issue, from time to time, on or before the collection of taxes, bonds, or other evidence of indebtedness, including, but not limited to, capital appreciation bonds, in the aggregate principal amount at any one time outstanding of not to exceed $500 million, and to secure such indebtedness solely by way of future collection of taxes, for capital outlay expenditure for the purposes set forth in Section V hereof, including to carry out the transportation projects described in the Expenditure Plan. SECTION VII. MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT. The Commission, by the enactment of this Ordinance, intends the additional funds provided government agencies by this Chapter to supplement existing local revenues and required developer improvements being used for transportation purposes. The government agencies shall maintain their existing commitment of local funds for street, highway and public transit purposes pursuant to this Ordinance, and the Commission shall enforce this Section by appropriate actions including fiscal audits of the local agencies. The local cities and the County shall annually submit to the Commission a list of the proposed uses for these funds and a certification that the maintenance of effort requirement is being met. If in any fiscal year the maintenance of effort requirement is not met, the agency shall not be eligible for any Measure “A” funds in the following fiscal year. Such funds shall be distributed to the remaining local governments using the formula for the area. SECTION VIII. RETURN TO SOURCE. Funds for transportation purposes shall be allocated to the Western County, Coachella Valley, and Palo Verde Valley areas proportionate to the Measure “A” funds generated within these areas. SECTION IX. ADMINISTRATION OF PLANS. The Commission shall impose and collect Measure “A” funds, shall allocate revenues derived, and shall administer the Expenditure Plan consistent with the authority cited herein. SECTION X. ADMINISTRATIVE COSTS. The Commission shall expend only that amount of the funds generated from Measure “A” for staff support, audit, administrative expenses, and contract services that are necessary and reasonable to carry out its responsibilities pursuant to Division 25, and in no case shall the funds expended for salaries and benefits exceed one percent (1%) of the annual net amount of revenue raised by Measure “A”. SECTION XI. ANNUAL APPROPRIATIONS LIMIT. The annual appropriations limit has been established pursuant to Ordinance 88-01 pursuant to Article XIIIB of the California Constitution and Section 240308(b) of the Public Utilities Code. The appropriations limit has and shall be subject to adjustment as provided by law. SECTION XII. EFFECTIVE AND OPERATIVE DATES. Subject to voter approval, this Ordinance shall take effect at the close of the polls on November 5, 2002. SECTION XIII. ELECTION. The Commission requests the Board of Supervisors to call an election for voter approval of Measure “A ” (Exhibit A), which election shall be held on November 5, 2002. The election shall be called and conducted in the same manner as provided by law for the conduct of elections by a county. Pursuant to Section 240308 of the Public Utilities Code, the sample ballot to be mailed to the voters shall be the full proposition as set forth in the Ordinance, and the voter information handbook shall include the entire Expenditure Plan. Approval of the attached proposition, and the imposition of the Measure “A” retail sales and use tax described herein, shall require the affirmative vote of 2/3rds of the electors voting on the attached proposition at the election described in this section. SECTION XIV. EXPENDITURE PLAN AMENDMENTS. The Expenditure Plan for Measure “A” funds may only be amended, if required, in accordance with Public Utilities Code section 240302, as amended. This section currently provides the following process for amendment: (1) initiation of the amendment by the Commission reciting findings of necessity; (2) approval by the Board of Supervisors; and, (3) approval by a majority of the cities constituting a majority of the incorporated population, unless such process is amended in a manner consistent with State legislation. Commencing in 2019 and at least every ten years thereafter, the Commission shall review and, where necessary propose revisions to the Expenditure Plan. Such revisions shall be submitted for approval according to the procedures set forth in this Section XIV. Until approved, the then existing Expenditure Plan shall remain in full force and effect. SECTION XV. SEVERABILITY. If any tax or provision of this ordinance is for any reason held invalid or unenforceable by a court of competent jurisdiction, that holding shall not affect the validity or enforceability of the remaining Measure “A” funds or provisions, and the Commission declares that it would have passed each part of this ordinance irrespective of the validity of any other part. SECTION XVI. THE EXISTING TAX. Nothing in the ordinance is intended to modify, repeal, alter or increase the Existing Tax. The provisions of this ordinance shall apply solely to the retail transactions and use tax adopted herein, and not to the collection or administration of the Existing Tax. APPROVED AND ADOPTED by the Riverside County Transportation Commission at its meeting on Wednesday, May 8, 2002. By: John F. Tavaglione, Chairman Riverside County Transportation Commission ATTESTED: By: Naty Kopenhaver, Clerk of the Board Riverside County Transportation Commission Riverside County Transportation Improvement Plan GOALS AND OBJECTIVES MAINTAIN AND IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY BY SUPPLEMENTING EXISTING FUNDS FOR TRANSPORTATION Reduce current congestion and provide adequate transportation facilities to accommodate reasonable growth in the future. Provide funding for the adequate maintenance and improvement of local streets and roads in the cities and unincorporated areas. Enhance Riverside County’s ability to secure state and federal funding for transportation by offering local matching funds. PROVIDE FOR ACCOUNTABILITY IN THE EXPENDITURE OF TAX PAYER FUNDS Provides for mandatory dedication of sales tax funds only for the transportation improvements and programs identified in the Expenditure Plan and no other purpose. Provides for a mandatory, annual financial audit of program expenditures to insure that all funds are spent in accordance with this voter adopted Plan and associated legal ordinance. Provides for a Maintenance of Effort requirement in funds made available to city and county governments for local street and road programs to insure the new money for this purpose is adding to current funding levels. Provides for the strict limitation of administrative staff costs in implementing this Plan, by limiting, in law, funds expended for salaries and benefits to no more than one (1) percent of the annual net amount of revenues raised by Measure "A". 1 Provides for the Plan to be updated every 10 years for the period it is in effect to insure that the changing needs and priorities of the county are met. Provides for the mandatory termination of the tax in 2039, requiring additional voter approval for extension at a County General Election according to state law. PROVIDE FOR EQUITY IN THE DISTRIBUTION OF MEASURE “A” REVENUES Return funds to the Western County, Coachella Valley and Palo Verde Valley proportionate to the funds generated in those areas. Adopt a Transportation Improvement Plan, which address the unique needs of each of the areas of the county. Provide a reasonable balance between competing highway, commuter rail, transit, and local streets and roads needs. PROVIDE FOR LOCAL CONTROL OF THE TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Provide for cost effective, local administration of the program through the existing Riverside County Transportation Commission. No new agency would be required to administer these funds. Delegates appropriate administrative responsibility to the cities and the county and other local agencies for local programs. This TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PLAN, which shall act as the County’s Expenditure Plan, was prepared by the Riverside County Transportation Commission for the purpose of extending the current ½ cent local transaction and use tax for transportation to be collected for an additional 30 years, if approved by the voters on November 5, 2002 – Measure “A”. This is proposed by the Commission as a means to fill the funding shortfall to: implement necessary highway, commuter rail, and transit projects; secure new transportation corridors through environmental clearance and right of way purchases; provide adequate maintenance and improvements on the local street and road system; promote economic growth throughout the county; and provide specialized programs to meet the needs of commuters and the specialized needs of the growing senior and disabled population. 2 TAXPAYER ACCOUNTABILITY SAFEGUARDS LEGAL DEDICATION OF FUNDS Measure "A" funds may only be used for transportation purposes and described in the local ordinance governing this program, including the construction, environmental mitigation of transportation projects, capital activities, acquisition, maintenance, and operation of streets, roads, highways, including state highways and public transit systems and for related purposes. These purposes include but are not limited to expenditures for the planning, environmental reviews, engineering and design costs, related right-of-way acquisition, and construction, engineering and administration. MANDATORY ANNUAL FISCAL AUDIT No less than annually, the RCTC shall conduct an independent fiscal audit of the expenditure of all sales tax funds raised by this measure. The audit, which shall be made available to the public, shall report on evidence that the expenditure of funds is in accordance with the Riverside County Transportation Improvement Plan as adopted by the voters in approving the sales tax measure on November 5, 2002. In addition, the audit shall determine that Maintenance of Effort requirements, other requirements regarding local government participation in Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee Programs, as well as requirements described in Section 5 of the Plan entitled "Local Streets and Roads" have been complied with. The audit shall also insure that no more than 1 (one) percent of total sales tax expenditures are used for administrative staff salaries and benefits in implementing this Plan. MANDATORY PLAN UPDATE AND TERMINATION OF SALES TAX This Plan shall be updated by RCTC every 10 years that the sales tax is in effect to reflect current and changing priorities and needs in the County, as defined by the duly elected local government representatives on the RCTC Board. Any changes to this Plan must be adopted in accordance with current law in effect at the time of the update and must be based on findings of necessity for change by the Commission. The sales tax authorized to be collected by the voters shall be terminated on March 31, 2039, unless reauthorized by the voters to extend the sales tax prior to the termination date as required under state law in effect at the time of the vote for extension. 3 SPECIFIC TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS TO BE FUNDED WESTERN RIVERSIDE COUNTY The Expenditure Plan Map illustrates the Western and Coachella Valley areas. The Western County area includes the cities of Banning, Beaumont, Calimesa, Canyon Lake, Corona, Hemet, Lake Elsinore, Moreno Valley, Riverside, Murrieta, Norco, Perris, San Jacinto, and Temecula. It also includes the unincorporated communities of Jurupa, Mira Loma, Menifee, Wildomar, and Sun City and other more sparsely populated areas, and the reservations of the Pechanga Band of Mission Indians, the Soboba Band of Mission Indians, the Cahuilla Band of Mission Indians, the Ramona Band of Cahuilla Indians, and the Morongo Band of Indians. 1. STATE HIGHWAYS Many more state highway improvement projects are needed to deal with congestion and safety problems than existing state and federal revenues can fund. Projected formula funds from these sources over the 30 years is estimated to be $640 million and will fund less than ½ of the improvements needed and identified in the Expenditure Plan, which are estimated to cost $1.66 billion in current dollars. Measure “A” funds will supplement those funding sources by an estimated $1.02 billion and will cover the remaining costs estimated to accomplish these improvements. The Highway projects to be implemented with funding returned to the Western County Area by extending the Measure “A” Program are as follows: 4 ROUTE LIMITS PROJECT EST. COST 91, 60, I-15, & I-215 Reducing congestion on these routes will require that new transportation corridors are constructed See Section 2 Rte 91 Pierce Street to Orange County Line Add 1 lane each direction $ 161 91/I-15 Interchange Add new Connector from I-15 North to 91 West $ 243 91/71 Interchange Improve Interchange $ 26 Rte 71 Rte 91 to San Bernardino County Line Widen to 3 lanes each direction $ 68 I-215 60/91/215 to San Bernardino County Line Add 2 lanes each direction $ 231 I-215 Eucalyptus Ave to I-15 Add 1 lane each direction $ 210 I-15 Rte 60 to San Diego County Line Add 1 lane each direction $ 359 I-10 San Bernardino County Line to Banning Add eastbound truck climbing lane $ 75 I-10/60 Interchange Construct new interchange $ 129 Rte 60 Badlands area, east of Moreno Valley Add truck climbing lane $ 26 Rte 79 Ramona Expressway to Domenigoni Parkway Realign highway $ 132 SUBTOTAL Measure “A” Funding State & Federal Formula Funds $1.02 Billion $0.64 Billion TOTAL $1.66 Billion The Commission may add additional State Highway projects, should additional Measure “A” revenue become available. An estimated 5% of the total cost for these highway projects ($83 million) will be used for environmental purposes to mitigate the cumulative and indirect impacts associated with construction of these projects. 5 2. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW TRANSPORTATION CORRIDORS State Routes 91 and 60 and Interstate Routes 15 and 215 cannot cost effectively be widened enough to provide for the traffic expected as Riverside County continues to grow. In addition to the specific highway improvements listed in Section 1 above, congestion relief for these highways will require that new north–south and east-west transportation corridors will have to be developed to provide mobility within Riverside County and between Riverside County and its neighboring Orange and San Bernardino Counties. Four new Transportation Corridors have been identified as necessary through the Community Environmental Transportation Approval Process (CETAP) currently underway. An estimated $370 million in Measure "A" matching funds to leverage local, state and federal funding will be made available for environmental clearance, right of way, and construction of these new corridors. An estimated $70 million of these funds will be used to mitigate the cumulative and indirect impacts associated with construction of these projects. 3. PUBLIC TRANSIT The Transportation Improvement Plan will provide an estimated $390 million to expand commuter rail, implement intercity bus services and to continue and expand programs to assist the elderly, disabled and commuters. A. Discount Fares and Transit Services for Seniors and Disabled Persons Seniors and disabled persons are becoming an increasing percentage of the population each year. They are currently charged a fare on fixed route transit services that is one-half the normal fare for service within the Western County area. In addition a number of specialized transportation programs have been implemented which meet specialized needs for transportation to medical services, social service agencies and programs, shopping and other purposes that cannot be met by conventional transit. A minimum of $85 million in Measure “A” funds will be used to guarantee these services. 6 B. Commuter Rail and Intercity Bus Service Metrolink has provided a viable alternative to the automobile for thousands of daily commuters to Orange and Los Angeles counties and reduces the demand on our freeways. The current service level needs to double in the future and expansion of the system to Moreno Valley and Perris is needed to relieve congestion on I-215. In addition, an intercity express bus service that feeds the Metrolink service and provides a reasonable alternative to the automobile for daily commuters who travel within the region is needed. Measure “A” funds will be made available for operations of these services and to match federal funds for capital. C. Commuter Services, Ridesharing, Vanpools, Buspools, Park-N-Ride Commuter traffic created by Riverside County residents traveling to jobs in neighboring Orange, Los Angeles, and San Bernardino counties adds significantly to the peak hour congestion on the freeway and highway system. A number of programs have been implemented to assist commuters to share rides, reduce congestion, and take advantage of travel in the “carpool” lanes. These programs include; rideshare matching services; incentive programs; vanpool “seed money”; buspool subsidies; and park-n-ride lot leasing. These programs will become even more necessary in the future as traffic increases. A minimum of $50 million in Measure “A” funds will be used for this purpose. 4. REGIONAL ARTERIAL SYSTEM The freeway and state highway system can no longer be expected to handle the traffic demands for travel between and through the cities of the Western County area, with the development projected for the future. A system of regional arterials (major local roadways) with limited access, freeway interchanges, grade separations, and coordinated traffic signals are needed to supplement the highway backbone system. The Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG), in conjunction with the cities and the County, has developed this system of roadways to meet this need. This roadway system will be periodically updated by the Commission, or the Western Riverside Council of Governments, to reflect actual development trends. 7 Funding to widen existing roads and construct new roads on this system will be funded by an estimated $300 million in revenues generated by Measure “A” and by matching revenues to be generated by the cities and County implementing a Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) administered by the Commission or the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG). Examples of the roadways on the regional arterial system that may be eligible to receive Measure “A” and TUMF funding for widening and other improvements to increase capacity and traffic flow are: • Van Buren Boulevard from I-215 to State Route 60 • Alessandro Boulevard from I-215 westerly to Central Avenue • Central Avenue from Alessandro Blvd to Van Buren Boulevard • Arlington Avenue from Central Avenue to Van Buren Boulevard • Green River Road from Dominguez Ranch Rd to State Route 91 • Foothill Parkway from Lincoln Ave to Green River Road • Scott Road from State Route 79 to I-215 • Clinton Keith Road from State Route 79 to I-215 • Date Street from State Route 79 to I-15 • State Route 79/I-10 Interchange Improvements and possible bypass to I-10 • Ramsey Street from Banning City Limits to Field Road • Ramona Expressway from San Jacinto to I-215 • Cajalco Road from I-215 to I-15 • Perris Boulevard from State Route 74 to San Bernardino Co. Line • Pyrite Street from San Bernardino County Line to State Route 60 • Schleisman Road from San Bernardino County Line to I-15 and Arlington Avenue • Domenigoni Parkway from State Street to I-215 • Railroad Canyon/Newport Road from I-215 to I-15 The final scope and project limits of all improvements proposed for the regional arterial system will be determined through noticed public hearings, environmental clearance process, and agreement with affected agencies. 5. LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS The local street and road system is critical to the every day movement of people within the cities and the county. This system is reaching “middle age”, with potholes and is in need of continued maintenance and rehabilitation. New local roads adjacent to new residential and business developments will continue to be constructed and paid for by the developers. 8 Current resources, without the extension of the existing sales tax revenues for transportation, cannot provide adequate funding to maintain the local street and road system at the level necessary to adequately serve the public. The Transportation Improvement Plan will provide an estimated $970 million specifically for this purpose. The funds made available in the Western County area will be distributed to the cities and the county by a formula based 75% on proportionate population and 25% on revenues generated by Measure “A”. In order to be eligible for these funds, each agency will be required to: 1) File a Five-Year Capital Improvement Program, updated annually, with the Commission; 2) Participate in a Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) Program to be developed and administered by the Commission or the Western Riverside Council of Governments (WRCOG); and, 3) Participate in the Multi- Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) currently under development by the County of Riverside by endorsing the Permit Application and signing the Implementation Agreement. The TUMF Program shall be adopted according to all applicable laws and shall provide that the first $400 million of TUMF revenues will be made available to the Commission to fund equally the: 1) Regional Arterial System, as described above; and, 2) Development of New Corridors (“CETAP”) described above. 6. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INCENTIVES PROGRAM The need to attract new commercial and industrial development and jobs to Riverside County to reduce the need for long commutes to Orange and Los Angeles counties is important to the economic vitality and quality of life of Western Riverside County. A greater jobs – housing balance is needed immediately. The Transportation Improvement Plan will provide an estimated $40 million for this purpose. These funds will be used to create an Infrastructure Improvement Bank to improve existing interchanges, construct new interchanges, provide public transit linkages or stations, and make other improvements to the transportation system. Given the limited amount of funds available, the RCTC shall develop a program of competitive incentives to attract commercial and industrial development and jobs to locate within the Western Riverside County area. 9 In particular, the highest priority for these funds shall be for use in attracting key industrial development. For example, Western Riverside County through the provision of a needed interchange or transit service as a part of an overall package of incentives, could attract industrial development, which may have otherwise located elsewhere in California, in the United States or internationally. 7. BOND FINANCING Construction of the highway and rail projects and implementation of the local streets and roads and other programs identified in the Transportation Improvement Plan are needed as soon as possible. In order to accomplish this, some level of borrowing will be required. The Commission will determine the extent of borrowing that is reasonable as the program is implemented. Up to $270 million, 8% of the revenues expected to be generated, will be made available for this purpose. COACHELLA VALLEY AREA The Coachella Valley area is located in the central part of Riverside County and includes the cities of Cathedral City, Coachella, Desert Hot Springs, Indian Wells, Indio, La Quinta, Palm Desert, Palm Springs, and Rancho Mirage. It also includes the unincorporated areas, and the reservations of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, the Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, and the Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians. The Transportation Improvement Plan is designed to give flexibility to adjust to changing circumstances and to: • Improve Traffic Flow and Reduce Congestion on Highway 111 • Add/Improve Interchanges on Highway 86 and I-10 • Provide funding for Local Streets and Roads Improvements • Improve Safety and Visibility at Major Intersections and Arterial Roads ● Reduce Congestion by Improving Major Roadways Identified as Important by Local Governments in the Coachella Valley • Provide Express East-West Transit Routes in the Coachella Valley • Improve and Expand Public and Specialty Transit Service 10 1. STATE HIGHWAYS AND MAJOR REGIONAL ROAD PROJECT Fifty percent (50%) of the Measure “A” revenues will be used for State highways and regional road improvements. The Transportation Project Prioritization Study (TPPS), developed through the Coachella Valley Association of Governments (CVAG), will function as the Plan for future needs. Preventive maintenance of these Measure “A” funded arterials will be allowed, if a majority of the Coachella Valley local governments give approval. The system improvements will be accomplished with a mix of Measure “A” funds, state and federal highway funds, and the existing Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) on new development. This segment of the Measure “A” Expenditure Plan will be implemented through the Coachella Valley Association of Governments. 2. LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS Thirty-five percent (35%) of the Measure “A” revenues will be returned to the cities and the county in the Coachella Valley and shall be used to assist with the funding local street and road improvements. These funds will supplement existing federal, state, and local funds. Local street improvements adjacent to new residential and business developments will continue to be paid for by the developers. Cities and the county in the Coachella Valley must participate in the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) program to assist in the financing of the priority regional arterial system in order to receive these funds. If a city or the county chooses not to levy the TUMF, the funds they would otherwise receive for local streets and roads will be added to the Measure “A” funds for the Regional Arterial Program. Allocations of funds to the cities and the county will be based on a formula weighted 50% on proportionate dwelling units and 50% on Measure “A” revenues generated within each jurisdiction. A Five-Year Capital Improvement Program for the use of these funds will be prepared and annually updated with public participation by each city and the county. 11 3. PUBLIC TRANSIT Fifteen percent (15%) of the Measure “A” revenues will be used to improve and expand public transit and specialized transportation services. A. B. C. Discount Fares and Expanded Transportation Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities For Seniors (age 60 and older) and persons with disabilities, access to healthcare, social services, shopping, and recreation is a key to quality of life. Sunline Transit Agency offers a full array of public transit and specialized transportation services at reduced prices to individuals in these special groups. Measure “A” funds will guarantee discounts continue for the next 30 years. Funds will also be used to expand services to meet future needs of the growing population of the valley. Specialized Transportation Services In addition to providing SunBus public transit service, SunDial paratransit service, and SunLink express commuter service to Riverside, the Sunline Transit Agency offers specialized transportation services to Coachella Valley residents and visitors. These services include the Vets Express that provides free transportation to the Veterans Hospital in Loma Linda; SunTrip, that enables those beyond Sunline’s fixed route service area to receive reimbursement they can pay to volunteer drivers; and SunRide that coordinates the transportation services offered by many non-profit social service organizations. All of Sunline’s vehicles operate on clean, alternative fuels thereby preserving the environment and creating a healthier community while increasing access. Measure “A” funds will assist these and other types of specialized transportation services which may be implemented. Bus Replacement and More Frequent Service Public bus transportation offers communities many benefits – reduced traffic congestion, reduced wear and tear on roads, reduced parking demand, and lower emissions. By providing access to schools, jobs and shopping, it is also a vital force in economic development. This is especially true in the Coachella Valley where nearly 75% of the 4 million annual SunBus riders take a bus to work and/or school. Public 12 transit buses have a 12-year life. Passage of Measure “A” will enable Sunline’s fleet to be replaced as needed. Funds will also be used to increase frequency of service, which is the single most important factor in use of public transportation. PALO VERDE VALLEY AREA The Palo Verde Valley area is located in the far eastern part of Riverside County. It is geographically separated from the Western and Coachella Valley areas. The population within the area is relatively small, and significant growth over the next 30 years is not anticipated. The Palo Verde Valley is served by Interstate 10 which provides adequate connections to the more westerly portions of Riverside County and easterly to Arizona. Increasing transit needs can be adequately met using existing revenue sources available for that purpose. The greatest need for the Palo Verde Valley is additional funding to adequately maintain and rehabilitate local streets and roads. All of the funding generated by Measure “A” returned to the Palo Verde Valley is to be used for local streets and roads. Funds shall be distributed to the City of Blythe and the County of Riverside by formula. The formula distribution is based 75% on proportionate population and 25% on sales tax revenues generated in each area. MEASURE “A” REVENUE ALLOCATIONS ($ millions) Western County Area Highway Improvements $1,020 New Corridors $ 370 Commuter Rail / Intercity Bus/ Specialized $ 390 Transit/ Commuter Services Regional Arterial Projects $ 300 Local Streets and Road Improvements $ 970 Bond Finance $ 270 Economic Development Projects $ 40 TOTAL $3,360 Coachella Valley Highways and Regional Arterials $ 628 Local Streets and Roads $ 439 Specialized and Public Transit $ 188 TOTAL $1,255 Palo Verde Valley Area Local Street and Road Improvements $ 47 TOTAL $ 47 13 Click on Link to View 2002 MEASURE “A” MAP 14 GENERAL PROVISIONS OF THE TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PLAN 1. BASIS FOR REVENUE ESTIMATES Federal and state participation for highways, commuter rail, new corridors, and major non-highway roadway improvements is assumed to be $40 million per year allocated biannually by the California Transportation Commission through the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) process. The Riverside County Transportation Commission currently programs 24.2% of these funds on a discretionary basis for projects. This practice will be continued in order to fund major improvements that will arise and have not been anticipated by this Transportation Improvement Plan. Measure “A” revenue estimates have not been adjusted to reflect inflation. It is assumed that inflation revenue increases will be offset by inflation costs to deliver the projects. “Real Growth” is assumed to parallel countywide population growth. Based upon these factors Measure “A” revenues over the 30-year period are assumed to be about $4.665 billion. 2. BASIS FOR COST ESTIMATES All cost estimates for highway projects were developed by Caltrans based on a specific scope of improvements and are based on 2001 values. Future costs may increase due to inflation or other factors beyond the control of the Commission. The 2001 costs estimates are to be used to determine the proportionate distribution of funds to the categories of projects and programs identified in the transportation program. 3. STATE HIGHWAY AND MAJOR ARTERIAL PROGRAMS A. Eligible state highway project costs include preliminary engineering, environmental clearances, design engineering, project management, right of way acquisition and long-term leases and construction. Measure “A” funds are intended to supplement and not replace existing federal and state sources. If it is determined by the Commission that Riverside County is not receiving its fair share of existing funds, sales tax funds may be directed to other types of transportation needs. 15 B. C. A. B. C. D. The actual scope of the highway, and major arterial projects to be implemented is to be determined through a prioritization process, required environmental analysis, and full consideration of reasonable alternatives. Public participation during the environmental analysis process is required. The Commission shall establish a “State Highway Account” for funding capital expenditures for state highway improvements. 4. PUBLIC TRANSIT Eligible programs include: special discount fares for the elderly and persons with disabilities; funding for computer assisted rideshare programs; commuter incentive programs; “seed” programs to encourage the creation of vanpools and buspools; bus capital replacement and additional bus service in the Coachella Valley; and capital and operating assistance for commuter rail expansion and intercity bus service implementation in the Western County area. Western County area commuter rail services are anticipated to continue to be operated by Metrolink on existing rail lines to Los Angeles, Orange and San Bernardino counties. Increasing the level of services will require negotiation of the appropriate agreements with the railroads and appropriate cost sharing between the counties served. Extension of service to the Moreno Valley area and the City of Perris is anticipated to be along the San Jacinto Branch Line owned by the Commission. Measure “A” funds will be used for operating costs and to match federal and state funds for capital improvements. Western County area intercity bus express services to be implemented are intended to specifically target commuters and provide a viable connection to the Metrolink service and transportation between and to key employment centers within the region. The Commission shall establish a “Public Transit Account” for funding these programs. The Commission shall determine which public transportation or specialized transportation services operators, and carpool/vanpool facilitating agencies, shall receive funding assistance. The Commission may directly provide or operate these services and programs if it is determined that they are the most appropriate agency to do so in the Western County area. In the Coachella Valley area, the services will be provided by the SunLine Transit Agency. Based on 30 year funding estimates, the amount of funds should be $340 million for the Western County and $188 million for the Coachella Valley area. 16 5. LOCAL STREETS AND ROADS PROJECTS A. B. C. D. Eligible local street and road project costs include any environmental review and mitigation, engineering, right of way acquisition and, capital or maintenance cost. Decisions on projects are to be made by local jurisdictions, but subject to capital Improvement requirements. Annual population estimates used for the distribution formula for the Western County and Palo Verde Valley areas shall be from the State Department of Finance. Dwelling unit estimates used for the distribution formula in the Coachella Valley shall be from the Riverside County Planning Department. Actual State Board of Equalization retail sales transactions shall be used for the formula in all three areas. The County Planning Department shall estimate the share for each of the unincorporated areas for the three areas, from the total retail sales transactions for the total unincorporated area. The Commission shall assure the cities and the County are in compliance with maintenance of effort requirements before allocating funds for local streets and roads. Further, the Commission shall not allocate funds to an individual city or the County for local streets and roads within the Western County and Coachella Valley areas unless the local agency is certified by the Coachella Valley Association of Governments or in the Western County Area by the Commission or the Western Riverside County Association of Governments as applicable, to be a participant in the Transportation Uniform Mitigation Fee (TUMF) program necessary for the implementation of the Regional Arterial Program in their area. The cities and the county in the Western County Area must participate in the Multi Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP) by endorsing the Permit Allocation and executing the Implementation Agreement with the resources agencies in order to be eligible to receive local streets and roads funds. Funding which is not allocated to a city or the county because it is not a participant in the TUMF program in the Coachella Valley area and the TUMF and the MSHCP in the Western County area shall be allocated to the Regional Arterial Program in the geographic area in which the city or portion of the county is located. 17 18 6. FUNDING FLEXIBILITY AND BONDING TO EXPEDITE PROJECTS The Commission may make maximum use of available funds by temporarily shifting allocations between geographic areas and transportation purposes. However, the proportionate shares for areas and purposes over the 30-year period may not be changed without an amendment of the Transportation Improvement Plan as required by law. Shifts may not be made without previous consultation with the affected agencies and two-thirds majority approval of the Board of Commissioners. The Commission may also use bonds to speed implementation of some projects. Bonding will not be used without first determining that the benefits of an accelerated program outweigh the additional cost of interest on borrowing funds. 7. INFORMING THE PUBLIC OF LOCAL FUNDING SUPPORT All state highway, commuter rail, and regional arterial projects using $1 million or more of sales tax revenues shall be signed to inform the public that local voter approved revenues are being used to support the project. 8. SEVERANCE PROVISIONS If any provision of this Transportation Improvement Plan is for any reason held invalid and unenforceable by a court of competent jurisdiction, that holding shall not effect the validity or enforceability of the remaining provisions, and the Commission declares that it would have passed each part of the Plan irrespective of the validity of any other part. 1 Priorities for 2019 & Beyond Aaron Hake, External Affairs Director Priorities for 2019 & Beyond 2 How What Why PRIORITIES FOR 2019 & BEYOND The next CARB? 3 Why 4 2019 Measure A Review 2019-2029 Western County Highway Delivery Plan New Projects, Programs, Initiatives Beyond Measure A What PRIORITIES FOR 2019 & BEYOND Claremont Upland ona Ontario Chino Hills IDCorona ur guns nods ■ Aliso Viejo Laguna Niguel Norco m Fontana Rialto Riverside Lake Matthews �Lak- Elsinore RIVERSIDE CO. SAN DIEGO CO. ' Temecula i Lake Vail Perris Canyon Lake .133 Wildomar Murrieta Highland Lake Perris Menifee Calimesa end Lake Banning San Jacinto Beaumont 5 10 Miles 6 Status Quo/Reduce Expectations Innovative Finance (Express Lanes) Embrace New Technology Next Gen Express Lanes New Measure (2020) PRIORITIES FOR 2019 & BEYOND How PRIORITIES FOR 2019 & BEYOND 7 The Financial Climb $3-6 billion Countywide* Western County Highway : $4+ billion in RCTC led-projects Existing WC Highway sources: ~$936 million (23%) thru 2029 73% restricted use 8 PRIORITIES FOR 2019 & BEYOND •62% YES vote possible (ceiling) –2017 public opinion research •Need 66.67% (gap of 4.67%) •Public Engagement Program is in motion, ramping-up •Public sentiment towards RCTC remains positive On the Path to 2020 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2 -0.1 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 1/1 1/22 2/12 3/5 3/26 4/16 5/7 5/28 6/18 7/9 7/30 8/20 9/10 10/1 10/22 11/12 12/3 12/24 9 PRIORITIES FOR 2019 & BEYOND On the Path to 2020 10 PRIORITIES FOR 2019 & BEYOND To maintain feasibility of a 2020 measure, affirmative Commission action is necessary: 2020 is Now Timeline Action January 2019 (Today)Assign ad hoc to recommend priorities and whether to pursue a 2020 measure January-July Public Engagement Program Public Opinion/Stakeholder Research July Ad hoc recommendation to Commission + Commission vote July-December*Draft Expenditure Plan development, testing, review December 2019*Commission GO or NO GO decision January 2020-June 2020**Final Expenditure Plan development July 2020**Commission vote to request BOS set election PRIORITIES FOR 2019 & BEYOND 11 2019 Measure A Review 10 Year Western County Highway Plan 2020 New Measure Innovative Finance Review Priorities & Funding Strategy Recommend to Commission Future Funding Initiatives Ad Hoc Committee By July 2019 Countywide Countywide Countywide Priorities for 2019 & Beyond How What WhyToday By July 2019 By July 2019 Ad Hoc Commission Ad Hoc Commission Commission When Who PRIORITIES FOR 2019 & BEYOND Recommendations #1 and #3 13 1.Receive and file RCTC Staff Insight Brief 3.Assign the Future Funding Initiatives Ad Hoc Committee to thoroughly vet and make specific recommendations to the Commission no later than July 2019 on the following: a)Measure A Expenditure Plan Review and Update b)2019-2029 Western County Highway Delivery Plan c)A new local funding measure for the 2020 general election d)Innovative financing of express lanes revenues Priorities for 2019 and Beyond Recommendation #2: 14 2.Commit necessary 91 Express Lanes toll revenue to fully fund the 15/91 Express Lanes Connector design-build phase QUESTIONS 15 Riverside County Transportation Commission Workshop January 31, 2019 1 Metrolink In Riverside County •Three lines serving the county •51 trains providing service in the county •10 stations •Riders connect to LA, San Bernardino, Orange and San Diego counties 2 Riverside County Metrolink Riders Age of riders •63% ages 35-64 Gross annual household income •Over 50% between $60,000 -$149,999 Riverside County residents per line •Riverside –35% of riders; IEOC –56%; 91/PV –73% Ethnicity by highest percentage •RIV –35% Asian; IEOC –40% Caucasian; 91/PV –31% Caucasian 90% of trips are for work •90% have access to a personal vehicle Riverside County residents mainly travel to LA (8.6%) or OC (8.4%) •1.6% of all Metrolink riders travel to Riverside County 3 Riverside County Rider Demographics •Average ridership length is 5.2 years •Average miles between origin & destination: •RIV (50.2 mi) •20-Minute Savings •91/PV (47.8 mi) •9-Minute Savings •IEOC (27.7 mi) •16-Minute Savings •Most riders live near service areas 4 Metrolink’s importance in Riverside County •4th largest county in California •Steady growth  affordable housing and jobs *Projected 2025 Jobs/Housing Balance in the SCAG region from Study on Jobs/Housing Balance. April 2001 5 Metrolink’s importance in Riverside County •Metrolink connects to jobs, housing & entertainment •Provides relief for the 91 and other crowded freeways 6 Riverside County New Rider Prospects Riverside county rider feedback •54.9% rank Metrolink overall as “Good,” followed by “Excellent” at 25% •Riders would like reduced fares, more mid-day service and more reliable train arrival times •71% take Metrolink to avoid traffic 7 SCORE Program •10 year, $10 billion plan to improve Metrolink •More frequent, reliable train service across the region •Supported by SB1 and TIRCP grants KEY at least 8 trains per hour at least 4 trains per hour at least 2 trains per hour at least 1 trains per hour Express Overlay / LOSSAN (1 per hour) To Be Determined Irvine Riverside San Bernardino Oceanside Santa Clarita Antelope Valley Perris Pomona Valley San Gabriel Valley Corona Orange Ontario San Clemente San Fernando Valley Laguna Niguel LOSSAN LOSSAN Redlands 8 $1.5 Billion secured $875 Million grant award from the California Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program 7 Projects total in Riverside County 9 Riverside –Downtown Station improvements •Project will install additional center platform, a pair of tracks on the SE side, extension of pedestrian overpass and new elevator •Project benefits include increased capacity and better connectivity between IEOC & 91/PV Lines •$26.48M fully funded by TIRCP and FTA grants 10 SCORE improves Metrolink system for the future •Improves and adds tracks for more, reliable train service •Options for dedicated freight tracks to protect trade corridor •Upgrades crossings, enhancing safety and enabling more Quiet Zones 11 Metrolink leads the nation with PTC •Positive Train Control (PTC) is life- saving rail technology •First passenger rail in the nation to operate PTC across entire network •One of four in the nation to meet federal PTC deadline Dec. 31, 2018 12 13 Key Riverside County Initiatives •Special train service to Festival of Lights •2016 Opening of the Perris Valley Extension 14 Future Opportunities Improve partnership with Union Pacific and other freights •Address Riverside Line reliability concerns Leverage the affordable housing in Riverside county, along with job centers in LA County Add train service to special events in Riverside County •Train service to Coachella Music Festival 15 Metrolink powered by clean tech •Safer, cleaner and more power •Up to 85% reduction in PM and NOx exhaust emissions •64% more horsepower compared to Tier 0 •Seven currently in revenue service 16 Any Questions? 17